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  • Alwan, Seif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Tunable Fano Resonance in Double Quantum Dot Systems2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Janjua, Azeem
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Modelling and optimisation of a decentralised heat network and energy centre in London Docklands2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The following project aims to create a decentralised heat network development methodology which makes best use of heat sources and loads and can be widely applied to evaluate the energy economics of a heat network scheme and energy centre. As the energy transition takes shape, the key is connectivity and the potential now, or in the future to aid progressive development of energy systems and technologies rather than traditional models that consider schemes individually in isolation and not holistically; where with the latter we’re more likely to end up with robust, future-proof solutions.

     

    A methodology was formulated which encompassed various elements of decentralised energy masterplanning approaches and enabled heat demand loads and associated profiles to be simulated. The development of an optimisation model enabled strategies to be devised (maximisation of energy generation and revenue independently) over a set technology lifetime for the energy centre.

     

    The results have concluded that the maximisation of revenue optimisation strategy is the most viable economically. An energy generation optimisation for the energy centre produced optimal results in terms of its heat generation profile, however, the scheme was not economically viable due to significantly high capital costs associated with piping connections to multiple clusters.

     

    A CO2 emission analysis was carried out for a selection of energy technologies (CHP, heat pumps and gas boilers) for the heat network energy centre. An evaluation of the results has concluded that the optimal selection of technology for the energy centre for the minimisation of CO2 emissions is heat pumps. When selecting combinations of technologies for peak and base loads within the energy centre, heat pumps (base load) and gas boilers (peak load) are optimal when aiming to maximise revenue generation whilst minimising CO2 emissions. In this case, reductions in associated CO2 emissions have been calculated to achieve up to 89.07% when compared to a base case gas boiler technology (energy centre) scenario alone.

     

    The methodology and models developed in this project can be widely applied to decentralised heat network projects in London in order to identify optimal development and expansion strategies and evaluate the energy economics of schemes.

  • Holmström, Ebba
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Computer Systems.
    Holmqvist Evans, Katarina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Division of Computer Systems.
    Framtiden för mobila betalningar i svensk handel: En studie om mobila betalningars hinder och möjligheter, med ett fokus på säkerhet2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The use of cash in the Swedish society is decreasing, leaving room for digital payment methods to ascend. However, mobile payment solutions are not as established in Sweden compared to other countries. The objective of this thesis is twofold; map the current market of mobile payments solutions in Swedish in store retail and identify the opportunities and obstacles facing this market, both from a security perspective. Furthermore, the future potential of mobile payment solutions in Sweden will be assessed.

    To fullfil the purpose of this thesis, an empirical study consisting of qualitative interviews and a quantitative survey were conducted. The interviews brought the perspective of businesses and financial institutions that influence the payment market, whilst the data from the survey provided the perspective and attitudes of private users.

    The studied payment solutions were Apple Pay, Samsung Pay and Swish’s BLE solution. Apple Pay and Samsung Pay were found to be secure solutions, but with varying availability and compatibility for the users. Swish is a compatible payment solution for the users but is lacking in technical infrastructure. A lack of knowledge regarding security and availability of these solutions was found to have prevented widespread adoption by the population. Mobile payment solutions were perceived as useful and easy to use by the private users.

    Conclusions are that mobile payment solutions have a high market potential in Sweden if their availability improves. Swish’s BLE solution has the highest potential due to its popularity amongst users, under the circumstance that merchants invest in the BLE receivers.

  • Kozma, Radoslav
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Mörch, Patrik Rödin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Höglund, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Genomic regions of speciation and adaptation among three species of grouse2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the molecular basis of adaption is one of the central goals in evolutionary biology and when investigated across sister species it can provide detailed insight into the mechanisms of speciation. Here, we sequence the genomes of 34 individuals from three closely related grouse species in order to uncover the genomic architecture of speciation and the genes involved in adaptation. We identify 6 regions, containing 7 genes that show lineage specific signs of differential selection across the species. These genes are involved in a variety of cell processes ranging from stress response to neural, gut, olfactory and limb development. Genome wide neutrality test statistics reveal a strong signal of population expansion acting across the genomes. Additionally, we uncover a 3.5 Mb region on chromosome 20 that shows considerably lower levels of differentiation across the three grouse lineages, indicating possible action of uniform selection in this region.

  • Defourny, Jean
    et al.
    Univ Liege, Unit Cell & Tissue Biol, GIGA Neurosci, CHU B36, B-4000 Liege, Belgium;Univ Liege, Dev Neurobiol Unit, GIGA Neurosci, CHU B36, B-4000 Liege, Belgium.
    Peuckert, Christiane
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Kullander, Klas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience.
    Malgrange, Brigitte
    Univ Liege, Dev Neurobiol Unit, GIGA Neurosci, CHU B36, B-4000 Liege, Belgium.
    EphA4-ADAM10 Interplay Patterns the Cochlear Sensory Epithelium through Local Disruption of Adherens Junctions2019In: ISCIENCE, ISSN 2589-0042, Vol. 11, p. 246-257Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The cochlear sensory epithelium contains a functionally important triangular fluid-filled space between adjacent pillar cells referred to as the tunnel of Corti. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to local cell-cell separation during development remain elusive. Here we show that EphA4 associates with ADAM10 to promote the destruction of E-cadherin-based adhesions between adjacent pillar cells. These cells fail to separate from each other, and E-cadherin abnormally persists at the pillar cell junction in EphA4 forward-signaling-deficient mice, as well as in the presence of ADAM10 inhibitor. Using immunolabeling and an in situ proximity ligation assay, we found that EphA4 forms a complex with E-cadherin and its sheddase ADAM10, which could be activated by ephrin-B2 across the pillar cell junction to trigger the cleavage of E-cadherin. Altogether, our findings provide a new molecular insight into the regulation of adherens junctions, which might be extended to a variety of physiological or pathological processes.

  • Husain, Sajid
    et al.
    Indian Inst Technol Delhi, Dept Phys, Thin Film Lab, New Delhi 110016, India.
    Sisodia, Naveen
    Indian Inst Technol Delhi, Dept Phys, Thin Film Lab, New Delhi 110016, India.
    Chaurasiya, Avinash Kumar
    SN Bose Natl Ctr Basic Sci, Dept Condensed Matter Phys & Mat Sci, Block JD,Sect 3, Kolkata 700106, India.
    Kumar, Ankit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Singh, Jitendra Pal
    Yadav, Brajesh S.
    Solid State Phys Lab, Lucknow Rd, Delhi 110054, India.
    Akansel, Serkan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Chae, Keun Hwa
    Korea Inst Sci & Technol, Adv Anal Ctr, Seoul 02792, South Korea.
    Barman, Anjan
    SN Bose Natl Ctr Basic Sci, Dept Condensed Matter Phys & Mat Sci, Block JD,Sect 3, Kolkata 700106, India.
    Muduli, P. K.
    Indian Inst Technol Delhi, Dept Phys, Thin Film Lab, New Delhi 110016, India.
    Svedlindh, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics.
    Chaudhary, Sujeet
    Indian Inst Technol Delhi, Dept Phys, Thin Film Lab, New Delhi 110016, India.
    Observation of Skyrmions at Room Temperature in Co2FeAl Heusler Alloy Ultrathin Film Heterostructures2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 1085Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Magnetic skyrmions are topological spin-textures having immense potential for energy efficient spintronic devices. Here, we report the observation of stable skyrmions in unpatterned Ta/Co2FeAl(CFA)/MgO thin film heterostructures at room temperature in remnant state employing magnetic force microscopy. It is shown that these skyrmions consisting of ultrathin ferromagnetic CFA Heusler alloy result from strong interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction (i-DMI) as evidenced by Brillouin light scattering measurements, in agreement with the results of micromagnetic simulations. We also emphasize on room temperature observation of multiple skyrmions which can be stabilized for suitable combinations of CFA layer thickness, perpendicular magnetic anisotropy, and i-DMI. These results provide a significant step towards designing of room temperature spintronic devices based on skyrmions in full Heusler alloy based thin films.

  • Carrieri, Daniele
    et al.
    Univ Exeter, Egenis, England.
    Howard, Heidi Carmen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics.
    Benjamin, Caroline
    Univ Cent Lancashire UCLan, Sch Community Hlth & Midwifery, Preston, Lancs, England;Liverpool Womens NHS Hosp Trust, Merseyside & Cheshire Clin Genet Serv, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.
    Clarke, Angus J.
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Med, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales.
    Dheensa, Sandi
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Clin Eth & Law, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Doheny, Shane
    Cardiff Univ, Sch Med, Cardiff, S Glam, Wales.
    Hawkins, Naomi
    Univ Exeter, Law Sch, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Halbersma-Konings, Tanya F.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Genet, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Jackson, Leigh
    Univ Exeter, Sch Med, Egenis, England.
    Kayserili, Hulya
    Koc Univ KUSoM, Sch Med, Med Genet Dept, Istanbul, Turkey.
    Kelly, Susan E.
    Univ Exeter, Egenis, England.
    Lucassen, Anneke M.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Clin Eth & Law, Southampton, Hants, England;Univ Hosp Southampton NHS Fdn Trust, Wessex Clin Genet Serv, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Mendes, Alvaro
    Univ Porto, I3S, IBMC Inst Mol & Cell Biol, UnIGENe, Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, I3S, IBMC Inst Mol & Cell Biol, CGPP Ctr Predict & Prevent Genet, Porto, Portugal.
    Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle
    Univ Paul Sabatier Toulouse III, INSERM, UMR 1027, Toulouse, France.
    Stefansdottir, Vigdis
    Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Dept Genet & Mol Med, Landspitali, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Turnpenny, Peter D.
    Royal Devon & Exeter NHS Fdn Trust, Clin Genet, Exeter, Devon, England.
    van El, Carla G.
    Vrije Univ, Amsterdam UMC, Sect Community Genet, Dept Clin Genet, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    van Langen, Irene M.
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Genet, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Cornel, Martina C.
    Vrije Univ, Amsterdam UMC, Sect Community Genet, Dept Clin Genet, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ, Amsterdam UMC, Amsterdam Publ Hlth Res Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Forzano, Francesca
    Guys & St Thomas NHS Fdn Trust, Clin Genet Dept, London, ON, Canada.
    Recontacting patients in clinical genetics services: recommendations of the European Society of Human Genetics2019In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 169-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Technological advances have increased the availability of genomic data in research and the clinic. If, over time, interpretation of the significance of the data changes, or new information becomes available, the question arises as to whether recontacting the patient and/or family is indicated. The Public and Professional Policy Committee of the European Society of Human Genetics (ESHG), together with research groups from the UK and the Netherlands, developed recommendations on recontacting which, after public consultation, have been endorsed by ESHG Board. In clinical genetics, recontacting for updating patients with new, clinically significant information related to their diagnosis or previous genetic testing may be justifiable and, where possible, desirable. Consensus about the type of information that should trigger recontacting converges around its clinical and personal utility. The organization of recontacting procedures and policies in current health care systems is challenging. It should be sustainable, commensurate with previously obtained consent, and a shared responsibility between healthcare providers, laboratories, patients, and other stakeholders. Optimal use of the limited clinical resources currently available is needed. Allocation of dedicated resources for recontacting should be considered. Finally, there is a need for more evidence, including economic and utility of information for people, to inform which strategies provide the most cost-effective use of healthcare resources for recontacting.

  • Triebner, Kai
    et al.
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Core Facil Metabol, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Accordini, Simone
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Inst Biol 2, Str Le Grazie 8, I-37134 Verona, Italy.
    Calciano, Lucia
    Univ Verona, Dept Diagnost & Publ Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Med Stat, Inst Biol 2, Str Le Grazie 8, I-37134 Verona, Italy.
    Johannessen, Ane
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Jonas Lies Vei 65, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Jekteviksbakken 31, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.
    Benediktsdottir, Bryndis
    Univ Iceland, Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Bifulco, Ersilia
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Core Facil Metabol, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Demoly, Pascal
    Univ Montpellier, Univ Hosp Montpellier, Dept Pulmonol, Div Allergy, 371 Ave Doyen Gaston Giraud, F-34295 Montpellier, France;Sorbonne Univ, French Natl Inst Hlth & Med Res, Pierre Louis Inst Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, 56 Blvd Vincent Auriol, F-75646 Paris, France.
    Dharmage, Shyamali C.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Allergy & Lung Hlth Unit, 207 Bouverie St, Carlton, Vic 3052, Australia.
    Franklin, Karl A.
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Koksvagen 11, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith
    ISGlobal, Doctor Aiguader 88, Barcelona 08003, Spain;Univ Pompeu Fabra, Doctor Aiguader 88, Barcelona 08003, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Doctor Aiguader 88, Barcelona 08003, Spain.
    Gullon Blanco, Jose Antonio
    Univ Hosp San Agustin, Dept Pneumol, Camino Heros 4, Aviles 33410, Spain.
    Heinrich, Joachim
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Inst & Outpatient Clin Occupat Social & Environm, Ziemssenstr 1, D-80336 Munich, Germany.
    Holm, Mathias
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Occupat & Environm Med, Medicinaregatan 16A, S-41390 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jarvis, Debbie
    Imperial Coll, Natl Heart & Lung Inst, 1b Manresa Rd, London SW3 6LR, England.
    Jogi, Rain
    Tartu Univ Hosp, Lung Clin, Dept Lung Med, Riia 167, EE-51014 Tartu, Estonia.
    Lindberg, Eva
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Martinez-Moratalla, Jesus
    Hlth Serv Castilla La Mancha, Pulmonol Serv, Albacete Univ Hosp Complex, Albacete, Spain;Castilla La Mancha Univ, Fac Med Albacete, Albacete, Spain.
    Muniozguren Agirre, Nerea
    Basque Govt, Dept Hlth, Unit Epidemiol & Publ Hlth, Alameda Rekalde 39A, Bilbao 48008, Spain.
    Pin, Isabelle
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, Univ Hosp Grenoble Alpes, French Natl Inst Hlth & Med Res, Inst Adv Biosci,Dept Pediat, CS 10217, F-38043 Grenoble 9, France.
    Probst-Hensch, Nicole
    Swiss Trop & Publ Hlth Inst, Socinstr 58, CH-4002 Basel, Switzerland;Univ Basel, Dept Publ Hlth, Peterspl 1, CH-4001 Basel, Switzerland.
    Raherison, Chantal
    Bordeaux Univ, Bordeaux Populat Hlth Res, U1219, 146 Rue Leo Saignat, F-33076 Bordeaux, France.
    Luis Sanchez-Ramos, Jose
    Univ Huelva, Dept Nursing, Ave Tres Marzo S-N, Huelva 21071, Spain.
    Schlunssen, Vivi
    Aarhus Univ, Dept Publ Hlth, Bartholins Alle 2, DK-8000 Aarhus, Denmark;Natl Res Ctr Working Environm, Lerso Pk Alle 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Svanes, Cecilie
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Occupat Med, Jonas Lies Vei 65, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Ctr Int Hlth, Jekteviksbakken 31, N-5009 Bergen, Norway.
    Hustad, Steinar
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Core Facil Metabol, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Leynaert, Benedicte
    French Natl Inst Hlth & Med Res, UMR1152, Team Epidemiol, Paris, France.
    Real, Francisco Gomez
    Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Jonas Lies Veg 87, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Jonas Lies Veg 65, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Exogenous female sex steroids may reduce lung ageing after menopause: A 20-year follow-up study of a general population sample (ECRHS)2019In: Maturitas, ISSN 0378-5122, E-ISSN 1873-4111, Vol. 120, p. 29-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Menopause involves hypoestrogenism, which is associated with numerous detrimental effects, including on respiratory health. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is often used to improve symptoms of menopause. The effects of HRT on lung function decline, hence lung ageing, have not yet been investigated despite the recognized effects of HRT on other health outcomes. Study design: The population-based multi-centre European Community Respiratory Health Survey provided complete data for 275 oral HRT users at two time points, who were matched with 383 nonusers and analysed with a two-level linear mixed effects regression model. Main outcome measures: We studied whether HRT use was associated with the annual decline in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Results: Lung function of women using oral HRT for more than five years declined less rapidly than that of nonusers. The adjusted difference in FVC decline was 5.6 mL/y (95%CI: 1.8 to 9.3, p = 0.01) for women who had taken HRT for six to ten years and 8.9 mL/y (3.5 to 14.2, p = 0.003) for those who had taken it for more than ten years. The adjusted difference in FEV1 decline was 4.4 mL/y (0.9 to 8.0, p = 0.02) with treatment from six to ten years and 5.3 mL/y (0.4 to 10.2, p = 0.048) with treatment for over ten years. Conclusions: In this longitudinal population-based study, the decline in lung function was less rapid in women who used HRT, following a dose-response pattern, and consistent when adjusting for potential confounding factors. This may signify that female sex hormones are of importance for lung ageing.

  • Jiang, Xia
    et al.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Cardiovasc Epidemiol, Nobels Vagen 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Finucane, Hilary K.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Schumacher, Fredrick R.
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Dept Populat & Quantitat Hlth Sci, 10900 Eucid Ave, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Univ Hosp, Seidman Canc Ctr, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA.
    Schmit, Stephanie L.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA;H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Gastrointestinal Oncol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Tyrer, Jonathan P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Han, Younghun
    Geisel Sch Med Dartmouth, Dept Biomed Data Sci, 1 Med Ctr Dr, Dartmouth, NS, Lebanon.
    Michailidou, Kyriaki
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Cyprus Inst Neurol & Genet, Dept Elect Microscopy Mol Pathol, CY-1683 Nicosia, Cyprus.
    Lesseur, Corina
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B.
    UCL, Div Psychiat, Maple House,149 Tottenham Court Rd, London W1T 7NF, England;UCL, UCL Genet Inst, Gower St, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Conti, David V.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Casey, Graham
    Univ Virginia, Publ Hlth Sci, POB 800717, Charlottesville, VI 80071 USA;Univ Virginia, Ctr Publ Hlth Genom, POB 800717, Charlottesville, VI 80071 USA.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Huyghe, Jeroen R.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Aldrich, Melinda C.
    Vanderbilt Univ, Div Epidemiol, Dept Thorac Surg, Med Ctr, 609 Oxford House, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Andrew, Angeline S.
    Dartmouth Hitchcock Med Ctr, Dept Neurol, 7927 Rubin Bldg,Room 860,One Med Ctr Dr, Lebanon, NH 3756 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Mt Sinai Hosp, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Fred ALitwin Ctr Canc Genet, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92617 USA.
    Antoniou, Antonis C.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Antonenkova, Natalia N.
    NNAlexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Settlement Lesnoy 2, Minsk 223040, BELARUS.
    Arnold, Susanne M.
    Univ Kentucky, Markey Canc Ctr, 800 Rose St,Cc445, Lexington, KY 40508 USA.
    Aronson, Kristan J.
    Queens Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 10 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada;Queens Univ, Canc Res Inst, 10 Stuart St, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6, Canada.
    Arun, Banu K.
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Breast Med Oncol, 1155 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Bandera, Elisa V.
    Rutgers Canc Inst New Jersey, Canc Prevent & Control Program, 195 Little Albany St,Room 5568, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 USA.
    Barkardottir, Rosa B.
    Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Fac Med, BMC Biomed Ctr, Vatnsmyrarvegi 16, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Barnes, Daniel R.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Batra, Jyotsna
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen Nuremberg, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Univ Str 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Calle Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Benlloch, Sara
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Berchuck, Andrew
    Duke Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Med Ctr, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Bickeboeller, Heike
    Univ Med Ctr Goettingen, Dept Genet Epidemiol, Humboldtallee 32, D-37073 Gottingen, Germany.
    Bien, Stephanie A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, 1959 NE Pacific St,Hlth Sci Bldg,F-350, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Haartmaninkatu 4, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, S-70185 Orebro, Sweden.
    Boccia, Stefania
    Fdn Policlin Univ AGemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy;Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    NNAlexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Settlement Lesnoy 2, Minsk 223040, BELARUS;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Carl Neuberg Str 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Carl Neuberg Str 1, D-30625 Hannover, Germany.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    DrMargarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Auerbachstr112, D-70376 Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, Geschwister Scholl Pl, D-72074 Tubingen, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenton, James D.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, England.
    Brook, Mark N.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Brunet, Joan
    CIBERONC, Catalan Inst Oncol, IDIBGI Inst Invest Biomed Girona, Genet Counseling Unit,Hereditary Canc Program, AvFranca S-N, Girona 17007, Spain.
    Brunnstrom, Hans
    Lund Univ, Clin Sci, Box 117, S-22100 Lund, Sweden;Dept Genet & Pathol, Div Lab Med, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Buchanan, Daniel D.
    Univ Melbourne, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Ctr Canc Res, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Colorectal Oncogen Grp, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Melbourne Hosp, Genom Med & Family Canc Clin, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    Heidelberg Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Neuenheimer Feld 440, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080,Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Butzow, Ralf
    Univ Helsinki, Dept Pathol, Biomed Helsinki 4th Floor,Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00029, Finland;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Biomed Helsinki 4th Floor,Haartmaninkatu 8, Helsinki 00029, Finland.
    Cadoni, Gabriella
    Fdn Policlin Univ AGemelli IRCCS, I-00168 Rome, Italy;Univ Cattolica Sacro Cuore, I-00168 Rome, Italy.
    Caldes, Trinidad
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Med Oncol Dept, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Calle Prof Martin Lagos, Madrid 28040, Spain.
    Caligo, Maria A.
    Univ Pisa, Dept Lab Med, Sect Genet Oncol, Via Roma 67, I-56126 Pisa, Italy;Univ Hosp Pisa, Via Roma 67, I-56126 Pisa, Italy.
    Campbell, Ian
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia.
    Campbell, Peter T.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine
    Sorbonne Univ, Tenon Hosp, GRC N 5 ONCOTYPE URO, F-75020 Paris, France;Tenon Hosp, CeRePP, F-75020 Paris, France.
    Cannon-Albright, Lisa
    Univ Utah, Dept Med, Div Genet Epidemiol, Sch Med, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;George EWahlen Dept Vet Affairs Med Ctr, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Campa, Daniele
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Pisa, Dept Biol, I-56126 Pisa, Italy.
    Caporaso, Neil
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Carvalho, Andre L.
    Barretos Canc Hosp, Mol Oncol Res Ctr, Rua Antenor Duarte Villela 1331, BR-784400 Barretos, SP, Brazil;Barretos Canc Hosp, Head & Neck Surg Dept, Pio 12,1331 Antenor Duarte Villela St, BR-14784400 Barretos, SP, Brazil.
    Chan, Andrew T.
    Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Div Gastroenterol, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Chen, Chu
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Christiani, David C.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Claes, Kathleen B. M.
    Univ Ghent, Ctr Med Genet, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Claessens, Frank
    Katholieke Univ Leuven, Dept Cellular & Mol Med, Mol Endocrinol Lab, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Clements, Judith
    Australian Prostate Canc Res Ctr Qld, Translat Res Inst, 37 Kent St, Woolloongabba, Qld 4102, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Inst Hlth & Biomed Innovat, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia;Queensland Univ Technol, Sch Biomed Sci, 60 Musk Ave, Kelvin Grove, Qld 4059, Australia.
    Collee, J. Margriet
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Wytemaweg 80, NL-3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Correa, Marcia Cruz
    Univ Puerto Rico Med Sci Campus, San Juan, PR 00936 USA;Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Juan, PR 00936 USA.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Cox, Angela
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Nucle Acids SInFoNiA, Dept Oncol & Metab, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN, S Yorkshire, England.
    Cunningham, Julie M.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Cybulski, Cezary
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, 333 Cottman Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA.
    defazio, Anna
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Ctr Canc Res, 176 Hawkesbury Rd, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia;Westmead Hosp, Dept Gynaecol Oncol, Hawkesbury Rd & Darcy Rd, Sydney, NSW 2145, Australia.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Pathol, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Albinusdreef 2, NL-2333 ZA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Diez, Orland
    Univ Hosp Vall dHebron, Vall dHebron Inst Oncol VHIO, Clin & Mol Genet Area, Oncogenet Grp, Passeig Vall dHebron 119-129, Barcelona 08035, Spain.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hosp Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Genom Med Grp,Galician Fdn Genom Med, Travesia Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, 3855 Hlth Sci Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037 USA.
    Donovan, Jenny L.
    Univ Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Bristol BS8 1TH, Avon, England.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Duell, Eric J.
    ICO IDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol Res Program, Unit Nutr & Canc, AvGran Via 199-203, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, 309 Regent St, London W1B 2HW, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Canc Sci Acad Unit, Fac Med, Tremona Rd, Southampton SO16 6YD, Hants, England.
    Edlund, Christopher K.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Edwards, Digna R. Velez
    Vanderbilt Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr,Vanderbilt Genet Inst, 2525 West End Ave,Suite 600, Nashville, TN 37203 USA.
    Ellberg, Carolina
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Barngatan 4, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Cent Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Div Evolut & Genom Sci,St Marys Hosp, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9WL, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen Nuremberg, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Univ Str 21-23, D-91054 Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Ferris, Robert L.
    Univ Pittsburgh, UPMC Hillman Canc Ctr, Dept Otolaryngol, Canc Pavil,Suite 500,5150 Ctr Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA.
    Liloglou, Triantafillos
    Univ Liverpool, Mol & Clin Canc Med, Roy Castle Lung Canc Res Programme, Inst Translat Med, Wiliam Duncan Bldg,6 West Derby St, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England.
    Figueiredo, Jane C.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, 1450 Biggy St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Fletcher, Olivia
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Inst Canc Res, Breast Canc Now Toby Robins Res Ctr, 123 Old Brompton Rd, London SW7 3RP, England.
    Fortner, Renee T.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Fostira, Florentia
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Mol Diagnost Lab, INRASTES, Neapoleos 10, Athens 15310, Greece.
    Franceschi, Silvia
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Infect, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Friedman, Eitan
    Chaim Sheba Med Ctr, Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenet Unit, Emek HaEla St 1, IL-52621 Ramat Gan, Israel;Tel Aviv Univ, Sackler Fac Med, Haim Levanon 30, IL-69978 Ramat Aviv, Israel.
    Gallinger, Steven J.
    Mt Sinai Hosp, Dept Surg, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Samuel Lunenfeld Res Inst, 600 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada;Univ Hlth Network Toronto Gen Hosp, 200 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada.
    Ganz, Patricia A.
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Control Res, Sch Med, 650 Charles Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Jonsson Comprehens Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Control Res, Sch Publ Hlth, 650 Charles Young Dr South, Los Angeles, CA 90095 USA.
    Garber, Judy
    Dana Farber Canc Inst, Canc Risk & Prevent Clin, 450 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Hosp Clin San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Med Oncol Dept, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Calle Prof Martin Lagos, Madrid 28040, Spain.
    Gayther, Simon A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Ctr Canc Prevent & Translat Genom, Spielberg Bldg,8725 Alden Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Biomed Sci, Spielberg Bldg,8725 Alden Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Godwin, Andrew K.
    Univ Kansas, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, Med Ctr, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, Kansas City, KS 66160 USA.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;McGill Univ, Dept Med, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada;McGill Univ, Royal Victoria Hosp, Div Clin Epidemiol, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Sch Med, 2000 Circle Hope, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Goode, Ellen L.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Goodman, Marc T.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Canc Prevent & Control, 8700 Beverly Blvd,Room 1S37, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA;Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Dept Biomed Sci, Commun & Populat Hlth Res Inst, 8700 Beverly Blvd,Room 1S37, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Goodman, Gary
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Swedish Canc Inst, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1221 Madison StSte 300, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Grankvist, Kjell
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Umea Univ, Unit Clin Chem, Dept Med Biosci, 6M Van 2, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    Greene, Mark H.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;NCI, Clin Genet Branch, DCEG, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20850 USA.
    Gronberg, Henrik
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gronwald, Jacek
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Paris Saclay, Univ Paris Sud, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP, Canc & Environm Grp,INSERM, F-94805 Villejuif, France.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, Nobels Vag 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Sjukhusbacken 10, S-11883 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hamdy, Freddie C.
    Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Fac Med Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England.
    Hamilton, Robert J.
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, 610 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    Hampe, Jochen
    Tech Univ Dresden, Univ Hosp Dresden, Dept Internal Med 1, D-01307 Dresden, Germany.
    Haugen, Aage
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Inst Occupat Hlth STAMI, Gydas Vei 8, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
    Heitz, Florian
    DrHorst Schmidt Kliniken Wiesbaden, Dept Gynecol & Gynecol Oncol, Ludwig Erhard Str 100, D-65199 Wiesbaden, Germany;Knappschaft GmbH, Dept Gynecol & Gynecol Oncol, Kliniken Essen Mitte, EvangHuyssens Stiftung, Henricistr 92, D-45136 Essen, Germany.
    Herrero, Rolando
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Early Detect & Prevent Sect, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hoffmeister, Michael
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hogdall, Estrid
    Danish Canc Soc Res Ctr, Dept Virus Lifestyle & Genes, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Herlev Hosp, Dept Pathol, Mol Unit, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark.
    Hong, Yun-Chul
    Seoul Natl Univ, Coll Med, Prevent Med, 1 Gwanak Ro, Seoul 151742, South Korea.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Houlston, Richard
    Inst Canc Res, German Res Ctr Environm Hlth, Ingolstadter Landstr1, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Hulick, Peter J.
    NorthShore Univ HealthSystem, Ctr Med Genet, Evanston, IL 1000 USA;Univ Chicago, Pritzker Sch Med, 924 E 57th St, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Huntsman, David G.
    BC Canc Agcy, Vancouver Gen Hosp, British Columbias Ovarian Canc Res OVCARE Program, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;Univ British Columbia, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;BC Canc Agcy Res Ctr, Dept Mol Oncol, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada.
    Idos, Gregory
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Imyanitov, Evgeny N.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Pathol & Lab Med, 3427-600 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E6, Canada;NNPetrov Inst Oncol, Leningradskaya Ul 68, St Petersburg 197758, Russia.
    Ingles, Sue Ann
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Isaacs, Claudine
    Georgetown Univ, Lombardi Comprehens Canc Ctr, 3800 Reservoir Rd, Washington, DC 20007 USA.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Independent Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Rybacka 1, PL-70204 Szczecin, Poland.
    James, Paul
    Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia;Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Parkville Familial Canc Ctr, 305 Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3000, Australia.
    Jenkins, Mark A.
    Univ Melbourne, Victorian Comprehens Canc Ctr, Ctr Canc Res, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Johansson, Mattias
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Johansson, Mikael
    Umea Univ, Dept Radiat Sci, 6M Van 2, S-90185 Umea, Sweden.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Oncol, Dept Med, 780 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94304 USA;Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, 780 Welch Rd, Stanford, CA 94304 USA.
    Joshi, Amit D.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Clin & Translat Epidemiol Unit, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Kaneva, Radka
    Med Univ Sofia, Fac Med, Dept Med Chem & Biochem, Mol Med Ctr, Sofia 1504, Bulgaria.
    Karlan, Beth Y.
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Womens Canc Program, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Kelemen, Linda E.
    Med Univ South Carolina, Hollings Canc Ctr, 68 President St Bioengineering Bldg,MSC955, Charleston, SC 29425 USA;Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, 68 President St Bioengineering Bldg,MSC955, Charleston, SC 29425 USA.
    Kuhl, Tabea
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Clin Gerontol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, ulZaki Validi 32, Ufa 450076, Russia;Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa Sci Ctr, 71 Prosp Oktyabrya, Ufa 450054, Russia.
    Kibel, Adam S.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Urol Surg, Boston, MA USA.
    Kiemeney, Lambertus A.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Radboud Inst Hlth Sci, Med Ctr, Geert Grooteplein 21, NL-6525 EZ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Kim, Jeri
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Genitourinary Med Oncol, 1155 Pressler St, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kjaer, Susanne K.
    Danish Canc Soc Res Ctr, Dept Virus Lifestyle & Genes, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Dept Gynaecol, Rigshosp, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Knight, Julia A.
    Sinai Hlth Syst, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Prosserman Ctr Populat Hlth Res, 60 Murray St, Toronto, ON M5T 3L9, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dalla Lana Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, 155 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain;ISGlobal, Ctr Res Environm Epidemiol CREAL, Barcelona 08036, Spain;IMIM Hosp del Mar Res Inst, Barcelona 08003, Spain;UPF, Barcelona 08002, Spain.
    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Koutros, Stella
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, NIH, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Radiumhosp, Ullernchausseen 70, N-0379 Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Mol Biol, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.
    Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta
    Maria Sklodowska Curie Inst, Ctr Oncol, Dept Pathol & Lab Diagnost, Roentgena 5, PL-02781 Warsaw, Poland.
    Lacko, Martin
    Maastricht Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Otorhinolaryngol, Head & Neck Surg, PDebyelaan 25,POBox 5800, NL-6202 AZ Maastricht, Netherlands.
    Lam, Stephan
    British Columbia Canc Agcy, Dept Integrat Oncol, Room 10-111 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, VIB Ctr Canc Biol, Herestr 49, B-3001 Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Lab Translat Genet, Oude Markt 13, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Landi, Maria Teresa
    NCI, Integrat Tumor Epidemiol Branch, DCEG, 9609 Med Ctr Dr,Room SG 7E106, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Lazarus, Philip
    Washington State Univ, Coll Pharm, PBS 431 POB 1495, Spokane, WA 99210 USA.
    Le, Nhu D.
    BC Canc Agcy, Canc Control Res, 675 West 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1L3, Canada.
    Lee, Eunjung
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Israeli Canc Control Ctr, Clalit Hlth Serv, 2 Horev St, IL-3436212 Haifa, Israel.
    Lenz, Heinz-Josef
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Med, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Leslie, Goska
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Lessel, Davor
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Inst Human Genet, Martinistr 52, D-20246 Hamburg, Germany.
    Lester, Jenny
    Cedars Sinai Med Ctr, Samuel Oschin Comprehens Canc Inst, Womens Canc Program, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90048 USA.
    Levine, Douglas A.
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Surg, Gynecol Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA;NYU Langone Med Ctr, Laura & Isaac Pearlmutter Canc Ctr, Gynecol Oncol, 240 East 38th St 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016 USA.
    Li, Li
    Case Western Reserve Univ, Mary Ann Swetland Ctr Environm Hlth, Dept Family Med & Community Hlth, Cleveland, OH 44106 USA;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Serv Galego Saude SERGAS, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Li, Christopher I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Translat Res Program, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med & Surg, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindor, Noralane M.
    Mayo Clin Arizona, Hlth Sci Res, 13400 EShea Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85259 USA.
    Liu, Geoffrey
    Princess Margaret Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol, 610 Univ Ave, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    Loupakis, Fotios
    Ist Oncol Veneto IRCCS, Dept Clin & Expt Oncol, Unit Oncol 1, I-35122 Padua, Italy.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Int Hereditary Canc Ctr, ulUnii Lubelskiej 1, PL-71252 Szczecin, Poland.
    Maehle, Lovise
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Kirkeveien 166, N-0450 Oslo, Norway.
    Maier, Christiane
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Inst Human Genet, Prittwitzstr 43, D-89075 Ulm, Germany.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Yliopistonranta 1, Kuopio 70210, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, KuopioYliopistonranta 1, Kuopio 70210, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, Imaging Ctr, Puijonlaaksontie 2, Kuopio 70210, Finland.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Program Epidemiol, Ctr Canc, 701 Ilalo St, Honolulu, HI 96813 USA.
    Margolin, Sara
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    May, Taymaa
    Univ Hlth Network, Div Gynecol Oncol, Princess Margaret Hosp, 610 Univ Ave,OPG Wing 6-811, Toronto, ON M5G 2M9, Canada.
    McGuffog, Lesley
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Tech Univ Munich, Div Gynaecol & Obstet, Arcisstr 21, D-80333 Munich, Germany.
    Middha, Pooja
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Neuenheimer Feld 672, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Miller, Austin
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Stat & Data Management Ctr, NRG Oncol, Elm & Carlton St, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    MacInnis, Robert J.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, 615 St Kilda Rd, Melbourne, Vic 3004, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Modugno, Francesmary
    Magee Womens Res Inst, Canc Res Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA;Hillman Canc Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA;Univ Pittsburgh, Sch Med, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Reprod Sci, Div Gynecol Oncol, 300 Halket St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA.
    Montagna, Marco
    Veneto Inst Oncol IOV IRCCS, Immunol & Mol Oncol Unit, Via Gattamelata 64, I-35128 Padua, Italy.
    Moreno, Victor
    Consortium Biomed Res Epidemiol & Publ Hlth CIBER, Bellvitge Biomed Res Inst IDIBELL, Catalan Inst Oncol, Barcelona 08908, Spain;Univ Barcelona, Barcelona 08908, Spain.
    Moysich, Kirsten B.
    Roswell Pk Canc Inst, Div Canc Prevent & Control, Elm & Carlton St, Buffalo, NY 14263 USA.
    Mucci, Lorelei
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Muir, Kenneth
    Univ Manchester, Div Populat Hlth Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England;Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Div Hlth Sci, Coventry CV4 7AL, W Midlands, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, 1 Kings Coll Circle, Toronto, ON M5S 1A8, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, 200 Elizabeth St, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada.
    Nathanson, Katherine L.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Abramson Canc Ctr, Dept Med, 3400 Civ Ctr Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Neal, David E.
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Robinson Way, Cambridge CB2 0RE, England;Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Nuffield Dept Surg Sci, Fac Med Sci, Oxford OX1 2JD, England;Univ Cambridge, Addenbrookes Hosp, Dept Oncol, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Ness, Andrew R.
    Univ Bristol, NIHR Bristol Biomed Res Ctr Nutr Theme, Upper Maudlin St, Bristol BS2 8AE, Avon, England.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Res Inst City Hope, Dept Populat Sci, 1500 E Duarte, Duarte, CA 91010 USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Haartmaninkatu 8, FIN-00290 Helsinki, Finland.
    Newcomb, Polly A.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, 1959 NE Pacific St,Hlth Sci Bldg,F-350, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Newcomb, Lisa F.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Urol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Nielsen, Finn Cilius
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Rigshosp, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nikitina-Zake, Liene
    Latvian Biomed Res & Study Ctr, Ratsupites Str 1, LV-1067 Riga, Latvia.
    Nordestgaard, Borge G.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-75 Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Blegdamsvej 3B, DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Nussbaum, Robert L.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Canc Genet & Prevent Program, 1600 Div St, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Clin Genet Res Lab, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10065 USA.
    Olah, Edith
    Natl Inst Oncol, Dept Mol Genet, Rath Gyorgy u7-9, H-1122 Budapest, Hungary.
    Al Olama, Ali Amin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Clin Neurosci, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, 5841S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 135 Dauer Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA;UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, 450 West Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Barngatan 4, S-22242 Lund, Sweden.
    Osorio, Ana
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Calle Melchor Fernandez Almagro 3, Madrid 28029, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain.
    Pandha, Hardev
    Univ Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey, England.
    Park, Jong Y.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Pashayan, Nora
    UCL, Dept Appl Hlth Res, 1-19 Torrington Pl, London WC1E 6BT, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Strangeways Lab, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Parsons, Michael T.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Pejovic, Tanja
    Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Pk Rd,L-466, Portland, OR 97239 USA;Oregon Hlth & Sci Univ, Knight Canc Inst, 3181 SW Sam Jackson Pk Rd,L-466, Portland, OR 97239 USA.
    Penney, Kathryn L.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Channing Div Network Med, Dept Med, 181 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Peters, Wilbert H. M.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Med Ctr, Dept Gastroenterol, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 10,Internal BOBox 433, NL-6525 GA Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Phelan, Catherine M.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Phipps, Amanda I.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana
    Macedonian Acad Sci & Arts, Res Ctr Genet Engn & Biotechnol Georgi DEfremov, Blvd Krste Petkov Misirkov, Skopje 1000, Macedonia.
    Pring, Miranda
    Univ Bristol, Bristol Dent Sch, Lower Maudlin St, Bristol BS1 2LY, Avon, England.
    Prokofyeva, Darya
    Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, ulZaki Validi 32, Ufa 450076, Russia.
    Radice, Paolo
    INT, Fdn IRCCS, Dept Res, Unit Mol Bases Genet Risk & Genet Testing, Via Giacomo Venezian 1, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Decode Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Ramus, Susan J.
    Univ NSW Sydney, Sch Womens & Childrens Hlth, Fac Med, 18 High St, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia;Garvan Inst Med Res, Kinghorn Canc Ctr, 384 Victoria St, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.
    Raskin, Leon
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, 1161 21st Ave S D3300, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Rennert, Gad
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, 7 Michal St, IL-34362 Haifa, Israel.
    van Rensburg, Elizabeth J.
    Univ Pretoria, Dept Genet, Private Bag X323, ZA-0007 Arcadia, South Africa.
    Riggan, Marjorie J.
    Duke Univ, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Med Ctr, 25171 Morris Bldg, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Risch, Harvey A.
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Chron Dis Epidemiol, 60 Coll St, New Haven, CT 06510 USA.
    Risch, Angela
    Salzburg Univ, Dept Mol Biol, Canc Ctr Cluster Salzburg, PLUS, Billrothstr11, A-5020 Salzburg, Austria;DKFZ German Canc Res Ctr, Div Epigen & Canc Risk Factors, Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;German Ctr Lung Res DZL, TLRC H, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany.
    Roobol, Monique J.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Urol, Wytemaweg 80, NL-3015 CN Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Rosenstein, Barry S.
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Radiat Oncol, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 USA;Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, 1425 Madison Ave, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Rossing, Mary Anne
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, Program Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, M4 C308,1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    De Ruyck, Kim
    Univ Ghent, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, Basic Med Sci, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Hereditary Canc Clin, Iraklion 71110, Greece.
    Sandler, Dale P.
    NIEHS, Epidemiol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Kings Coll London, Guys Hosp, Guys Hosp Great Maze Pond, Res Oncol, London SE1 9RT, England.
    Schabath, Matthew B.
    HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Schleutker, Johanna
    Univ Turku, Inst Biomed, Turku 20014, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Med Genet, Div Lab, Turku 20014, Finland;Univ Tampere, Fac Med & Life Sci, Prostate Canc Res Ctr, Tampere 33014, Finland;Univ Tampere, BioMediTech Inst, Tampere 33014, Finland.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Pathol, Plesmanlaan 121, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Plesmanlaan 121, NL-1066 CX Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Setiawan, V. Wendy
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1450 Biggy St, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Shen, Hongbing
    Nanjing Med Univ, Collaborat Innovat Ctr Canc Personalized Med, Jiangsu Key Lab Canc Biomarkers Prevent & Treatme, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat,Sch Publ Hlth, 101 Longmian Ave, Nanjing 211166, Jiangsu, Peoples R China.
    Siegel, Erin M.
    H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr MRC CANCONT, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Sieh, Weiva
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Dept Populat Hlth Sci & Policy, Dept Genet & Genom Sci, 1425 Madison Ave,2nd Floor, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Singer, Christian F.
    Med Univ Vienna, Dept OB GYN, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria;Med Univ Vienna, Ctr Comprehens Canc, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna, Austria.
    Slattery, Martha L.
    Univ Utah, Dept Internal Med, Hlth Sci Ctr, 295 Chipeta Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 USA.
    Sorensen, Karina Dalsgaard
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Mol Med, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark;Aarhus Univ, Dept Clin Med, DK-8200 Aarhus, Denmark.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, 246 Clayton Rd, Clayton, Vic 3168, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Cnr Grattan St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Royal Parade, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia.
    Spurdle, Amanda B.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Stanford, Janet L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Stevens, Victoria L.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, 250 Williams St NW, Atlanta, GA 30303 USA.
    Stintzing, Sebastian
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Univ Hosp, Dept Med 3, Marchioninistr15, D-81377 Munich, Germany.
    Stone, Jennifer
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Level 1,723 Swanston St, Melbourne, Vic 3010, Australia;Curtin Univ, Curtin UWA Ctr Genet Origins Hlth & Dis, 35 Stirling Hwy, Perth, WA 6000, Australia;Univ Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Perth, WA 6000, Australia.
    Sundfeldt, Karin
    Univ Gothenburg, Inst Clin Sci, Sahlgrenska Canc Ctr, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Bla Straket 6, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Sutphen, Rebecca
    Univ S Florida, Coll Med, Epidemiol Ctr, 3650 Spectrum Blvd,Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London SW7 3RP, England.
    Tajara, Eloiza H.
    Sch Med Sao Jose do Rio Preto, Dept Mol Biol, Av Brig Faria Lima 5416 Vila Sao Pedro, BR-15090000 Sao Jose Do Rio Preto, SP, Brazil;Univ Sao Paulo, Inst Biosci, Dept Genet & Evolut Biol, Rua Matao 321, BR-05508090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil.
    Tangen, Catherine M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, SWOG Stat Ctr, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Tardon, Adonina
    Univ Oviedo, Fac Med, Campus Cristo S-N, E-33006 Oviedo, Spain;CIBERESP, Campus Cristo S-N, Oviedo 33006, Spain.
    Taylor, Jack A.
    NIEHS, Epidemiol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA;NIEHS, Epigenet & Stem Cell Biol Lab, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Teare, M. Dawn
    Univ Sheffield, Sch Hlth & Related Res ScHARR, Med Stat Grp, Regent Court,30 Regent St, Sheffield S1 4DA, S Yorkshire, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncol Inst, Dept Genet, Rua DrAntonio Bernardino de Almeida 62, P-4220072 Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Biomed Sci Inst ICBAS, RJorge de Viterbo Ferreira 228, P-4050013 Porto, Portugal.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 722 West 168th St, New York, NY 10032 USA.
    Terry, Kathryn L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Obstet & Gynecol Epidemiol Ctr, 221 Longwood Ave RFB 368, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard THChan Sch Publ Hlth, 221 Longwood Ave RFB 368, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Thibodeau, Stephen N.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Thomassen, Mads
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Sonder Blvd 29, DK-5000 Odense C, Denmark.
    Bjorge, Line
    Haukeland Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, N-5021 Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Dept Clin Sci, Ctr Canc Biomarkers CCBIO, N-5021 Bergen, Norway.
    Tischkowitz, Marc
    McGill Univ, Dept Human Genet & Oncol, Program Canc Genet, 1001 Decarie Blvd, Montreal, PQ H4A 3J1, Canada;Univ Cambridge, Dept Med Genet, Hills Rd, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 460W12th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Torres, Diana
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Neuenheimer Feld 580, D-69120 Heidelberg, Germany;Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Inst Human Genet, Carrera 7 40-90, Bogota, Colombia.
    Townsend, Paul A.
    Univ Manchester, NIHR Manchester Biomed Res Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth,Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Div Canc Sci,Manchester Canc Res Ctr,Hlth Innovat, Manchester M20 4GJ, Lancs, England.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Canc Epidemiol Unit, Oxford OX3 7LF, England.
    Tung, Nadine
    Beth Israel Deaconess Med Ctr, Dept Med Oncol, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215 USA.
    Tworoger, Shelley S.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;HLee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Canc Epidemiol, 12902 Magnolia Dr, Tampa, FL 33612 USA.
    Ulrich, Cornelia M.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Utah, Huntsman Canc Inst, 2000 Circle Hope,Rm 4125, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA;Univ Utah, Dept Populat Hlth Sci, 2000 Circle Hope,Rm 4125, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA.
    Usmani, Nawaid
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Univ Alberta, Cross Canc Inst, Dept Oncol, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada;Univ Alberta, Cross Canc Inst, Div Radiat Oncol, 116 St & 85 Ave, Edmonton, AB T6G 2R3, Canada.
    Vachon, Celine M.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Epidemiol Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France;Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, 200 First StSW, Rochester, MN 55905 USA.
    Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Div Gynecol Oncol, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium;Univ Hosp Leuven, Leuven Canc Inst, Herestr 49, B-3000 Leuven, Belgium.
    Vega, Ana
    Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, AvMonforte Lemos,3-5Pabellon 11Planta 0, Madrid 28029, Spain;Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Aguado-Barrera, Miguel Elias
    Fdn Publ Galega Med Xenom, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain;Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela, Calle Choupana S-N, Santiago De Compostela 15706, Spain.
    Wang, Qin
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Webb, Penelope M.
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Populat Hlth Dept, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Weinberg, Clarice R.
    NIEHS, Biostat & Computat Biol Branch, NIH, 111TWAlexander Dr, Res Triangle Pk, NC 27709 USA.
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Weissler, Mark C.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Otolaryngol Head & Neck Surg, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 USA.
    Weitzel, Jeffrey N.
    City Hope Clin Canc Genom Community Res Network, 1500 East Duarte Rd, Duarte, CA 91010 USA.
    West, Catharine M. L.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Christie Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Div Canc Sci,Manchester Canc Res Ctr, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England.
    White, Emily
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Whittemore, Alice S.
    Stanford Univ, Dept Hlth Res & Policy Epidemiol, Sch Med, 259 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Dept Biomed Data Sci, Sch Med, 259 Campus Dr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Wichmann, H-Erich
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Chair Epidemiol, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany;Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Inst Med Informat Biometry & Epidemiol, Chair Epidemiol, Munich, Bavaria, Germany;German Res Ctr Environm Hlth GmbH, Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Inst Epidemiol, Ingolstadter Landstr1, D-85764 Neuherberg, Germany;Tech Univ Munich, Inst Med Stat & Epidemiol, D-80333 Munich, Germany.
    Wiklund, Fredrik
    Karolinska Inst, Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Winqvist, Robert
    Univ Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Canc & Translat Med Res Unit, Bioctr Oulu, Aapistie 5A, SF-90220 Oulu, Finland;Northern Finland Lab Ctr Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Aapistie 5A, Oulu 90220, Finland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Dept Environm Med, Nobels Vag 13, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Woll, Penella
    Univ Sheffield, Weston Pk Hosp, Acad Unit Clin Oncol, Whitham Rd, Sheffield S10 2SJ, S Yorkshire, England.
    Woods, Michael
    Mem Univ Newfoundland, Discipline Genet, St John, NF A1C 5S7, Canada.
    Wu, Anna H.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Wu, Xifeng
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Div Canc Prevent & Populat Sci, Dept Epidemiol, 1515 Holcombe Blvd, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Yannoukakos, Drakoulis
    Natl Ctr Sci Res Demokritos, Mol Diagnost Lab, INRASTES, Neapoleos 10, Athens 15310, Greece.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, 1161 21st Ave S D3300, Nashville, TN 37232 USA.
    Zienolddiny, Shanbeh
    Natl Inst Occupat Hlth STAMI, Gydas Vei 8, N-0033 Oslo, Norway.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, 224 Irvine Hall, Irvine, CA 92617 USA.
    Zorn, Kristin K.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Womens Hosp, Sch Med, 300 Halket St, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA.
    Lane, Jacqueline M.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Anasthesia, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Saxena, Richa
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Dept Anasthesia, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Thomas, Duncan
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Hung, Rayjean J.
    Sinai Hlth Syst, Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst, Prosserman Ctr Populat Hlth Res, 60 Murray St, Toronto, ON M5T 3L9, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dalla Lana Sch Publ Hlth, Div Epidemiol, 155 Coll St, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada.
    Diergaarde, Brenda
    Univ Pittsburgh, Grad Sch Publ Hlth, Human Genet, UPMC Canc Pavil,Suite 4C,Off 467,5150 Ctr Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA;UPMC Hillman Canc Ctr, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 USA.
    Mckay, James
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Genet Canc Susceptibil Grp, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Peters, Ulrike
    Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Hsu, Li
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, 9609 Med Ctr Dr, Rockville, MD 20850 USA.
    Eeles, Rosalind A.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, 15 Cotswold Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Inst Canc Res, Oncogenet Team, Downs Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England;Royal Marsden NHS Fdn Trust, Downs Rd, Sutton SM2 5NG, Surrey, England.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, 300 Herston Rd, Brisbane, Qld 4006, Australia.
    Brennan, Paul J.
    Int Agcy Res Canc, Sect Genet, 150 Cours Albert Thomas, F-69008 Lyon, France.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 48109 USA.
    Simard, Jacques
    Univ Laval, Res Ctr, Ctr Hosp Univ Quebec, Genom Ctr, 2705 Laurier Blvd, Quebec City, PQ G1V 4G2, Canada.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Gruber, Stephen B.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, 1975 Zonal Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90033 USA.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, 2 Worts Causeway, Cambridge CB1 8RN, England.
    Price, Alkes L.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, 75 Ames St, Cambridge, MA 02142 USA.
    Pasaniuc, Bogdan
    Univ Calif Los Angeles, UCLA Path & Lab Med, 10833 Le Conte Ave, Los Angeles, CA 19009 USA.
    Amos, Christopher I.
    Baylor Coll Med, Inst Clin & Translat Res, Epidemiol Sect, Dept Med, One Baylor Plaza,MS BCM451,Suite 100D, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 677 Huntington Ave, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109 USA;Univ Washington, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Shared heritability and functional enrichment across six solid cancers2019In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 10, article id 431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantifying the genetic correlation between cancers can provide important insights into the mechanisms driving cancer etiology. Using genome-wide association study summary statistics across six cancer types based on a total of 296,215 cases and 301,319 controls of European ancestry, here we estimate the pair-wise genetic correlations between breast, colorectal, head/neck, lung, ovary and prostate cancer, and between cancers and 38 other diseases. We observed statistically significant genetic correlations between lung and head/neck cancer (r(g) = 0.57, p = 4.6 x 10(-8)), breast and ovarian cancer (r(g) = 0.24, p = 7 x 10(-5)), breast and lung cancer (r(g) = 0.18, p = 1.5 x 10(-6)) and breast and colorectal cancer (r(g) = 0.15, p = 1.1 x 10(-4)). We also found that multiple cancers are genetically correlated with non-cancer traits including smoking, psychiatric diseases and metabolic characteristics. Functional enrichment analysis revealed a significant excess contribution of conserved and regulatory regions to cancer heritability. Our comprehensive analysis of cross-cancer heritability suggests that solid tumors arising across tissues share in part a common germline genetic basis.

  • Dibitetto, Giuseppe
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Petri, Nicolo
    Bogazici Univ, Dept Math, TR-34342 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Surface defects in the D4-D8 brane system2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 1, article id 193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new class of exact supersymmetric solutions is derived within minimal d = 6 F(4) gauged supergravity. These flows are all characterized by a non-trivial radial profile for the 2-form gauge potential included into the supergravity multiplet. In particular three solutions within this class are featured by an AdS(3) foliation of the 6d background and by an AdS(6) asymptotic geometry. Secondly, considering the simplest example of these, we give its massive IIA uplift describing a warped solution of the type AdS(3) x S-2 x S-3 fibered over two intervals I-r x I. We interpret this background as the near-horizon of a D4-D8 system on which a bound state D2-NS5-D6 ends producing a surface defect. Finally we discuss its holographic dual interpretation in terms of a N = (0, 4) SCFT2 defect theory within the N = 2 SCFT5 dual to the AdS(6) x S-4 massive IIA warped vacuum.

  • Endres, Sonja
    et al.
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res, Biol Oceanog, Kiel, Germany;Max Planck Inst Chem, Climate Geochem, Mainz, Germany.
    Maes, Frank
    Univ Ghent, Maritime Inst, Fac Law & Criminol, Ghent, Belgium.
    Hopkins, Frances
    Plymouth Marine Lab, Plymouth, Devon, England.
    Houghton, Katherine
    Inst Adv Sustainabil Studies, Potsdam, Germany.
    Mårtensson, E. Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Oeffner, Johannes
    Fraunhofer Ctr Maritime Logist & Serv, Hamburg, Germany.
    Quack, Birgit
    GEOMAR Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res, Chem Oceanog, Kiel, Germany.
    Singh, Pradeep
    Univ Bremen, Ctr Marine Environm Sci, Bremen, Germany;Univ Bremen, Fac Law, Bremen, Germany.
    Turner, David
    Univ Gothenburg, Dept Marine Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    A New Perspective at the Ship-Air-Sea-Interface: The Environmental Impacts of Exhaust Gas Scrubber Discharge2018In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 5, article id 139Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Shipping emissions are likely to increase significantly in the coming decades, alongside increasing emphasis on the sustainability and environmental impacts of the maritime transport sector. Exhaust gas cleaning systems ("scrubbers"), using seawater or fresh water as cleaning media for sulfur dioxide, are progressively used by shipping companies to comply with emissions regulations. Little is known about the chemical composition of the scrubber effluent and its ecological consequences for marine life and biogeochemical processes. If scrubbers become a central tool for atmospheric pollution reduction from shipping, modeling, and experimental studies will be necessary to determine the ecological and biogeochemical effects of scrubber wash water discharge on the marine environment. Furthermore, attention must be paid to the regulation and enforcement of environmental protection standards concerning scrubber use. Close collaboration between natural scientists and social scientists is crucial for progress toward sustainable shipping and protection of the marine environment.

  • Bzowski, Adam
    et al.
    CEA Saclay, Inst Phys Theor, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Guica, Monica
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics. CEA Saclay, Inst Phys Theor, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France;Stockholm Univ, NORDITA, Roslagstullsbacken 23, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Roslagstullsbacken 23, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The holographic interpretation of J¯T-deformed CFTs2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 1, article id 198Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, a non-local yet possibly UV-complete quantum field theory has been constructed by deforming a two-dimensional CFT by the composite operator JT, where J is a chiral U(1) current and T is a component of the stress tensor. Assuming the original CFT was a holographic CFT, we work out the holographic dual of its JT deformation. We find that the dual spacetime is still AdS(3), but with modified boundary conditions that mix the metric and the Chern-Simons gauge field dual to the U(1) current. We show that when the coefficient of the chiral anomaly for J vanishes, the energy and thermodynamics of black holes obeying these modified boundary conditions precisely reproduce the previously derived field theory spectrum and thermodynamics. Our proposed holographic dictionary can also reproduce the field-theoretical spectrum in presence of the chiral anomaly, upon a certain assumption that we justify. The asymptotic symmetry group associated to these boundary conditions consists of two copies of the Virasoro and one copy of the U(1) Ka-Moody algebra, just as before the deformation; the only effect of the latter is to modify the spacetime dependence of the right-moving Virasoro generators, whose action becomes state-dependent and effectively non-local.

  • Rosén, Matilda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    Shamaner, komplicerade ceremonier och heliga stenar: En religionshistorisk studie av religion som kategori i Etnografiska museets utställning Nordamerikas indianer2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    What is religion? That is a question that have been asked and answered over and over again since the invention of the word itself. The definition of religion is still engaging and dividing social science. Despite that, the word has a untaught part of our everyday life. We meet the word on the news, in conversations and in education. What we may not consider is that religion is a product of it’s own history which until today, influences the understanding of it. The definition of it is also produced and reproduced in different contexts. These contexts in which religion is presented and explained imprint thus our understanding of religion.

    This paper aim to examine what religion is and how it is defined and described in the context of a museum, more particularly the exhibition Nordamerikas indianer at Etnografiska museet in Stockholm, Sweden.

  • Heddini, Andreas
    et al.
    GSK, GSK Nord Cluster, Solna, Sweden.
    Sundh, Josefin
    Orebro Univ, Dept Resp Med, Sch Med Sci, Orebro, Sweden.
    Ekström, Magnus
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund Resp Med & Allergol, Lund, Sweden.
    Janson, Christer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Effectiveness trials: critical data to help understand how respiratory medicines really work?2019In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1565804Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most of the information about the benefits, safety aspects, and cost effectiveness of pharmacological treatment in the respiratory field has been obtained from traditional efficacy studies, such as randomised controlled trials (RCT). The highly controlled environment of an RCT does not always reflect everyday practice. The collection, analysis, and application of effectiveness data to generate Real World Evidence (RWE) through pragmatic trials or observational studies therefore has the potential to improve decision making by regulators, payers, and clinicians. Despite calls for more RWE, effectiveness data are not widely used in decision making in the respiratory field. Recent advances in data capture, curation, and storage combined with new analytical tools have now made it feasible for effectiveness data to become routine sources of evidence to supplement traditional efficacy data. In this paper, we will examine some of the current data gaps, diverse types of effectiveness data, look at proposed frameworks for the positioning of effectiveness data, as well as provide examples from therapeutic areas. We will give examples of both previous effectiveness studies and studies that are ongoing within the respiratory field. Effectiveness data hold the potential to address several evidentiary gaps related to the effectiveness, safety, and value of treatments in patients with respiratory diseases.

  • Sigvardsson, Angeliqa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Stork, Carolin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Kan flickor vara våldsamma och pojkar omtänksamma?: Olika typer av karaktärer som går att identifiera i några av skolans läromedel2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie handlar om hur olika föreställningar om manlighet och kvinnlighet framställs i läseböcker som används i skolan. Den bakomliggande teorin för denna studie är socialkonstruktivism samt Yvonne Hirdmans genussystem/genusordning med fokus på den dikotomiska uppdelningen av vad som anses vara manligt och kvinnligt. Syftet med studien är att bidra med en förståelse för hur manlighet och kvinnlighet kan framställas i läseböcker som används i grundskolans tidigare år. Den frågeställning som vägleder arbetet är: Vilka olika typer av karaktärer går att identifiera med hjälp av de egenskaper och beteenden som beskriver män/pojkar och kvinnor/flickor i läseböckerna? För att kunna genomföra denna studie och besvara den frågeställning vi ställt har kvalitativa samt komparativa analyser av text och bild i fyra stycken läseböcker som används i grundskolans tidigare år gjorts. Fem olika karaktärstyper kunde identifieras. Vi har valt att kalla dem Den vackra flickan/kvinnan (kvinnliga karaktärer som är omtänksamma, snälla och bryr sig om sitt utseende), Den aggressiva pojken/mannen (manliga karaktärer som är våldsamma, aggressiva och hotfulla), Det mångsidiga barnet (pojkar och flickor som visar på en kombination av manliga och kvinnliga egenskaper), Den mångsidiga vuxna (kvinnor och män som visar på en kombination av manliga och kvinnliga egenskaper) samt Den brytande karaktären (karaktärer som endast visar upp egenskaper från det motsatta könet).  Slutsatsen vi kunde dra var att böckerna visade upp en variation av hur manlighet och kvinnlighet framställs i läseböcker som används i grundskolans tidigare år.

  • Johannesson, Pontus
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala University Innovation (UU Innovation).
    Nilsson, Alexander
    Skola eller särskola?: ”Då är det kört, då är han eller hon utvecklingsstörd”2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Eriksson, Victoria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Upplevelser av tacksamhetskrav: En studie kring upplevelser av en invandraridentitet och krav på tacksamhet riktat mot första generationens invandrare i Sverige.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Knoph, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Socialvetare utan yrkesexamen: En etnografisk studie om studenters förhoppningar om sin framtida arbetsmarknad2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines college students, studying their final year of their bachelors’ in social work at Gävle Collage, Sweden, and their aspirations for their future after graduating. The students are immigrants to Sweden and they come from less fortunate family backgrounds. As the results demonstrate, the family background of the students and their collage experiences, shape their aspirations. To demonstrate this, the study draws to the anthropological research of Arjun Appadurai (2004). He argues that the individuals’ capacity to aspire is a navigational capacity, which is determined by the individuals access to various resources. My results show that despite the students’ difficult backgrounds, they have developed the resources to confidently orient their future. A further analysis suggests that the students’ aspirations, despite their less fortunate backgrounds, are reasonable in today’s Swedish society.

  • Fröberg, Klara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Att vara ung kvinna och feminist: En uppsats om vad det innebär för unga kvinnor i Uppsala att identifiera sig som feminist2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Att vara feminist har olika innebörd beroende på vilken kvinna man tillfrågar. Hela ordet feminism har olika innebörd för olika kvinnor. Denna uppsats handlar om hur feminismen tar sig uttryck i fem unga kvinnors liv, vad innebörden av att vara feminist är för dem och hur de lever som feminister, hur identifikationen som feminist påverkar deras vardag och på sätt och vis är deras vardag. Vad det är att vara feminist utifrån ett politiskt perspektiv, men även ett socialt och personligt perspektiv om vad det innebär för dessa kvinnor personligen. Att vara feminist är för dessa kvinnor en del av deras identitet och är därför en stor del av deras varande. Denna uppsats är en diskussion om hur man kan prata om feminism i termer av olika feminismer och hur feminismen har kommit att bli en individuell tolkning allt mer sen allt fler unga kvinnor har börjat identifiera sig som feminister. Denna uppsats tar även upp ämnet om hur det finns olika habitus med fokus på kön i samhället, dels en diskus- sion om hur det finns ett feministiskt habitus, men också ett patriarkalt habitus i samhället som feminister arbetar för att bekämpa.

  • Steinfurth, Karolin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Face in Japanese culture: A study on the importance of face and the relation to shame, based on the example of Japanese living in the Stockholm/Uppsala region2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This bachelor thesis conducts an anthropological study of the definition of face within Japanese culture through literature as well as by Japanese people in the age group 20 to 30 years living in the Stockholm/Uppsala region. It further investigates how face is related to shame and, in which conditions shame is felt by the above-mentioned target group. Having analyzed when shame occurs, the study further enquires how these Japanese people avoid shameful situations and how this relates to their face. As a core theme to this thesis will be an analysis of the conducted interviews with the help of Japanese anthropologist Takie Lebra’s definition of shame. This thesis will demonstrate how these Japanese informants are influenced, how they react to shaming situations and how it is related to their face.

  • Sjödin, Frida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Jag vill också ha en bästis: En antropologisk studie av framställningar av kvinnlig vänskap i textmaterial publicerat på hemsidan GoFrendly.se2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Att kvinnor i alla åldrar har vänner är ett allmänt känt faktum. Dock har denna relation ägnats lite uppmärksamhet. Det beror på att det samhälle vi lever i präglas av en maskulin dominans. Den styr vilka relationer som vi kommer att uppfatta som betydelsefulla, i vuxenlivet är detta främst den heterosexuella parrelationen. Hemsidan GoFrendly.se marknadsför en app som syftar till att hjälpa vuxna kvinnor finna vänner i andra kvinnor. Trots att vänskap är en relation som tenderar att ses som av liten betydelse spelar den en stor roll. Det visar bland annat materialet på hemsidan. Det är bland annat genom den som kvinnor tränar upp och diskuterar görandet av sin femininitet. Något som är avgörande för att den maskulina dominansen ska kunna upprätthållas. Utan en uppdelning mellan könen kan ingen överordnas den andre. Det finns även många andra aspekter av relationen utöver genus som gör den annorlunda mot ett heterosexuellt förhållande. Bland annat uppmuntras en gruppgemenskap och det dras många paralleller till relationer vi hade när vi var barn. Saker som dels kan uppfattas som del i underordnandet av kvinnan men som även kan ses som ett aktivt maktutövande av henne själv. Oavsett hur vi väljer att se på detta står det klart att strukturen producerar föreställningar om vänskap som i sin tur påverkar hur den framställs på hemsidan GoFrendly.se.  

  • Kilje, Bim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    The Conception of Responsibility: Experiences of and Reflections on Male Contraceptive Responsibility in Sweden2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay examines male contraceptive responsibility in theory and practice, within the framework of experiences of existing contraceptives, as well as views on new contraceptives for men that are being researched.

       In today’s Sweden, contraception is largely a female area. However, with progress on the area of research into new hormonal male contraceptives, we might be headed towards a different reality. In hope of gaining a fuller understanding of contraceptive experiences, this paper aims to contribute to the understudied area of men and reproduction, and add understanding of how men would approach a new contraceptive.

       The empirical material consists of in-depth interviews with five male Medicine students and Intern Physicians living in Sweden – some of the people who are going to influence other’s contraceptive realities in their professional practice. The essay explores the social contexts in which these men’s personal contraceptive experiences and thoughts around responsibility are created.

       The results show that women use contraceptive methods to a greater extent than men do. However, it is thought among the students and Physicians that contraceptive responsibility should be equal between the genders, and the approach to using a new male contraceptive is positive.

       Female contraceptive use is understood by the informants as a “burden”, the sharing of which is posed as the main reason to use new male contraceptives. New male contraceptives are hence found to be understood as a female right, rather than a male right.

       The essay shows that perceptions of responsibilities for contraception are rooted in cultural discourses, such as the assumption that women are more concerned to avoid pregnancy, and that it is difficult to develop contraceptives for men. Therefore, new male contraceptives might extend the possibilities for men to be involved in contraception – but our gendered ideas of, for example risk, might not change just because new contraceptives become available.

  • Thörnqvist, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Framing Nature: A discussion on the ethics of animal confinement in animal parks2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The confinement of animals is today a widespread, widely accepted practice, regardless of the intention behind it. The confinement of animals for entertainment purposes, however, poses ethical questions that transgress the body of the animal itself and onto the boundaries of the human. What happens when a captured animal behaves differently from what we expect of it? Different from what we’ve trained it to?

    SeaWorld and Kolmården are two parks that both display animals in different ways. Both advertise themselves as offering unique experiences; close up encounters with animals that would most likely not happen in the wild. Both parks have also been subject to predatory animals behaving in unexpected ways. Furthermore, the artificial relationships established between humans and nonhumans in captivity have in the cases of SeaWorld and Kolmården proven to create a dangerous environment for both humans and animals. The ethical dilemmas that arises in correlations with the deadly-outcome incidents that have occurred in the parks, takes the form of questions regarding if confining animals such as wolves and orcas are ethically defensible in the first place

  • Adem, Aida
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    Den delade patriotismen: En antropologisk studie om den upplevda patriotismen bland Stockholms eritreaner2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Larson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Energiberäkning och utvärdering av valbara värmekällor för skolbyggnad vid Miljöbyggnadskrav2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A school will be built in Upplands Väsby, north of Stockholm, Sweden. The school will be located outside the district heating area. The selected location for the school is also inside a water protection area. The available heating system for the school at the located site has been examined and compared against the set requirements in Miljöbyggnad, a Swedish environmental certification system for buildings. In addition, the available heating systems for the school have been compared in a Life Cycle Cost analysis. To address these questions, energy calculations were done in VIP Energy. For deeper understanding, a literary study was done and study visits to two different schools in Enköping.  

    The results show that the school achieved grade GOLD for indicator 1 when the school use heat pumps as source of heating. When using a pellet boiler, the grade SILVER where achieved for indicator 1. For indicator 2, the school fulfilled the set requirement for grade SILVER regardless of heating system in the building. When eco-labeled electricity was used, the school received grade GOLD for indicator 4 regardless of heating system in the building. If no eco-labeled electricity was used, the grade GOLD was only achieved if a pellets boiler was used as heating source. Geothermal heating was recommended for the school when combining the result from requirements in Miljobyggnad and the results for the Life Cycle Cost analysis. If drilling for thermal heating would be disapproved, air/water heat pumps where recommended as heating system for the school.

  • Tegby, Oskar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Analysis and Probability Theory.
    The Laplacian in its different guises2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Eriksson, Linnéa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics.
    PSA testing, seasonal variation and relations to media in terms of prostate cancer2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Fraile, Marc
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics.
    A study of an approximate equation for sharp fronts in the generalized Surface Quasi-Geostrophic Equations in the cylinder2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Treacy, Brian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Analysis and Probability Theory.
    A stochastic differential equation derived from evolutionary game theory2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Zhang, Hanqian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Ericsson, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Weström, Simone
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Vahlquist, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Virtanen, Marie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Törmä, Hans
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Dermatology and Venereology.
    Patients with congenital ichthyosis and TGM1 mutations overexpress other ARCI genes in the skin: Part of a barrier repair response?2018In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Autosomal recessive congenital ichthyosis (ARCI) is a group of monogenic skin disorders caused by mutations in any of at least 12 different genes, many of which are involved in the epidermal synthesis of ω-O-acylceramides (acylCer). AcylCer are essential precursors of the corneocyte lipid envelope crosslinked by transglutaminase-1 (TGm-1), or a yet unidentified enzyme, for normal skin barrier formation. We hypothesized that inactivating TGM1 mutations will lead to a compensatory overexpression of the transcripts involved in skin barrier repair, including many other ARCI-causing genes. Using microarray we examined the global mRNA expression profile in skin biopsies from five ARCI-patients with TGM1 mutations and four healthy controls. There were a total of 599 significantly differentially expressed genes (adjusted P<0.05), out of which 272 showed more than 1.5 log2fold-change (FC) up- or down-regulation. Functional classification of the latter group of transcripts showed enrichment of mRNA encoding proteins mainly associated with biological pathways involved in keratinocyte differentiation and immune response. Moreover, the expression of seven out of twelve ARCI-causing genes were significantly increased (FC=0.98-2.05). Also, many of the genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation (cornified envelope formation) and immune response (anti-microbial peptides and proinflammatory cytokines) were upregulated. The results from the microarray analysis were also verified for selected genes at the mRNA level by qPCR and at the protein level by semi-quantitative immunofluorescence. The upregulation of these genes might reflect a compensatory induction of acylCer biosynthesis as a part of a global barrier repair response in the patient´s epidermis.

  • Bernerstedt, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Unintentionally Helping the Radical Right?: A Study on the Swedish Established Parties' Articulation on the Immigration Issue and the Electoral Support for the Swedish Radical Right.2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years Sweden has witnessed an unprecedented electoral support for the radical right in domestic politics. Similar developments for radical right parties have in the last decades been observed around Western Europe, and scholars have tried to identify the reasons for this (arguably surprising) political trend. One possible explanation is presented by the legitimisation theory, which holds that when the political parties incorporate more of the issues typically associated with the radical right into their own party agenda in the hopes of regaining lost votes they simultaneously legitimise the controversial issues advocated by the radical right. Consequently, in contrast to its aim this political strategy may in fact unintentionally facilitate the growing support for the radical right. The findings of this study suggest that there are indications of a potential correlation between the Swedish established parties’ articulation on the immigration issue and the electoral support for the Swedish radical right in 1988-2018. Furthermore, the study provides descriptive information on how the Swedish established parties’ articulation on the immigration issue has changed over time, and how the Swedish printed media’s articulation on the immigration issue has differed from it. Together, the descriptive and statistical findings of this research are both useful and encouraging for future research on this highly contemporary issue in political science.

  • van Baalen, Miriam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Beyond Bullets and Ballots: A theoretical inquiry on sexualised election violence2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    How can we understand sexual violence in electoral conflict? This study probes into this question through critically examining, structuring and assessing the status of election-related violence literature. Scholars within the interdisciplinary field that explores conflict-related sexual violence have given rise to important debates and insights on the dynamics and drivers of the prevalence of sexual violence in war, yet, such developments have remained absent in understandings of election-related violence. Little is thus known about the dynamics of sexual violence in electoral competition. Insofar as sexual violence has been brought into limelight within election-related violence literature, it has been accounted for as an element embedded in gendered dimensions of violence; either within a narrative of being a gendered ‘Weapon of Politics’, or part of a narrative on women being victims. Through questioning the underlying distinctions between war and peace within political science research, this study argues that election-related sexual violence is co-produced by various actors and motives, on multiple dimensions and through interlockings of analytical levels. Highlighting elements such as (1) strategy, motivation and intent; (2) the role of gender and men as victims; (3) localised and decentralised violence and; (4) sexual violence as altering bargaining powers, transnationality and as ‘shameful’ violence; the argument is illustrated in relation to the violence surrounding Kenya’s 2007 election.

  • Pettersson, Samuel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Algebra and Geometry.
    Searching for self-injective planar quiverswith potential2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Yilmaz, Bertan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Applied Mathematics and Statistics.
    Customer Analytics and Cluster Analysis: A Clustering Application for CustomerSegmentation Based on CX Data2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Public defence: 2019-03-15 10:00 Zootissalen, Uppsala
    Bengtsson, Fia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Plant Ecology and Evolution.
    Functional Traits in Sphagnum2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Peat mosses (Sphagnum) are ecosystem engineers that largely govern carbon sequestration in northern hemisphere peatlands. I investigated functional traits in Sphagnum species and addressed the questions: (I) Are growth, photosynthesis and decomposition and the trade-offs between these traits related to habitat or phylogeny?, (II) Which are the determinants of decomposition and are there trade-offs between metabolites that affect decomposition?, (III) How do macro-climate and local environment determine growth in Sphagnum across the Holarctic?, (IV) How does N2 fixation vary among different species and habitats?, (V) How do species from different microtopographic niches avoid or tolerate desiccation, and are leaf and structural traits adaptations to growth high above the water table?

    Photosynthetic rate and decomposition in laboratory conditions (innate growth and decay resistance) were related to growth and decomposition in their natural habitats. We found support for a trade-off between growth and decay resistance, but innate qualities translated differently to field responses in different species. There were no trade-offs between production of different decay-affecting metabolites. Their production is phylogenetically controlled, but their effects on decay are modified by nutrient availability in the habitat. Modelling growth of two species across the Holarctic realm showed that precipitation, temperature and vascular plant cover are the best predictors of performance, but responses were stronger for the wetter growing species. N2 fixation rates were positively related to moss decomposability, field decomposition and tissue phosphorus concentration. Hence, higher decomposition can lead to more nutrients available to N2-fixing microorganisms, while higher concentrations of decomposition-hampering metabolites may impede N2 fixation. A mesocosm experiment, testing effects of water level drawdown on water content and chlorophyll fluorescence, showed that either slow water loss or high maximum water holding capacity can lead to desiccation avoidance. Furthermore, leaf anatomical traits rather than structural traits affected the water economy.

    This thesis has advanced the emerging field of trait ecology in Sphagnum by comparing many species and revealing novel mechanisms and an ever more complex picture of Sphagnum ecology. In addition, the species-specific trait measurements of this work offers opportunities for improvements of peatland ecosystem models.

    List of papers
    1. Photosynthesis, growth, and decay traits in Sphagnum – a multispecies comparison
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Photosynthesis, growth, and decay traits in Sphagnum – a multispecies comparison
    2016 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 10, p. 3325-3341Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Peat mosses (Sphagnum) largely govern carbon sequestration in Northern Hemisphere peatlands. We investigated functional traits related to growth and decomposition in Sphagnum species. We tested the importance of environment and phylogeny in driving species traits and investigated trade-offs among them. We selected 15 globally important Sphagnum species, representing four sections (subgenera) and a range of peatland habitats. We measured rates of photosynthesis and decomposition in standard laboratory conditions as measures of innate growth and decay potential, and related this to realized growth, production, and decomposition in their natural habitats. In general, we found support for a trade-off between measures of growth and decomposition. However, the relationships are not strong, with r ranging between 0.24 and 0.45 for different measures of growth versus decomposition. Using photosynthetic rate to predict decomposition in standard conditions yielded R2 = 0.20. Habitat and section (phylogeny) affected the traits and the trade-offs. In a wet year, species from sections Cuspidata and Sphagnum had the highest production, but in a dry year, differences among species, sections, and habitats evened out. Cuspidata species in general produced easily decomposable litter, but their decay in the field was hampered, probably due to near-surface anoxia in their wet habitats. In a principal components analysis, PCA, photosynthetic capacity, production, and laboratory decomposition acted in the same direction. The species were imperfectly clustered according to vegetation type and phylogeny, so that some species clustered with others in the same section, whereas others clustered more clearly with others from similar vegetation types. Our study includes a wider range of species and habitats than previous trait analyses in Sphagnum and shows that while the previously described growth–decay trade-off exists, it is far from perfect. We therefore suggest that our species-specific trait measures offer opportunities for improvements of peatland ecosystem models. Innate qualities measured in laboratory conditions translate differently to field responses. Most dramatically, fast-growing species could only realize their potential in a wet year. The same species decompose fast in laboratory, but their decomposition was more retarded in the field than that of other species. These relationships are crucial for understanding the long-term dynamics of peatland communities.

    National Category
    Ecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284287 (URN)10.1002/ece3.2119 (DOI)000376646700024 ()27103989 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council FormasThe Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
    Available from: 2016-04-16 Created: 2016-04-16 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
    2. Biochemical determinants of litter quality in 15 species of Sphagnum
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biochemical determinants of litter quality in 15 species of Sphagnum
    2018 (English)In: Plant and Soil, ISSN 0032-079X, E-ISSN 1573-5036, Vol. 425, no 1-2, p. 161-176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims Sphagnum mosses are ecosystem engineers that create and maintain boreal peatlands. With unique biochemistry, waterlogging and acidifying capacities, they build up meters-thick layers of peat, reducing competition and impeding decomposition. We quantify within-genus differences in biochemical composition to make inferences about decay rates, related to hummock-hollow and fen-bog gradients and to phylogeny. Methods We sampled litter from 15 Sphagnum species, abundant over the whole northern hemisphere. We used regression and Principal Components Analysis (PCA) to evaluate general relationships between litter quality parameters and decay rates measured under laboratory and field conditions. Results Both concentrations of the polysaccharide sphagnan and the soluble phenolics were positively correlated with intrinsic decay resistance, however, so were the previously understudied lignin-like phenolics. More resistant litter had more of all the important metabolites; consequently, PC1 scores were related to lab mass loss (R-2 = 0.57). There was no such relationship with field mass loss, which is also affected by the environment. PCA also revealed that metabolites clearly group Sphagnum sections (subgenera). Conclusions We suggest that the commonly stated growth-decomposition trade-off is largely due to litter quality. We show a strong phylogenetic control on Sphagnum metabolites, but their effects on decay are affected by nutrient availability in the habitat.

    Keywords
    Peatland, Decay resistance, Sphagnan, Phenolics, Lignin, Hummock-hollow
    National Category
    Botany
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354249 (URN)10.1007/s11104-018-3579-8 (DOI)000430992300011 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research CouncilThe Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences
    Available from: 2018-06-29 Created: 2018-06-29 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Environmental drivers of Sphagnum growth in mires across the Holarctic region
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental drivers of Sphagnum growth in mires across the Holarctic region
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    climate, global change, NPP, peatlands, peat mosses, nitrogen deposition
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Ecological Botany; Biology with specialization in Ecological Botany
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375010 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-02-01
    4. Variation in symbiotic Nfixation among Sphagnum and feather mosses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Variation in symbiotic Nfixation among Sphagnum and feather mosses
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    diazotrophs, peat moss, bog, peatland, nitrogen, phosphorus, carbon, nutrient cycling, traits, boreal forest
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Ecological Botany
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375008 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-02-01
    5. Mechanisms behind species-specific water economy responses to water level drawdown in peat mosses
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanisms behind species-specific water economy responses to water level drawdown in peat mosses
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    peat mosses, water economy, capitulum water content, bulk density, hyaline cell, pore size, leaf anatomy
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Ecological Botany
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375009 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-02-01
  • Lindvall, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    “The purpose of life is finding the largest burden that you can bear and bearing it.”: A study of the making of meaning among Jordan Peterson supporters2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to study, understand and explain the theories and work of the Canadian psychologist Jordan Peterson, whose controversial statements and lectures have made him a darling of certain factions of the political right, as he portrays himself as an enemy of progressive ideology. With a focus on understanding and explaining Peterson and how he provides meaning to his followers, the study will go through Peterson’s work in his two books Maps of Meaning and 12 Rules for Life in order to analyze their content and the follower’s reaction to the books as well as Peterson’s persona as a whole.

     

    To analyze these works, hermeneutic methods based on the work of finnish theologian Björn Vikström will be utilized. The texts will be analyzed on a textual and intertextual level, but the role of the author as well as the readers will also be put under scrutiny in order to elaborate on many aspects of Peterson’s writing. To analyze how he provides meaning to his followers and the definition of the terms lifestance and meaning, the work of Swedish theologian Carl Reinhold Bråkenhielm will be referenced and compared to Peterson’s work.

     

    While Vikström and Bråkenhielm will be the main sources of intertextual comparison with Jordan Peterson, they will also be supplemented with the work of other established theologians such as Hjalmar Sundén and others to further understand and compare the making of meaning undertaken by Jordan Peterson to other academic studies in the field of making meaning.

  • Skovdahl Åsenblad, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Musicology.
    Griegjubiléet 1943: Ett avgörande slag mellan radikal kulturnationalism och patriotism om framtidens musikliv2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Edvard Griegs 100-årsjubileum i juni 1943 var en spänningsfylld händelse i det tyskockuperade norska musiklivet, som i Oslo markerades med tillställningar av bland annat Filharmonisk Selskap, revyscenen Chat Noir och den nazistiska regimen. Genom att diskutera Griegjubiléets politiska signifikans för nazister och anti-nazister (s.k. jøssinger), samt analysera tonsättarens symboliska värde för respektive läger, förklarar uppsatsen varför båda lägren ville fira jubiléet och ha Grieg på sin sida. Huvudsyftet med detta är att öka kunskapen om de musikaliska och kulturella aspekterna av ockupationstiden i Norge. De källor som används är samtida tidningar, arkivmaterial från Kultur- og Folkeopplysningsdepartementet, samt Hans Jørgen Hurums samtidsskildring Musikken under okkupasjonen. Eftersom uppsatsen bygger på tolkning av historiskt material, tillämpas hermeneutisk metod.

     

    Uppsatsen visar att nazisterna använde Griegjubiléet som kulturell propaganda, för att ge sken av ett lugnt och harmoniskt musikliv, vilket i sin tur skulle påvisa nationens välmående. Griegjubiléet var viktigt för nazisterna, eftersom Grieg var en viktig symbol för deras radikala kulturnationalism och framtidsvisioner. För jøssingene innebar Griegjubiléet en möjlighet att känna samhörighet med varandra och uttrycka en stilla protest mot regimen i form av bojkotter mot statligt arrangerade Griegkonserter. För dem hade Griegs musik ett trösterikt värde, samtidigt som den i likhet med 1800-talets kulturnationalism fick symbolisera frihet, självständighet och demokrati. Griegjubiléet i Oslo 1943 blev ett avgörande slag mellan radikal kulturnationalism och patriotism om framtidens musikliv, vilket slutade med total bojkott och slutligen död för det offentliga konsertlivet under resten av ockupationen.

  • Public defence: 2019-03-14 13:15 Häggsalen, 10132, Ångströmlaboratoriet, Uppsala
    Bermejo-Velasco, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Polymer Chemistry.
    Insights into Covalent Chemistry for the Developmen­t of Biomaterials2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Covalent cross-linking chemistry is currently exploited in the preparation of biomaterial for biomedical applications. Choice of these chemistries for the preparation of biomaterials and bioconjugates strongly influences the biological output of these materials. Therefore, this thesis aims to develop novel bioconjugation strategies understanding their advantages and drawbacks. Our results provide new insight to adapt these chemical transformations for a specific application.

    The first part of this thesis points out the relevance of tuning different properties of biomaterials with specific emphasis on the development of hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels. The second part of the thesis describes how different chemical transformations including hydrazone formation (Paper I), thiazolidine formation (Paper II), cross-aldol addition reaction (Paper III) and disulfide formation (Paper IV) dictate material properties.

    This thesis explores both basic organic reaction mechanism and application of these reactions to influence material characteristics. The detailed study of the reaction conditions, kinetics, and stability of the products will help to understand the mechanical properties, hydrolytic stability, and degradability of the materials described here.

    Additionally, we performed degradation studies of gadolinium labeled HA hydrogels using magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, we also explored post-synthetic modification of hydrogels to link model fluorescent moieties as well as explored the tissue adhesive properties using Schiff-base formation.

    In summary, this thesis presents a selection of different covalent chemistries for the design of advanced biomaterials. The advantages and disadvantages of these chemistries are rigorously investigated. We believe, such an investigation provides a better understanding of the bioconjugation strategies for the preparation of biomaterials with potential clinical translation.

    List of papers
    1. Injectable hyaluronic acid hydrogels with the capacity for magnetic resonance imaging
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Injectable hyaluronic acid hydrogels with the capacity for magnetic resonance imaging
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 197, p. 641-648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring hydrogel degradation in real time using noninvasive imaging techniques is of great interest for designing a scaffold in tissue engineering. We report the preparation of gadolinium (Gd)-labeled and injectable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels that can be visualized using T-1- and T-2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An HA derivative functionalized with thiol and hydrazide was labeled using a diethylenetriaminepentaacetate complex modified with "clickable" dithiopyridyl functionalities (degree of modification was 3.77% with respect to HA repeat units). The HA derivative modified with cross-linkable groups and Gd complex exhibited relaxivities r(1) = 3.78 mM(-1)s(-1) and r(2) = 56.3 mM(-1)s(-1). A hydrazone hydrogel network was obtained by mixing Gd-labeled HA-hydrazide and HA-aldehyde derivatives. Enzymatic hydrogel degradation could be followed using MRI because the MR images showed great correlation with the hydrogel mass loss. Ex vivo MRI of injected Gd-labeled hydrogels demonstrated that they show a significant contrast difference (SNRcoronal = 456; SNRaxial = 459) from the surrounding tissues. These results indicate that our Gd-labeled HA hydrogel has great potential as an injectable biocompatible hydrogel that can be used for longitudinal tracking in vivo using MRI.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2018
    Keywords
    Gadolinium complex, Hyaluronic acid, Injectable hydrogels, Magnetic resonance imaging, Biodegradation
    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361020 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2018.06.028 (DOI)000438466500070 ()30007657 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-09-20 Created: 2018-09-20 Last updated: 2019-01-24
    2. Thiazolidine chemistry revisited: a fast, efficient and stable click-type reaction at physiological pH
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thiazolidine chemistry revisited: a fast, efficient and stable click-type reaction at physiological pH
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Chemical Communications, ISSN 1359-7345, E-ISSN 1364-548X, Vol. 54, no 88, p. 12507-12510Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the fast reaction kinetics between 1,2-aminothiols and aldehydes. Under physiological conditions such a click-type reaction afforded a thiazolidine product that remains stable and did not require any catalyst. This type of bioorthogonal reaction offers enormous potential for the coupling of biomolecules in an efficient and biocompatible manner.

    National Category
    Polymer Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364896 (URN)10.1039/c8cc05405c (DOI)30345438 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-11-06 Created: 2018-11-06 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
    3. First Aldol-Crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel: Fast and Hydrolytically Stable Gel with Tissue Adhesive Properties
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>First Aldol-Crosslinked Hyaluronic Acid Hydrogel: Fast and Hydrolytically Stable Gel with Tissue Adhesive Properties
    Show others...
    (English)In: Chemical Sciences Journal, ISSN 2150-3494Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, there are limited approaches to tailor 3D scaffolds crosslinked with a stable covalent C-C bond that does not require any catalysts or initiators. We present here the first hydrogels employing aldol condensation chemistry that exhibit exceptional physicochemical properties. We investigated the aldol-crosslinking chemistry using two types of aldehyde-modified hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives, namely; an enolizable HA-aldehyde (HA-Eal) and a non-enolizable HA-aldehyde (HA-Nal). Hydrogels formed using HA-Eal demonstrate inferior crosslinking efficiency (due to intramolecular loop formation), when compared with hydrogels formed by mixing HA-Eal and HA-NaI leading to a cross-aldol product. The change in mechanical properties as a result of crosslinking at different pH is determined using rheological measurements and is interpreted in terms of molecular weight between cross-links (Mc). The novel HA cross-aldol hydrogels demonstrate excellent hydrolytic stability and favorable mechanical properties but allow hyaluronidase mediated enzymatic degradation. Interestingly, residual aldehyde functionality within the aldol product leads to adhesion to tissue as demonstrated by bonding two bone tissues. The aldehyde functionality also permits facile post-synthetic modifications with nucleophilic reagents such as Alexa FluorTM 488. Finally, we demonstrate that the novel hydrogel is biocompatible with encapsulated stem cells that show a linear rate of expansion in our 3–6 days of study.

    Keywords
    hyaluronic acid, aldol chemisty, stable hydrogels, tissue adhesive
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374999 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-01-24
    4. Modulating thiol pKa promotes disulfide formation at physiological pH: An elegant strategy to design disulfide crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modulating thiol pKa promotes disulfide formation at physiological pH: An elegant strategy to design disulfide crosslinked hyaluronic acid hydrogels
    Show others...
    (English)In: Biomacromolecules, ISSN 1525-7797, E-ISSN 1526-4602Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    The disulfide bond plays a crucial role in protein biology and has been exploited by scientists to develop antibody-drug conjugates, sensors and for the immobilization other biomolecules to materials surfaces. In spite of its versatile use, the disulfide chemistry suffers from some inevitable limitations such as the need for basic conditions (pH > 8.5), strong oxidants and long reaction times. We demonstrate here that thiol-substrates containing electron-withdrawing groups at the β-position influence the deprotonation of the thiol group, which is the key reaction intermediate in the formation of disulfide bonds. Evaluation of reaction kinetics using small molecule substrate such as L-cysteine indicated disulfide formation at a 2.8-fold higher (k1 = 5.04 x 10-4 min-1) reaction rate as compared to the conventional thiol substrate, namely 3-mercaptopropionic acid (k1 = 1.80 x 10-4 min-1) at physiological pH (pH 7.4). Interestingly, the same effect could not be observed when N-acetyl-L-cysteine substrate (k1 = 0.51 x 10-4 min-1) was used. We further grafted such thiol-containing molecules (cysteine, N-acetyl-cysteine, and 3-mercaptopropionic acid) to a biopolymer namely hyaluronic acid (HA) and determined the pKa value of different thiol groups by spectrophotometric analysis. The electron-withdrawing group at the β-position reduced the pKa of the thiol group to 7.0 for HA-cysteine (HA-Cys); 7.4 for N-acetyl cysteine (HA-ActCys) and 8.1 for HA-thiol (HA-SH) derivatives respectively. These experiments further confirmed that the concentration of thiolate (R-S-) ions could be increased with the presence of electron-withdrawing groups, which could facilitate disulfide cross-linked hydrogel formation at physiological pH. Indeed, HA grafted with cysteine or N-acetyl groups formed hydrogels within 3.5 minutes or 10 hours, respectively at pH 7.4. After completion of crosslinking reaction both gels demonstrated a storage modulus G’ ≈3300–3500 Pa, indicating comparable levels of crosslinking. The HA-SH gel, on the other hand, did not form any gel at pH 7.4 even after 24 h. Finally, we demonstrated that the newly prepared hydrogels exhibited excellent hydrolytic stability but can be degraded by cell-directed processes (enzymatic and reductive degradation). We believe our study provides a valuable insight on the factors governing the disulfide formation and our results are useful to develop strategies that would facilitate generation of stable thiol functionalized biomolecules or promote fast thiol oxidation according to the biomedical needs.

    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375001 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-01-24
  • Svensson Åström, Tova
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    "Ett gemensamt ansvar för barnets uppfostran": Om barnkonventionens artikel 18 och den ogifta faderns vårdnadsansvar2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Artikel 18 i barnkonventionen behandlar principen om föräldrarnas gemensamma ansvar för barnets uppfostran och utveckling. Sverige har sedan ratificeringen av konventionen 1990 varit folkrättsligt bundet av att följa dess artiklar, däribland artikel 18. Riksdagen har nu valt att fullt ut erkänna barnkonventionen som svensk lag genom att inkorporera den år 2020. Inkorporeringen kommer att innebära en rad förändringar i tillämpningen av barnrätten. En del av den svenska regleringen som är intressant att granska mot bakgrund mot barnkonventionen och artikel 18 är de ogifta fädernas möjlighet till gemensam vårdnad. Frågan kan ställas om den svenska vårdnadsregleringen lever upp till de krav som artikel 18 i barnkonventionen ställer upp. Arbetet syftar till att utreda överensstämmelsen mellan den svenska regleringen och barnkonventionens artikel 18 genom att kartlägga och analysera de olika regleringarna.

  • Petersson, Natalia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Konkurrensskadedirektivets inverkan på svenska civilprocessuella regler och principer: En uppsats i ljuset av den civilprocessrättsliga harmoniseringen2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Edén, Julia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Utökade sekretessgenombrott hos socialtjänsten: en lämplig åtgärd för att motverka terrorismrelaterad brottslighet?2018Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    I uppsatsen diskuteras utökade sekretessgenombrott hos socialtjänsten som åtgärd för att motverka terrorismrelaterad brottslighet. Uppsatsen har två syften. Det första syftet är att klargöra under vilka förutsättningar socialtjänsten får lämna uppgifter till polisen om personer som är misstänkta för terrorismrelaterad brottslighet enligt nuvarande lagstiftning. Syftet uppnås genom en redogörelse för regler om offentlighet och sekretess, samt regler som styr myndigheters utbyte av information. Det andra syftet, som är det mest centrala i uppsatsen, är att diskutera huruvida det bör införas sekretessgenombrott som innebär att socialtjänsten får lämna uppgifter till polisen om personer som är misstänkta för brott enligt finansierings- och rekryteringslagen. I augusti 2018 presenterades en utredning som genomförts på uppdrag av regeringen där en sekretessbestämmelse med denna innebörd föreslås.

    För att uppnå uppsatsens andra syfte studeras målen med socialtjänstlagstiftningen. Det konstateras att sekretess är en grundläggande förutsättning för att uppnå målen och att utökade sekretessgenombrott hos socialtjänsten bör undvikas i så stor utsträckning som möjligt. Vissa intressen kan dock motivera sekretessgenombrott och intresset av att motverka terrorismrelaterad brottslighet skulle kunna vara ett sådant. Vidare studeras lagarna gällande terrorismrelaterad brottslighet, närmare bestämt terroristbrottslagen, finansieringslagen och rekryteringslagen. Slutsatsen i denna del är att dessa lagar innehåller ett flertal otydliga begrepp och att komplicerade straffrättsliga bedömningar krävs för att konstatera om handlingar utgör brott enligt vissa av bestämmelserna i lagarna. Delar av lagarna har dessutom hastigt arbetats fram för att leva upp till internationella åtaganden och tycks motiverade av hotet från islamistisk terrorism, trots att det inte nämns uttryckligen. Till sist studeras konflikten mellan sekretessgenombrott hos socialtjänsten och den enskildes grundlagsskyddade rätt till personlig integritet och yttrandefrihet. Det konstateras bland annat att ett införande av det för uppsatsen aktuella sekretessgenombrottet knappast skulle vara förenligt med proportionalitetsprincipen. Slutsatsen i uppsatsen är att sekretessgenombrott som innebär att socialtjänsten får lämna uppgifter till polisen om personer som är misstänkta för brott enligt finansierings- och rekryteringslagen inte bör införas. 

  • Lindblom, Emmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History, Conservation.
    Det var en gång en trädgård: Om odlande vid Stora Karlsö fyrplats2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The island of Stora Karlsö, located about 15 km west of Klintehamn, Gotland, has long been protected for its high natural values. There’s a lighthouse from 1887 on the island and buildings connected to it are state monuments. South of the lighthouse there’s an overgrown garden from the lighthouse period which is the subject of study in this essay. Karlsö Jagt- och Djurskyddsförening AB owns the majority of all land on the island and manages it, as well as conducting visiting activities. They have the desire to resume small-scale cultivation of vegetables in the lighthouse garden.The aim of this studie is to, through documentation, gathering of knowledge and information about the lighthouse garden at Stora Karlsö, ensure that its cultural and historical values are not lost in the event of any new cultivation in the garden. The aim is also to increase the knowledge about lighthouse gardens and its importance and function in Sweden in general, and thereby make the green heritage in gardeing of elder times more visible. The results show that the garden, which was in constant change while used, was hierarchically divided between the employees at the lighthouse and the cultivation area was divided into fenced allottments. The garden has both had a function of self-sufficiency and contemplation, and both vegetable plants and ornamental plants have been cultivated. Today there are e. g. lilacs, common laburnum, peony and nine different older varieties of narcissus left in the garden. Structures in the field as well as foundations for fence posts show where previous allotments have been located. If carefully implemented, new cultures in the garden would not damage the cultural and historical value of the garden, but rather contribute to the understanding of the history of the site and be positive from a preservation and maintenance perspective.

  • Sundberg, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Utställningsrum: Hur konstupplevelsen på Liljevalchs konsthall och Fotografiska påverkas av utställningsrummets gestaltning2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Exhibition room: How the experience of art is affected by the exhibition room design at Liljevalchs art gallery and Fotografiska.

    This thesis explores the effect the exhibition design presented in two of Stockholm ́s art galleries has on the viewer. This study investigates Liljevalchs exhibition Vårsalongen and Fotografiskas exhibition The Extraordinary World of Christian Tagliavani. It conducts how the rooms in these two exhibitions relate to each other, and also compare the design of each exhibition room, one by one. This report is based on space syntax theory combined with observations and interviews with both the curators of these two exhibitions and people who has visited both of the exhibition rooms. This analysis show how the exhibition rooms in Liljevalchs and Fotografiska relate to each other. It also shows that the design in the exhibition room, such as the colour on the walls, lights, noises, how the art pieces are hanging as well as the spatial of the room has a big effect on the viewers experience. This thesis describes how these elements above affect the viewer in these two art galleries.

  • Sundberg, Louise
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Offentlig konst i egenskap av en samhällsspegel: En studie av Carolina Falkholts konstverk Övermålning och dess uppseende i det offentliga rummet2017Student paper second term, 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Konst väcker något inom oss, en känsla av förundran, eufori, förvirring eller avsky för att nämna några. Somliga upplever en stark känsla att de måste uttrycka sig antingen positivt eller negativt om konstverket, främst det senare. Kanske rent av hävdar att konstverket inte bör existera i det offentliga rummet. Dessa känslor blir ofta grunden till en stor debatt vilket främst äger rum i media. Därav finns intresset att fundera över hur det kommer sig att vissa konstverk väcker sådana starka känslor och vad dessa konstverk egentligen skildrar.

    Offentlig konst kan ha varierande tillämpningar i samhället. Konstverket kan existera endast för det estetiska likt ett vackert landskapsmåleri, men det kan också ifrågasätta samhället och anses provocerande. Frågan kan då lyda om provocerande konst endast bör vara utställd på ett konstgalleri. Vilket är en plats du aktivt väljer att besöka och därav får vara beredd på att ställas inför konst som kan väcka känslor. Istället för att tvinga människor möta den provocerande konsten i det offentliga rummet. Av den anledningen behövs konst som för vissa kan uppfattas provocerande i våra gemensamma rum. För att nå ut till de som aktivt inte söker konsten, till de personer som verkligen behöver uppmärksammas. Det är viktigt att debatter tas upp i det offentliga rummet för att kunna observeras av alla. Konstnärerna kanske rent av gör samhället en stor tjänst.

    Det finns ett intresse hos mig att undersöka konst som väcker debatt och starka känslor hos individer. Undersöka vad konstverken skildrar och hur verken har mottagits av samhället i och med att de orsakat en debatt. Syftet med uppsatsen är att genom en analys av konstverketÖvermålning, både ikonografisk bildanalys och av meningsutbyte kring verket, nå en slutsats angående verkets uppseende, vad målningen väcker för känslor och tankar.

  • Franz, Linnéa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Sara-Vide Ericson: Identitet - fiktion och verklighet2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay explores Sara-Vide Ericsons paintings and to what extent they portrait her identity. This is viewed upon through two different theories concerning identity presented by Marcia Pointon and Shearer West. The role memories play in Ericsons paintings, both consciously and subconscious ones are examined through Sigmund Freuds theory of Screen Memories. The applied method is an extensive interview with the artist herself. What I have found is that Ericsons paintings, including both nature, herself, and different textiles all to a certain extent portray her identity; they are narrative both in themselves and in their analysis of who the artist is. The paintings that depict both the artist and textiles can be viewed as self-portraits as they tell the viewer something about who the artist is. Her professional identity has also been explored and viewed as experimental and explorative in its abstract and representative style, which gives the paintings a mysterious tone, making them attractive to a wider analysis within the viewer. The relationship between fiction and reality has been examined and I have found that fiction is allowed to take over motifs in order to convey a true emotion or a core feeling.

  • Henriksson, Carina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Tamara de Lempicka: Expressivt och dekorativt2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Forsberg, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Dimensionering och utformning av dagvattendammar2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Storm water runoff in urban areas will be collected in storm water systems and one typeof solution to receive a flow and pollution reduction is storm water ponds. This studyincludes a literature study that compiles knowledge and literature about storm water andtreatment of storm water by ponds. Compiled information and equations describingrunoff and processes in storm water ponds have been used as base for creating an Excelbased calculation tool specific for storm water ponds. By entering information about astorm water pond as input to the tool step by step it provides an estimated resultregarding the pollution reduction efficiency of the incoming storm water. The toolestimates the reduction efficiency for suspended soils (SS), phosphorus, (P), copper(Cu) and zinc (Zn). The reduction efficiency of SS is determined in the tool by usingtwo different methods that includes input data of the pond hydraulics depending on itsdesign, incoming concentration of SS and the pond volume relative to runoff area. Thetool also estimates the reduction efficiency of SS by particle fraction. Reduction of P,Cu and Zn is estimated in two methods by using the particle bound and the reductionefficiency of SS. The created tool has thereafter been applied on six well documentedponds located in Sweden. The estimated results by the tool is thereafter compeered tothe documented results regarding incoming flow, pollution concertation and reductionefficacy. The estimated tool is also compared with results from StormTac, which is aprogram for design of storm water facilities. The result indicates that the tool estimatesthe incoming flow and concentration relatively well but that it is complicated toestimates the big variations in storm water. Both the tool and StormTac generallyestimates lower reduction efficacy of SS than the actual for all selected ponds. Thereduction efficiency of P, Cu and Zn is also underestimated by the tool compared to theactual values. However, it can be observed that the estimated result follow the sametrend as the actual values and result from StormTac.

  • Ku, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Art History.
    Berghain: Arkitekturens ideologi, mytbildning och makt2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Berghain is a techno club in Berlin which has become a popular culture phenomenon due to its selective door policy and the rumour about the decadent parties that takes place every weekend in the old power plant building. Although its popularity, there’s a little scientific research about the club. A lot has to do with the clubs low profile and the photo prohibition inside the club. The purpose of the theses is to investigate the phenomenon about Berghain in terms of mythology and power perspective with the emphasis of the building. The myth perspective is based on Roland Barthes theory about myth as a hidden and ideological message, while the power perspective is based on Mattias Kärrholms theory about architectural territoriality. The method that will be used is a form of architectural field analysis adapted by Åsa Dahlin and Iain Borden and is based on phenomenology. Phenomenology is about using the body and senses to understand its surrounding. As a recurring visitor at Berghain, I have access to the codex and culture and can therefore use previous memories and experience as empire material.

    I have initially analysed two texts written by Alexis Waltz about Berghain to understand what kind of myths Berghain reproduces. In the text analysis I found out that the building and the culture created inside Berghain is compared to a religion. The religious is in reality a strong sense of community that is based on subcultural capital, exclusivity and the exclusion of the mainstream culture. As the centrum of the worship are the utmost decadence and the rejection of capitalistic ideals. The shocking and extreme stories that flourish around the internet regarding the activities inside Berghain, function in a religious context, as regulation and morality about the culture. I define the ideology behind the architecture of Berghain as the aesthetic of decadence, which is an opposition to capitalistic ideal of everyday architecture that should produce rested workers. The aesthetic of decadence in the architecture creates discomfort for the visitors through vibrations, loud sounds, darkness and crowded flows, which allows the visitors to reach the point of losing control and to increase the intimacy between the people.

    Berghain appropriates values from its own predecessor, Ostgut, as well as techno clubs in Berlin from the early 90’s in Berlin. Even though Berghain is today institutionalized, it still has a temporary aesthetic in the landscape. The building façade also resemblance to an occupied building with it leaking vibrations and noise to the surrounding. The ideology behind Ostgut and the temporary techno clubs in Berlin from early 90’s had the purpos to unify different groups of people in the society, has partly been lost in Berghain due to its door policy that creates exclusivity. The power relation between Berghain and the queuing people are centralized around the visual sight from the Bouncer, which the architecture helps to support. The power relation is stabilized since the same behaviour shows regularly in terms of people separating from each other in the front part of the queue as well as secretly putting beer bottles on the ground.

  • Boman, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Dimensioneringsförutsättningar för spillvattennät i nybyggda småhusområden: En fallstudie i Lindbacken2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Spillvatten är förorenat vatten från hushåll, allmänna verksamheter och industrier. I bostadsområden har kommunen enligt Lagen om allmänna vattentjänster ett ansvar att ordna med avlopp för att skydda människors hälsa eller miljön. För att se till att detta uppfylls har branchorganisationen Svenskt Vatten tagit fram riktlinjer för dimensionering av spillvattenförande system. Dimensioneringen grundar sig på det sannolikt högsta flödet under en tidsperiod, vilket beräknas baserat på specifik spillvattenavrinning, antal anslutna personer, en maxdygnsfaktor och en maxtimfaktor. Maxfaktorerna har i en tidigare studie visat sig ligga onödigt högt. Detta skulle kunna medföra att systemen dimensioneras större än nödvändigt. Spillvattensystem dimensioneras i ett tidigt skede då alla förutsättningar inte kända. Då Mälardalen växer kraftigt och förtätningar i nybyggda småhusområden inte är ovanliga skulle denna överdimensionering kunna möjliggöra att fler hushåll än vad som planerats för kan anslutas till spillvattennätet utan att systemet behöver dimensioneras upp.

    Syftet med examensarbetet var att undersökta förutsättningarna för dimensionering av spillvattennät i nybyggda småhusområden. Detta gjordes genom att analysera spillvattenflödet i Lindbacken utanför Uppsala. Specifika spillvattenavrinningen beräknades utifrån uppmätta flöden och utifrån de uppmätta flödena tillsammans med frekvensanalyser predikterades även det sannolikt högsta dygns- respektive timflödet under ett år för att ta fram nya maxdygnsfaktorer och maxtimfaktorer.

    Specifika spillvattenavrinningen beräknades till 114 (110-118) liter per person och dag, vilket är lägre än vad som rekommenderas i Svenskt Vattens riktlinjer. Maxdygnsfaktorerna som beräknades låg i intervallet 1,7–2,3 och maxtimfaktorerna i intervallet 1,9–3,2. För maxdygnsfaktorn sammanfaller intervallet med Svenskt Vattens rekommenderade värden. Maxtimfaktorn sammanfaller till viss del med Svenskt Vattens värden, men högsta värdet är något högre. Schablonvärdena i Svenskt Vattens riktlinjer verkar därmed lämpliga att använda i det studerade nybyggda småhusområdet. Eventuellt bör maxtimfaktorn väljas något högre än det rekommenderade intervallet.En utvärdering av dimensioneringen som gjordes 2010 för det studerade området visade att den största osäkerheten vid beräkning av det dimensionerande flödet ligger i skattningen av antalet anslutna personer. Dessutom visades att systemen inte dimensioneras större än nödvändigt och att den stora ökningen i antalet anslutna personer kan istället medföra att systemet underdimensionerats.

  • Söderqvist, Åsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Regnvatteninsamling för toalettspolning: Effektivitet, lämplig magasinstorlek och rekommenderade vattenreningsmetoder i Celsiushusets system2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years, there has been an increased usage of rainwater harvesting globally. The technology reduces drinking water consumption and improves stormwater management. In Sweden, the implementation of rainwater harvesting is still at an early stage but several systems are now under construction. One of them is in Celsiushuset in Uppsala where rainwater will be used for toilet flushing. One aim of the project was to calculate the efficiency (the ratio between the volume of used rainwater and the water demand for toilet flushing) of the system. Based on the efficiency and economic calculations, an appropiate storage tank size was to be identified. An additional aim was to recommend water treatment methods that would prevent color or odour in water in the toilets and also prevent microbe and algae growth.

    The efficiency, along with other parameters, was examined with simulations for three periods between 1961-2017 with different precipitation amounts. Also, a simplified calculation of the systems' costs depending on tank size was carried out. The recommendation of treatment methods was made based on a literature review combined with a calculation of the roof runoff quality, which was performed in StormTac.

    For a tank size of 50 m3, the highest efficiency of the system is obtained during summer and autumn and varies between 60 % and 100 %. The mean efficiency for the different periods has a higher value with increased precipitation amount and the efficiency is 40 %, 51 % and 56 %, respectively. An appropiate size of the rainwater storage tank would be between 50 m3 and 75 m3. The recommended treatment methods include strainers on the roof, a first flush diverter, sedimentation, a rapid sand filter and UV treatment.