uu.seUppsala University Publications
1234567 1 - 50 of 324
rss atomLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
  • Abdulreda, Alico
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Giba, Gabriela
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Generation Y: En studie om vad som motiverar yngre medarbetare2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Generation Y or Millennials are people born 1980-1999. They are raised with a more advanced technology like no other generation before them. The technology has affected the individuals from generation Y in a way which has led them to become impatience. Studies have shown that people in generation Y are very emotional compared to other generations before them. Individuals from generation Y are already entering the labour market. Studies have shown that if an organisation wants to have a bright future the employees are a very important access. A leader who knows how to motivate and lead his co-workers has a great asset which may have a positive impact on the organisation. The purpose of this study is to understand what motivates people who are included in generation Y and what kind of leadership suits them best. Most of the theoretical framework came from scientific articles with theories and models of motivation and leadership for generation Y. Semi-structured interviews were chosen for the research method to get right information. The result of the study showed that generation Y is mostly motivated by inner motivation and prefer a leader who can adapt to the many work situations that can occur in the organisations.

  • Senek, Aleksandar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Scientific Computing.
    Multiscale Stochastic Neuron Modeling: with applications in deep brain stimulation2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years deep brain stimulation (DBS) has seen success in curing adverseeffects of several diseases, among those Parkinson. Current method for treatmentuses implanted electrodes of the brain which stimulate neurons via potential fields.The precise mechanism with which DBS works is still being researched. To this end amodel allowing for seamless coupling of DBS-signals and neuron behavior will aid intesting and further development of the existing DBS-signals.

    We simulate the ionic channels in the neuronal membrane as well as the synapticchannels in the dendrites. The scheme has been implemented using URDME, aMATLAB research code, where a C-code solver is available. A neuron tree is loadedthrough the TREES toolbox from which a connectivity matrix can be formulated. Foreach time step the propagation of the electric potential in the neuronal membrane iscalculated in MATLAB using a Crank-Nicholson scheme. The membrane current isthen calculated and (through Livelink for COMSOL) it is sent to a time dependentPDE-solver which calculates the extracellular potential created by a action potential.

    Convergence of the interspike interval (ISI) as the time step decreases is shown, aswell as when the space discretization of a neuronal structure is refined. A majority ofthe computational time is spent evaluating the stochastic simulation of ion-channels,and computes the solution of a reference test in ~80s, compared to the ODE modelwhich takes ~30s. Due to the highly parallel nature of the stochastic solver this timecould be decreased.

    We also show that the stochastic model of a neuron has a different threshold currentfor a potential spike compared to the deterministic model, a systematic study is doneto find the threshold gradient for the stochastic case. Further, the propagationthrough a chain of neurons is simulated where the obtained potential field is realistic.

  • Sjöstedt, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology, History of Religions.
    Religion och Magi: Religio et Superstitio2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Rössle, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Historia​ ​för​ ​Folkskolan ​ ​​ ​​ ​Eller Hur​ ​man​ ​gör​ ​sina​ ​undersåtar​ ​till lojala​ ​lutheraner: En​ ​undersökning​ ​om​ ​religioner​ ​i​ ​Läsebok​ ​för​ ​folkskolan2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In​ ​the​ ​late​ ​19th​ ​century,​ ​Sweden​ ​went​ ​through​ ​many​ ​social​ ​and​ ​political​ ​changes​ ​which resulted​ ​in​ ​the​ ​establishment​ ​of​ ​an​ ​educational​ ​system​ ​for​ ​the​ ​broader​ ​masses.​ ​The educational​ ​system​ ​was​ ​designed​ ​to​ ​put​ ​Christianity​ ​at​ ​centre,​ ​or​ ​more​ ​specifically​ ​the Lutheran​ ​faith,​ ​which​ ​was​ ​the​ ​state​ ​religion​ ​of​ ​19th​ ​century​ ​Sweden.​ ​This​ ​paper​ ​focuses​ ​on the​ ​other​ ​religions​ ​that​ ​made​ ​its​ ​way​ ​into​ ​the​ ​school​ ​books​ ​during​ ​that​ ​time,​ ​that​ ​were​ ​not typically​ ​a​ ​part​ ​of​ ​the​ ​religious​ ​education.​ ​Was​ ​any​ ​other​ ​religions​ ​mentioned​ ​at​ ​all,​ ​and​ ​if they​ ​were,​ ​then​ ​how​ ​and​ ​if​ ​possible​ ​why? During​ ​this​ ​study​ ​it​ ​was​ ​clear​ ​that​ ​the​ ​best​ ​place​ ​in​ ​the​ ​books​ ​to​ ​find​ ​informations​ ​about other​ ​religions​ ​was​ ​in​ ​the​ ​history​ ​sections,​ ​and​ ​it​ ​was​ ​clear​ ​that​ ​the​ ​ways​ ​they​ ​were mentioned​ ​was​ ​very​ ​different​ ​from​ ​how​ ​they​ ​mentioned​ ​Lutheran​ ​Christianity.​ ​The “heathen”​ ​religion,​ ​as​ ​it​ ​was​ ​called,​ ​was​ ​portrayed​ ​in​ ​a​ ​national​ ​romantic​ ​light,​ ​but​ ​the Catholic​ ​faith​ ​was​ ​seen​ ​as​ ​an​ ​outdated​ ​version​ ​of​ ​Christianity.​ ​The​ ​way​ ​that​ ​it​ ​was​ ​explained in​ ​the​ ​books​ ​makes​ ​it​ ​clear​ ​that​ ​the​ ​ruling​ ​class​ ​wanted​ ​the​ ​ruled​ ​class​ ​to​ ​know​ ​that Lutheranism​ ​was​ ​the​ ​true​ ​and​ ​real​ ​Christian​ ​faith.

  • Pettersson, Joanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    The Sheela-na-gig and the creation of her history: a comparative analysis of two theories concerning the mysterious medieval figure2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    After scholars started conducting research on the medieval Sheela-na-gig carvings, a number of theories regarding the purpose and origin of the figure have been suggested. The question has been tackled through many different approaches, but still remains unfinished as there are no written records explaining what the Sheela-na-gig figure actually is. Scholars have divided into different areas, approaching the discussion from different disciplines: art history, medieval social history, and religious history (both Christian and pre-Christian) to name a few. As the figure is usually found on Christian buildings but is distinguished by very sexual imagery, it leaves the door open for many interpretations.

    This thesis looks at two common theories on what the Sheela-na-gig is; one which is viewing her as a Romanesque warning against lust and sin, and one which argues that the figure is a folk deity used as an amulet for childbirth, symbolising both life and death. By using discourse theory and a comparative method, this thesis compares the descriptions and arguments of the different theories, and studies the intention behind them. The thesis then shows how the theories choose to focus their search for evidence in order to support their own perspective, while also excluding information which does not serve their particular agenda.

  • Runeson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Informatics and Media.
    Performing on a digital stage: A Twitch.tv case study on streamer behavior2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Twitch.tv is a growing platform for game related live streaming. Streamers present themselves live in front of a live audience, where innovative interactions take place. In this study, I looked at two Twitch.tv live streamers with varying audience sizes. The study was conducted to better understand the differences in behavior based on their interaction with their audiences. The research question was as follows: How do two live streamers, one big and one small, interact with their audiences through the use of different features of Twitch.tv? To do this I conducted video analyses of over 60 hours worth of streaming data as well as one interview with one of the live streaming participants. The gathered data was analyzed using Erving Goffman’s (1990) Dramaturgical theory for studying the behaviors during the streamers performances. The results show differences in both performance behavior (Dramatization and Idealization) as well as differences in their streaming interface (Stage and Set pieces). Both streamers where affected by expectations from the audience while creating fronts to maintain these expectations for the benefit of the performance. 

  • Krusing, Markus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Tiricke, Leo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Big datas påverkan på beslutsfattande av kundsegment: - En fallstudie av organisationer inom resebranschen2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Through an ever-increasing connectivity, the digital imprints left behind are opening new possibilities for organizations. Big data contains large amounts of consumer data and through analysis this data is transformed into information. This has enabled organizations new forms of how to implement big data to the decision-making process regarding segmentation of consumers. Through a qualitative survey and semi-structured interviews, a case study is used for the research of Destination Gotland and TUI. The purpose of this study is to investigate how big data affects the decision-making process for segmentation at two organizations in the travel industry. The theoretical framework has been designed after thorough research of relevant literature. The Analysis model used in the thesis is a product of the theoretical framework. The results of this study show that big data is affecting how organizations are identifying customer segments. Big data is used a foundation for decision-making but still relies on knowledgeable decision-makers. The type of market the organization is operating in is crucial to the nature decision that can be made regarding segmentation.

  • Harris, Melissa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Left-Right Symmetric Model: Putting lower bounds on the mass of the heavy, charged WR gauge boson2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this project I have studied the left-right symmetric model (LRSM) as a candidate beyond standard model theory of particle physics. The most common version of the theory, called the minimal LRSM, has been studied and tested extensively for several decades. I have therefore modied this minimal LRSM by adapting the scalar sector and computing the mass of the charged right-handed gauge bosons WR for this particular scalar sector. I carried out a study of the theory and implemented it into FeynRules, in order to simulate LHC events using MadGraph. This allowed computation of the cross-section for the decay WR to a top and a bottom quark as a function of the mass of WR , which was compared with CMS data for the same decay, with proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 13 TeV. The final result was a constraint on the mass of WR , with a lower bound of 3 TeV.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 10:00 Hambergsalen, Uppsala
    Mehta, Suman
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Development of RMT techniques for urban infrastructure planning: Stockholm Bypass (Förbifart) case study2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The tensor radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) method has extensively been used in near-surface investigations to obtain resistivity models of the subsurface. The main objective of this thesis is to further develop the RMT survey technique for a less paid attention and challenging environment namely on shallow water bodies and in the urban environment. The other objective is to develop a new processing technique to enhance the resolution and sensitivity of the tensor RMT method. For the first time a data acquisition system called ‘boat-towed RMT’ is introduced that has the capability to measure tensor RMT data on water bodies like lakes and rivers. A RMT survey carried out on Lake Mälaren near the city of Stockholm shows the capability and efficiency of the boat-towed RMT system. The resistivity models obtained from the RMT data are consistent from one line to another and show good correlation with the existing geological and drill core data. In general, a three-layer resistivity model was obtained that has a conductive layer interpreted as lake sediments, which is sandwiched between high resistive bedrock and resistive water column. A coherent discontinuity of low resistivity zone was observed in bedrock across all the lines. It was interpreted to originate from a major fracture zone striking in the direction of water bodies. However, due to the lack of penetration, RMT method alone was insufficient to provide a conclusive interpretation of this. Synthetic analysis was performed and showed that lower frequencies using controlled-sources are required to obtain the desired penetration depth. We took the advantage of the Swedish winters and carried out controlled-source RMT measurements on frozen lake at the same location. The new controlled-source models have enough depth penetration to delineate fractured bedrock. Furthermore, in order to improve the resolution and sensitivity of tensor RMT data, a new processing technique was developed that preserves the identity of each transmitter and allows improved resistivity model of the subsurface. These new acquisition and processing techniques should be useful in many different applications for urban infrastructure planning projects especially in Scandinavia where 7% of the land is covered by fresh water bodies and is poorly explored for these purposes.

    List of papers
    1. Boat-towed radio-magnetotellurics: A new technique and case study from the city of Stockholm
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boat-towed radio-magnetotellurics: A new technique and case study from the city of Stockholm
    2015 (English)In: Geophysics, ISSN 0016-8033, E-ISSN 1942-2156, Vol. 80, no 6, B193-B202 p.Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We have developed a new data acquisition system and technique to measure the radio magnetotelluric (RMT) signals from distant radio transmitters with the objective of mapping and modeling electric resistivity structures below a river or lake. The acquisition system is towed by a boat; therefore, we call the technique boat-towed RMT. The data acquisition is fast with a production rate of approximately 1  km/hr using a nominal sampling spacing of 10–15 m. Given the ample number of radio transmitters available in most parts of the world, the method can be used for near-surface studies of various targets. We have developed boat-towed RMT measurements on Lake Mälaren near the city of Stockholm in Sweden to determine the feasibility of the method. Approximately 15 km of RMT data were collected during three days above a planned 60-m-deep bypass tunnel with the goal of providing information on the bedrock depth and possible weak zones within the bedrock. The measured resistivity and phase data were of high quality with errors on the order of a few percent. The resistivity models from 2D inversion of the data showed a good correlation with available geologic data in resolving bedrock depth and also resistivity layering within the lake. Resistivity maps derived from the dense 2D models suggested a northeast–southwest-striking low-resistivity zone at less than a 30-m depth. The zone likely represents fractured crystalline bedrock. The boat-towed RMT technique is well suited for water bodies with moderate electric resistivity such as in brackish and freshwater environments.

    National Category
    Geophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267995 (URN)10.1190/GEO2014-0527.1 (DOI)000368347800021 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council Formas
    Available from: 2015-12-01 Created: 2015-12-01 Last updated: 2017-08-22Bibliographically approved
    2. Resolution and sensitivity of boat-towed RMT data to delineate fracture zones - Example of the Stockholm bypass multi-lane tunnel
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Resolution and sensitivity of boat-towed RMT data to delineate fracture zones - Example of the Stockholm bypass multi-lane tunnel
    2017 (English)In: Journal of Applied Geophysics, ISSN 0926-9851, E-ISSN 1879-1859, Vol. 139, 131-143 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The resolution and sensitivity of water-borne boat-towed multi-frequency radio-magnetotelluric (RMT) data for delineating zones of weaknesses in bedrock are examined in this study. 2D modeling of RMT data along 40 profiles in joint transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) as well as determinant mode was used for this purpose. The RMT data were acquired over two water passages from the Lake Malaren near the city of Stockholm where one of the largest underground infrastructure projects, a multi-lane tunnel, in Europe is currently being developed. Comparison with available borehole coring, refraction seismic and bathymetric data was used to scrutinize the RMT resistivity models. A low-resistivity zone observed in the middle of all the profiles is suggested to be from fracture/fault zones striking in the same direction as the water passages. Drilling observations confirm the presence of brittle structures in the bedrock, which manifest themselves as zones of low-resistivity and low-velocity in the RMT and refraction seismic data, respectively. Nevertheless, RMT is an inductive electromagnetic method hence the presence of conductive lake sediments may shield detecting the underlying fractured bedrock. The loss of resolution at depth implies that the structures within the bedrock under the lake sediments cannot reliably be delineated. To support this, a synthetic data analysis was carried out providing useful information on how to improve and plan the lake measurements for future studies. Synthetic modeling results for example suggested that frequencies as low as 3 kHz would be required to reliably resolve the bedrock and fracture zone within it in the study area. The modeling further illustrated the advantage of a fresh water layer that acts as a near-surface homogeneous medium eliminating the static shift effects. While boat-towed RMT data provided substantial information about the subsurface geology, the acquisition system should be upgraded to enable controlled-source data acquisition to increase the penetration depth and to overcome the shortcomings of using only radio-frequencies.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2017
    Keyword
    Boat-towed radio magnetotelluric, Fracture zone, Urban geophysics, Resolution, Synthetic modeling, Controlled source
    National Category
    Geophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322221 (URN)10.1016/j.jappgeo.2017.02.012 (DOI)000399269400013 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council Formas, 252-2012-1907The Geological Survey of Sweden (SGU), 363-26512013
    Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2017-08-22Bibliographically approved
    3. Preserving the identity of VLF and LF transmitters for enhanced resolution of geoelectric models of RMT data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preserving the identity of VLF and LF transmitters for enhanced resolution of geoelectric models of RMT data
    Show others...
    (English)In: Geophysics, ISSN 0016-8033, E-ISSN 1942-2156Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Geophysics
    Research subject
    Geophysics with specialization in Solid Earth Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328392 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-08-22
    4. CSRMT survey on frozen lakes: opportunities for urban applications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>CSRMT survey on frozen lakes: opportunities for urban applications
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Geophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328395 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-09-01
  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 13:15 B41 BMC, Uppsala
    Lind, Christoffer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Computational Biology and Bioinformatics.
    Computational Studies of Protein Synthesis on the Ribosome and Ligand Binding to Riboswitches2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The ribosome is a macromolecular machine that produces proteins in all kingdoms of life. The proteins, in turn, control the biochemical processes within the cell. It is thus of extreme importance that the machine that makes the proteins works with high precision. By using three dimensional structures of the ribosome and homology modelling, we have applied molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations to study the codon specificity of protein synthesis in initiation and termination on an atomistic level. In addition, we have examined the binding of small molecules to riboswitches, which can change the expression of an mRNA.

    The relative affinities on the ribosome between the eukaryotic initiator tRNA to the AUG start codon and six near-cognate codons were determined. The free-energy calculations show that the initiator tRNA has a strong preference for the start codon, but requires assistance from initiation factors 1 and 1A to uphold discrimination against near-cognate codons.

    When instead a stop codon (UAA, UGA or UAG) is positioned in the ribosomal A-site, a release factor binds and terminates protein synthesis by hydrolyzing the nascent peptide chain. However, vertebrate mitochondria have been thought to have four stop codons, namely AGA and AGG in addition to the standard UAA and UAG codons. Furthermore, two release factors have been identified, mtRF1 and mtRF1a. Free-energy calculations were used to determine if any of these two factors could bind to the two non-standard stop codons, and thereby terminate protein synthesis. Our calculations showed that the mtRF’s have similar stop codon specificity as bacterial RF1 and that it is highly unlikely that the mtRF’s are responsible for terminating at the AGA and AGG stop codons.

    The eukaryotic release factor 1, eRF1, on the other hand, can read all three stop codons singlehandedly. We show that eRF1 exerts a high discrimination against near-cognate codons, while having little preference for the different cognate stop codons. We also found an energetic mechanism for avoiding misreading of the UGG codon and could identify a conserved cluster of hydrophobic amino acids which prevents excessive solvent molecules to enter the codon binding site.

    The linear interaction energy method was used to examine binding of small molecules to the purine riboswitch and the FEP method was employed to explicitly calculate the LIE b-parameters. We show that the purine riboswitches have a remarkably high degree of electrostatic preorganization for their cognate ligands which is fundamental for discriminating against different purine analogs.

    List of papers
    1. Codon-reading specificities of mitochondrial release factors and translation termination at non-standard stop codons
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Codon-reading specificities of mitochondrial release factors and translation termination at non-standard stop codons
    2013 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A key feature of mitochondrial translation is the reduced number of transfer RNAs and reassignment of codons. For human mitochondria, a major unresolved problem is how the set of stop codons are decoded by the release factors mtRF1a and mtRF1. Here we present three-dimensional structural models of human mtRF1a and mtRF1 based on their homology to bacterial RF1 in the codon recognition domain, and the strong conservation between mitochondrial and bacterial ribosomal RNA in the decoding region. Sequence changes in the less homologous mtRF1 appear to be correlated with specific features of the mitochondrial rRNA. Extensive computer simulations of the complexes with the ribosomal decoding site show that both mitochondrial factors have similar specificities and that neither reads the putative vertebrate stop codons AGA and AGG. Instead, we present a structural model for a mechanism by which the ICT1 protein causes termination by sensing the presence of these codons in the A-site of stalled ribosomes.

    National Category
    Biological Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-217675 (URN)10.1038/ncomms3940 (DOI)000329396700004 ()
    Available from: 2014-02-05 Created: 2014-02-04 Last updated: 2017-08-27Bibliographically approved
    2. Binding Site Preorganization and Ligand Discrimination in the Purine Riboswitch
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Binding Site Preorganization and Ligand Discrimination in the Purine Riboswitch
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 119, no 3, 773-782 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The progress of RNA research has suggested a wide variety of RNA molecules as possible targets for pharmaceutical drug molecules. Structure-based computational methods for predicting binding modes and affinities are now important tools in drug discovery, but these methods have mainly been focused on protein targets. Here we employ molecular dynamics free-energy perturbation calculations and the linear interaction energy method to analyze the energetics of ligand binding to purine riboswitches. Calculations are carried out for 14 different purine complexes with the guanine and adenine riboswitches in order to examine their ligand recognition principles. The simulations yield binding affinities in good agreement with experimental data and rationalize the selectivity of the riboswitches for different ligands. In particular, it is found that these receptors have an unusually high degree of electrostatic preorganization for their cognate ligands, and this effect is further quantified by explicit free-energy calculations, which show that the standard electrostatic linear interaction energy parametrization is suboptimal in this case. The adenine riboswitch specifically uses the electrostatic preorganization to discriminate against guanine by preventing the formation of a G-U wobble base pair.

    National Category
    Physical Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-252042 (URN)10.1021/jp5052358 (DOI)000351329400016 ()25014157 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-04-29 Created: 2015-04-28 Last updated: 2017-08-27Bibliographically approved
    3. Principles of start codon recognition in eukaryotic translation initiation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Principles of start codon recognition in eukaryotic translation initiation
    2016 (English)In: Nucleic Acids Research, ISSN 0305-1048, E-ISSN 1362-4962, Vol. 44, no 17, 8425-8432 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Selection of the correct start codon during initiation of translation on the ribosome is a key event in protein synthesis. In eukaryotic initiation, several factors have to function in concert to ensure that the initiator tRNA finds the cognate AUG start codon during mRNA scanning. The two initiation factors eIF1 and eIF1A are known to provide important functions for the initiation process and codon selection. Here, we have used molecular dynamics free energy calculations to evaluate the energetics of initiator tRNA binding to different near-cognate codons on the yeast 40S ribosomal subunit, in the presence and absence of these two initiation factors. The results show that eIF1 and eIF1A together cause a relatively uniform and high discrimination against near-cognate codons. This works such that eIF1 boosts the discrimination against a first position near-cognate G-U mismatch, and also against a second position A-A base pair, while eIF1A mainly acts on third codon position. The computer simulations further reveal the structural basis of the increased discriminatory effect caused by binding of eIF1 and eIF1A to the 40S ribosomal subunit.

    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-312122 (URN)10.1093/nar/gkw534 (DOI)000386158800039 ()27280974 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2011.0081Swedish Research CouncilSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC)
    Available from: 2017-01-04 Created: 2017-01-04 Last updated: 2017-08-27Bibliographically approved
    4. Origin of the omnipotence of eukaryotic release factor 1
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Origin of the omnipotence of eukaryotic release factor 1
    (English)In: Article in journal (Other academic) Submitted
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328582 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-27 Created: 2017-08-27 Last updated: 2017-08-27
  • Olménius, Fanny
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Boström, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Djur som stöd i demensvården: Hur personer med demenssjukdom påverkas av djur i omvårdnaden2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Every year, approximately 25 000 people in Sweden are diagnosed with a form of dementia. The need for adapted care for this demographic is current and thus new forms of care and treatment need to be found and be up to date. There are currently no curing treatment for dementia, instead, focus is to decrease the suffering of the symptoms connected to a dementia diagnosis. Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) and Animal-assisted activity (AAA) has increased its popularity within different areas of care. Animals can have a positive effect of both physical as psychological symptoms. Thus there are reasons to believe that animals can and should be used by nurses, as a further step of developing patient-centred methods of care.

    Aim: This review looked into the different forms animals can help in the treatment of people with dementia, especially focusing on how animals affect the different but typical symptoms of dementia.

    Method: A review of 18 original articles that has been studying Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) and Animal-Assisted Activity (AAA) or any other form of animals presenting itself in the dementia care. This included several different types of animals, like dogs, cats, aquatic fish and even stuffed animals and a robot seal.

    Result: The result of this review was that animals’ participation in the treatment of people with dementia, or just occurring in these people’s every day life, helped reducing the levels of anxiety and stress, lowered their blood pressure, and if not reduced at least halted the degenerative process of the illness.

    Conclusion: According to the results to this review, animals should be considered to be a valuable asset in the treatment and care of people suffering of dementia, since they increase the quality of life of those with dementia, and in best case scenario reduces the progression of the disease.

  • Nyberg, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    EGG BUOYANCY AND SURVIVAL PROBABILITIES OF BALTIC FLOUNDER (PLATICHTHYS FLESUS): DIFFERENCES BETWEEN SPAWNING AREAS AND INTER-ANNUAL VARIATION IN CONDITIONS FOR REPRODUCTION2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The reproductive success for pelagic spawning Baltic flounders is strongly linked to the hydrodynamics in the spawning areas. Egg survival is dependent upon the ability to achieve neutral buoyancy at a depth interval where temperature and oxygen concentrations are favourable for egg development. The main focus of this thesis was to compare egg survival probabilities of pelagic eggs from Baltic flounder in the Bornholm, Gdansk and Gotland basins, prior to and after the saline water inflow in December 2014. The results showed greatly enhanced survival probabilities in Bornholm basin 2015 (p<0.01), as egg survival increased from 47% in 2014 to 100% the following year. In Gdansk basin the situation was similar, and survival probability increased from 13% to 100% (p<0.01). In Gotland basin no difference in survival probability was identified, although the dominant cause of mortality shifted from sedimentation, i.e. due to low salinity conditions in 2014, to oxygen deficiency in 2015 (p<0,01).

  • Fransson, Lina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Äggläggningspreferenser för honor av väddnätfjäril, Euphydryas aurinia, på området Bälsalvret, Gotland2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to get a better understanding of the oviposition-behaviour of the butterflyMarsh Fritillary (Euphydryas aurinia), in the area Bälsalvret on the Island of Gotland. Thestudy may provide helpful information to aid the conservation of the species in the area andalso provide overall knowledge about the female’s preferences when it comes to choosingmicrohabitat and host plant for their eggs.The analysis of the microhabitat preference for oviposition by the Marsh Fritillary showedthat eggs were predominantly laid on large-sized host plant individuals with a warmermicroclimate; with a preference for the rosette diameter, the length and the width of the leafand the number of Succisa pratensis individuals in the vicinity. This indicates that thefemale’s priority is to place the eggs at the most optimal place for their offspring’s survivaland growth.

  • Jacobsson, Viktor
    Betydelsen av en anlagd damm för biologisk mångfald i jordbrukslandskapet: Resultat från inventering av kärlväxter, bottenfauna och fåglar i tidiga stadier av succession2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Mandahl, Nils
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Genet, SE-22184 Lund, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Linda
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Genet, SE-22184 Lund, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Genet, SE-22184 Lund, Sweden..
    Viklund, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Arbajian, Elsa
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Genet, SE-22184 Lund, Sweden..
    von Steyern, Fredrik Vult
    Lund Univ, Dept Orthoped Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Isaksson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Mertens, Fredrik
    Lund Univ, Dept Lab Med, Div Clin Genet, SE-22184 Lund, Sweden..
    Scattered genomic amplification in dedifferentiated liposarcoma2017In: Molecular Cytogenetics, ISSN 1755-8166, E-ISSN 1755-8166, Vol. 10, 25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atypical lipomatous tumor (ALT), well differentiated liposarcoma (WDLS) and dedifferentiated liposarcoma (DDLS) are cytogenetically characterized by near-diploid karyotypes with no or few other aberrations than supernumerary ring or giant marker chromosomes, although DDLS tend to have somewhat more complex rearrangements. In contrast, pleomorphic liposarcomas (PLS) have highly aberrant and heterogeneous karyotypes. The ring and giant marker chromosomes contain discontinuous amplicons, in particular including multiple copies of the target genes CDK4, HMGA2 and MDM2 from 12q, but often also sequences from other chromosomes.

    Results: The present study presents a DDLS with an atypical hypertriploid karyotype without any ring or giant marker chromosomes. SNP array analyses revealed amplification of almost the entire 5p and discontinuous amplicons of 12q including the classical target genes, in particular CDK4. In addition, amplicons from 1q, 3q, 7p, 9p, 11q and 20q, covering from 2 to 14 Mb, were present. FISH analyses showed that sequences from 5p and 12q were scattered, separately or together, over more than 10 chromosomes of varying size. At RNA sequencing, significantly elevated expression, compared to myxoid liposarcomas, was seen for TRIO and AMACR in 5p and of CDK4, HMGA2 and MDM2 in 12q.

    Conclusions: The observed pattern of scattered amplification does not show the characteristics of chromothripsis, but is novel and differs from the well known cytogenetic manifestations of amplification, i. e., double minutes, homogeneously staining regions and ring chromosomes. Possible explanations for this unusual distribution of amplified sequences might be the mechanism of alternative lengthening of telomeres that is frequently active in DDLS and events associated with telomere crisis.

  • John, R.
    et al.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Phys, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany..
    Berritta, Marco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Hinzke, D.
    Univ Konstanz, Dept Phys, D-78457 Constance, Germany..
    Mueller, C.
    Univ Kiel, Inst Mat Sci, D-24143 Kiel, Germany..
    Santos, T.
    Western Digital Corp, San Jose, CA 95131 USA..
    Ulrichs, H.
    Georg August Univ, Phys Inst 1, D-37077 Gottingen, Germany..
    Nieves, P.
    CSIC, Inst Ciencia Mat Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, Spain.;Univ Burgos, Int Res Ctr Crit Raw Mat Adv Ind Technol ICCRAM, Burgos 09001, Spain..
    Walowski, J.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Phys, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany..
    Mondal, Ritwik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.
    CSIC, Inst Ciencia Mat Madrid, E-28049 Madrid, Spain..
    McCord, J.
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, POB 516, SE-75120 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nowak, U.
    Univ Konstanz, Dept Phys, D-78457 Constance, Germany..
    Muenzenberg, M.
    Ernst Moritz Arndt Univ Greifswald, Dept Phys, D-17489 Greifswald, Germany..
    Magnetisation switching of FePt nanoparticle recording medium by femtosecond laser pulses2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 4114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Manipulation of magnetisation with ultrashort laser pulses is promising for information storage device applications. The dynamics of the magnetisation response depends on the energy transfer from the photons to the spins during the initial laser excitation. A material of special interest for magnetic storage are FePt nanoparticles, for which switching of the magnetisation with optical angular momentum was demonstrated recently. The mechanism remained unclear. Here we investigate experimentally and theoretically the all-optical switching of FePt nanoparticles. We show that the magnetisation switching is a stochastic process. We develop a complete multiscale model which allows us to optimize the number of laser shots needed to switch the magnetisation of high anisotropy FePt nanoparticles in our experiments. We conclude that only angular momentum induced optically by the inverse Faraday effect will provide switching with one single femtosecond laser pulse.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 09:30 Polhemsalen, Uppsala
    Ruan, Chang-Qing
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials.
    Functionalization, Characterization and Applications of Oxidized Nanocellulose Derivatives2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cellulose, a sustainable raw material derived from nature, can be used for various applications following its functionalization and oxidation. Nanocellulose, inheriting the properties of cellulose, can offer new properties due to nanoscale effects, in terms of high specific surface area and porosity. The oxidation of cellulose can provide more active sites on the cellulose chains, improving its functionalization and broadening applications. Two kinds of oxidation and their corresponding applications are described in this thesis: periodate oxidation and Oxone® oxidation.

    2,3-dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) beads were prepared from Cladophora nanocellulose via periodate oxidation, and were further modified with amines via reductive amination. Several diamines were selected as possible crosslinkers to produce porous DAC beads, which showed higher porosity, stability in alkaline solution and enhanced thermal stability.

    After functionalization of DAC beads with L-cysteine (DAC-LC), thiol, amine and carboxyl groups were introduced into the DAC beads, endowing the DAC-LC beads with high adsorption capacity for palladium. The synthesized DAC-LC beads were character­ized with SEM, FTIR, XPS, TGA, BET and XRD and the palladium adsorption process was investigated.

    Chitosan was employed as a crosslinker in functionalization of DAC beads (DAC-CS). The conditions for the synthesis of DAC-CS beads were screened and verifying the stability of the beads in alkaline solution. The DAC-CS beads produced were investigated using SEM, FTIR, XPS, TGA and BET, and the adsorption and desorption capacity of Congo red was studied, indicating DAC-CS beads have potential as sorbent.

    Oxone oxidation of cellulose is a novel one-pot oxidation method in which mainly the hydroxyl groups on C6 are oxidized to produce carboxylic acid groups on the cellulose chains. To increase the efficiency of Oxone oxidation, several reaction parameters were studied. Cellulose pulp and Cladophora nanocellulose were chosen as prototypes to investigate the effects of oxidation, and the physico­chemical properties of the oxidized products were characterized. Cellulose pulp, pretreated with Oxone oxidation, was disintegrated by homogenization to prepare cellulose nanofibers (CNF). The effect of pre­treat­ment on the preparation of CNF was studied, and the results indicated that Oxone oxidation was efficient in the production of CNF.

    List of papers
    1. Preparation of Porous Cellulose Beads via Introduction of Diamine Spacers
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preparation of Porous Cellulose Beads via Introduction of Diamine Spacers
    2016 (English)In: Langmuir, ISSN 0743-7463, E-ISSN 1520-5827, Vol. 32, no 22, 5600-5607 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The current work presents a synthesis route based on the reductive amination of 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose beads with diamines to render micrometer-sized beads with increased specific surface area (SSA) and porosity in the mesoporous range. Specifically, the influence of the reductive amination of 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) using aliphatic and aromatic tethered mono- and diamines on bead microstructure was investigated. Aliphatic and aromatic tethered monoamines were found to have limited utility for producing porous beads whereas the introduction of diamines provided beads with a porous texture and an SSA increasing from <1 to >30 m(2)/g. Both aliphatic and aromatic diamines were found to be useful in producing porous beads having a pore size distribution range of 10 to 100 nm, as verified by N-2 gas adsorption and mercury intrusion porosimetry analyses. The true density of the functionalized DAC beads decreased to an average of about 1.36 g/cm(3) as compared to 1.48 g/cm(3) for the unfunctionalized, fully oxidized DAC beads. The total porosity of the beads was, according to mercury porosimetry, in the range of 54-64%. Reductive amination with 1,7-diaminoheptane provided beads that were stable under alkaline conditions (I M NaOH). It was concluded that the introduction of tethered diamines into DAC beads is a facile method for producing mesoporous beads.

    National Category
    Nano Technology Materials Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299045 (URN)10.1021/acs.langmuir.6b01288 (DOI)000377631300017 ()27181427 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationGöran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of Technology
    Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-13 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
    2. A green and simple method for preparation of an efficient palladium adsorbent based on cysteine functionalized2,3-dialdehyde cellulose
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A green and simple method for preparation of an efficient palladium adsorbent based on cysteine functionalized2,3-dialdehyde cellulose
    2016 (English)In: Cellulose (London), ISSN 0969-0239, E-ISSN 1572-882X, Vol. 23, no 4, 2627-2638 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A green and efficient adsorbent for adsorption of palladium ions was prepared from 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) originating from nanocellulose from the green algae Cladophora. The DAC was functionalized with cysteine via reductive amination in a convenient one-pot procedure to provide the adsorbent. The adsorption properties for adsorbing palladium(II) ions, including capacity, adsorption isotherm and kinetics, were studied. The successful reductive amination of cysteine with 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose was confirmed by FT-IR, elemental analysis and XPS. The adsorbent was characterized by SEM, XRD, gas adsorption and TGA. The adsorbent had a high adsorption capacity (130 mg palladium per gram adsorbent) and enabled fast adsorption of palladium(II) ions from solution (80 % of maximum capacity reached in 2 h). Adsorbent materials suitable for both filters (fibrous) and column matrixes (spherical particles) could be obtained in an efficient manner by controlling the degree of oxidation while producing the DAC material.

    Keyword
    2, 3-dialdehyde cellulose, Palladium adsorption, Cellulose beads, Nanocellulose
    National Category
    Nano Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-303299 (URN)10.1007/s10570-016-0976-0 (DOI)000380089300028 ()
    Available from: 2016-09-15 Created: 2016-09-15 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
    3. On the preparation of porous 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose beads crosslinked with chitosan and their adsorption of Congo red
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the preparation of porous 2,3-dialdehyde cellulose beads crosslinked with chitosan and their adsorption of Congo red
    2017 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Nano Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328386 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-08-23
    4. Favored Surface-limited Oxidation of Cellulose with Oxone® in Water
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Favored Surface-limited Oxidation of Cellulose with Oxone® in Water
    2017 (English)In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 7, 40600-40607 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A novel method for favored primary alcohol oxidation of cellulose was developed. Cellulose pulp andCladophora nanocellulose were oxidized in a one-pot procedure by Oxone® (2KHSO5$KHSO4$K2SO4)and efficient reaction conditions were identified. The effects of the reaction on the morphology,viscosity and chemical structure of the products obtained were studied. The primary alcohol groupswere oxidized to carboxyl groups and the content of carboxyl groups was determined byconductometric titration. SEM, capillary-type viscometry and XRD were applied to characterize theproducts and to investigate the influence of oxidation. For the first time, low-cost and stable Oxone®was used as a single oxidant to oxidize cellulose into carboxyl cellulose. The oxidation is an inexpensiveand convenient process to produce carboxylic groups on the surface of the cellulose fibers and to makethe cellulose fibers charged. Particularly, this method can avoid the use of halogens and potentially toxicradicals and constitute a green route to access carboxylated cellulose. Further, sodium bromide could beused as a co-oxidant to the Oxone® and increase the carboxylic acid content by 10–20%. The Oxone®oxidation is a promising method for oxidation of cellulose and might facilitate the production of CNC.

    Keyword
    cellulose, Oxone
    National Category
    Nano Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328237 (URN)10.1039/c7ra06141b (DOI)
    Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
    5. Cellulose nanofibers prepared via pretreatment based on Oxone® oxidation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cellulose nanofibers prepared via pretreatment based on Oxone® oxidation
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Nano Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328387 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-08-23
  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 09:00 B/B42, Uppsala
    Lindh, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Organic Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Computational Modelling in Drug Discovery: Application of Structure-Based Drug Design, Conformal Prediction and Evaluation of Virtual Screening2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Structure-based drug design and virtual screening are areas of computational medicinal chemistry that use 3D models of target proteins. It is important to develop better methods in this field with the aim of increasing the speed and quality of early stage drug discovery.

    The first part of this thesis focuses on the application of structure-based drug design in the search for inhibitors for the protein 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), one of the enzymes in the DOXP/MEP synthetic pathway. This pathway is found in many bacteria (such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis) and in the parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    In order to evaluate and improve current virtual screening methods, a benchmarking data set was constructed using publically available high-throughput screening data. The exercise highlighted a number of problems with current data sets as well as with the use of publically available high-throughput screening data. We hope this work will help guide further development of well designed benchmarking data sets for virtual screening methods.

    Conformal prediction is a new method in the computer-aided drug design toolbox that gives the prediction range at a specified level of confidence for each compound. To demonstrate the versatility and applicability of this method we derived models of skin permeability using two different machine learning methods; random forest and support vector machines.

    List of papers
    1. Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Crystallographic Studies of alpha-Aryl Substituted Fosmidomycin Analogues as Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Reductoisomerase
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Crystallographic Studies of alpha-Aryl Substituted Fosmidomycin Analogues as Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose 5-Phosphate Reductoisomerase
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 54, no 14, 4964-4976 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The natural antibiotic fosmidomycin acts via inhibition of 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), an essential enzyme in the non-mevalonate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis. Fosmidomycin is active on Mycobacterium tuberculosis DXR (MtDXR), but it lacks antibacterial activity probably because of poor uptake. alpha-Aryl substituted fosmidomycin analogues have more favorable physicochemical properties and are also more active in inhibiting malaria parasite growth. We have solved crystal structures of MtDXR in complex with 3,4-dichlorophenyl substituted fosmidomycin analogues; these show important differences compared to our previously described forsmidomycin-DXR complex. Our best inhibitor has an IC(50) = 0.15 mu M on MtDXR but still lacked activity in a mycobacterial growth assay (MIC > 32 mu g/mL). The combined results, however, provide insights into how DXR accommodates the new inhibitors and serve as an excellent starting point for the design of other novel and more potent inhibitors, particularly against pathogens where uptake is less of a problem, such as the malaria parasite.

    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Other Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-156614 (URN)10.1021/jm2000085 (DOI)000292892300003 ()21678907 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2011-08-07 Created: 2011-08-04 Last updated: 2017-08-24Bibliographically approved
    2. Substitution of the phosphonic acid and hydroxamic acid functionalities of the DXR inhibitor FR900098: An attempt to improve the activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Substitution of the phosphonic acid and hydroxamic acid functionalities of the DXR inhibitor FR900098: An attempt to improve the activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis
    Show others...
    2011 (English)In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 0960-894X, E-ISSN 1090-2120, Vol. 21, no 18, 5403-5407 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Two series of FR900098/fosmidomycin analogs were synthesized and evaluated for MtDXR inhibition and Mycobacterium tuberculosis whole-cell activity. The design rationale of these compounds involved the exchange of either the phosphonic acid or the hydroxamic acid part for alternative acidic and metal-coordinating functionalities. The best inhibitors provided IC(50) values in the micromolar range, with a best value of 41 mu M.

    Keyword
    Tuberculosis, DXR, Enzyme inhibitor, Fosmidomycin, FR900098
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-158288 (URN)10.1016/j.bmcl.2011.07.005 (DOI)000294051800057 ()
    Available from: 2011-09-07 Created: 2011-09-06 Last updated: 2017-08-24
    3. DXR Inhibition by Potent Mono- and Disubstituted Fosmidomycin Analogues
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>DXR Inhibition by Potent Mono- and Disubstituted Fosmidomycin Analogues
    Show others...
    2013 (English)In: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, ISSN 0022-2623, E-ISSN 1520-4804, Vol. 56, no 15, 6190-6199 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The antimalarial compound fosmidomycin targets DXR, the enzyme that catalyzes the first committed step in the MEP pathway producing the universally essential isoprenoid precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. The MEP pathway is used by a number of pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis and apicomplexan parasites, and differs from the classical mevalonate pathway that is essential in humans. Using a structure-based approach, we designed a number of analogues of fosmidomycin, including a series that are substituted in both the Cα and the hydroxamate positions. The latter proved to be a stable framework for the design of inhibitors that extend from the cramped substrate-binding site and can, for the first time, bridge the substrate and cofactor binding sites. A number of these compounds are more potent than fosmidomycin in terms of killing Plasmodium falciparum in an in vitro assay; the best has an IC50 of 40 nM.

    Keyword
    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase, DXR
    National Category
    Structural Biology
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Structural Biology; Medicinal Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-196616 (URN)10.1021/jm4006498 (DOI)000323082400015 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Research Council
    Note

    De tre (3) första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2013-03-11 Created: 2013-03-11 Last updated: 2017-08-24Bibliographically approved
    4. Toward a Benchmarking Data Set Able to Evaluate Ligand- and Structure-based Virtual Screening Using Public HTS Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward a Benchmarking Data Set Able to Evaluate Ligand- and Structure-based Virtual Screening Using Public HTS Data
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling, ISSN 1549-9596, Vol. 55, no 2, 343-353 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Virtual screening has the potential to accelerate and reduce costs of probe development and drug discovery. To develop and benchmark virtual screening methods, validation data sets are commonly used. Over the years, such data sets have been constructed to overcome the problems of analogue bias and artificial enrichment. With the rapid growth of public domain databases containing high-throughput screening data, such as the PubChem BioAssay database, there is an increased possibility to use such data for validation. In this study, we identify PubChem data sets suitable for validation of both structure- and ligand-based virtual screening methods. To achieve this, high-throughput screening data for which a crystal structure of the bioassay target was available in the PDB were identified. Thereafter, the data sets were inspected to identify structures and data suitable for use in validation studies. In this work, we present seven data sets (MMP13, DUSP3, PTPN22, EPHX2, CTDSP1, MAPK10, and CDK5) compiled using this method. In the seven data sets, the number of active compounds varies between 19 and 369 and the number of inactive compounds between 59 405 and 337 634. This gives a higher ratio of the number of inactive to active compounds than what is found in most benchmark data sets. We have also evaluated the screening performance using docking and 3D shape similarity with default settings. To characterize the data sets, we used physicochemical similarity and 2D fingerprint searches. We envision that these data sets can be a useful complement to current data sets used for method evaluation.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    American Chemical Society (ACS), 2015
    National Category
    Structural Biology Pharmaceutical Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Bioorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-248018 (URN)10.1021/ci5005465 (DOI)000349943100014 ()25564966 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-03-26 Created: 2015-03-26 Last updated: 2017-08-24Bibliographically approved
    5. Predicting the Rate of Skin Penetration Using an Aggregated Conformal Prediction Framework
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predicting the Rate of Skin Penetration Using an Aggregated Conformal Prediction Framework
    2017 (English)In: Molecular Pharmaceutics, ISSN 1543-8384, E-ISSN 1543-8392, Vol. 14, no 5, 1571-1576 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Skin serves as a drug administration route, and skin permeability of chemicals is of significant interest in the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. An aggregated conformal prediction (ACP) framework was used to build models, for predicting the permeation rate (log K-p) of chemical compounds through human skin. The conformal prediction method gives as an output the prediction range at a given level of confidence for each compound, which enables the user to make a more informed decision when, for example, suggesting the next compound to prepare, Predictive models were built using;both the random forest and the support vector machine methods and were based on experimentally derived permeability data on 211 diverse compounds. The derived models were of similar predictive quality as compared to earlier published models but have the extra advantage of not only presenting a single predicted value for each, compound but also a reliable, individually assigned prediction range. The models use calculated descriptors and can quickly predict the skin permeation rate of new compounds.

    Keyword
    conformal prediction, skin penetration nonconformist, Scikit Learn, random forest, Support vector machines
    National Category
    Basic Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323448 (URN)10.1021/acs.molpharmaceut.7b00007 (DOI)000400633300024 ()28335598 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-07-04 Created: 2017-07-04 Last updated: 2017-08-24Bibliographically approved
  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 13:00 Auditorium Minus, Gustavianum, Uppsala
    Martinell, Mats
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Diabetes Mellitus at the Time for Diagnosis: Studies on Prognostic Factors2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim for this thesis was to identify prognostic factors for chronic diabetes complications that exist at the time of diabetes diagnosis.

    Low level of education (<12 years) and low income (<60% of median) was found to increase the risk to have high (>70 mmol/mol) HbA1c at the time of diagnosis with 34 % and 35 %, respectively.

    Prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) was 12% in a cohort of patients newly diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetic macular edema was present in 11% of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and 13% of those with Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). Low beta cell function and low level of education increased the risk for DR with 110% and 43%, respectively. For every unit of increase in body mass index, the risk for DR was reduced by 3%.

    The cellular immunology of LADA patients was a mixture of that observed in both type 1 (T1D) and T2D patients. Compared to patients with T1D, LADA patients had more B-regulatory lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells capable of producing interleukine-35. This indicates a higher anti-inflammatory capacity in LADA patients compared to type T1D patients.

    By imputing age, body mass index, HbA1c at diagnosis, beta cell function and insulin resistance in a cluster analysis, five distinct diabetes clusters were identified. The four clusters representing T2D patients differed in incidence of DR, nephropathy and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. This was replicated with similar results in three geographically separate populations.

    By studying socioeconomic background and factors present at the time of diagnosis we can better predict prognosis for chronic diabetes complications. These findings may facilitate better-targeted diabetes screening programs and more individually tailored treatment regimes.

    List of papers
    1. Education, immigration and income as risk factors for hemoglobin A1c >70 mmol/mol when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes in adult: a population-based cohort study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Education, immigration and income as risk factors for hemoglobin A1c >70 mmol/mol when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or latent autoimmune diabetes in adult: a population-based cohort study
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: BMJ Open Diabetes Research and Care, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The aim of this research is to study education, income and immigration as risk factors for high hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c &gt;70 mmol/mol (8.6%)) when diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA).Research design and methods Patients were included from the All New Diabetics in Scania study (2008-2013). Level of education, disposable income and immigration year were retrieved from the longitudinal integrated database for labour market research (LISA) register compiled by Statistics Sweden. Logistic regression models were used to estimate ORs for HbA1c &gt;70 mmol/mol (8.6%) at diagnosis.Results A total of 3794 patients with incident T2D (n=3 525) or LADA (n=269) were included. Patients with T2D with a low (<=9 years) or medium (10-12 years) levels of education were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with patients with T2D with a high (&gt;12 years) level of education (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.08 to1.66, OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.54). Low-income patients with T2D (&lt;60% of median) were more likely to have high HbA1c at diagnosis compared with high-income patients withT2D (&gt;150% of median) (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.79).Conclusions Patients with lower levels of education or low income and are more likely to have HbA1c is &gt;70 mmol/mol (8.6%) when diagnosed with T2D. An understanding of how socioeconomic position influences the clinical presentation at diagnosis may facilitate screening programs designed to target populations at risk for delayed diagnosis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    BMJ Specialist Journals, 2017
    National Category
    Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321637 (URN)10.1136/bmjdrc-2016-000346 (DOI)
    Available from: 2017-05-18 Created: 2017-05-18 Last updated: 2017-08-22
    2. Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis (DRAD) in patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence and risk factors for diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis (DRAD) in patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA)
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Journal of diabetes and its complications, ISSN 1056-8727, E-ISSN 1873-460X, Vol. 30, no 8, 1456-1461 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: 

    To study prevalence of diabetic retinopathy (DR) at diagnosis (DRAD) and to estimate contributing risk by sociodemographic, cardiovascular and metabolic characteristics present in patients recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes (T2D) or latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA).

    METHODS: 

    Patients (n=2174) recently diagnosed T2D (93%) or LADA (7%) were included upon arrival for their baseline DR screening. Fundus photographs of 4902 eyes were graded by a senior ophthalmologist according to the International Diabetic Retinopathy Disease Severity Scale. Official registers held by Statistics Sweden provided sociodemographic variables. The National Patient Register and Swedish Prescribed Drug Register were used to assess cardiovascular risk. Beta cell function (HOMA2%b) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA2%s) were estimated from fasting (f) C-Peptide using the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) 2 calculator. Odds ratios (OR) for DRAD were estimated using generalized estimating equation models.

    RESULTS: 

    The prevalence of DRAD was 12% (7% mild and 5% moderate) and of diabetic macular edema it was 11% (all within vascular arch). The prevalence did not significantly differ between T2D and LADA. Due to sample size, the regression analysis of LADA patients did not yield any significant estimates. In T2D low educational level (≤9years) increased risk for DRAD by 44% (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.07-1.93) and <50% beta-cell function adjusted for HbA1c and insulin sensitivity at diagnosis increased the risk by 77% (OR 1.77; 95% CI 1.28-2.44). For every unit increase in BMI, risk for DRAD decreased by 3% (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.95-0.99).

    CONCLUSIONS: 

    DRAD prevalence in patients recently diagnosed with T2D or is 12%. Low educational level and low beta cell function at diagnosis are risk factors for DRAD. Estimation of beta cell function from (f)C-Peptide and (f)P-Glucose may be a valuable tool in identifying patients at risk for DRAD.

    Keyword
    Diabetes, Diabetic macular edema, Diabetic retinopathy, Diabetic retinopathy at diagnosis (DRAD), Latent autoimmune diabetes in the adult (LADA), Type 2 diabetes (T2D)
    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Research subject
    Endocrinology and Diabetology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319750 (URN)10.1016/j.jdiacomp.2016.08.009 (DOI)000399434900009 ()27593902 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2017-04-08 Created: 2017-04-08 Last updated: 2017-08-22Bibliographically approved
    3. Characterization of Cellular Immunology in LADA Patients
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of Cellular Immunology in LADA Patients
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Patients with latent autoimmune diabetes mellitus in adults (LADA) have antibodies against the insulin-producing b-cells but at disease onset they are not insulin-dependent. This study presents cellular immunological differences between LADA, type 1, type 2 diabetes and healthy controls.

    Research Design and Methods: All patients and matched (by age, gender and body mass index) healthy controls were recruited from the County of Uppsala, Sweden. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from freshly collected blood to determine proportions of innate, adaptive and regulatory immune cells by using flow cytometry.

    Results: Included were 14 patients with LADA, 16 with type 1 diabetes, 16 with type 2 diabetes and 13 healthy controls. The proportion of CD11c+CD123- antigen presenting cells (APCs) was lower, whilst proportions of CD11c+CD123+ APCs and Interleukin (IL)-35+ tolerogenic APCs were higher in LADA patients compared to patients with type 1 diabetes. The proportion of CD3-CD56highCD16+ Natural Killer (NK) cells was higher in LADA patients than in both healthy controls and type 2 diabetes patients. IL-35+ Treg cell numbers were similar to those observed in both type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes patients, but a lower frequency of IL-35+ regulatory T (Treg) cells was observed in LADA patients than in healthy controls. The proportion of regulatory B (Breg) cells in LADA patients was higher than in healthy controls, type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients and IL-35+ Breg cell numbers were higher than in type 1 diabetes patients.

    Conclusions: LADA patients present a mixed cellular immunological pattern compared to type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. Numbers of APCs, IL-35+ tolerogenic APCs and IL-35+ Breg cells in LADA patients are similar to those observed in type 2 diabetes patients, whereas the changes in NK cells are similar to those observed in type 1 diabetes patients. 

    Keyword
    Cellular immunology, latent autoimmun diabetes in adults, diabetes, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, interleukin 35
    National Category
    Immunology in the medical area
    Research subject
    Immunology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328352 (URN)
    Projects
    Diabetes Mellitus at the Time of Diagnosis - Studies on Prognostic Factors
    Note

    De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-09-01Bibliographically approved
    4. Clustering of adult-onset diabetes into novel subgroups guides therapy and improves prediction of outcome
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clustering of adult-onset diabetes into novel subgroups guides therapy and improves prediction of outcome
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Diabetes is presently classified into two main forms, type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D), but especially T2D is highly heterogeneous. A refined classification could provide a powerful tool to identify those at greatest risk of complications already at diagnosis, and enable individualized treatment regimes.

    Method

    We applied a data-driven cluster analysis (k-means and TwoStep hierarchical clustering) in a large cohort of newly diagnosed diabetic patients (N=8,980) from the Swedish ANDIS (All New Diabetics in Scania) cohorts and related to prospective data from patient records. Replication was performed in three independent cohorts: the Scania Diabetes Registry (SDR, N=1466), ANDIU (All New Diabetics in Uppsala, N=844) and DIREVA (Diabetes Registry Vaasa, N=3485). Cox regression and logistic regression was used to compare risk of diabetic complications and genetic associations.

    Results

    We identified 5 replicable clusters of diabetes patients, with significantly different patient characteristics and risk of diabetic complications. Particularly, belonging to the most insulin-resistant cluster was a strong predictor of diabetic kidney disease, while the insulin deficient cluster 2 had increased risk of retinopathy. In support of the clustering, genetic associations to the clusters differed from those seen in traditional T2D.

    Conclusions

    We could classify patients into five subgroups predicting disease progression and development of diabetic complications more precisely than the current classification. This new classification may help to tailor and target early treatment to patients who would benefit most, thereby representing a first step towards precision medicine in diabetes.

     

    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Research subject
    Endocrinology and Diabetology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328355 (URN)
    Projects
    Diabetes Mellitus at the Time for Diagnosis - Studies on Prognostic Factors
    Funder
    EXODIAB - Excellence of Diabetes Research in Sweden, 2009-1039Swedish Research Council, 521-2010-3490Swedish Research Council, 2010-5983Linnaeus research environment CADICS, 349-2006-237
    Note

    Tredjeförfattarskapet delas av tredje och fjärde författaren.

    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-09-01Bibliographically approved
  • Ekström, Björn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    The Illicit Information Community: Information - Practical Reflections on the Shadow Library AAARG2017In: Improving Quality of Life Through Information: Proceedings of the XXV Bobcatsss Symposium, Tampere Finland, January 2017 / [ed] Paavo Arvola, Tanja Hintsanen, Serafia Kari, Soile Kolehma, Shan Luolin, Jasmiina Sillanpää, Tampere, 2017, 121-125 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a netnographic analysis of information needs and practices related to the shadow library AAARG. AAARG is regarded as a portal and community for the sharing and distribution of academic and artistic texts, books and articles. The portal in question is defined as an actor within the guerrilla open access movement, a radical node within the larger open access movement, which is analysed as a cultural field using the theoretical framework of Sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. AAARG is thereafter discussed in an information-practical sense with re- gards to social interaction between individual users’ needs as well as discursive and constructional origins of such needs. These needs and the practices they create are then examined with regards to the order that the platform itself creates, tied to the cultural field which it is a part of. The conclusion is that alternative knowledge organizational platforms such as AAARG have had and will continue to have a big influence on the discussion of today’s open access models, since they clearly fill a certain demand. The discrepancy between such initiatives and institutional open access activities will therefore need further analysis in a library and information scientific context.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-12 13:15 Auditorium Minus, Uppsala
    Carlsson, Tommy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Clinical Psychology in Healthcare.
    To Grasp the Unexpected: Information Following a Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defect in the Fetus2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim was to explore experiences and needs of information following a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect, and to assess the quality of publicly available information websites about congenital heart defects. Study I was a qualitative interview study that explored experiences among 11 parents to prenatally diagnosed children. Respondents tried to grasp the facts today while reflecting on the future, and personal contact with medical specialists was valued. The analysis showed that the Web contained an overwhelming amount of information. Study II was a qualitative interview study that explored experiences among 26 females and males 5-15 weeks after a prenatal diagnosis. Respondents hunted for information in a confusing reality, with a need for information about various topics and methods for information delivery. Although high satisfaction with the specialist information was described, the information was considered overwhelming and complex. Supplemental information was sought via the Web. Insufficient information about induced abortions was described. Study III was a quantitative study that explored content and quality of 67 English websites about congenital heart defects. Few websites included information about prenatal aspects, such as pregnancy termination. The overall quality was poor, especially reliability and information about treatment choices. Study IV was a mixed methods study that explored the quality of 10 Swedish websites about congenital heart defects, from the perspectives of 9 assessors with personal experience of a prenatal diagnosis. Quantitative Likert scale assessments were followed by written open-ended questions and focus group discussions. Quantitative assessments represented unfulfilled quality criterion for treatment choices, and partially fulfilled quality criteria for appearance, details, relevance, suitability and overall quality. Websites had significantly different scores for all investigated quality criteria. Various issues were highlighted in the responses to the open-ended questions and during the discussions, including inappropriate advertisements, biased information, poor illustrations, complex language and poor trustworthiness. In conclusion, expectant parents faced with a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect in the fetus try to grasp the unexpected, an attempt that involves difficulties in relation to information. These are present during the consultation with health professionals and when searching for web-based information. 

    List of papers
    1. Information following a Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defect: Experiences among Parents to Prenatally Diagnosed Children
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information following a Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defect: Experiences among Parents to Prenatally Diagnosed Children
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 2, e0117995Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Prenatal screening of pregnant women in Sweden has improved the detection of major congenital heart defects (CHD). The aim was to explore parental experiences and need for information following a prenatal diagnosis of CHD.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews conducted with six fathers and five mothers to seven prenatally diagnosed children. Data were analyzed through content analysis.

    RESULTS: Three themes and 9 categories emerged. Theme 1, Grasping the facts today while reflecting on the future, containing five categories: Difficulties sorting out information when in emotional chaos; Respectful information regarding termination of pregnancy; Early information is crucial; Understanding the facts regarding the anomaly; Preparing for the future. Theme 2, Personal contact with medical specialists who give honest and trustworthy information is valued, containing two categories: Trust in information received from medical specialists and Truth and honesty is valued. Theme 3, An overwhelming amount of information on the Internet, containing two categories: Difficulties in finding relevant information and Easy to focus on cases with a poor outcome when searching the Internet.

    CONCLUSION: Early and honest information in line with individual preferences is crucial to support the decisional process regarding whether to continue or terminate the pregnancy. The use of illustrations is recommended, as a complement to oral information, as it increases comprehension and satisfaction with obtained information. Furthermore, the overwhelming amount of information on the Internet calls for compilation of easily accessible and reliable information sources via the Internet.

    Keyword
    Congenital heart defects, Interview as topic, Parents, Pregnancy, Prenatal diagnosis
    National Category
    Nursing Specific Languages
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244704 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0117995 (DOI)000350061500089 ()25692879 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
    Available from: 2015-02-20 Created: 2015-02-20 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
    2. Experiences of Informational Needs and Received Information Following a Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defect
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experiences of Informational Needs and Received Information Following a Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defect
    2016 (English)In: Prenatal Diagnosis, ISSN 0197-3851, E-ISSN 1097-0223, Vol. 36, no 6, 515-522 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the need for information and what information was actually received following a prenatal diagnosis of a congenital heart defect, in a country where termination of pregnancy beyond 22 weeks of gestation is not clinically performed.

    METHODS: Twenty-six Swedish-speaking pregnant women (n = 14) and partners (n = 12) were consecutively recruited for semi-structured telephone interviews following the prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect. Data was analyzed using content analysis.

    RESULTS: Although high satisfaction with the specialist information was described, the information was considered overwhelming and complex. Objective, honest and detailed information about multiple subjects were needed, delivered repeatedly and supplemented by written information/illustrations. Eighteen respondents had used the Internet to search for information and found issues involving searching difficulties, low quality, and that it was too complex, insufficient or unspecific. Those who terminated the pregnancy criticized that there was a lack of information about termination of pregnancy, both from health professionals and online sources, resulting in unanswered questions and unpreparedness.

    CONCLUSION: Individuals faced with a prenatal diagnosis of a congenital heart defect need individualized and repeated information. These needs are not all adequately met, as individuals are satisfied with the specialist consultation but left with unanswered questions regarding pregnancy termination.

    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281384 (URN)10.1002/pd.4815 (DOI)000378541100003 ()26991536 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2016-03-23 Created: 2016-03-23 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
    3. Content and quality of information websites about congenital heart defects following a prenatal diagnosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Content and quality of information websites about congenital heart defects following a prenatal diagnosis
    2015 (English)In: Interactive Journal of Medical Research, E-ISSN 1929-073X, Vol. 4, no 1, 66-76 p., e4Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pregnant women and their partners use the Internet to search for information following a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect.

    OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to explore central subjects of content and to assess the accessibility, reliability, usability, and quality of written information on publicly available information websites about congenital heart defects following a prenatal diagnosis.

    METHODS: Following searches on Bing and Google, we included websites containing patient information in English. Hits ranged from 340,000-67,500,000 and the first 50 hits from each search were screened for inclusion (N=600). Of these hits, 39.3% (236/600) were irrelevant. A total of 67 websites were included, of which 37% (25/67) were affiliated with independent information websites, 25% (17/67) with charity/private organizations, 25% (17/67) with hospitals/clinics, and 13% (8/67) had other affiliations. The majority of the websites (76%, 51/67) could not be attributed to an author. A manifest content analysis was performed to explore central subjects of content. The DISCERN instrument was used to assess the quality of information, and the LIDA tool was used to assess accessibility, usability, and reliability of the included websites.

    RESULTS: The content on the majority of the websites included care and treatment of children with congenital heart defects (88%, 59/67), causes of congenital heart defects (88%, 59/67), symptoms of congenital heart defects (85%, 57/67), prevalence of congenital heart defects (81%, 54/67), potential complications of congenital heart defects (75%, 50/67), prenatal diagnostics/screening methods (72%, 48/67), and specific congenital heart defects (72%, 48/67), whereas less than 10% included information about termination of pregnancy (6%, 4/67), care during pregnancy (5%, 3/67), and information specifically directed to partners (1%, 1/67). The mean of the total DISCERN score was 27.9 (SD 9.7, range 16-53). According to the instrument, a majority of the websites were categorized as very poor regarding information about effects of no treatment (88%, 59/67), support for shared decision making (85%, 57/67), achievement of its aims (84%, 56/67), explicit aims (82%, 55/67), risks of each treatment (82%, 55/67), how treatment choices affect overall quality of life (76%, 51/67), and areas of uncertainty (76%, 51/67). The mean of the total LIDA score was 92.3 (SD 13.1, range 61-127). According to the tool, a majority of the websites were categorized as good with regard to registration (97%, 65/67) and browser test (75%, 50/67), whereas a majority were categorized as poor with regard to currency (87%, 58/67), content production (84%, 56/67), and engagability (75%, 50/67).

    CONCLUSIONS: Difficulties in finding relevant information sources using Web search engines and quality deficits on websites are an incentive for health professionals to take an active part in providing adequate and reliable information online about congenital heart defects.

    Keyword
    Consumer health information, Congenital heart defects, Internet, Prenatal diagnosis
    National Category
    Nursing Specific Languages
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-242304 (URN)10.2196/ijmr.3819 (DOI)000359673600006 ()25608457 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-01-23 Created: 2015-01-23 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
    4. Quality of Patient Information Websites About Congenital Heart Defects: Mixed-Methods Study of Perspectives Among Individuals With Experience of a Prenatal Diagnosis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality of Patient Information Websites About Congenital Heart Defects: Mixed-Methods Study of Perspectives Among Individuals With Experience of a Prenatal Diagnosis
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Interactive Journal of Medical Research, E-ISSN 1929-073X, Vol. 6, no 2, e15Article in journal (Refereed) In press
    Abstract [en]

    Background: When a heart defect is prenatally diagnosed in the fetus, expectant parents experience a great need for information about various topics. After the diagnosis, the Web is used for supplemental information, and the scarcity of research calls attention to the need to explore patient information websites from the perspectives of the intended consumers.

    Objective: The overarching aim of this study was to explore the quality of Swedish patient information websites about congenital heart defects, from the perspectives of individuals with experience of a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart defect in the fetus.

    Methods: This was a mixed-methods study of websites identified through systematic searches in the two most used Web-based search engines. Of the total 80 screened hits, 10 hits led to patient information websites about congenital heart defects. A quality assessment tool inspired by a previous study was used to evaluate each website’s appearance, details, relevance, suitability, information about treatment choices, and overall quality. Answers were given on a 5-point Likert scale, ranging from 1, representing the lowest score, to 5, representing the highest score. Each website was assessed individually by persons with experience of continued (n=4) and terminated (n=5) pregnancy following a prenatal diagnosis. Assessments were analyzed with Kendall’s coefficient of concordance W, Mann-Whitney U test, Friedman’s test, and a Wilcoxon-Nemenyi-McDonald-Thompson test. In addition, each assessor submitted written responses to open-ended questions in the quality assessment tool, and two joint focus group discussions were conducted with each group of assessors. The qualitative data were analyzed with inductive manifest content analysis.

    Results: Assessments represented a low score (median=2.0) for treatment choices and moderate scores (median=3.0) for appearance, details, relevance, suitability, and overall quality. No website had a median of the highest achievable score for any of the questions in the quality assessment tool. Medians of the lowest achievable score were found in questions about treatment choices (n=4 websites), details (n=2 websites), suitability (n=1 website), and overall quality (n=1 website). Websites had significantly different scores for appearance (P=.01), details (P<.001), relevance (P<.001), suitability (P<.001), treatment choices (P=.04), and overall quality (P<.001). The content analysis of the qualitative data generated six categories: (1) advertisements, (2) comprehensiveness, (3) design, (4) illustrations and pictures, (5) language, and (6) trustworthiness. Various issues with the included websites were highlighted, including the use of inappropriate advertisements, biased information, poor illustrations, complex language, and poor trustworthiness.

    Conclusions: From the perspectives of the intended consumers, patient information websites about congenital heart defects are, to a large extent, inadequate tools for supplemental information following a prenatal diagnosis. Health professionals should initiate discussions with patients about their intentions to use the Web, inform them about the varied quality in the Web-based landscape, and offer recommendations for appropriate Web-based sources.

    Keyword
    congenital heart defects, consumer health information, information literacy, Internet, popular works, pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis
    National Category
    Nursing
    Research subject
    Caring Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328480 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-23 Created: 2017-08-23 Last updated: 2017-08-30
  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 09:00 A7:107a, Uppsala
    Emilson, Christina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Long-term perspectives on musculoskeletal pain: Health care utilization and integration of behavioral medicine treatment into physical therapy2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    There are currently no effective methods for treating and preventing chronic pain. The aim of this thesis was to study prognostic factors for health care utilization, and the long-term outcomes of tailored behavioral medicine treatment for patients with musculoskeletal pain. Another aim was to increase knowledge about physical therapists’ assessment and analysis of patients’ pain conditions and to investigate the potential of subgrouping patients based on prognostic factors.

    Methods: In Study I, a prospective population-based cohort was followed over 21 years. Data from three measure points were analyzed: 1995 (n=2425), 2007 (n=1582) and 2016 (n=1184). Study II was a 10-year follow-up of randomized controlled trial (n=97), comparing tailored behavioral medicine treatment and exercise-based physical therapy. In Study III, a descriptive and explorative design was applied, using data from video-recordings of 12 physical therapists. In study IV, assignment to three subgroups based on the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire was validated against reference instruments, and the stability between two points of measurement was investigated in patients (n=40) who were seeking primary health care due to musculoskeletal pain.

    Results: Chronic pain, female gender and high age predict high health care utilization over 21 years, and a trajectory of stable high health care utilization over the entire period. The differences between groups in favor for tailored behavioral medicine treatment reported at post-treatment and after two years, were not maintained at the 10-year follow-up. A majority of the physical therapists assessed factors for poor prognosis. The analyses were mainly based on biomedical assessments and none of the physical therapists included behavioral factors. Subgroup assignment according to the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire appears to be valid and stable over time.

    Conclusion: Prognostic factors such as chronic pain and female gender need to be considered when allocating health care resources and planning treatment to improve long-term outcomes. The treatment should also be tailored based on individual functional behavioral analyses of key behaviors and on patient´s biomedical and psychosocial condition, including strategies for maintenance of behavioral changes. Evidence-based methods for integrating behavioral medicine treatment into physical therapy need to be further evaluated and improved. 

    List of papers
    1. Association between health care utilization and musculoskeletal pain. A 21-year follow-up of a population cohort
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association between health care utilization and musculoskeletal pain. A 21-year follow-up of a population cohort
    (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Few studies have reported the long-term impact of pain on health care utilization. The aim of this study was to describe and predict health care utilization associated with chronic pain in a 21-year follow-up of a population cohort and to identify and describe different trajectories over time.                                                                              Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included five measurement time points. A representative sample of 3928 subjects (age 20-74) from the south of Sweden was selected. Data were collected by self-reported questionnaires, and the response rate was n=2425 (62%). Three time points of 1995, 2007 and 2016 were included in the study. The associations between baseline variables and health care utilization in 2016 were calculated based on logistic regression analysis. Different trajectories for health care utilization were compared and described.                                                             Results: The response rate in 2016 was n=1184 (63%) of the eligible participants. Predictors for high health care utilization at the 21-year follow-up was chronic widespread pain (OR: 3.2, CI: 1.9-5.1), chronic regional pain (OR:1.8, CI: 1.2-2.6), female gender and high age. Trajectory for high health care utilization over the entire period was characterized by high prevalence of chronic pain at baseline and female gender.                                                                                                                     Conclusions: Chronic pain, which may reflect poorer general health, had implications in health care utilization over a 21-year period. A stable high health care utilization trajectory was identified among a small group of the general population characterized by chronic widespread pain and female gender, indicating that treatment of this group has not been successful.

    Keyword
    Musculoskeletal pain, health care utilization, chronic pain, pain prevalence
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328402 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-08-23
    2. A 10-year follow-up of tailored behavioural medicine treatment and exercise-based physiotherapy in persistent musculoskeletal pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A 10-year follow-up of tailored behavioural medicine treatment and exercise-based physiotherapy in persistent musculoskeletal pain
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 2, 186-196 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study the long-term outcomes of two interventions targeting patients with sub-acute and persistent pain in a primary care physiotherapy setting.

    Design: A 10-year follow-up of a two-armed randomised controlled trial, initially including 97 participants.

    Interventions: Tailored behavioural medicine treatment, applied in a physiotherapy context (experimental condition), and exercise-based physiotherapy (control condition). Main measures: Pain-related disability was the primary outcome. The maximum pain intensity, pain control, fear of movement, sickness-related absence (register data) and perceived benefit and confidence in coping with future pain problems were the secondary outcomes.

    Results: Forty-three (44%) participants responded to the follow-up survey, 20 in the tailored behavioural medicine treatment group and 23 in the exercise-based physiotherapy group. The groups did not differ in terms of the change in the scores for the primary outcome (p=0.17) of pain-related disability between the experimental group (median: 2.5, Q1-Q3: -2.5-14.25), and the control group (median: 0, Q1-Q3: -5-6). Further, there were also no significant differences found for the secondary outcomes except for sickness-related absence, where the exercise-based physiotherapy group had more days of sickness-related absence three months before treatment (p= 0.02), and at the 10-year follow-up (p=0.03).

    Discussion: The beneficial effects favouring tailored behavioural medicine treatment that observed post-treatment and at the two-year follow-up were not maintained 10 years after treatment.

    Keyword
    Chronic pain, behavioural medicine, primary care, physical exercise, long-term compliance
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-281461 (URN)10.1177/0269215516639356 (DOI)000394758500005 ()27009057 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Rheumatism Association
    Available from: 2016-03-24 Created: 2016-03-24 Last updated: 2017-08-22Bibliographically approved
    3. Physical Therapists' Assessments, Analyses And Use Of Behavioral Change Techniques In Initial Consultations On Musculoskeletal Pain: Direct Observations In Primary Health Care
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physical Therapists' Assessments, Analyses And Use Of Behavioral Change Techniques In Initial Consultations On Musculoskeletal Pain: Direct Observations In Primary Health Care
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, ISSN 1070-5503, E-ISSN 1532-7558, Vol. 23, S187-S187 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Physiotherapy
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313852 (URN)000388943400587 ()
    Available from: 2017-01-26 Created: 2017-01-25 Last updated: 2017-08-22Bibliographically approved
    4. Concurrent validity and stability of subgroup assignment based on three levels of pain condition severity in patients with musculoskeletal pain
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Concurrent validity and stability of subgroup assignment based on three levels of pain condition severity in patients with musculoskeletal pain
    Show others...
    (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Pain screening instruments have been used to identify risk factors for poor prognosis and are recommended for the stratification of treatment for musculoskeletal pain. The aim of this study was to investigate the concurrent validity of subgroup assignment based on the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire compared with reference instruments: The Pain Disability Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. A secondary aim was to investigate the stability of the subgroup assignment over a defined period of time. Participants (n=40) aged 18-65 years were recruited from five primary health care centers in Sweden. Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires. The subgroups based on the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire were predefined to low, moderate or high pain condition severity. The reference instrument data were dichotomized into low or high level based on previously used cut-off scores. Concurrent validity was analyzed with Fisher´s exact test. Stability was calculated using quadraticweighted kappa analysis. The results indicated acceptable psychometric properties of the subgroup assignment based on the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire regarding concurrent validity, and the stability over two to three weeks. To further increase validity, it is suggested that subgroup assignment is complemented with other measures assessing e.g. pain catastrophizing. In conclusion, assignment to subgroups with low, moderate and high pain condition severities based on the Örebro Musculoskeletal Pain Screening Questionnaire, could be used as a valid base for stratified treatment for patients with musculoskeletal pain.   

    Keyword
    Musculoskeletal pain, psychological factors, stratified care, screening instruments, primary care
    National Category
    Medical and Health Sciences
    Research subject
    Medical Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328403 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-22 Created: 2017-08-22 Last updated: 2017-08-23Bibliographically approved
  • Envall, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Centre for Gender Research.
    Reproduktionen som mål: En studie om framställningen av det kvinnliga könsorganet och sex i biologiböcker avsedda för högstadiet2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsatsens syfte är att undersöka hur det kvinnliga könsorganet porträtteras i biologiböcker för högstadieelever och vilka diskurser om kön och sexualitet som går att skönja genom dessa. Studien är baserad på text och illustrationer ur fem olika biologiböcker som används av högstadieelever idag. För att analysera materialet har Faircloughs kritiska diskursanalys använts och teorier kring hur kön konstrueras genom sociala diskurser har applicerats. Författarnas beskrivningar av klitoris är bristfälliga vilket bidrar till aktivt reproducerande av okunskap. I samtliga böcker jämförs klitoris med penis vilket visar på en diskurs om mannen som norm och kvinnan som avvikande. En del av materialet framställer slidan som passivt kärl för penis, en heteronormativ diskurs som återkommer i vilka sexuella praktiker som porträtteras som ”riktigt” sex. Tvåkönsmodellen som hegemonisk diskurs cementeras genom böckernas binära könsuppdelning och genom de skilda egenskaper som appliceras på respektive kön vid sexuell upphetsning. Studien genomsyras av synen på människan som reproduktiv varelse snarare än social. 

  • Muscalu, Andrea
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Woxberg, Matilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Lärares uppfattning om "Kompis med kroppen": Ett hälsofrämjande projekt med fokus på frukt och grönsaker hos barn i skolåldern2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Introduktion: Intaget av frukt och grönsaker hos barn i grundskolan är lägre än rekommenderat. Matvanor grundläggs i tidig ålder och flera försök har gjorts att främja goda matvanor. "Kompis med kroppen", ett ICA-baserat hälsofrämjande projekt, syftar till att inspirera skolbarn till bättre matvanor.

    Syfte: Att undersöka hur "Kompis med kroppen" uppfattats av lärare i grundskolan. I examensarbetet tillfrågades lärarna om vad de ansåg om olika delar av projektet samt om de upplevde att det finns ett intresse för hälsofrämjande projekt i grundskolan.

    Metod: Tvärsnittsdesign med webbenkät som undersökningsmetod. Examensarbetet baserades på svar från 263 deltagare, samtliga lärare. Databearbetningen gjordes i SPSS och tester som utfördes var Spearmans rangkorrelation och chi-två test.

    Resultat: Deltagarna var positivt inställda till projektet och upplevde även mottagandet hos eleverna som positivt. En statistisk analys visade att det fanns ett signifikant samband (p<0.001) mellan deltagarnas inställning och elevernas upplevda mottagande. Deltagarnas upplevda effekt på eleverna var att eleverna pratade mer om frukt och grönsaker (42 %), samt att de uppskattade att arbeta med materialet (41 %). De allra flesta lärare genomförde ett butiksbesök (95 %) och gav positiva kommentarer angående besöket, en majoritet använde sig även av arbetsboken (72 %).

    Slutsats: "Kompis med kroppen" tycks genomgående ha upplevts positivt av majoriteten av lärarna som deltog i examensarbetets undersökning. ICA som aktör kan hjälpa till att främja goda matvanor hos barn, men det är möjligt att det behövs en utökad satsning i samhället med större engagemang från samtliga individer för att få en bestående förändring.

  • Saxén, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Laurentia’s Oldest Brachiopods:Lower Cambrian Brachiopods ofthe Montezuma Range, Nevada2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    New brachiopod materials from the lower Cambrian (Global Stage 3 and lower Stage 4) of Esmeralda County, Nevada are described and their age distribution and diversity is discussed. The specimens originate from the Fritzaspis, “Fallotaspis”, “Nevadella” and Bonnia-Olenellus biozone which in the area correspond to the Campito Formation and the overlying Poleta Formation. As the specimens from the Gold Coin Member (Begadean Series) and the Montenegro Member (Waucoban Series) of the Campito Formation encompass the oldest samples, they were therefore prioritised as there was not enough time to describe all the specimens. The oldest known trilobites from Laurentia have previously been reported from the Gold Coin Member and it is of interest to determine if the brachiopods from the same member also are the oldest known from Laurentia.As many specimens are poorly preserved, especially the ones from coarse siliciclastic intervals, the determination of their systematic position is somewhat aggravated. Despite this, a diverse fauna including Lingulida, Obolellida, Naukatida, Kutorginida, Orthida and stem-group brachiopods have been successfully identified. A total of 16 taxa were noted for the Campito fauna, including the problematic and rare genera Swantonia and Spinulothele but unfortunately little new information could be gained regarding the characters for these rare genera. Four genera are reported for the first time from the area, not including material described under open nomenclature.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 09:15 4001, Uppsala
    Mattera, Andrea
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Studying neutron-induced fission at IGISOL-4: From neutron source to yield measurements and model comparisons2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fission yields represent the probability of producing a certain nuclide in a fission event, and are important observables for fission research. For applications, accurate knowledge of the yields is fundamental at all stages of the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors, e.g., for reactivity calculations, or to estimate (spent) fuel inventory. Fission yields also help in the basic understanding of the fission process, for nucleosynthesis models, and for radioactive ion beam production.

    This thesis was developed in the framework of the AlFONS project, the objective of which was to measure neutron-induced fission yields of relevance for partitioning and transmutation of spent fuel. The work is performed at the IGISOL-4 facility in JYFL (University of Jyväskylä).

    The first part of this thesis work is dedicated to the development and characterisation of a suitable 9Be(p(30MeV),nx) neutron source for IGISOL-4. The neutron energy spectrum and the neutron yield from a 5mm thick converter were studied with Monte Carlo simulations. Two characterisation campaigns that validated the MCNPX code were also performed. At the maximum current available from the cyclotron at JYFL, a total neutron yield between 2 and 5×1012 neutrons/(sr s) can be obtained. This satisfies the design goal for studies of fission yields.

    The neutron source was used in the measurement of fission yields from high-energy neutron-induced fission of natU at IGISOL-4, discussed in the second part of this thesis. The fission products were online-separated with a dipole magnet. The isobars, with masses in the range A = 128-133, were identified using γ-spectroscopy. Data for the relative yields of tin and antimony, as well as isomeric yield ratios for five nuclides will be reported. The yields show trends not observed in the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation, and only in part confirmed by the GEF model.

    The final part of this thesis concerns a study of the performance of different nuclear model codes, that aim at describing the states of the fission fragments right after scission. Reproduction of experimental data serves to benchmark the models and it indicates, to some extent, how reliably the results can be extrapolated to regions where no data exist.

    A methodology to compare and test these models has been developed, which was implemented in the DEℓFIN code. DEℓFIN takes the excited fission fragments, defined by the model under test, and de-excites them in a standardised way using the nuclear model code TALYS. Eliminating any variability in the way the final observables are extracted helps focusing on each model's assumptions. DEℓFIN was tested on five models, and interesting features in the prompt neutron multiplicity were found for some of them. This study will promote a better understanding of the ideas used in the development of fission models.

    List of papers
    1. A neutron source for IGISOL-JYFLTRAP: Design and characterisation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A neutron source for IGISOL-JYFLTRAP: Design and characterisation
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: European Physical Journal A, ISSN 1434-6001, E-ISSN 1434-601X, Vol. 53, no 8, 173-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A white neutron source based on the Be(p,nx) reaction for fission studies at the IGISOLJYFLTRAP facility has been designed and tested. 30 MeV protons impinge on a 5mm thick water-cooled beryllium disc. The source was designed to produce at least 1012 fast neutrons/s on a secondary fission target, in order to reach competitive production rates of fission products far from the valley of stability.

    The Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA were used in the design phase to simulate the neutron energy spectra. Two experiments to characterise the neutron field were performed: the first was carried out at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala (SE), using an Extended-Range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer and a liquid scintillator which used the time-of-flight (TOF) method to determine the energy of the neutrons; the second employed Thin-Film Breakdown Counters for the measurement of the TOF, and activation foils, at the IGISOL facility in Jyväskylä (FI). Design considerations and the results of the two characterisation measurements are presented, providing benchmarks for the simulations.

    National Category
    Subatomic Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328569 (URN)10.1140/epja/i2017-12362-x (DOI)
    Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2017-08-29
    2. A methodology for the intercomparison of nuclear fission codes using TALYS
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A methodology for the intercomparison of nuclear fission codes using TALYS
    Show others...
    2017 (English)In: EPJ Web of Conferences, ISSN 2101-6275, E-ISSN 2100-014X, Vol. 146, 04047Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Codes for the calculation of fission observables are frequently used to describe experimentally observed phenomena as well as provide predictions in cases where measurements are missing. Assumptions in the models, and tuning of parameters within the codes, often result in a good reproduction of experimental data. In this work we propose a methodology, coded in the newly developed program DELFIN (De-Excitation of FIssion fragmeNts), that can be used to compare some of the assumptions of the various models. Our code makes use of the fission fragments information after scission and processes them in an independent and consistent fashion to obtain measurable fission observables (such as ν(A) distributions and Isomeric Fission Yield ratios). All the available information from the models, such as fragments' excitation energies, spin distributions and yields are provided as input to DELFIN that uses the nuclear reaction code TALYS to handle the de-excitation of the fission fragments. In this way we decouple the fragments relaxation from the actual fission models. We report here the first results of a comparison carried out on the GEF, Point-by-Point and FREYA models for thermal fission of 235U and 239Pu and spontaneous fission of 252Cf.

    National Category
    Subatomic Physics
    Research subject
    Physics with specialization in Applied Nuclear Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317442 (URN)10.1051/epjconf/201714604047 (DOI)
    Conference
    International Conference on Nuclear Data for Science and Technology, Bruge (BE), September 11-16, 2016.
    Available from: 2017-03-14 Created: 2017-03-14 Last updated: 2017-09-14Bibliographically approved
    3. Comparison of Fission Models with the DElFIN code
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of Fission Models with the DElFIN code
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Nuclear model codes are used to describe aspects of the fission process. The general aim is a better understanding of the states of the fragments right after scission. A successful description of the available experimental data serves as benchmark for the models and determines the reliability of extrapolations to other fissioning systems and energy domains, where no experimental data exist.

    The DElFIN code has been developed as a tool to compare and test nuclear fission codes. This can be done using the quantities defined right after scission by the fission models and introducing a transparent and consistent way of handling the fragments' de-excitation. Eliminating any variability in the way the final observables are extracted can help focus on the models' assumptions.

    In this work, we present the comparison of the (A) extracted from DElFIN to using excitation energies from GEF, PbP, FREYA, FIFRELIN and CGMF codes.

    National Category
    Subatomic Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328570 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2017-08-28
    4. Production of Sn and Sb isotopes in high-energy neutron induced fission of natU
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Production of Sn and Sb isotopes in high-energy neutron induced fission of natU
    Show others...
    (English)In: European Physical Journal A, ISSN 1434-6001, E-ISSN 1434-601XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    The first systematic measurement of neutron-induced fission yields has been performed at the upgraded IGISOL-4 facility at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland.

    The fission products from high-energy neutron-induced fission of natU stopped in a gas cell filled with helium buffer gas, and were online-separated with a dipole magnet. The isobars, with masses in the range A = 128-133, were transported to a tape-implantation station and identified using γ-spectroscopy.

    We report here the relative cumulative isotopic yields of tin (Z = 50) and the relative independent isotopic yields of antimony (Z = 51). Isomeric yield ratios were also obtained for five nuclides.

    The yields of tin show a staggered behaviour around A = 131, not observed in the ENDF/B-VII.1 evaluation.The yields of antimony also contradict the trend from the evaluation, but are in agreement with a calculation performed using the GEF model, that shows the yield increasing with mass in the range A = 128-133.

    National Category
    Subatomic Physics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328572 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-26 Created: 2017-08-26 Last updated: 2017-08-28
  • Public defence: 2017-10-12 13:00 Hambergsalen, Uppsala
    Adamaki, Angeliki
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Geophysics.
    Seismicity Analyses Using Dense Network Data: Catalogue Statistics and Possible Foreshocks Investigated Using Empirical and Synthetic Data2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Precursors related to seismicity patterns are probably the most promising phenomena for short-term earthquake forecasting, although it remains unclear if such forecasting is possible. Foreshock activity has often been recorded but its possible use as indicator of coming larger events is still debated due to the limited number of unambiguously observed foreshocks. Seismicity data which is inadequate in volume or character might be one of the reasons foreshocks cannot easily be identified. One method used to investigate the possible presence of generic seismicity behavior preceding larger events is the aggregation of seismicity series. Sequences preceding mainshocks chosen from empirical data are superimposed, revealing an increasing average seismicity rate prior to the mainshocks. Such an increase could result from the tendency of seismicity to cluster in space and time, thus the observed patterns could be of limited predictive value. Randomized tests using the empirical catalogues imply that the observed increasing rate is statistically significant compared to an increase due to simple clustering, indicating the existence of genuine foreshocks, somehow mechanically related to their mainshocks. If network sensitivity increases, the identification of foreshocks as such may improve. The possibility of improved identification of foreshock sequences is tested using synthetic data, produced with specific assumptions about the earthquake process. Complications related to background activity and aftershock production are investigated numerically, in generalized cases and in data-based scenarios. Catalogues including smaller, and thereby more, earthquakes can probably contribute to better understanding the earthquake processes and to the future of earthquake forecasting. An important aspect in such seismicity studies is the correct estimation of the empirical catalogue properties, including the magnitude of completeness (Mc) and the b-value. The potential influence of errors in the reported magnitudes in an earthquake catalogue on the estimation of Mc and b-value is investigated using synthetic magnitude catalogues, contaminated with Gaussian error. The effectiveness of different algorithms for Mc and b-value estimation are discussed. The sample size and the error level seem to affect the estimation of b-value, with implications for the reliability of the assessment of the future rate of large events and thus of seismic hazard.

    List of papers
    1. EVIDENCE OF PRECURSORY PATTERNS IN AGGREGATED TIME SERIES
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>EVIDENCE OF PRECURSORY PATTERNS IN AGGREGATED TIME SERIES
    2016 (English)In: Bulletin of the Geological Society of Greece, vol. L, 2016, Proceedings of the 14th Intern. Congress, Thessaloniki, May 2016, 2016, Vol. 50Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate temporal changes in seismic activity observed in the West Corinth Gulfand North-West Peloponnese during 2008 to 2010. Two major earthquake sequencestook place in the area at that time (in 2008 and 2010). Our aim is to analyse Greekseismicity to attempt to confirm the existence or non-existence of seismic precursorsprior to the strongest earthquakes. Perhaps because the area is geologically andtectonically complex, we found that it was not possible to fit the data well using aconsistent Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model. Nor could weunambiguously identify foreshocks to individual mainshocks. Therefore we soughtpatterns in aggregated foreshock catalogues. We set a magnitude threshold (M3.5)above which all the earthquakes detected in the study area are considered as“mainshocks”, and we combined all data preceding these into a single foreshockcatalogue. This reveals an increase in seismicity rate not robustly observable forindividual cases. The observed effect is significantly greater than that consistent withstochastic models, including ETAS, thus indicating genuine foreshock activity withpotential useful precursory power, if sufficient data is available, i.e. if the magnitudeof completeness is sufficiently low.

    Abstract [el]

    Μελετάμε χρονικές μεταβολές της σεισμικής δραστηριότητας στο Δυτικό ΚορινθιακόΚόλπο και τη Βορειοδυτική Πελοπόννησο κατά τα έτη 2008-2010. Δύο σημαντικέςσεισμικές ακολουθίες σημειώθηκαν στην περιοχή σε αυτή την περίοδο (2008 και 2010).Στόχος είναι να αναλύσουμε τη σεισμικότητα ώστε να επιβεβαιώσουμε την ύπαρξη ή μηπροσεισμικής δραστηριότητας πριν από τους μεγαλύτερους σεισμούς. Λόγω τηςγεωλογικής και τεκτονικής πολυπλοκότητας της περιοχής, δεν ήταν εφικτή η εφαρμογήενός ενιαίου μοντέλου Επιδημικού Τύπου Μετασεισμικών Ακολουθιών (ETAS), ούτε ηαναγνώριση προσεισμών μεμονωμένων κυρίων σεισμών. Επομένως, αναζητήσαμεανάλογα μοτίβα σε ενιαίους καταλόγους προσεισμών. Θέσαμε ένα μέγεθος (Μ3.5)πάνω από το οποίο όλοι οι σεισμοί θεωρούνται “κύριοι”, και συνδυάσαμε τα δεδομέναπου προηγούνται αυτών, σε ένα κοινό κατάλογο. Αναδεικνύεται έτσι μια αύξηση τουρυθμού σεισμικότητας που δεν είναι εμφανής σε μεμονωμένες περιπτώσεις και είναι πιοσημαντική από εκείνη που προβλέπεται από στοχαστικά μοντέλα, όπως το ETAS,υποδηλώνοντας την ύπαρξη προσεισμών που μπορούν να δώσουν τη δυνατότηταπρόγνωσης αν υπάρχει ικανοποιητικό πλήθος δεδομένων, δηλ. αν το μέγεθοςπληρότητας είναι αρκετά χαμηλό.

    Keyword
    Corinth Gulf, Seismicity, Aggregated Foreshock Catalogues, Κορινθιακός Κόλπος, Σεισμικότητα, Ενιαίοι Κατάλογοι Προσεισμών
    National Category
    Natural Sciences Geophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-295440 (URN)
    Conference
    14th International Congress, Geological Society of Greece, Thessaloniki, May 2016
    Available from: 2016-06-07 Created: 2016-06-07 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
    2. Precursory Activity Before Larger Events in Greece Revealed by Aggregated Seismicity Data
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Precursory Activity Before Larger Events in Greece Revealed by Aggregated Seismicity Data
    2017 (English)In: Pure and Applied Geophysics, ISSN 0033-4553, E-ISSN 1420-9136, Vol. 174, no 3, 1331-1343 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the seismicity rate behaviour in and around Greece during 2009, seeking significant changes in rate preceding larger events. For individual larger events it is difficult to clearly distinguish precursory rate changes from other, possibly unrelated, variations in seismicity. However, when we aggregate seismicity data occurring within a radius of 10 km and in a 50-day window prior to earthquakes with, e. g. magnitude C3.5, the resulting aggregated time series show a clearly increasing trend starting 2-3 weeks prior to the "mainshock'' time. We apply statistical tests to investigate if the observed behaviour may be simply consistent with random (poissonian) variations, or, as some earlier studies suggest, with clustering in the sense that high activity rates at some time may imply increased rates later, and thus (randomly) greater probability of larger coming events than for periods of lower seismicity. In this case, rate increases have little useful predictive power. Using data from the entire catalogue, the aggregated rate changes before larger events are clearly and strongly statistically significant and cannot be explained by such clustering. To test this we choose events at random from the catalogue as potential "mainshocks''. The events preceding the randomly chosen earthquakes show less pronounced rate increases compared to the observed rate changes prior to larger events. Similar behaviour is observed in data sub-sets. However, statistical confidence decreases for geographical subsets containing few "mainshocks'' as it does when data are weighted such that "mainshocks'' with many preceding events are strongly downweighted relative to those with fewer. The analyses suggest that genuine changes in aggregated rate do occur prior to larger events and that this behaviour is not due to a small number of mainshocks with many preceding events dominating the analysis. It does not automatically follow that it will be possible to routinely observe precursory changes prior to individual larger events, but there is a possibility that this may be feasible, e. g. with better data from more sensitive networks.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    SPRINGER BASEL AG, 2017
    Keyword
    Temporal seismicity patterns, aggregated data, precursory activity, Greece
    National Category
    Geophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320921 (URN)10.1007/s00024-017-1465-6 (DOI)000396834700039 ()
    Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Advantages and Limitations of Foreshock Activity as a Useful Tool for Earthquake Forecasting
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Advantages and Limitations of Foreshock Activity as a Useful Tool for Earthquake Forecasting
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keyword
    Accelerating Seismicity, Earthquake Predictability
    National Category
    Geophysics
    Research subject
    Geophysics with specialization in Seismology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328055 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2017-08-21
    4. Impact of Magnitude Uncertainties on Seismic Catalogue Properties
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of Magnitude Uncertainties on Seismic Catalogue Properties
    Show others...
    (English)In: Geophysical Journal International, ISSN 0956-540X, E-ISSN 1365-246XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Keyword
    Statistical Seismology, Earthquake Catalogue Properties, Completeness Magnitude, b-value
    National Category
    Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
    Research subject
    Statistics; Geophysics with specialization in Seismology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328053 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-16 Created: 2017-08-16 Last updated: 2017-08-21
  • Beckman, Jockum
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Literature, Rhetoric.
    Var är visionerna?: En analys av visionär retorik i två tal av Stefan Löfven2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis analyses two speeches by the Swedish prime minister Stefan Löfven; one from the Swedish Social Dmocratic Party's congress in 2015 and the other from Almedalen week the same year. The purpose is to provide insight into how visions for the future are expressed by a contemporary high-profile politician and to explore if there are any differences in how these visions are expressed depending on whether the speaker is primarily adressing his own party or a broader public.

    The thesis features three different aspects of political vision (practical, utopian and imaginary) and anyses the speeches focusing on these. This is combined with an analysis of the rhetorical situations, intended to highlight and explain differences in how the visions are expressed in the two speeches.

    The results show that the visions expressed by Löfven in both speeches tends to focus more on solving immediate problems than buildning a future society. The thesis also reveals that the speech from the congress connects the expressed visions to social democratic ideology more clearly than the speech from Almedalen Week does.

  • Public defence: 2017-10-13 10:00 Häggsalen, Uppsala
    Esfandiarfard, Keyhan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Molecular Biomimetics. Uppsala University.
    Novel Organophosphorus Compounds for Materials and Organic Synthesis2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is devoted to the development of new organophosphorus compounds for potential uses in material science and as reagents in Organic Chemistry. Organophosphorus compounds in a single molecule or organic electronics context are appealing as the phosphorous centers perturb the electronic properties of the π-conjugated systems while at the same time provide synthetic handles for subsequent synthetic modifications. As such, new synthetic methodology to such compounds and the exploration of new building blocks is of considerable interest. In a different study, novel organophosphorus compounds are synthesized and shown to promote a reaction in Organic Chemistry that has previously not been possible, i.e. the stereoselective reductive coupling of aldehydes to alkenes. Such developments enlarge the toolkit of reactions that are available to Organic Chemists, and may impact the synthetic routes to pharmaceuticals and other important commodity chemicals.

    A general introduction of the key structural unit of this thesis, phosphaalkenes, is given in the first chapter. The synthesis, reactivity, properties and applications of these P=C double bond containing compounds are highlighted. The Wittig reaction and its variations as well as the phosphorus analogues that produce phosphaalkenes are outlined in detail.

    The second chapter is dedicated to the synthesis of a precursor that is used for the preparation of novel π-conjugated, organophosphorus compounds. C,C-Dibromophosphaalkenes are prepared and the halide substituents are used for the selective introduction of acetylene units. Besides the phosphaalkenes, the successful syntheses of two new diphosphenes is presented, indicating a broad applicability of the precursors.

    The third chapter is dedicated to the isolation of a metal-free phosphanylphosphonate that transforms aldehydes quantitatively to their corresponding E-phosphaalkenes in a transition metal-free phospha-HWE (Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons) reaction. The reaction benefits from mild conditions, high E-stereoselectivity, and a broad substrate scope.

    In the last chapter, a novel method for the reductive coupling of aldehydes to olefins is introduced. The reaction, which is a vast improvement over the McMurry coupling, allows for the selective synthesis of symmetrical and most importantly unsymmetrical E-alkenes. The phosphanylphosphonate mentioned above is the reagent that facilitates the coupling of the aldehydes via a phosphaalkene intermediate. This one-pot reaction benefits from mild conditions, good conversions, and high E-stereoselectivity.

    In summary, the thesis presents novel aspects of organophosphorus chemistry. These include the preparations and exploration of interesting precursors for the construction of π-conjugated organophosphorus compounds, and the use of organophosphorus reagents for unprecedented transformations in Organic Chemistry.

    List of papers
    1. Synthesis of 2,6-Dimesitylphenyl-C,C-dibromophosphaalkene
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis of 2,6-Dimesitylphenyl-C,C-dibromophosphaalkene
    2015 (English)In: Phosphorus Sulfur and Silicon and the Related Elements, ISSN 1042-6507, E-ISSN 1563-5325, Vol. 190, no 5-6, 816-820 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A facile one-pot transformation of Dmp-I to Dmp-P=CBr2 (Dmp = 2,6-dimesitylphenyl), a valuable precursor for other unsaturated phosphorus compounds, is described. VT-1H-NMR experiments reveal a hindered rotation of the m-terphenyl structure with a rotational barrier of approx. 14 kcal/mol. Bromination of Dmp-I gives selective substitution of all aromatic protons of the mesityl substituents.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis Group, 2015
    National Category
    Inorganic Chemistry Organic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-257682 (URN)10.1080/10426507.2014.984030 (DOI)000357323000038 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2013-4763
    Available from: 2015-07-07 Created: 2015-07-07 Last updated: 2017-08-21
    2. Synthesis of Novel Precursors for the Development of Low-valent Phosphorus Compounds
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis of Novel Precursors for the Development of Low-valent Phosphorus Compounds
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Organic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-328291 (URN)
    Available from: 2017-08-21 Created: 2017-08-21 Last updated: 2017-08-21
    3. Direct, Sequential, and Stereoselective Alkynylation of C,C-Dibromophosphaalkenes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Direct, Sequential, and Stereoselective Alkynylation of C,C-Dibromophosphaalkenes
    Show others...
    2016 (English)In: Chemistry - A European Journal, ISSN 0947-6539, E-ISSN 1521-3765, Vol. 22, no 30, 10614-10619 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The first direct alkynylation of C,C-dibromophosphaalkenes by a reaction with sulfonylacetylenes is reported. Alkynylation proceeds selectively in the trans position relative to the P substituent to afford bromoethynylphosphaalkenes. Owing to the absence of transition metals in the procedure, the previously observed conversion of dibromophosphaalkenes into phosphaalkynes through the phosphorus analog of the Fritsch-Buttenberg-Wiechell rearrangement is thus suppressed. The bromoethynylphosphaalkenes can subsequently be converted to C,C-diacetylenic, cross-conjugated phosphaalkenes by following a Sonogashira coupling protocol in good overall yields. By using the newly described method, full control over the stereochemistry at the P=C double bond is achieved. The substrate scope of this reaction is demonstrated for different dibromophosphaalkenes as well as different sulfonylacetylenes.

    Keyword
    alkynylation, cross-conjugation, phosphaalkenes, Sonogashira coupling, sulfonyl coupling
    National Category
    Inorganic Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-302705 (URN)10.1002/chem.201601955 (DOI)000380273300043 ()27310813 (PubMedID)
    External cooperation:
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilCarl Tryggers foundation
    Available from: 2016-09-08 Created: 2016-09-08 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
    4. Synthesis of the first metal-free phosphanylphosphonate and its use in the "phospha-Wittig-Horner" reaction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis of the first metal-free phosphanylphosphonate and its use in the "phospha-Wittig-Horner" reaction
    2016 (English)In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 45, no 5, 2201-2207 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of the first phophanylphosphonate, Mes*PH-PO(OEt)(2) (2-H), in which the P(III) centre is not coordinated by a M(CO)(5) (M = W, Mo, Cr) fragment is reported. The title compound reacts with LDA under the formation of 2-Li which is best described as the enolate form with a high double bond character between the two phosphorus centres. 2-Li is shown to engage in the phospha-Wittig-Horner reaction and converts aldehydes into phosphaalkenes that are metal-free and thus available for future manipulations at the phophorus lone pair. Using a selection of aldehydes with aliphatic, aromatic or vinylic substituents as substrates, phosphaalkene formation proceeds in high yields and high E-selectivity. The selectivity is however compromised during purification on standard silica which was found to promote E/Z isomerization.

    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280913 (URN)10.1039/c5dt03686k (DOI)000369413700046 ()26574885 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
    5. Unsymmetrical E-Alkenes from the Stereoselective Reductive Coupling of Two Aldehydes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unsymmetrical E-Alkenes from the Stereoselective Reductive Coupling of Two Aldehydes
    2017 (English)In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, ISSN 0002-7863, E-ISSN 1520-5126, Vol. 139, no 8, 2940-2943 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The unprecedented formation of unsymmetrical alkenes from the intermolecular reductive coupling of two different aldehydes is described. In contrast to the McMurry reaction which affords statistical product mixtures, selectivity in the reported procedure is achieved by a sequential ionic mechanism in which a first aldehyde is reacted with a phosphanylphosphonate to afford a phosphaalkene intermediate which, upon activation by hydroxide, reacts with a second aldehyde to the unsymmetrical E-alkenes. The described reaction is free of transition metals and proceeds under ambient temperature within minutes in good to excellent overall yields. It is a new methodology to use feedstock aldehydes for the direct production of C=C double bond-containing products and may impact how chemists think of multistep synthetic sequences in the future.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
    National Category
    Chemical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320411 (URN)10.1021/jacs.7b00428 (DOI)000395493400021 ()28186736 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council
    Available from: 2017-04-19 Created: 2017-04-19 Last updated: 2017-08-21Bibliographically approved
  • Wibroe, Morten
    et al.
    Rigshosp, Dept Neurosurg, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Cappelen, Johan
    St Olavs Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, Trondheim, Norway..
    Castor, Charlotte
    Lund Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Clausen, Niels
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Grillner, Pernilla
    Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gudrunardottir, Thora
    Posterior Fossa Soc Https Www Posteriorfossa Org, Stockholm, Sweden.;North Zealand Hosp, Dept Oncol & Palliat, Hillerod, Denmark..
    Gupta, Ramneek
    Tech Univ Denmark, Ctr Biol Sequence Anal, Lyngby, Denmark..
    Gustavsson, Bengt
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Heyman, Mats
    Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Holm, Stefan
    Karolinska Univ Sjukhuset, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Karppinen, Atte
    Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Neurosurg, Helsinki, Finland..
    Klausen, Camilla
    Rigshosp, Univ Hosp Copenhagen, Dept Neuroradiol, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Lönnqvist, Tuula
    Univ Helsinki, Cent Hosp, Dept Child Neurol, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mathiasen, Rene
    Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Nilsson, Pelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Neurosurgery.
    Nysom, Karsten
    Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Persson, Karin
    Child & Youth Rehabil Ctr, Habilitat & Tech Aid, Lund, Sweden..
    Rask, Olof
    Lund Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Schmiegelow, Kjeld
    Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Inst Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Langone, Med Ctr, Perlmutter Canc Ctr, Div Pediat Hematol Oncol, New York, NY USA..
    Sehested, Astrid
    Rigshosp, Dept Pediat & Adolescent Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Thomassen, Harald
    St Olavs Hosp, Dept Pediat, Trondheim, Norway..
    Tonning-Olsson, Ingrid
    Lund Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Paediat, Lund, Sweden..
    Zetterqvist, Barbara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Intervent & Tech, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Juhler, Marianne
    Rigshosp, Dept Neurosurg, Copenhagen, Denmark.;Univ Copenhagen, Inst Clin Med, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Cerebellar mutism syndrome in children with brain tumours of the posterior fossa2017In: BMC Cancer, ISSN 1471-2407, E-ISSN 1471-2407, Vol. 17, 439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Central nervous system tumours constitute 25% of all childhood cancers; more than half are located in the posterior fossa and surgery is usually part of therapy. One of the most disabling late effects of posterior fossa tumour surgery is the cerebellar mutism syndrome (CMS) which has been reported in up to 39% of the patients but the exact incidence is uncertain since milder cases may be unrecognized. Recovery is usually incomplete. Reported risk factors are tumour type, midline location and brainstem involvement, but the exact aetiology, surgical and other risk factors, the clinical course and strategies for prevention and treatment are yet to be determined.

    Methods: This observational, prospective, multicentre study will include 500 children with posterior fossa tumours. It opened late 2014 with participation from 20 Nordic and Baltic centres. From 2016, five British centres and four Dutch centres will join with a total annual accrual of 130 patients. Three other major European centres are invited to join from 2016/17. Follow-up will run for 12 months after inclusion of the last patient. All patients are treated according to local practice. Clinical data are collected through standardized online registration at pre-determined time points pre- and postoperatively. Neurological status and speech functions are examined pre- operatively and postoperatively at 1-4 weeks, 2 and 12 months. Pre- and postoperative speech samples are recorded and analysed. Imaging will be reviewed centrally. Pathology is classified according to the 2007 WHO system. Germline DNA will be collected from all patients for associations between CMS characteristics and host genome variants including pathway profiles.

    Discussion: Through prospective and detailed collection of information on 1) differences in incidence and clinical course of CMS for different patient and tumour characteristics, 2) standardized surgical data and their association with CMS, 3) diversities and results of other therapeutic interventions, and 4) the role of host genome variants, we aim to achieve a better understanding of risk factors for and the clinical course of CMS - with the ultimate goal of defining strategies for prevention and treatment of this severely disabling condition.

  • Safdari, Majid
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem, Appl Phys Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Phuyal, Dibya
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Philippe, Bertrand
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Svensson, Per H.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem, Appl Phys Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden.;SP Proc Dev, Sodertalje, Sweden..
    Butorin, Sergei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Kvashnina, Kristina O.
    ESRF European Synchrotron, CS40220, F-38043 Grenoble 9, France.;Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf, Inst Resource Ecol, D-01314 Dresden, Germany..
    Rensmo, Håkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem, Appl Phys Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gardner, James M.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Chem, Appl Phys Chem, SE-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Impact of synthetic routes on the structural and physical properties of butyl-1,4-diammonium lead iodide semiconductors2017In: Journal of Materials Chemistry A, ISSN 2050-7488, Vol. 5, no 23, 11730-11738 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the significant role of synthetic routes and the importance of solvents in the synthesis of organic-inorganic lead iodide materials. Through one route, the intercalation of dimethylformamide in the crystal structure was observed leading to a one-dimensional (1D) [NH3(CH2)(4)NH3]Pb2I6 structure of the product. This product was compared with the two-dimensional (2D) [NH3(CH2)(4)NH3]PbI4 recovered from aqueous solvent based synthesis with the same precursors. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy showed a red-shift of 0.1 eV for the band gap of the 1D network in relation to the 2D system. This shift primarily originates from a shift in the valence band edge as determined from photoelectron-and X-ray spectroscopy results. These findings also suggest the iodide 5p orbital as the principal component in the density of states in the valence band edge. Single crystal data show a change in the local coordination around iodide, while in both materials, lead atoms are surrounded by iodide atoms in octahedral units. The conductivity of the one-dimensional material ([NH3(CH2)(4)NH3]Pb2I6) was 50% of the two-d(i)mensional material ([NH3(CH2)(4)NH3]PbI4). The fabricated solar cells reflect these changes in the chemical and electronic structure of both materials, although the total light conversion efficiencies of solar cells based on both products were similar.

  • Raclariu, Ancuta C.
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Plant Evolut & Metabarcoding Grp, Oslo, Norway.;Natl Inst Res & Dev Biol Sci NIRDBS, Stejarul Res Ctr Biol Sci, Piatra Neamt, Romania..
    Mocan, Andrei
    Iuliu Hatieganu Univ Med & Pharm, Fac Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Bot, Cluj Napoca, Romania.;Univ Agr Sci & Vet Med Cluj Napoca, ICHAT, Cluj Napoca, Romania.;Univ Agr Sci & Vet Med Cluj Napoca, Inst Life Sci, Cluj Napoca, Romania..
    Popa, Madalina O.
    Natl Inst Res & Dev Biol Sci NIRDBS, Stejarul Res Ctr Biol Sci, Piatra Neamt, Romania..
    Vlase, Laurian
    Univ Oslo, CEES, Dept Biosci, Oslo, Norway..
    Ichim, Mihael C.
    Natl Inst Res & Dev Biol Sci NIRDBS, Stejarul Res Ctr Biol Sci, Piatra Neamt, Romania..
    Crisan, Gianina
    Iuliu Hatieganu Univ Med & Pharm, Fac Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut Bot, Cluj Napoca, Romania..
    Brysting, Anne K.
    CEES, Dept Biosci, Oslo, Norway..
    de Boer, Hugo J.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Plant Evolut & Metabarcoding Grp, Oslo, Norway.
    Veronica officinalis Product Authentication Using DNA Metabarcoding and HPLC-MS Reveals Widespread Adulteration with Veronica chamaedrys2017In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 8, 378Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studying herbal products derived from local and traditional knowledge and their value chains is one of the main challenges in ethnopharmacology. The majority of these products have a long history of use, but non-harmonized trade and differences in regulatory policies between countries impact their value chains and lead to concerns over product efficacy, safety and quality. Veronica officinalis L. (common speedwell), a member of Plantaginaceae family, has a long history of use in European traditional medicine, mainly in central eastern Europe and the Balkans. However, no specified control tests are available either to establish the quality of derived herbal products or for the discrimination of its most common substitute, V. chamaedrys L. (germander speedwell). In this study, we use DNA metabarcoding and high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS) to authenticate sixteen V. officinalis herbal products and compare the potential of the two approaches to detect substitution, adulteration and the use of unreported constituents. HPLC-MS showed high resolution in detecting phytochemical target compounds, but did not enable detection of specific plant species in the products. DNA metabarcoding detected V. officinalis in only 15% of the products, whereas it detected V. chamaedrys in 62% of the products. The results confirm that DNA metabarcoding can be used to test for the presence of Veronica species, and detect substitution and/or admixture of other Veronica species, as well as simultaneously detect all other species present. Our results confirm that none of the herbal products contained exactly the species listed on the label, and all included substitutes, contaminants or fillers. This study highlights the need for authentication of raw herbals along the value chain of these products. An integrative methodology can assess both the quality of herbal products in terms of target compound concentrations and species composition, as well as admixture and substitution with other chemical compounds and plants.

  • Posmykiewicz, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Religion, Multiculturalism and Racism in Poland: An interview-based exploration among members of religious minorities2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores what members of religious minorities in Poland think about multiculturalism, the religious and ethnic homogeneity of Poland, and racism. The theoretical part includes discussion about the relation between Christianity and Polish national identity as well as the relation between Christianity and racism. The case study was based on the semi-structured interviews with five individuals representing various religious minorities.

     

    The research conclusions, drawing upon the participants’ observations, are explored within a theoretical framework. The results suggest that the lack of exposure is seen as the foremost reason for racial and religious prejudice. Moreover, religion is identified to be more central than skin colour or other ethnic features when assessing “others”. In order to change minorities' position in Polish society, Poland needs social integration programmes designed together with members of minority communities, as well as the Church’s support in building unity.

  • Korinek, Michal
    et al.
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Dept Biotechnol, Coll Life Sci, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Tsai, Yi-Hong
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    El-Shazly, Mohamed
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Ain Shams Univ, Dept Pharmacognosy, Fac Pharm, Cairo, Egypt..
    Lai, Kuei-Hung
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy. Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.
    Backlund, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Division of Pharmacognosy.
    Wu, Shou-Fang
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Dev Ctr Biotechnol, Nat Resource Dev Inst Pharmaceut, New Taipei, Taiwan..
    Lai, Wan-Chun
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Wu, Tung-Ying
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Chen, Shu-Li
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Wu, Yang-Chang
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Res Ctr Nat Prod & Drug Dev, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Med Res, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Cheng, Yuan-Bin
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Res Ctr Nat Prod & Drug Dev, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Ctr Infect Dis & Canc Res, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Hwang, Tsong-Long
    Chang Gung Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Med, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Univ Sci & Technol, Res Ctr Chinese Herbal Med, Res Ctr Food & Cosmet Safety, Coll Human Ecol, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Univ Sci & Technol, Coll Human Ecol, Grad Inst Hlth Ind Technol, Taoyuan, Taiwan.;Chang Gung Mem Hosp, Dept Anesthesiol, Taoyuan, Taiwan..
    Chen, Bing-Hung
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Dept Biotechnol, Coll Life Sci, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Med Res, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Natl Sun Yat Sen Univ, Inst Biomed Sci, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Chang, Fang-Rong
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Grad Inst Nat Prod, Coll Pharm, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Ctr Infect Dis & Canc Res, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Natl Sun Yat Sen Univ, Dept Marine Biotechnol & Resources, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Res Ctr Environm Med, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Canc Ctr, Kaohsiung, Taiwan..
    Anti-allergic Hydroxy Fatty Acids from Typhonium blumei Explored through ChemGPS-NP2017In: Frontiers in Pharmacology, ISSN 1663-9812, E-ISSN 1663-9812, Vol. 8, 356Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing prevalence of allergic diseases with an inadequate variety of treatment drives forward search for new alternative drugs. Fatty acids, abundant in nature, are regarded as important bioactive compounds and powerful nutrients playing an important role in lipid homeostasis and inflammation. Phytochemical study on Typhonium blumei Nicolson and Sivadasan (Araceae), a folk anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory medicine, yielded four oxygenated fatty acids, 12R-hydroxyoctadec-9Z, 13E-dienoic acid methyl ester (1) and 10R-hydroxyoctadec-8E, 12Z-dienoic acid methyl ester (2), 9R-hydroxy-10E-octadecenoic acid methyl ester (3), and 12R *-hydroxy-10E-octadecenoic acid methyl ester (4). Isolated compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods along with GC-MS analysis. Isolated fatty acids together with a series of saturated, unsaturated and oxygenated fatty acids were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory and anti-allergic activities in vitro. Unsaturated (including docosahexaenoic and eicosapentaenoic acids) as well as hydroxylated unsaturated fatty acids exerted strong anti-inflammatory activity in superoxide anion generation (IC50 2.14-3.73 mu M) and elastase release (IC50 1.26-4.57 mu M) assays. On the other hand, in the anti-allergic assays, the unsaturated fatty acids were inactive, while hydroxylated fatty acids showed promising inhibitory activity in A23187-and antigen-induced degranulation assays (e.g., 9S-hydroxy-10E, 12Z-octadecadienoic acid, IC50 92.4 and 49.7 mu M, respectively). According to our results, the presence of a hydroxy group in the long chain did not influence the potent anti-inflammatory activity of free unsaturated acids. Nevertheless, hydroxylation of fatty acids (or their methyl esters) seems to be a key factor for the anti-allergic activity observed in the current study. Moreover, ChemGPS-NP was explored to predict the structure-activity relationship of fatty acids. The anti-allergic fatty acids formed different cluster distant from clinically used drugs. The bioactivity of T. blumei, which is historically utilized in folk medicine, might be related to the content of fatty acids and their metabolites.

  • Halcox, Julian P.
    et al.
    Swansea Univ, Inst Life Sci 2, Coll Med, Singleton Pk, Swansea SA2 8PP, W Glam, Wales..
    Banegas, Jose R.
    Univ Autonoma Madrid, Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med & Publ Hlth, IdiPaz, Madrid, Spain.;CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain..
    Roy, Carine
    Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, INSERM CIC EC 1425, Paris, France.;Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, Dept Epidemiol & Rech Clin, Paris, France..
    Dallongeville, Jean
    Univ Lille Nord France, Inst Pasteur Lille, INSERM, U744, Lille, France..
    De Backer, Guy
    Univ Ghent, Dept Publ Hlth, Ghent, Belgium..
    Guallar, Eliseo
    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Med, Baltimore, MD USA.;Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Welch Ctr Prevent Epidemiol & Clin Res, Baltimore, MD USA..
    Perk, Joep
    Linnaeus Univ, Sch Hlth & Caring Sci, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Hajage, David
    Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, INSERM CIC EC 1425, Paris, France.;Hop Bichat Claude Bernard, AP HP, Dept Epidemiol & Rech Clin, Paris, France..
    Henriksson, Karin M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular epidemiology.
    Borghi, Claudio
    Univ Bologna, Dept Internal Med Ageing & Clin Nephrol, Bologna, Italy..
    Prevalence and treatment of atherogenic dyslipidemia in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease in Europe: EURIKA, a cross-sectional observational study2017In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 17, 160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atherogenic dyslipidemia is associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes, yet markers of this condition are often ignored in clinical practice. Here, we address a clear evidence gap by assessing the prevalence and treatment of two markers of atherogenic dyslipidemia: elevated triglyceride levels and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    Methods: This cross-sectional observational study assessed the prevalence of two atherogenic dyslipidemia markers, high triglyceride levels and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, in the study population from the European Study on Cardiovascular Risk Prevention and Management in Usual Daily Practice (EURIKA; N = 7641; of whom 51.6% were female and 95.6% were White/Caucasian). The EURIKA population included European patients, aged at least 50 years with at least one cardiovascular risk factor but no history of cardiovascular disease.

    Results: Over 20% of patients from the EURIKA population have either triglyceride or high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels characteristic of atherogenic dyslipidemia. Furthermore, the proportions of patients with one of these markers were higher in subpopulations with type 2 diabetes mellitus or those already calculated to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. Approximately 55% of the EURIKA population who have markers of atherogenic dyslipidemia are not receiving lipid-lowering therapy.

    Conclusions: A considerable proportion of patients with at least one major cardiovascular risk factor in the primary cardiovascular disease prevention setting have markers of atherogenic dyslipidemia. The majority of these patients are not receiving optimal treatment, as specified in international guidelines, and thus their risk of developing cardiovascular disease is possibly underestimated.

  • Andersson, Sandra
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Sundberg, Mårten
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Pristovsek, Nusa
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Div Prote & Nanotechnol, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Natl Res Ctr, Div Pharmaceut Ind, Dokki 12622, Egypt..
    Jonsson, Philip
    Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Human Oncol & Pathogenesis Program, New York, NY 10065 USA..
    Katona, Borbala
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Clausson, Carl-Magnus
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Zieba, Agata
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Ramström, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - BMC.
    Söderberg, Ola
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Biotechnol, Div Prote & Nanotechnol, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.;Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Houston, TX 77204 USA.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, S-14183 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Asplund, Anna
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology.
    Insufficient antibody validation challenges oestrogen receptor beta research2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 15840Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of oestrogen receptor beta (ER beta/ESR2) was a landmark discovery. Its reported expression and homology with breast cancer pharmacological target ER alpha (ESR1) raised hopes for improved endocrine therapies. After 20 years of intense research, this has not materialized. We here perform a rigorous validation of 13 anti-ER beta antibodies, using well-characterized controls and a panel of validation methods. We conclude that only one antibody, the rarely used monoclonal PPZ0506, specifically targets ER beta in immunohistochemistry. Applying this antibody for protein expression profiling in 44 normal and 21 malignant human tissues, we detect ER beta protein in testis, ovary, lymphoid cells, granulosa cell tumours, and a subset of malignant melanoma and thyroid cancers. We do not find evidence of expression in normal or cancerous human breast. This expression pattern aligns well with RNA-seq data, but contradicts a multitude of studies. Our study highlights how inadequately validated antibodies can lead an exciting field astray.

  • Nolte, Ilja M.
    et al.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Munoz, M. Loretto
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Tragante, Vinicius
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Amare, Azmeraw T.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands.;Univ Adelaide, Sch Med, Dept Epidemiol, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.;Bahir Dar Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Bahir Dar 6000, Ethiopia..
    Jansen, Rick
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Vaez, Ahmad
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands.;Isfahan Univ Med Sci, Sch Med, Esfahan 8174673461, Iran..
    von der Heyde, Benedikt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Avery, Christy L.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Bis, Joshua C.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA..
    Dierckx, Bram
    Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Generat Study Grp R, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB0 Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    van Dongen, Jenny
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Gogarten, Stephanie M.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Goyette, Philippe
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada..
    Hernesniemi, Jussi
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland.;Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33521, Finland..
    Huikari, Ville
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland..
    Hwang, Shih-Jen
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA.;NHLBI, Populat Sci Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Jaju, Deepali
    Sultan Qaboos Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Muscat 123, Oman..
    Kerr, Kathleen F.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Kluttig, Alexander
    Martin Luther Univ Halle Wittenberg, Inst Med Epidemiol Biostat & Informat, D-06097 Halle, Germany..
    Krijthe, Bouwe P.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kumar, Jitender
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology.
    van der Laan, Sander W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Heart & Lung, Lab Expt Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Maihofer, Adam X.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    Minassian, Arpi
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    van der Most, Peter J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Med, Univ Hosp Munich, D-80539 Munich, Germany.;Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Nivard, Michel
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Salvi, Erika
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, I-20122 Milan, Italy..
    Stewart, James D.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Carolina Populat Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Thayer, Julian F.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Psychol, 1835 Neil Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 USA..
    Verweij, Niek
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Wong, Andrew
    UCL, MRC Unit Lifelong Hlth & Ageing, 33 Bedford Pl, London WC1B 5JU, England..
    Zabaneh, Delilah
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, De Crespigny Pk, London SE5 8AF, England.;UCL, Genet Inst, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Zafarmand, Mohammad H.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Abdellaoui, Abdel
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Albarwani, Sulayma
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Physiol, Muscat Al Khoudh 123, Oman..
    Albert, Christine
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA 02115 USA..
    Alonso, Alvaro
    Emory Univ, Rollins Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA..
    Ashar, Foram
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, McKusick Nathans Inst Genet Med, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA..
    Auvinen, Juha
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Hlth Care, Oulu 90220, Finland..
    Axelsson, Tomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Baker, Dewleen G.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    de Bakker, Paul I. W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Dept Genet, Ctr Mol Med, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.;Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Dept Epidemiol, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Barcella, Matteo
    Univ Milan, Dept Hlth Sci, I-20122 Milan, Italy..
    Bayoumi, Riad
    Mohammed Bin Rashid Univ, Coll Med, Dubai Healthcare City, POB 505055, Dubai, U Arab Emirates..
    Bieringa, Rob J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Boomsma, Dorret
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Boucher, Gabrielle
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada..
    Britton, Annie R.
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Christophersen, Ingrid E.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Broad Inst Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;Baerum Hosp, Vestre Viken Hosp Trust, Dept Med Res, N-1346 Rud, Norway..
    Dietrich, Andrea
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Ehret, George B.
    Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, McKusick Nathans Inst Genet Med, Ctr Complex Dis Genom, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.;Geneva Univ Hosp, Dept Specialties Internal Med, Cardiol, CH-1211 Geneva, Switzerland..
    Ellinor, Patrick T.
    Broad Inst Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiac Arrhythmia Serv, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Eskola, Markku
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Felix, Janine F.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Floras, John S.
    Univ Toronto, Univ Hlth Network, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Toronto, Mt Sinai Hosp, Div Cardiol, Dept Med, Toronto, ON, Canada.;Univ Hlth Network, Toronto Gen Res Inst, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada..
    Franco, Oscar H.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Friberg, Peter
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Univ Hosp, Inst Med, Dept Mol & Clin Med, SE-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Gademan, Maaike G. J.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Geyer, Mark A.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA..
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Hartman, Catharina A.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hemerich, Daiane
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.;Minist Educ Brazil, CAPES Fdn, BR-70040020 Brasilia, DF, Brazil..
    Hofman, Albert
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Hottenga, Jouke-Jan
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Huikuri, Heikki
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Med Res Ctr, Res Unit Internal Med, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Univ Oulu, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Hutri-Kahonen, Nina
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Pediat, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Pediat, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Jouven, Xavier
    Paris Descartes Univ, INSERM, U970, F-75006 Paris, France..
    Junttila, Juhani
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Med Res Ctr, Res Unit Internal Med, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Univ Oulu, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Juonala, Markus
    Univ Turku, Dept Med, Turku 20520, Finland.;Turku Univ Hosp, Div Med, Turku 20521, Finland..
    Kiviniemi, Antti M.
    Oulu Univ Hosp, Med Res Ctr, Res Unit Internal Med, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Univ Oulu, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland..
    Kors, Jan A.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Med Informat, NL-3015 CE Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Kumari, Meena
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England.;Essex Univ, ISER, Colchester CO4 3SQ, Essex, England..
    Kuznetsova, Tatiana
    Univ Leuven, KU Leuven Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Studies Coordinating Ctr, Res Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Epidemiol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Laurie, Cathy C.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Lefrandt, Joop D.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Vasc Med, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Li, Yong
    Univ Freiburg, Fac Med, Med Center, Div Genet Epidemiol,Inst Med Biometry & Stat, D-79110 Freiburg, Germany..
    Li, Yun
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Biostat, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Comp Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Liao, Duanping
    Penn State Univ, Coll Med, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Div Epidemiol, Hershey, PA 17033 USA..
    Limacher, Marian C.
    Univ Florida, Coll Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Gainesville, FL 32611 USA..
    Lin, Henry J.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst Harbor, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90502 USA.;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Div Med Genet, Torrance, CA 90502 USA..
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Univ Oxford, Big Data Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr Hlth Informat & Discovery, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England..
    Lubitz, Steven A.
    Broad Inst Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;MIT, Cambridge, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiac Arrhythmia Serv, Boston, MA 02114 USA.;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA..
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England..
    McKnight, Barbara
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    zu Schwabedissen, Henriette Meyer
    Univ Basel, Dept Pharmaceut Sci, Biopharm, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland..
    Milaneschi, Yuri
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Mononen, Nina
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford OX3 7BN, England.;Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool L69 3GL, Merseyside, England..
    Nalls, Mike A.
    NIA, Lab Neurogenet, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA..
    Navis, Gerjan
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Neijts, Melanie
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Nikus, Kjell
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Heart Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Cardiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    North, Kari E.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Carolina Ctr Genome Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    O'Connor, Daniel T.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Med, San Diego, CA 92093 USA..
    Ormel, Johan
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Perz, Siegfried
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Peters, Annette
    Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;German Ctr Diabet Res, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol & Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Grp Hlth Cooperat Puget Sound, Grp Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA 98101 USA..
    Raitakari, Olli T.
    Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol & Nucl Med, Turku 20521, Finland.;Univ Turku, Res Ctr Appl & Prevent Cardiovasc Med, Turku 20520, Finland..
    Risbrough, Victoria B.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    Sinner, Moritz F.
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Med, Univ Hosp Munich, D-80539 Munich, Germany.;Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Siscovick, David
    New York Acad Med, New York, NY 10029 USA..
    Smit, Johannes H.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Smith, Nicholas L.
    Grp Hlth Cooperat Puget Sound, Grp Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA 98101 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.;Vet Affairs Off Res & Dev, Seattle Epidemiol Res & Informat Ctr, Seattle, WA 98108 USA..
    Soliman, Elsayed Z.
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Epidemiol Cardiol Res Ctr EPICARE, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Sotoodehnia, Nona
    Univ Washington, Dept Med & Epidemiol, Div Cardiol, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98101 USA..
    Staessen, Jan A.
    Univ Leuven, KU Leuven Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Studies Coordinating Ctr, Res Unit Hypertens & Cardiovasc Epidemiol, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium..
    Stein, Phyllis K.
    Washington Univ, Heart Rate Variabil Lab, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    Stilp, Adrienne M.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna
    Jagiellonian Univ, Med Coll, Dept Cardiol Intervent Electrocardi & Hypertens 1, PL-31008 Krakow, Poland..
    Strauch, Konstantin
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Inst Genet Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Chair Genet Epidemiol, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, D-81377 Munich, Germany..
    Sundstrom, Johan
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Cardiovasc Epidemiol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Swenne, Cees A.
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    Syvänen, Ann-Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular Medicine.
    Tardif, Jean-Claude
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3T IJ4, Canada..
    Taylor, Kent D.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Dept Pediat & Med, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Teumer, Alexander
    Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, D-17475 Greifswald, Germany..
    Thornton, Timothy A.
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Tinker, Lesley E.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, NL-3015 CE Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Netherlands Consortium Hlth Aging, Netherlands Genom Initiat, NL-2300 RC Leiden, Netherlands..
    van Setten, Jessica
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Voss, Andreas
    IGHT Jena Ernst Abbe Hsch, Inst Innovat Hlth Technol, D-07745 Jena, Germany..
    Waldenberger, Melanie
    Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol 2, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany.;Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Res Unit Mol Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany..
    Wilhelmsen, Kirk C.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Genet & Neurol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Renaissance Comp Inst, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    Willemsen, Gonneke
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Wong, Quenna
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Zhang, Zhu-Ming
    Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Epidemiol Cardiol Res Ctr EPICARE, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA.;Wake Forest Sch Med, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent, Winston Salem, NC 27157 USA..
    Zonderman, Alan B.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Cusi, Daniele
    Italian Natl Res Council, CNR, Inst Biomed Technol, I-20090 Milan, Italy.;KOS Genet SRL, I-20091 Milan, Italy..
    Evans, Michele K.
    NIA, Lab Epidemiol & Populat Sci, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224 USA..
    Greiser, Halina K.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, D-69210 Heidelberg, Germany..
    van der Harst, Pim
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Hassan, Mohammad
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Coll Med & Hlth Sci, Dept Physiol, Muscat Al Khoudh 123, Oman..
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA..
    Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta
    Univ Oulu, Ctr Life Course Hlth Res, Oulu 90014, Finland.;Oulu Univ Hosp, Unit Primary Hlth Care, Oulu 90220, Finland.;Imperial Coll London, Fac Med, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, St Marys Campus, London, England.;Univ Oulu, Bioctr Oulu, Oulu 90014, Finland..
    Kaab, Stefan
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Dept Med, Univ Hosp Munich, D-80539 Munich, Germany.;Munich Heart Alliance, DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site, D-80336 Munich, Germany..
    Kahonen, Mika
    Tampere Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33521, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Sch Med, Dept Clin Physiol, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Kivimaki, Mika
    UCL, Dept Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, London WC1E 6BT, England..
    Kooperberg, Charles
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA..
    Kuh, Diana
    UCL, MRC Unit Lifelong Hlth & Ageing, 33 Bedford Pl, London WC1B 5JU, England..
    Lehtimaki, Terho
    Fimlab Labs, Dept Clin Chem, Tampere 33520, Finland.;Univ Tampere, Dept Clin Chem, Sch Med, Tampere 33014, Finland..
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Med Sci Cardiovasc Epidemiol, S-75185 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Nievergelt, Caroline M.
    Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Psychiat, San Diego, CA 92093 USA.;VA San Diego Healthcare Syst, Ctr Stress & Mental Hlth CESAMH, San Diego, CA 92161 USA..
    O'Donnell, Chris J.
    Framingham Heart Dis Epidemiol Study, Framingham, MA 01702 USA.;NHLBI, Populat Sci Branch, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.;Boston Vet Adm Healthcare Boston, Cardiol Sect, Boston, MD 02132 USA..
    Oldehinkel, Albertine J.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Penninx, Brenda
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res & Neurosci, Dept Psychiat,GGZ inGeest, Campus Amsterdam, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Reiner, Alexander P.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Publ Hlth Sci Div, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Riese, Harriette
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Interdisciplinary Ctr Psychopathol & Emot Regulat, Dept Psychiat, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    van Roon, Arie M.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Internal Med, Div Vasc Med, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    Rioux, John D.
    Montreal Heart Inst, Montreal, PQ H1T IC8, Canada.;Univ Montreal, Montreal, PQ H3T IJ4, Canada..
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Dept Pediat & Med, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90509 USA..
    Sofer, Tamar
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Stricker, Bruno H.
    Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Inspectorate Hlth Care, NL-2511 VX The Hague, Netherlands..
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat, Dept Child & Adolescent Psychiat Psychol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands.;Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Epidemiol, POB 2060, NL-3000 CB Rotterdam, Netherlands..
    Vrijkotte, Tanja G. M.
    Univ Amsterdam, Acad Med Ctr, Dept Publ Hlth, NL-1105 AZ Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Heidelberglaan 100, NL-3584 CX Utrecht, Netherlands.;UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, 222 Euston Rd, London NW1 2DA, England.;ICIN Netherlands Heart Inst, Durrer Ctr Cardiogenet Res, NL-3501 DG Utrecht, Netherlands..
    Brundel, Bianca J. J. M.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Inst Cardiovasc Res, Dept Physiol, Med Ctr, De Boelelaan 1118, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Heckbert, Susan R.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Hlth Res Unit, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA..
    Whitsel, Eric A.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.;Univ N Carolina, Dept Med, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA..
    den Hoed, Marcel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Snieder, Harold
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Epidemiol, POB 30001, NL-9700 RB Groningen, Netherlands..
    de Geus, Eco J. C.
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Dept Biol Psychol Behav & Movement Sci, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, EMGO Inst Hlth & Care Res, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands.;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Med Ctr, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands..
    Genetic loci associated with heart rate variability and their effects on cardiac disease risk2017In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 8, 15805Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reduced cardiac vagal control reflected in low heart rate variability (HRV) is associated with greater risks for cardiac morbidity and mortality. In two-stage meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies for three HRV traits in up to 53,174 individuals of European ancestry, we detect 17 genome-wide significant SNPs in eight loci. HRV SNPs tag non-synonymous SNPs (in NDUFA11 and KIAA1755), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) (influencing GNG11, RGS6 and NEO1), or are located in genes preferentially expressed in the sinoatrial node (GNG11, RGS6 and HCN4). Genetic risk scores account for 0.9 to 2.6% of the HRV variance. Significant genetic correlation is found for HRV with heart rate (-0.74 < r(g) < -0.55) and blood pressure (-0.35 < r(g) < -0.20). These findings provide clinically relevant biological insight into heritable variation in vagal heart rhythm regulation, with a key role for genetic variants (GNG11, RGS6) that influence G-protein heterotrimer action in GIRK-channel induced pacemaker membrane hyperpolarization.

  • Pathak, Ashish
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH). Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Paediat, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India.; Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mahadik, Kalpana
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Swami, Manmat B.
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Roy, Pulak K.
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Sharma, Megha
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden.;Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Dept Pharmacol, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Mahadik, Vijay K.
    Ruxmaniben Deepchand Gardi Med Coll, Ujjain, Madhya Pradesh, India..
    Lundborg, Cecilia Stalsby
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Global Hlth Hlth Syst & Policy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Incidence and risk factors for surgical site infections in obstetric and gynecological surgeries from a teaching hospital in rural India2017In: Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, ISSN 2047-2994, E-ISSN 2047-2994, Vol. 6, 66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Surgical site infections (SSI) are one of the most common healthcare associated infections in the low-middle income countries. Data on incidence and risk factors for SSI following surgeries in general and Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in particular are scare. This study set out to identify risk factors for SSI in patients undergoing Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries in an Indian rural hospital.

    Methods: Patients who underwent a surgical procedure between September 2010 to February 2013 in the 60-bedded ward of Obstetric and Gynecology department were included. Surveillance for SSI was based on the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) definition and methodology. Incidence and risk factors for SSI, including those for specific procedure, were calculated from data collected on daily ward rounds.

    Results: A total of 1173 patients underwent a surgical procedure during the study period. The incidence of SSI in the cohort was 7.84% (95% CI 6.30-9.38). Majority of SSI were superficial. Obstetric surgeries had a lower SSI incidence compared to gynecological surgeries (1.2% versus 10.3% respectively). The risk factors for SSI identified in the multivariate logistic regression model were age (OR 1.03), vaginal examination (OR 1.31); presence of vaginal discharge (OR 4.04); medical disease (OR 5.76); American Society of Anesthesia score greater than 3 (OR 12.8); concurrent surgical procedure (OR 3.26); each increase in hour of surgery, after the first hour, doubled the risk of SSI; inappropriate antibiotic prophylaxis increased the risk of SSI by nearly 5 times. Each day increase in stay in the hospital after the surgery increased the risk of contacting an SSI by 5%.

    Conclusions: Incidence and risk factors from prospective SSI surveillance can be reported simultaneously for the Obstetric and Gynecological surgeries and can be part of routine practice in resource-constrained settings. The incidence of SSI was lower for Obstetric surgeries compared to Gynecological surgeries. Multiple risk factors identified in the present study can be helpful for SSI risk stratification in low-middle income countries.

  • Cato, Karin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Sylvén, Sara M
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Lindbäck, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, UCR-Uppsala Clinical Research Center.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health.
    Risk factors for exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months-Identifying women in need of targeted breastfeeding support2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 6, e0179402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Breastfeeding rates in Sweden are declining, and it is important to identify women at risk for early cessation of exclusive breastfeeding.

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum.

    Methods: A population-based longitudinal study was conducted at Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden. Six hundred and seventy-nine women were included in this sub-study. Questionnaires were sent at five days, six weeks and six months postpartum, including questions on breastfeeding initiation and duration as well as several other background variables. The main outcome measure was exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used in order to calculate adjusted Odds Ratios (AOR) and 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI).

    Results: Seventy-seven percent of the women reported exclusive breastfeeding at two months postpartum. The following variables in the multivariate regression analysis were independently associated with exclusive breastfeeding lasting less than two months postpartum: being a first time mother (AOR 2.15, 95% CI 1.32 +/- 3.49), reporting emotional distress during pregnancy (AOR 2.21, 95% CI 1.35 +/- 3.62) and giving birth by cesarean section (AOR 2.63, 95% CI 1.34 +/- 5.17).

    Conclusions: Factors associated with shorter exclusive breastfeeding duration were determined. Identification of women experiencing emotional distress during pregnancy, as well as scrutiny of caregiving routines on cesarean section need to be addressed, in order to give individual targeted breastfeeding support and promote longer breastfeeding duration.

  • Yang, Xiao
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Yanshan Univ, Coll Civil Engn & Mech, Qin Huangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Li, Huijian
    Yanshan Univ, Coll Civil Engn & Mech, Qin Huangdao 066004, Hebei, Peoples R China..
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Royal Inst Technol KTH, Dept Mat & Engn, S-10044 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kang, Taewon
    Dongguk Univ, Nano Informat Technol Acad, Seoul 100715, South Korea..
    Luo, Wei
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Dongguk Univ, Nano Informat Technol Acad, Seoul 100715, South Korea..
    Formation and electronic properties of palladium hydrides and palladium-rhodium dihydride alloys under pressure2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, 3520Article in journal (Refereed)