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  • Olsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Inkomstfördelning, strejker och industrialisering i Sverige 1870–1900: regressionsanalys med nya mikrodata2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    This study examines the distribution of income in Sweden 1870–1900, alongside with the historical labour strikes during the same period. The income data is extracted from old tax records at the National Archive of Sweden, and the dataset of historical strikes was created by the economist Axel Raphael by analyzing newspapers from this time. I have combined the two datasets, processed them accordingly, and calculated descriptive statistics, in order to execute linear regression analysis. The descriptive statistics shows that the gini coefficients decreased nationally, and in every county, but the coefficients from 1870 are not particularly well correlated with the coefficients from 1900. The results from the regression analysis show that the strike concentration in each county, controlled for by the gini coefficient from 1870, increased the expected values of the gini coefficients from 1900. This model is then further controlled for by the level of industrialization in each county, and this new independent variable proves to have been the underlying variable as to why the strikes correlated with the increased inequality. The level of industrialization maintains its significance in all models, with a positive b-coefficient in relation to the gini coefficients from 1900, and the mechanism for this result is quite plausible. These results are then discussed as a context for the situation in some of today’s developing countries.

  • Elverö, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Förstelärarreformen utifrån New Public Management2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Öhlund, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Hur påverkar arbetsplatsen uttaget av föräldraförsäkringen: En kvalitativ intervjustudie om hur normer påverkar uttaget av föräldraförsäkringen2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte är att att öka förståelsen för implementeringen av föräldraförsäkringen. Uttaget av föräldraförsäkringen skiljer sig mellan män och kvinnor och genom att undersöka om det finns könade normer (kopplat till föräldraförsäkringen) som påverkar män och kvinnor på olika sätt på arbetsplatsen, samt hur normer och informella regler på arbetsplatsen påverkar föräldrars uttag av föräldraförsäkringen, kompletteras tidigare studier på området. Studiens teoretiska ramverk utgörs av Feministisk Institutionalism och genom att intervjua föräldrar angående normer på sina arbetsplatser bidrar studien med kunskap om förldraförsäkringens informella regelverk. Studiens resultat ger en kvalitativ beskrivning om hur normer kring föräldraförsäkring är olika för män och kvinnor på arbetsplatsen. Kvinnor bemöts som den primära förälderns medan männen blir bemötta som den primära förvärvsarbetaren.

  • Scocco, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    What Can a Small State Do?: Swedish Leadership in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in the United Nations2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the face of a global headwind against sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), led by the Trump administration, Sweden has worked together with like-minded countries to keep ground in SRHR issues. The purpose of this thesis is to increase the knowledge about what strategies are available for small states to influence global policies in international organizations. Looking at the period of 2017–2019, this thesis aims to answer the question: “Which strategies has Sweden used to establish leadership in sexual and reproductive health and rights issues in the United Nations?” The analysis through the framework of leadership theory shows that Sweden utilized all strategies investigated (ideational, structural, directional and instrumental), acting like an efficient leader. Despite previous research assuming small states would rely less on traditional sources of power, Sweden actively deployed its structural resources, covering the gap after the Trump administration defunded the United Nations Population Fund. As a result of Sweden’s and other actors’ efforts, agreed language was protected at the Commission on Population and Development.

  • Wingård, Olov
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    “Samtidigt i Sverige – arkitekturens u-land”: En ideologi- och argumentationsanalys av Arkitekturupproret2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Bäckman, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Saffronisation or moderation?: A comparative case study of the Bharatiya Janata Party between two terms2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Cöllen, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages.
    Metaforens historicitet: En kognitionslingvistisk undersökning av medeltida bildspråk2020In: Årsbok Kungl. Humanistiska Vetenskaps-Samfundet i Uppsala = Annales Societatis litterarum humaniorum regiae Upsaliensis, ISSN 0349-0416, Vol. 2018-2019, p. 201-213Article in journal (Other academic)
  • Pérez-Penichet, Carlos
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    Piumwardane, Dilushi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Systems.
    Rohner, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    Voigt, Thiemo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology, Computer Architecture and Computer Communication.
    A Fast Carrier Scheduling Algorithm for Battery-free Sensor Tags in Commodity Wireless Networks2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New battery-free sensor tags that interoperate with unmodified standard IoT devices and protocols can extend a sensor network’s capabilities in a scalable and cost-effective manner. The tags achieve battery-free operation through backscatter-related techniques, while the standard IoT devices avoid additional dedicated infrastructure by providing the unmodulated carrier that tags need to communicate. However, this approach requires coordination between devices transmitting, receiving and generating carrier, adds extra latency and energy consumption to already constrained devices, and increases interference and contention in the shared spectrum. We present a scheduling mechanism that optimizes the use of carrier generators, minimizing any disruptions to the regular nodes. We employ timeslots to coordinate the unmodulated carrier while minimizing latency, energy consumption and overhead radio emissions. We propose an efficient scheduling algorithm that parallelizes communications with battery-free tags when possible and shares carriers among multiple tags concurrently. In our evaluation we demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of our approach in testbed experiments. We find that we can significantly reduce the excess latency and energy consumption caused by the addition of sensor tags when compared to sequential interrogation. We show that the gains tend to improve with the network size and that our solution is close to optimal on average.

  • Maxia, Alexander James
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Cultural Anthropology and Ethnology.
    The Principles of a Stable Community: 90 Years of Structured Integration in a Culturally Diverse New Town in Sardinia2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    An atom, a cell and a solar system have very little in common. My science teachers from high school will confirm that I am very far from being an expert on the matter but nontheless, I have studied these three systems in separate classes: chemistry, biology and astronomy. So I believe they must be fairly unrelated from each other! All they have in common is that they are studied through a magnifying lens by people who are better than me in maths. But onceyou look through the lens, you should see a main body and smaller objects rotating around it. The electrons around the protons, the cytoplasm around the nucleus and the planets around the sun. The key element they have in common is structure. Perhaps this is too abstract, even for an abstract, so let’s bring things back to earth.

    Structures play a fundamental role in shaping the world around us and this thesis aims to understand to what extent and how they influence people’s daily lives. The case study is based on the new town of Arborea in Sardinia, originally designed and owned by a private company to make an efficient and innovative industrial food production system. It aims to show how the ambition to produce was ingrained in the buildings and societal structures and how the surroundings affected the people who moved there. Everything was studied in detail:from the road grid to the houses, the church’s positioning and even selecting people from the north of Italy who were deemed most suitable to work there. The use of structuration theory will be key to uncover the different layers and relations that still shape the community today. 35.000 cows, 3800 people, a history of cultural clashes, a productive system, a very fascist background, a ’sex patrolling’ priest, a dozen volunteering organisations will all feature in thethesis and together enable to draw a picture of the new town.

  • Hasselgren, Kristina
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Ardnor, Bjarne
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Lindell, Gert
    Lund Univ, Dept Surg, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Rizell, Magnus
    Univ Gothenburg, Transplant Inst, Sahlgrenska Acad, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stromberg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci Intervent & Technol CLLNTEC, Div Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Loftas, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Bjornsson, Bergthor
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sandstrom, Per
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Surg, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Liver resection is beneficial for patients with colorectal liver metastases and extrahepatic disease2020In: Annals of Translational Medicine, ISSN 2305-5839, E-ISSN 2305-5847, Vol. 8, no 4, article id 109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Liver metastases are the most common cause of death for patients with colorectal cancer and affect up to half of the patients. Liver resection is an established method that can potentially be curative. For patients with extrahepatic disease (EHD), the role of liver surgery is less established. Methods: This is a retrospective study based on data from the national quality registry SweLiv. Data were obtained between 2009 and 2015. SweLiv is a validated registry and has been in use since 2009, with coverage above 95%. Patients with liver metastases and EHD were analyzed and cross-checked against the national death cause registry for survival analysis. Results: During the study period, 2,174 patients underwent surgery for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM), and 277 patients with EHD were treated with resection or ablation. The estimated median survival time for the entire cohort from liver resection/ablation was 40 months (95% CI, 32-47). The survival time for patients treated with liver resection was 45 months compared to 26 months for patients treated with ablation (95% CI 38-53, 18-33, P=0.001). A subgroup analysis of resected patients revealed that the group with pulmonary metastases had a significantly longer estimated median survival (50 months; 95 % CI, 39-60) than the group with lymph node metastases (32 months; 95% CI, 7-58) or peritoneal carcinomatosis (28 months; 95% CI, 14-41) (P=0.022 and 0.012, respectively). Other negative prognostic factors were major liver resection and nonradical liver resection. Conclusions: For patients with liver metastases and limited EHD, liver resection results in prolonged survival compared to what can be expected from chemotherapy alone.

  • Yordanova, Emiliya
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Voros, Zoltan
    Austrian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Graz, Austria;Res Ctr Astron & Earth Sci, Geodet & Geophys Inst, Sopron, Hungary.
    Raptis, Savvas
    Royal Inst Technol, Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Tomas
    Royal Inst Technol, Space & Plasma Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Current Sheet Statistics in the Magnetosheath2020In: FRONTIERS IN ASTRONOMY AND SPACE SCIENCES, ISSN 2296-987X, Vol. 7, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The magnetosheath (MSH) plasma turbulence depends on the structure and properties of the bow shock (BS). Under quasi-parallel (Q(||)) and quasi-perpendicular (Q(perpendicular to)) BS configurations the electromagnetic field and plasma quantities possess quite distinct behavior, e.g., being highly variable and structured in the Q(||) case. Previous studies have reported abundance of thin current sheets (with typical scales of the order of the plasma kinetic scales) in the Q(||) MSH, associated with magnetic reconnection, plasma heating, and acceleration. Here we use multipoint observations from Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission, where for the first time a comparative study of discontinuities and current sheets in both MSH geometries at very small spacecraft separation (of the order of the ion inertial length) is performed. In Q(||) MSH the current density distribution is characterized by a heavy tail, populated by strong currents. There is high correlation between these currents and the discontinuities associated with large magnetic shears. Whilst, this seems not to be the case in Q(perpendicular to) MSH, where current sheets are virtually absent. We also investigate the effect of the discontinuities on the scaling of electromagnetic fluctuations in the MHD range and in the beginning of the kinetic range. There are two (one) orders of magnitude higher power in the magnetic (electric) field fluctuations in the Q(||) MSH, as well as different spectral scaling, in comparison to the Q(perpendicular to) MSH configuration. This is an indication that the incoming solar wind turbulence is completely locally reorganized behind Q(perpendicular to) BS while even though modified by Q(||) BS geometry, the downstream turbulence properties are still reminiscent to the ones upstream, the latter confirming previous observations. We show also that the two geometries are associated with different temperature anisotropies, plasma beta, and compressibility, where the Q(perpendicular to) MSH is unstable to mostly mirror mode plasma instability, while the Q(||) MSH is unstable also to oblique and parallel fire-hose, and ion-cyclotron instabilities.

  • Rudström, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social and Economic Geography.
    Entrepreneurialism in Uppsala: Public - Private partnership and the construction of a safe public space2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Entrepreneurial urbanism is the narrative of the modern city, and more and more the city is constructed as a commodity to be competitive on the market and attract investment. City managers and developers are using different strategies to market and construct the city as attractive and vibrant. One characteristic of the entrepreneurial city is the use of public-private partnerships. This thesis explores the public-private partnership project in Uppsala inner city where private security guards are, since 2017, patrolling public space.  

    Urban development narratives in Uppsala are promoting the city as attractive and as a living room for the residents, and it is through this conceptualisation they want to protect the inner city. This paper is, through the theoretical framework of Laclau and Mouffe´s Discourse Theory, analysing material focusing on the articulatory practices of the public-private partnership and the discursive construction of “the city”. The operationalization of Discourse theory with the theoretical framework presented in this paper produces a critique of the entrepreneurial and neo-liberal agenda in Uppsala. Focusing on the public-private partnership project and the control of public space, as well as the entrepreneurial narrative of the partnership, the paper argues for a radicalisation of urban politics and the creation of a plural city. 

  • Public defence: 2020-04-17 09:00 Sal IV, Uppsala
    Aarnio, Riina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive biology.
    Self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: Including clinical and health economic aspects2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prerequisite for the development of cervical cancer. HPV testing has higher sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+) than cytology, resulting in more effective screening. As HPV testing also offers an opportunity for self-sampling, it could serve as an even more effective and cost-effective method of cervical screening.

    First, we compared repeated self-sampling for HPV testing with Pap smear cytology in detection of CIN2+ in primary cervical screening for women aged 30–49 years (n=36 390). We found a more than twofold higher detection rate of CIN2+ and a fourfold higher detection rate of CIN2 with self-sampling compared with cytology. However, no difference was seen between the arms in the detection rate of CIN3+. It thus seems that CIN is detected at an earlier stage with self-sampling than with cytology, but the impact of this needs to be further explored.

    Second, as management of HPV-positive women with normal cytology results is a challenge, we wanted to evaluate the proportion of cases of histological CIN2+ in these women. In this prospective study we performed LEEP and found that 15% (6/40) of the women had undetected CIN2+. These findings can be used in counseling women about the risk of cervical cancer and helping clinicians in decisions on management.

    Third, we performed a cost-effectiveness analysis on the same study population as in Study I. Self-sampling for HPV testing resulted in a higher participation rate and more detected cases of CIN2+ at a lower cost and was regarded as more cost-effective than Pap smear cytology in cervical screening. These results can guide policy-makers when planning future screening programs.

    Fourth, we compared self-sampling with sampling by medical professionals for HPV testing in detection of CIN2+, using a combination of an FTA card as storage medium and a PCR-based HPV test (hpVIR) in women aged 30–60 years (n=11 951). No difference in the detection rates of histological CIN2+ was found between the arms.

    Taken together, self-sampling resulted in a higher participation rate than sampling by medical professionals in cervical screening and that triage with repeated self-sampling resulted in high compliance and detection rate of CIN2+. As repeated self-sampling for HPV testing was also cost-effective, it could serve as an attractive alternative in the development of future cervical screening programs. More research is needed on how to refine the management of HPV-positive women by self-sampling only.

    List of papers
    1. Randomised study shows that repeated self-sampling and HPV test has more than two-fold higher detection rate of women with CIN2+ histology than Pap smear cytology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomised study shows that repeated self-sampling and HPV test has more than two-fold higher detection rate of women with CIN2+ histology than Pap smear cytology
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    2018 (English)In: British Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0007-0920, E-ISSN 1532-1827, Vol. 118, no 6, p. 896-904Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    This randomised study compared the detection rate of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia-positive (CIN2+) based on histology in women performing repeated self-sampling of vaginal fluid (VF) for human papillomavirus (HPV) test with a control group following the ordinary screening by Pap smear cytology.

    Methods:

    36390 women aged 30–49 years scheduled for invitation to organised screening were randomised in two groups, one to perform self-sampling of VF for HPV test (n=17 997, HPV arm) and the other group to perform screening by PAP smear cytology (n=18 393, control arm). HPV positive women in the HPV arm repeated the self-sampling and the HPV test on average 4.4 months later and those with two consecutive positive HPV tests were referred to colposcopy. Outcome was CIN2+ based on histology during 18-month follow-up.

    Results:

    Participation rate was 47% in the HPV arm and 39% in the control arm. The HPV prevalence in the first self-sampling was 6.9%, and 71% of these women were HPV positive in their second test. For the per-protocol approach, cumulative prevalence of histological CIN2+ in the HPV arm was 20.2 per 1000 women screened as compared to 10.8 in the control arm. The cumulative prevalence of CIN2+ diagnosed per 1000 years screened was 160.8 in the HPV arm as compared with 25.4 in the control arm.

    Conclusions:

    Repeated self-sampling of VF and HPV test had more than a two-fold higher discovery rate of CIN2+ per 1000 women screened as compared with PAP smear cytology.

    National Category
    Cancer and Oncology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367087 (URN)10.1038/bjc.2017.485 (DOI)000427945800030 ()29438367 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)
    Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
    2. Diagnostic excision of the cervix in women over 40 years with human papilloma virus persistency and normal cytology
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diagnostic excision of the cervix in women over 40 years with human papilloma virus persistency and normal cytology
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    2019 (English)In: European journal of obstetrics & gynecology and reproductive biology: X, ISSN 2590-1613, Vol. 3, article id 100042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as the main risk factor of cervical cancer. Investigation via cytology and colposcopy have lower sensitivity than HPV testing in the diagnosis of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2+). Despite normal cytology and colposcopy findings women with persistent HPV infection have an increased risk of CIN2+. The aim of the study was to evaluate the proportion of histologically confirmed CIN2+ in women with persistent HPV infection and normal Pap smears.

    Study design: From April 2013 until March 2016 we prospectively recruited 91 women over 40 years with persistent HPV infection without any abnormalities in cytology. Of these, 40 women attended a gynecological examination including an HPV test, Pap smear, endocervical cytology, colposcopy with biopsies and diagnostic loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP). Biopsy and LEEP samples were subjected to histological examination.

    Results: CIN2+ was verified by histological examination of the LEEP sample in 6/40 (15%) of the women. All the cytological samples were normal and none of the biopsies confirmed CIN2+. Only 19/40 women still had a persistent HPV infection at the study visit. None of the 21/40 women who had cleared their HPV infection at the study visit had CIN2+ in histology of the LEEP sample.

    Conclusions: A persistent HPV infection needs to be monitored despite normal Pap smears, since 6/40 (15%) women older than 40 years, was revealed to have an undiagnosed CIN2+ when LEEP was performed. Counseling women regarding the risk of cervical cancer and the expected effect of an eventual LEEP can help them to make an optimal informed choice.

    Keywords
    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, Colposcopy, Human papillomavirus, Loop electrical excision procedure, Transformation zone
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-400770 (URN)10.1016/j.eurox.2019.100042 (DOI)31404426 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2020-01-02 Created: 2020-01-02 Last updated: 2020-03-18Bibliographically approved
    3. Cost-effectiveness analysis of repeated self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: a randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cost-effectiveness analysis of repeated self-sampling for HPV testing in primary cervical screening: a randomized study
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is recommended in primary cervical screening to improve cancer prevention. An advantage of HPV testing is that it can be performed on self-samples, which could increase population coverage and result in a more efficient strategy to identify women at risk of developing cervical cancer. Our objective was to assess whether repeated self-sampling for HPV testing is cost-effective in comparison with Pap smear cytology for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or more (CIN2+) in increasing participation rate in primary cervical screening.

    Methods

    A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) was performed on data from a previously published randomized clinical study including 36 390 women aged 30–49 years. Participants were randomized either to perform repeated self-sampling of vaginal fluid for HPV testing (n = 17 997, HPV self-sampling arm) or to midwife-collected Pap smears for cytological analysis (n = 18 393, Pap smear arm).

    Results

    Self-sampling for HPV testing led to 1633 more screened women and 107 more histologically diagnosed CIN2+ at a lower cost vs. midwife-collected Pap smears (€ 228 642 vs. € 781 139). 

    Conclusions

    This study projected that repeated self-sampling for HPV testing increased participation and detection of CIN2+ at a lower cost than midwife-collected Pap smears in primary cervical screening. Offering women a home-based self-sampling may therefore be a more cost-effective alternative than clinic-based screening.

     

    Keywords
    Self-sampling, HPV testing, primary cervical screening, cost-effectiveness, CIN2+, precancerous lesion, cervical cancer
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405549 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
    4. Comparison of vaginal self-sampling and cervical sampling by medical professionals for the detection of HPV and CIN2+: a randomized study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of vaginal self-sampling and cervical sampling by medical professionals for the detection of HPV and CIN2+: a randomized study
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Primary screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) test is more effective in reducing cervical cancer incidence than cytology and it also offers the opportunity to self-sample. We conducted a randomized study to compare vaginal self-sampling with cervical sampling by medical professionals for HPV testing concerning prevalence of HPV and detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) of grade 2 or worse (CIN2+)  or grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) in primary screening. In total, 11 951 women aged 30–60 years were randomized into two groups, 5961 for self-sampling (SS arm) and 5990 for sampling by medical professionals (SMP arm). Sampling was performed with a Rovers®Viba-brush in the SS arm and a cytobrush in the SMP arm. All samples were applied to an indicating FTA elute card and analyzed for HPV using a clinically validated real-time PCR test (hpVIR). All HPV-positive women performed repeated sampling about six months later using the same procedure as used initially. All HPV-positive women in the second sampling were referred to colposcopy. HPV prevalence in the first test did not differ between the SS arm (6.8%, 167/2466) and the SMP arm (7.8%, 118/1519) (p=0.255). The prevalence of CIN2+ per 1000 screened women was 17 (43/2466 × 1000) (95%CI 13–24) in the SS arm and 21 (32/1519 × 1000) (95%CI 15–30) in the SMP arm. For CIN3+, the prevalence per 1000 screened women was 14 (35/2466 × 1000) (95%CI 10–20) in the SS arm and 15 (23/1519 × 1000) (95%CI 10–23) in the SMP arm.  In conclusion, self-sampling and sampling by medical professionals showed the same prevalence of HPV and detection rate of CIN2+ and CIN3+ in histology.

    Novelty and Impact

    Offering self-sampling in primary cervical screening results in similar rates of HPV prevalence and detection of CIN2+ and CIN3+ compared with sampling by medical professionals when using an FTA card as storage medium and PCR-based HPV test (hpVIR). Considering health-economic aspects, resources should be directed towards self-sampling as a first choice for primary cervical screening, with careful follow-up of this strategy.

    Keywords
    Self-sampling, HPV test, Primary cervical screening
    National Category
    Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
    Research subject
    Obstetrics and Gynaecology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405547 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-03-12Bibliographically approved
  • May, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Narratives in the spotlight: an analysis of two positions in sustainability2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    People’s view of the world can cause them to make decisions that may not be sensible or based on incomplete information. A way to rectify this problem is by drawing upon ideas that are presented within bestselling popular science publications, in this case relating to sustainable development. This thesis sets out to map two positions in sustainability, techno optimism (based around technological solutions for societal and ecological problems) and eco centrism (based around the importance and irreplaceability of natural capital). Four parameters were selected for analysis; overpopulation, energy, decentralization, and economy, to analyse the key ideas of the respective positions. A small number of texts were used, based on the prominence of the authors and their relevance to the field. The two positions were chosen for their similarities, and how others had attempted to combine them in the past. In addition, a chapter on the Sustainocene was added, an idea based around humans living sustainably within the environment; important due to including ideas from both positions. A similar concept, the arcology, was also included. Both concepts were discussed as a means of bridging the gap between eco centrism and techno optimism. It was found that there were some similarities between the two positions, although several important differences, mainly relating to the role of ecosystems and limits to growth. A future thesis would ideally further build on this one in discussing ways in which the two positions could be combined further within sustainable development.

  • Eidem, Aaron
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Dahlgren, Nicholas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Hur påverkas finansiell prestation av hållbarhetsarbete?: En studie om svenska bolags ESG-betyg2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie undersöker sambandet mellan hållbarhetsarbete och den marknadsbaserade samt redovisningsbaserade finansiella prestationen hos svenska, börsnoterade bolag. Studiens observationer utgörs av bolag som är noterade vid Stockholmsbörsen åren 2017 och 2018. Hållbarhetsarbetet har bedömts genom att ta del av dels ESG Score, dels ESG Controversy Score (ESGC Score). Det första måttet utgör ett betyg som presenterar ett helhetsomdöme av bolagens samlade arbete inom parametrarna miljö, bolagsstyrning och hantering av sociala frågor. Det senare måttet mäter graden av negativ exponering i samband med ESG-relaterade kontroverser. Studien har företagits genom multipla regressionsanalyser där sambandet mellan ESG Score respektive ESGC Score och den finansiella prestationen har undersökts. Finansiell prestation har mätts genom användandet av de finansiella måtten Tobins Q och ROA. Resultaten uppvisar statistiskt säkerställda negativa samband mellan de finansiella måtten och ESG Score, vilket i viss mån motsäger forskningen, men kan förklaras av teorier såsom Shareholder Theory. Gällande ESGC Score uppvisas ett statistiskt säkerställt positivt samband med Tobins Q. Studien bidrar till forskningen genom att ESGC Score, enligt studieförfattarnas kännedom, inte undersökts på förevarande vis. 

  • Öhlund, Maja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Hur påverkar arbetsplatsen uttaget av föräldraförsäkringen: En kvalitativ intervjustudie om hur normer påverkar uttaget av föräldraförsäkringen2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Studiens syfte är att att öka förståelsen för implementeringen av föräldraförsäkringen. Uttaget av föräldraförsäkringen skiljer sig mellan män och kvinnor och genom att undersöka om det finns könade normer (kopplat till föräldraförsäkringen) som påverkar män och kvinnor på olika sätt på arbetsplatsen, samt hur normer och informella regler på arbetsplatsen påverkar föräldrars uttag av föräldraförsäkringen, kompletteras tidigare studier på området. Studiens teoretiska ramverk utgörs av Feministisk Institutionalism och genom att intervjua föräldrar angående normer på sina arbetsplatser bidrar studien med kunskap om förldraförsäkringens informella regelverk. Studiens resultat ger en kvalitativ beskrivning om hur normer kring föräldraförsäkring är olika för män och kvinnor på arbetsplatsen. Kvinnor bemöts som den primära förälderns medan männen blir bemötta som den primära förvärvsarbetaren.

  • Hedberg, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Literature.
    En strid för det som borde vara: Viktor Rydberg som moderniseringskritiker 1891–18952012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This dissertation deals with the critique of modernization in the late work of Viktor Rydberg (1828–1895). The primary objects of study are the novel Vapensmeden (”The Armourer”) and the essay ”Den hvita rasens framtid” (”The Future of the White Race”). The study combines perspectives from narrative, rhetorical and sociological theory and describes the fictive and non-fictive text as tools of resistance against the process of modernization.

    Rydberg’s later work has often been left uncommented by critics and literary historians. The novel Vapensmeden, for example, has been considered nostalgic and conservative, in contrast to Rydberg’s earlier poems and novels, widely read as progressive and idealistic. This study questions that view, while at the same time explaining its roots, through a detailed study of the changes in Rydberg’s fame and persona during the first century after his death. In order to describe how Rydberg’s work reached a mass audience during the first half of the twentieth century, this dissertation also includes a bibliography for the years 1896–2003.

    Rydberg’s ideological development in the 1880s and 1890s is interpreted as a consequence of his reluctance to accept a society created by the liberalism of his youth, which he felt had metamorphosed from an ideology of freedom to a defense of greed and destruction. This, however, does not mean that he had become a conservative, but rather a restless seeker of alternatives. In his last works, he made use of his reputation both as a poet and a novelist and as a well-read and respected academic. Every device, every possible effort was needed in order to control the forces of modernization. In fact, in Vapensmeden as well as in ”Den hvita rasens framtid”, Rydberg mixes fictional and academic writing, speaking from two positions at the same time.

  • Fäldt, Göran
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Schönning, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Sequential hyperon decays in the reaction e(+)e(-) -> Sigma(0)(Sigma)over-bar(0)2020In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 101, no 3, article id 033002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a study of the sequential hyperon decay Sigma(0) -> Lambda gamma; Lambda -> p pi(-) and its corresponding antihyperon decay. We derive a multidimensional and model-independent formalism for the case when the hyperons are produced in the reaction e(+)e(-) -> Sigma(0)(Sigma) over bar (0). Cross-section distributions are calculated using the folding technique. We also study sequential decays of single-tagged hyperons.

  • Öfverberg, Miriam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Policyprofessionella i politiken: ett demokratiskt problem?: En studie om policyprofessionellas inflytande på kommunal nivå2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Cederwall, B.
    et al.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Liu, X.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Aktas, O.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ertoprak, A.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Istanbul Univ, Fac Sci, Dept Phys, TR-34134 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Zhang, W.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Qi, C.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Clement, E.
    CEA DSM CNRS IN2P3, GANIL, Bd Henri Becquerel,BP 55027, F-14076 Caen 5, France.
    de France, G.
    CEA DSM CNRS IN2P3, GANIL, Bd Henri Becquerel,BP 55027, F-14076 Caen 5, France.
    Ralet, D.
    Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Sci Nucl & Sci Mat, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay, France.
    Gadea, A.
    Univ Valencia, CSIC, Inst Fis Corpuscular, E-46980 Valencia, Spain.
    Goasduff, A.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy.
    Jaworski, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy;Univ Warsaw, Heavy Ion Lab, Ul Pasteura 5A, PL-02093 Warsaw, Poland.
    Kuti, I.
    MTA Atomki, H-4001 Debrecen, Hungary.
    Nyako, B. M.
    MTA Atomki, H-4001 Debrecen, Hungary.
    Nyberg, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Palacz, M.
    Univ Warsaw, Heavy Ion Lab, Ul Pasteura 5A, PL-02093 Warsaw, Poland.
    Wadsworth, R.
    Univ York, Dept Phys, York YO10 5DD, N Yorkshire, England.
    Valiente-Dobon, J. J.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy.
    Al-Azri, H.
    Rustaq Coll Educ, Dept Sci, Al Rustaq 329, Oman.
    Nyberg, A. Atac
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Back, T.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    de Angelis, G.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy.
    Doncel, M.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Lab, Dept Phys, Liverpool L69 7ZE, Merseyside, England.
    Dudouet, J.
    Univ Lyon, IPN Lyon, CNRS, IN2P3, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France.
    Gottardo, A.
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland.
    Jurado, M.
    Univ Valencia, CSIC, Inst Fis Corpuscular, E-46980 Valencia, Spain.
    Ljungvall, J.
    Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Sci Nucl & Sci Mat, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay, France.
    Mengoni, D.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy.
    Napoli, D. R.
    Ist Nazl Fis Nucl, Lab Nazl Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro, Italy.
    Petrache, C. M.
    Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Sci Nucl & Sci Mat, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay, France.
    Sohler, D.
    MTA Atomki, H-4001 Debrecen, Hungary.
    Timar, J.
    MTA Atomki, H-4001 Debrecen, Hungary.
    Barrientos, D.
    CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23, Switzerland.
    Bednarczyk, P.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Ul Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Benzoni, G.
    INFN, Sez Milano, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Birkenbach, B.
    Univ Cologne, Inst Kernphys, Zulpicher Str 77, D-50937 Cologne, Germany.
    Boston, A. J.
    Univ Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool L69 7ZE, Merseyside, England.
    Boston, H. C.
    Univ Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Lab, Liverpool L69 7ZE, Merseyside, England.
    Burrows, I.
    STFC Daresbury Lab, Warrington WA4 4AD, Cheshire, England.
    Charles, L.
    CNRS, UNISTRA, IPHC, 23 Rue Loess, F-67200 Strasbourg, France.
    Ciemala, M.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Ul Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Crespi, F. C. L.
    Univ Milan, Dept Phys, I-20133 Milan, Italy;INFN Milano, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Cullen, D. M.
    Univ Manchester, Nucl Phys Grp, Schuster Lab, Manchester M13 9PL, Lancs, England.
    Desesquelles, P.
    Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Sci Nucl & Sci Mat, CNRS, IN2P3, F-91405 Orsay, France;Univ Paris Saclay, CNRS, IN2P3, Bat 104, F-91405 Orsay, France.
    Domingo-Pardo, C.
    Univ Valencia, CSIC, Inst Fis Corpuscular, E-46071 Valencia, Spain.
    Eberth, J.
    Univ Cologne, Inst Kernphys, Zulpicher Str 77, D-50937 Cologne, Germany.
    Erduran, N.
    Istanbul Sabahattin Zaim Univ, Fac Engn & Nat Sci, TR-34303 Istanbul, Turkey.
    Erturk, S.
    Nigde Univ, Dept Phys, TR-51240 Nigde, Turkey.
    Gonzalez, V.
    Univ Valencia, Dept Ingn Elect, E-46100 Valencia, Spain.
    Goupil, J.
    CEA DSM CNRS IN2P3, GANIL, Bd Henri Becquerel,BP 55027, F-14076 Caen 5, France.
    Hess, H.
    Univ Cologne, Inst Kernphys, Zulpicher Str 77, D-50937 Cologne, Germany.
    Huyuk, T.
    Univ Valencia, CSIC, Inst Fis Corpuscular, E-46980 Valencia, Spain.
    Jungclaus, A.
    CSIC, Inst Estruct Mat, E-28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Korten, W.
    Univ Paris Saclay, CEA, Irfu, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Lemasson, A.
    CEA DSM CNRS IN2P3, GANIL, Bd Henri Becquerel,BP 55027, F-14076 Caen 5, France.
    Leoni, S.
    Univ Milan, Dept Phys, I-20133 Milan, Italy;INFN Milano, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Maj, A.
    Polish Acad Sci, Henryk Niewodniczanski Inst Nucl Phys, Ul Radzikowskiego 152, PL-31342 Krakow, Poland.
    Menegazzo, R.
    INFN Padova, I-35131 Padua, Italy.
    Million, B.
    INFN Milano, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Perez-Vidal, R. M.
    Univ Valencia, CSIC, Inst Fis Corpuscular, E-46071 Valencia, Spain.
    Podolyak, Zs.
    Univ Surrey, Dept Phys, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey, England.
    Pullia, A.
    Univ Milan, Dept Phys, I-20133 Milan, Italy;INFN Milano, I-20133 Milan, Italy.
    Recchia, F.
    INFN Padova, I-35131 Padua, Italy;Univ Padua, Dipartimento Fis & Astron, I-35131 Padua, Italy.
    Reiter, P.
    Univ Cologne, Inst Kernphys, Zulpicher Str 77, D-50937 Cologne, Germany.
    Saillant, F.
    CEA DSM CNRS IN2P3, GANIL, Bd Henri Becquerel,BP 55027, F-14076 Caen 5, France.
    Salsac, M. D.
    Univ Paris Saclay, CEA, Irfu, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Sanchis, E.
    Univ Valencia, Dept Ingn Elect, E-46100 Valencia, Spain.
    Simpson, J.
    STFC Daresbury Lab, Warrington WA4 4AD, Cheshire, England.
    Stezowski, O.
    Univ Lyon 1, CNRS, IN2P3, IPN Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne, France.
    Theisen, Ch.
    Univ Paris Saclay, CEA, Irfu, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Zielinska, M.
    Univ Paris Saclay, CEA, Irfu, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Isospin Properties of Nuclear Pair Correlations from the Level Structure of the Self-Conjugate Nucleus Ru-882020In: Physical Review Letters, ISSN 0031-9007, E-ISSN 1079-7114, Vol. 124, no 6, article id 062501Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The low-lying energy spectrum of the extremely neutron-deficient self-conjugate (N = Z) nuclide Ru-88(44)44 has been measured using the combination of the Advanced Gamma Tracking Array (AGATA) spectrometer, the NEDA and Neutron Wall neutron detector arrays, and the DIAMANT charged particle detector array. Excited states in Ru-88 were populated via the Fe-54(Ar-36, 2n gamma)Ru-88* fusion-evaporation reaction at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL) accelerator complex. The observed gamma-ray cascade is assigned to Ru-88 using clean prompt gamma-gamma-2-neutron coincidences in anticoincidence with the detection of charged particles, confirming and extending the previously assigned sequence of low-lying excited states. It is consistent with a moderately deformed rotating system exhibiting a band crossing at a rotational frequency that is significantly higher than standard theoretical predictions with isovector pairing, as well as observations in neighboring N > Z nuclides. The direct observation of such a "delayed" rotational alignment in a deformed N = Z nucleus is in agreement with theoretical predictions related to the presence of strong isoscalar neutron-proton pair correlations.

  • Escala-Garcia, Maria
    et al.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Abraham, Jean
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England;Cambridge Expt Canc Med Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, Cambridge Breast Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst Mt Sinai Hosp, Fred A Litwin Ctr Canc Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Irvine, CA USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Ashworth, Alan
    Univ Calif San Francisco, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehens Canc Ctr, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Auer, Paul L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Canc Prevent Program, Seattle, WA USA;Univ Wisconsin Milwaukee, Zilber Sch Publ Hlth, Milwaukee, WI USA.
    Auvinen, Paivi
    Kuopio Univ Hosp, Canc Ctr, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med, Oncol, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Kuopio, Finland.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Beesley, Jonathan
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Behrens, Sabine
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Benitez, Javier
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Madrid, Spain;Biomed Network Rare Dis CIBERER, Madrid, Spain.
    Bermisheva, Marina
    Ufa Sci Ctr Russian Acad Sci, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa, Russia.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Blot, William
    Vanderbilt Univ Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Dept Med,Div Epidemiol, Nashville, TN USA;Int Epidemiol Inst, Rockville, MD USA.
    Bogdanova, Natalia V.
    Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany;NN Alexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Minsk, BELARUS.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise
    Oslo Univ Hosp Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, iFIT Cluster Excellence, Tubingen, Germany;German Canc Consortium DKTK, German Canc Res Ctr DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Consortium DKTK, German Canc Res Ctr DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Brucker, Sara Y.
    Univ Tubingen, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Tubingen, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Womens Clin Heidelberg, Mol Biol Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Caldas, Carlos
    Univ Cambridge, Li Ka Shing Ctr, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England;CRUK Cambridge Canc Ctr, Breast Canc Programme, Cambridge, England;Cambridge Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Canc Res Ctr, Gen Epidemiol Grp, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Chin, Suet-Feung
    Univ Cambridge, Canc Res UK Cambridge Inst, Cambridge, England.
    Clarke, Christine L.
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Cox, Angela
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield Inst Nucle Acids SInFoNiA, Dept Oncol & Metab, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Cross, Simon S.
    Univ Sheffield, Dept Neurosci, Acad Unit Pathol, Sheffield, S Yorkshire, England.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, Philadelphia, PA USA.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Pathol, Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Human Genet, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Dunn, Janet A.
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Clin Trials Unit, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Earl, Helena M.
    Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, NIHR Cambridge Biomed Res Ctr, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge NHS Fdn Hosp, Cambridge Breast Unit, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Canc Sci Acad Unit, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Eliassen, A. Heather
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Ellberg, Carolina
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, St Marys Hosp,Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, NIHR Manchester Biomed Res Ctr, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, David Geffen Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA;Univ Edinburgh Med Sch, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland;Canc Res UK Edinburgh Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Breast Surg, Herlev, Denmark.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hospitalario Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago Compostela IDIS, Galician Fdn Genom Med,Genom Med Grp, Santiago De Compostela, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Hosp Clino San Carlos, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Madrid, Spain.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA USA.
    George, Angela
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Univ Utah Sch Med Salt, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Gonzalez-Neira, Anna
    Spanish Natl Canc Res Ctr CNIO, Human Canc Genet Programme, Madrid, Spain.
    Grip, Mervi
    Univ Oulu, Oulu Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Oulu, Finland.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP,Canc & Envi, Villejuif, France.
    Guo, Qi
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cardiovasc Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge, England.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Harrington, Patricia A.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England.
    Hiller, Louise
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Clin Trials Unit, Coventry, W Midlands, England.
    Hooning, Maartje J.
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Dept Med Oncol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Howell, Anthony
    Univ Manchester, Div Canc Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Huang, Chiun-Sheng
    Natl Taiwan Univ Hosp, Dept Surg, Taipei, Taiwan;Natl Taiwan Univ Coll Med, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Huang, Guanmengqian
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hunter, David J.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Univ Oxford, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Oxford, England.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Independent Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Szczecin, Poland.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, Dept Med, Div Oncol, Stanford, CA USA.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kapoor, Pooja Middha
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Keeman, Renske
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Kitahara, Cari M.
    Natl Canc Inst, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Radiat Epidemiol Branch, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Koppert, Linetta B.
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Dept Surg Oncol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB Ctr Canc Biol, VIB, Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Lab Translat Genet, Dept Human Genet, Leuven, Belgium.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii Canc Ctr, Epidemiol Program, Honolulu, HI USA.
    Lejbkowicz, Flavio
    Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel;Carmel Hosp, Haifa, Israel.
    Lindblom, Annika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Pathol, Imaging Ctr, Kuopio, Finland.
    Manoochehri, Mehdi
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori Milano INT, Dept Med Oncol & Hematol, Unit Med Genet, Milan, Italy.
    Margolin, Sara
    Ssdersjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Ssdersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martinez, Maria Elena
    Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA USA;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth, La Jolla, CA USA.
    Maurer, Tabea
    Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, Univ Canc Ctr Hamburg UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Hamburg, Germany.
    Mavroudis, Dimitrios
    Univ Hosp Herakl, Dept Med Oncol, Iraklion, Greece.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Munich, Germany.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci Monash Hlth, Precis Med, Clayton, Vic, Australia.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    Beckman Res Inst City Hope, Dept Populat Sci, Duarte, CA USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Newman, William G.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, St Marys Hosp,Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ N Carolina, Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Orr, Nick
    Queens Univ Belfast, Ctr Canc Res & Cell Biol, Belfast, Antrim, North Ireland.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    Inst Mol Oncol, IFOM FIRC Italian Fdn Canc Research, Genome Diagnost Program, Milan, Italy.
    Petridis, Christos
    Guys Hosp, Kings Coll London, Res Oncol, London, England.
    Prentice, Ross L.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Canc Prevent Program, Seattle, WA USA.
    Presneau, Nadege
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Punie, Kevin
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Leuven Canc Inst, Leuven Multidisciplinary Breast Ctr, Dept Oncol, Leuven, Belgium.
    Ramachandran, Dhanya
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Rennert, Gad
    Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel;Carmel Hosp, Haifa, Israel.
    Romero, Atocha
    Hosp Univ Puerta Hierro, Med Oncol Dept, Madrid, Spain.
    Sachchithananthan, Mythily
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Larissa, Dept Oncol, Larisa, Greece.
    Sawyer, Elinor J.
    Guys Hosp, Kings Coll London, Res Oncol, London, England.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    Univ Hosp Cologne, Ctr Hereditary Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Ctr Mol Med Cologne CMMC, Cologne, Germany.
    Schwentner, Lukas
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Ulm, Germany.
    Scott, Christopher
    Simard, Jacques
    Univ Laval, Ctr Hosp Univ Quebec, Res Ctr, Gen Ctr, Quebec City, PQ, Canada.
    Sohn, Christof
    Heidelberg Univ, Natl Ctr Tumor Dis, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci Monash Hlth, Precis Med, Clayton, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London, England.
    Tamimi, Rulla M.
    Harvard Med Sch, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA.
    Tapper, William J.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Teixeira, Manuel R.
    Portuguese Oncol Inst, Dept Genet, Porto, Portugal;Univ Porto, Biomed Sci Inst ICBAS, Porto, Portugal.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, New York, NY USA.
    Thorne, Heather
    Peter MacCallum Canc Ctr, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Sir Peter MacCallum Dept Oncol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.
    Leiden Univ Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Tomlinson, Ian
    Univ Birmingham, Inst Canc & Genom Sci, Birmingham, W Midlands, England;Univ Oxford, Oxford NIHR Biomed Res Ctr, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Troester, Melissa A.
    Univ N Carolina, Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Truong, Therese
    Univ Paris Sud, INSERM, Univ Paris Saclay, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat Hlth CESP,Canc & Envi, Villejuif, France.
    Turnbull, Clare
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Vachon, Celine M.
    van der Kolk, Lizet E.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Wang, Qin
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Winqvist, Robert
    Univ Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Canc & Translat Med Res Unit, Bioctr Oulu, Oulu, Finland;Northern Finland Lab Ctr Oulu, Lab Canc Genet & Tumor Biol, Oulu, Finland.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yang, Xiaohong R.
    Natl Canc Inst, Natl Inst Hlth, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD USA.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Univ Calif Irvine, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Dept Epidemiol, Irvine, CA USA.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Ssdersjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wessels, Lodewyk F. A.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Carcinogenesis, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Delft Univ Technol, Fac EEMCS, Delft, Netherlands.
    Chenevix-Trench, Georgia
    QIMR Berghofer Med Res Inst, Dept Genet & Computat Biol, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Bader, Gary D.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Toronto, Donnelly Ctr, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Doerk, Thilo
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Oncol, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Canisius, Sander
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Mol Carcinogenesis, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Divi Mol Pathol, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    A network analysis to identify mediators of germline-driven differences in breast cancer prognosis2020In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the underlying genetic drivers of the heritability of breast cancer prognosis remains elusive. We adapt a network-based approach to handle underpowered complex datasets to provide new insights into the potential function of germline variants in breast cancer prognosis. This network-based analysis studies similar to 7.3 million variants in 84,457 breast cancer patients in relation to breast cancer survival and confirms the results on 12,381 independent patients. Aggregating the prognostic effects of genetic variants across multiple genes, we identify four gene modules associated with survival in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative and one in ER-positive disease. The modules show biological enrichment for cancer-related processes such as G-alpha signaling, circadian clock, angiogenesis, and Rho-GTPases in apoptosis.

  • Carlsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Abujrais, Sandy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Herman, Stephanie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Emami Khoonsari, Payam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Svenningsson, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Danderyd Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Burman, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Landtblom: Neurology.
    Kultima, Kim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Chemistry.
    Targeted metabolomics of CSF in healthy individuals and patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis using high-resolution mass spectrometry2020In: Metabolomics, ISSN 1573-3882, E-ISSN 1573-3890, Vol. 16, no 2, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Standardized commercial kits enable targeted metabolomics analysis and may thus provide an attractive complement to the more explorative approaches. The kits are typically developed for triple quadrupole mass spectrometers using serum and plasma.

    Objectives: Here we measure the concentrations of preselected metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) using a kit developed for high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS). Secondarily, the study aimed to investigate metabolite alterations in patients with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) compared to controls.

    Methods: We performed targeted metabolomics in human CSF on twelve SPMS patients and twelve age and sex-matched healthy controls using the Absolute IDQ-p400 kit (Biocrates Life Sciences AG) developed for HRMS. The extracts were analysed using two methods; liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS) and flow injection analysis-MS (FIA-HRMS).

    Results: Out of 408 targeted metabolites, 196 (48%) were detected above limit of detection and 35 were absolutely quantified. Metabolites analyzed using LC-HRMS had a median coefficient of variation (CV) of 3% and 2.5% between reinjections the same day and after prolonged storage, respectively. The corresponding results for the FIA-HRMS were a median CV of 27% and 21%, respectively. We found significantly (p < 0.05) elevated levels of glycine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), glycerophospholipid PC-O (34:0) and sum of hexoses in SPMS patients compared to controls.

    Conclusion: The Absolute IDQ-p400 kit could successfully be used for quantifying targeted metabolites in the CSF. Metabolites quantified using LC-HRMS showed superior reproducibility compared to FIA-HRMS.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Measurement of J/psi production in association with a W-+/- boson with pp data at 8 TeV2020In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A measurement of the production of a prompt J/psi meson in association with a W-+/- boson with W-+/- -> mu nu and J/psi -> mu(+)mu(-) is presented for J/psi transverse momenta in the range 8.5-150 GeV and rapidity |y(J/psi)| < 2.1 using ATLAS data recorded in 2012 at the LHC. The data were taken at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of s = 8 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb(-1). The ratio of the prompt J/psi plus W-+/- cross-section to the inclusive W-+/- cross-section is presented as a differential measurement as a function of J/psi transverse momenta and compared with theoretical predictions using different double-parton-scattering cross-sections.

  • Marboe, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Nordita, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Widén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics. Stockholm Univ, Nordita, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    The fate of the Konishi multiplet in the β-deformed Quantum Spectral Curve2020In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 1, article id 26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate the solution space of the β-deformed Quantum Spectral Curve by studying a sample of solutions corresponding to single-trace operators that in the undeformed theory belong to the Konishi multiplet. We discuss how to set the precise boundary conditions for the leading Q-system for a given state, how to solve it, and how to build perturbative corrections to the Pμ-system. We confirm and add several loop orders to known results in the literature.

  • Ebadi, Mahsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Eriksson, Therese
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Mandal, Prithwiraj
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Costa, Luciano T.
    Univ Fed Fluminense, Inst Quim, Dept Fis Quim, BR-24020150 Niteroi, RJ, Brazil.
    Araujo, Carlos Moyses
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Mindemark, Jonas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Brandell, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Structural Chemistry.
    Restricted Ion Transport by Plasticizing Side Chains in Polycarbonate-Based Solid Electrolytes2020In: Macromolecules, ISSN 0024-9297, E-ISSN 1520-5835, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 764-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing the ionic conductivity has for decades been an overriding goal in the development of solid polymer electrolytes. According to fundamental theories on ion transport mechanisms in polymers, the ionic conductivity is strongly correlated to free volume and segmental mobility of the polymer for the conventional transport processes. Therefore, incorporating plasticizing side chains onto the main chain of the polymer host often appears as a clear-cut strategy to improve the ionic conductivity of the system through lowering of the glass transition temperature (T-g) This intended correlation between Tg and ionic conductivity is, however, not consistently observed in practice. The aim of this study is therefore to elucidate this interplay between segmental mobility and polymer structure in polymer electrolyte systems comprising plasticizing side chains. To this end, we utilize the synthetic versatility of the ion-conductive poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) platform. Two types of host polymers with side chains added to a PTMC backbone are employed, and the resulting electrolytes are investigated together with the side chain-free analogue both by experiment and with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results show that while added side chains do indeed lead to a lower Tg, the total ionic conductivity is highest in the host matrix without side chains. It was seen in the MD simulations that while side chains promote ionic mobility associated with the polymer chain, the more efficient interchain hopping transport mechanism occurs with a higher probability in the system without side chains. This is connected to a significantly higher solvation site diversity for the Li+ ions in the side-chain-free system, providing better conduction paths. These results strongly indicate that the side chains in fact restrict the mobility of the Li+ ions in the polymer hosts.

  • Käll, Anton
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Backlund, Ulrika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Shafran, Roz
    UCL Great Ormond St Inst Child Hlth, London, England.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Behav Sci & Learning, SE-58183 Linkoping, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lonesome no more?: A two-year follow-up of internet-administered cognitive behavioral therapy for loneliness2020In: Internet Interventions, ISSN 2214-7829, Vol. 19, article id 100301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study sought to investigate the long-term effects of an internet-administered programme based on CBT principles for which the initial efficacy has been reported in Kall, Jagholm, et al. (In press). Seventy-three participants who were recruited on the basis of experiencing frequent and prolonged loneliness were contacted to complete questionnaires measuring loneliness, quality of life, and symptoms of psychopathology two years after the conclusion of the initial treatment period. Additional items regarding use of the treatment techniques and strategies contained in the programme during the follow-up period was included. In total, 44 participants provided data for the loneliness measure at follow-up. The outcome data were analyzed with a piecewise mixed effects model to provide estimates of change for the continuous measures. Linear multiple regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between use of treatment techniques and reliable change on the primary outcome measure. The results showed decreases in loneliness during the follow-up period for the sample as a whole. Additionally, an increase in quality of life and a decrease in social anxiety were noted, but no significant changes of depressive symptoms or generalized anxiety. Effect sizes for the observed changes from baseline to follow-up were in the moderate to large range for all measures. Reported use of the treatment techniques was not significantly related to reliable change in loneliness after the two-year period. In conclusion, the results of the study support the utility of internet-based CBT targeting loneliness and indicate that the benefits from the intervention can be enduring.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Measurement of the top-quark mass in tt 1-jet events collected with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at=8 TeV2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 11, article id 150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A determination of the top-quark mass is presented using 20.2 fb-1 of 8 TeV proton-proton collision data produced by the Large Hadron Collider and collected by the ATLAS experiment. The normalised differential cross section of top-quark pair production in association with an energetic jet is measured in the lepton+jets final state and unfolded to parton and particle levels. The unfolded distribution at parton level can be described using next-to-leading-order QCD predictions in terms of either the top-quark pole mass or the running mass as defined in the (modified) minimal subtraction scheme. A comparison between the experimental distribution and the theoretical prediction allows the top-quark mass to be extracted in the two schemes. The value obtained for the pole-mass scheme is: rnirle 171.1 0.4 (stat) 0.9 (syst) 173 (theo) GeV. The extracted value in the running-mass scheme is: rnt(rnt) = 162.9 0.5 (stat) 1.0 (syst) 1:12 (theo) GeV. The results for the top -quark mass using the two schemes are consistent, when translated from one scheme to the other.

  • Yamamoto, Kohei
    et al.
    Univ Tokyo, Inst Solid State Phys, Chiba 2778581, Japan;Univ Tokyo, Dept Phys, Tokyo 1130033, Japan;Inst Mol Sci, Okazaki, Aichi 4448585, Japan.
    Kubota, Yuya
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795198, Japan;RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Suzuki, Motohiro
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795198, Japan.
    Hirata, Yasuyuki
    Univ Tokyo, Inst Solid State Phys, Chiba 2778581, Japan;Univ Tokyo, Dept Phys, Tokyo 1130033, Japan;Natl Def Acad Japan, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 2398686, Japan.
    Carva, Karel
    Charles Univ Prague, Fac Math & Phys, Dept Condensed Matter Phys, Ke Karlovu 5, Prague 12116, Czech Republic.
    Berritta, Marco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Takubo, Kou
    Univ Tokyo, Inst Solid State Phys, Chiba 2778581, Japan;Tokyo Inst Technol, Dept Chem, Meguro Ku, Tokyo 1528551, Japan.
    Uemura, Yohei
    Inst Mol Sci, Okazaki, Aichi 4448585, Japan;Paul Scherrer Inst, CH-5232 Villigen, Switzerland.
    Fukaya, Ryo
    High Energy Accelerator Res Org, Inst Mat Struct Sci, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 3050801, Japan.
    Tanaka, Kenta
    Univ Hyogo, Grad Sch Mat Sci, Kamigori, Hyogo 6781297, Japan.
    Nishimura, Wataru
    Univ Hyogo, Grad Sch Mat Sci, Kamigori, Hyogo 6781297, Japan.
    Ohkochi, Takuo
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795198, Japan.
    Katayama, Tetsuo
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795198, Japan;RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Togashi, Tadashi
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795198, Japan;RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Tamasaku, Kenji
    RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Yabashi, Makina
    Japan Synchrotron Radiat Res Inst, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795198, Japan;RIKEN, SPring 8 Ctr, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 6795148, Japan.
    Tanaka, Yoshihito
    Univ Hyogo, Grad Sch Mat Sci, Kamigori, Hyogo 6781297, Japan.
    Seki, Takeshi
    Tohoku Univ, Inst Mat Res, Sendai, Miyagi 9808577, Japan;Tohoku Univ, Ctr Spintron Res Network, Sendai, Miyagi 9808577, Japan.
    Takanashi, Koki
    Tohoku Univ, Inst Mat Res, Sendai, Miyagi 9808577, Japan;Tohoku Univ, Ctr Spintron Res Network, Sendai, Miyagi 9808577, Japan.
    Oppeneer, Peter M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory.
    Wadati, Hiroki
    Univ Tokyo, Inst Solid State Phys, Chiba 2778581, Japan;Univ Tokyo, Dept Phys, Tokyo 1130033, Japan;Univ Hyogo, Grad Sch Mat Sci, Kamigori, Hyogo 6781297, Japan.
    Ultrafast demagnetization of Pt magnetic moment in L1(0)-FePt probed by magnetic circular dichroism at a hard x-ray free electron laser2019In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 21, no 12, article id 123010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unraveling the origin of ultrafast demagnetization in multisublattice ferromagnetic materials requires femtosecond x-ray techniques to trace the magnetic moment dynamics on individual elements, but this could not yet be achieved in the hard x-ray regime. We demonstrate here the first ultrafast demagnetization dynamics in the ferromagnetic heavy 5d-transition metal Pt using circularly-polarized hard x-rays at an x-ray free electron laser (XFEL). The decay time of laser-induced demagnetization of L1(0)-FePt is determined to be tau(Pt) = 0.61 +/- 0.04 ps using time-resolved x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Pt L-3 edge, whereas magneto-optical Kerr measurements indicate the decay time for the total magnetization as tau(total) < 0.1 ps. A transient magnetic state with a photomodulated ratio of the 3d and 5d magnetic moments is demonstrated for pump-probe delays larger than 1 ps. We explain this distinct photo-modulated transient magnetic state by the induced-moment behavior of the Pt atom and the x-ray probing depth. Our findings pave the way for the future use of XFELs to disentangle atomic spin dynamics contributions.

  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Measurement of ZZ production in the ll nu nu final state with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at root s=13 TeV2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 10, article id 127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a measurement of ZZ production with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The measurement is carried out in the final state with two charged leptons and two neutrinos, using data collected during 2015 and 2016 in pp collisions at root s = 13 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1 fb(-1). The integrated cross-sections in the total and fiducial phase spaces are measured with an uncertainty of 7% and compared with Standard Model predictions, and differential measurements in the fiducial phase space are reported. No significant deviations from the Standard Model predictions are observed, and stringent constraints are placed on anomalous couplings corresponding to neutral triple gauge-boson interactions.

  • Ablikim, M.
    et al.
    Adlarson, Patrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Biernat, Jacek
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Ikegami Andersson, Walter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Johansson, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Kupsc, Andrzej
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Li, Cui
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Papenbrock, Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Pettersson, Joachim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Schönning, Karin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Thorén, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Wolke, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Nuclear Physics.
    Zou, J. H.
    Search for baryon and lepton number violating decays D+ -> (Lambda)over-bar((Sigma)over-bar(0))e(+) and D+ -> Lambda(Sigma(0))e(+)2020In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 101, no 3, article id 031102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a 2.93 fb(-1) data sample of electron-positron collisions taken with the BESIII detector at a center-of-mass energy of 3.773 GeV, which corresponds to (8296 +/- 31 +/- 64) x 10(3) D+ D- pairs, we search for the baryon and lepton number violating decays D+ -> (Lambda) over bar((Sigma) over bar (0))e(+) and D+ -> Lambda(Sigma(0))e(+). No obvious signals are found with the current statistics and upper limits on the branching fractions of these four decays are set at the level of 10(-6) at 90% confidence level.

  • Aad, G.
    et al.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Measurement of the azimuthal anisotropy of charged-particle production in Xe plus Xe collisions at root S-NN=5.44 TeV with the ATLAS detector2020In: Physical Review C: Covering Nuclear Physics, ISSN 2469-9985, E-ISSN 2469-9993, Vol. 101, no 2, article id 024906Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes the measurements of flow harmonics v(2)-v(6) in 3 mu b(-1) of Xe Xe collisions at root S-NN = 5.44 TeV performed using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Measurements of the centrality, multiplicity, and p(T) dependence of the v(n) obtained using two-particle correlations and the scalar product technique are presented. The measurements are also performed using a template-fit procedure, which was developed to remove nonflow correlations in small collision systems. This nonflow removal is shown to have a significant influence on the measured v(n) at high p(T), especially in peripheral events. Comparisons of the measured v(n) with measurements in Pb + Pb collisions and p + Pb collisions at root S-NN = 5.02 TeV are also presented. The v(n) values in Xe + Xe collisions are observed to be larger than those in Pb + Pb collisions for n = 2, 3, and 4 in the most central events. However, with decreasing centrality or increasing harmonic order n, the v(n) values in Xe + Xe collisions become smaller than those in Pb + Pb collisions. The v(n) in Xe + Xe and Pb + Pb collisions are also compared as a function of the mean number of participating nucleons, < N-part >, and the measured charged-particle multiplicity in the detector. The v(3) values in Xe + Xe and Pb + Pb collisions are observed to be similar at the same < N-part > or multiplicity, but the other harmonics are significantly different. The ratios of the measured v(n) in Xe + Xe and Pb + Pb collisions, as a function of centrality, are also compared to theoretical calculations.

  • Irisarri, Iker
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Dept Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, C Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid, Spain.
    Uribe, Juan E.
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Dept Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, C Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid, Spain;Natl Museum Nat Hist, Smithsonian Inst, Dept Invertebrate Zool, 10th St & Constitut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20560 USA.
    Eernisse, Douglas J.
    Calif State Univ Fullerton, Dept Biol Sci, 800 N State Coll Blvd, Fullerton, CA 92831 USA.
    Zardoya, Rafael
    CSIC, Museo Nacl Ciencias Nat, Dept Biodivers & Evolutionary Biol, C Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid, Spain.
    A mitogenomic phylogeny of chitons (Mollusca: Polyplacophora)2020In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Polyplacophora, or chitons, have long fascinated malacologists for their distinct and rather conserved morphology and lifestyle compared to other mollusk classes. However, key aspects of their phylogeny and evolution remain unclear due to the few morphological, molecular, or combined phylogenetic analyses, particularly those addressing the relationships among the major chiton lineages.

    Results

    Here, we present a mitogenomic phylogeny of chitons based on 13 newly sequenced mitochondrial genomes along with eight available ones and RNAseq-derived mitochondrial sequences from four additional species. Reconstructed phylogenies largely agreed with the latest advances in chiton systematics and integrative taxonomy but we identified some conflicts that call for taxonomic revisions. Despite an overall conserved gene order in chiton mitogenomes, we described three new rearrangements that might have taxonomic utility and reconstructed the most likely scenario of gene order change in this group. Our phylogeny was time-calibrated using various fossils and relaxed molecular clocks, and the robustness of these analyses was assessed with several sensitivity analyses. The inferred ages largely agreed with previous molecular clock estimates and the fossil record, but we also noted that the ambiguities inherent to the chiton fossil record might confound molecular clock analyses.

    Conclusions

    In light of the reconstructed time-calibrated framework, we discuss the evolution of key morphological features and call for a continued effort towards clarifying the phylogeny and evolution of chitons.

  • Katsogiannos, Petros
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Kamble, Prasad G.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Wiklund, Urban
    Umea Univ, Radiat Sciences, BioMed Engn & Informat, Umea, Sweden.
    Sundbom, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Upper Abdominal Surgery.
    Espes, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Hammar, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Karlsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Pereira, Maria J
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Eriksson, Jan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical diabetology and metabolism.
    Rapid changes in neuroendocrine regulation may contribute to reversal of type 2 diabetes after gastric bypass surgery2020In: Endocrine (Basingstoke), ISSN 1355-008X, E-ISSN 1559-0100, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 344-353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore the role of hormones and the autonomic nervous system in the rapid remission of diabetes after Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB).

    Research design and methods: Nineteen obese patients with type 2 diabetes, 7 M/12 F, were randomized (2:1) to RYGB or standard-of-care medical treatment (control). At baseline and 4 and 24 weeks post surgery, fasting blood sampling, OGTT, intravenous arginine challenge, and heart-rate variability (HRV) assessments were performed.

    Results: At both 4 and 24 weeks post-RYGB the following effects were found: arginine-stimulated insulin secretion was reduced. GLP-1, GIP, and glucagon rise during OGTT was enhanced. IGF-1 and GH levels increased. In addition, total HRV and spectral components P-LF (power of low frequency) and P-HF (power of high frequency) increased. At 4 weeks, morning cortisol was lower than baseline and 24 weeks. At 24 weeks, NEFA levels during OGTT, and the P-LF/P-HF ratio decreased. None of these changes were seen in the control group.

    Conclusions: There were rapid changes within 4 weeks after RYGB: signs of enhanced parasympathetic nerve activity, reduced morning cortisol, and enhanced incretin and glucagon responses to glucose. The findings suggest that neurohormonal mechanisms can contribute to the rapid improvement of insulin resistance and glycemia following RYGB in type 2 diabetes.

  • Owesson, Sofie
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Förändring i fysisk aktivitet hos barn som deltagit i en intervention2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children's health can be affected by insufficient physical activity together with an over-exposure of screen-time. This could contribute to social differences in health between individuals.

    Aim: The aim of the study was to examine the effects of the intervention ”En frisk generation” on physical activity habits, screen-time and physical fitness in second grade children.

    Methods: The Study design was a controlled study with an intervention and a control group. In total, the sample consisted of 67 children, where 36 belonged to the intervention and 31 to control-group. Intervention was based on different physical activities for families to try out in a nine months period, twice a week. The effect of the intervention “En frisk generation” valuate with a measuring-instrument survey with selected standard questions. Following implemented analysismethods were T-test, Mann-Whitney U-test, Chi-square test and ANCOVA. The variables gender, parental education-level and the baseline value were adjusted in the ANCOVA analysis.

    Main result: The intervention “En frisk generation” had no significant effects on either physical activity habits, screen-time or physical fitness in second grade children, because no significant differences could be found between the intervention and control group. When it comes to screentime, changes were seen within the group through significant differences. For physical fitness there was no change within the group during follow-up measurement, with regard to differences in meanvalue.

    Conclusion: The intervention ”En frisk generation” did not show any effect on physical activity habits, screen-time or physical fitness. No significant difference was found between the groups in second grade children. The content is that more studies needs to be done on a larger proportion of children in families, whose parents have a lower socioeconomic status. This needs to be done to see if family interventions have any effect on these variables.

  • Balgoma, David
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Zelleroth, Sofia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Grönbladh, Alfhild
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Hallberg, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Pettersson, Curt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Hedeland, Mikael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Analytical Pharmaceutical Chemistry.
    Anabolic androgenic steroids exert a selective remodeling of the plasma lipidome that mirrors the decrease of the de novo lipogenesis in the liver2020In: Metabolomics, ISSN 1573-3882, E-ISSN 1573-3890, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The abuse of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) is a source of public concern because of their adverse effects. Supratherapeutic doses of AASs are known to be hepatotoxic and regulate the lipoproteins in plasma by modifying the metabolism of lipids in the liver, which is associated with metabolic diseases. However, the effect of AASs on the profile of lipids in plasma is unknown.

    Objectives: To describe the changes in the plasma lipidome exerted by AASs and to discuss these changes in the light of previous research about AASs and de novo lipogenesis in the liver.

    Methods: We treated male Wistar rats with supratherapeutic doses of nandrolone decanoate and testosterone undecanoate. Subsequently, we isolated the blood plasma and performed lipidomics analysis by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Results: Lipid profiling revealed a decrease of sphingolipids and glycerolipids with palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, and oleic acids. In addition, lipid profiling revealed an increase in free fatty acids and glycerophospholipids with odd-numbered chain fatty acids and/or arachidonic acid.

    Conclusion: The lipid profile presented herein reports the imprint of AASs on the plasma lipidome, which mirrors the downregulation of de novo lipogenesis in the liver. In a broader perspective, this profile will help to understand the influence of androgens on the lipid metabolism in future studies of diseases with dysregulated lipogenesis (e.g. type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, and hepatocellular carcinoma).

  • Iliasov, Askar
    et al.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Mol & Mat, Heyendaalseweg 135, NL-6525AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands;Russian Acad Sci, Space Res Inst, Moscow 117997, Russia.
    Bagrov, Andrey A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Mol & Mat, Heyendaalseweg 135, NL-6525AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Katsnelson, Mikhail I.
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Inst Mol & Mat, Heyendaalseweg 135, NL-6525AJ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    Krikun, Alexander
    Leiden Univ, ITP, Inst Lorentz Theoret Phys, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333CA Leiden, Netherlands.
    Anisotropic destruction of the Fermi surface in inhomogeneous holographic lattices2020In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 1, article id 65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We analyze fermionic response of strongly correlated holographic matter in presence of inhomogeneous periodically modulated potential mimicking the crystal lattice. The modulation is sourced by a scalar operator that explicitly breaks the translational symmetry in one direction. We compute the fermion spectral function and show that it either exhibits a well defined Fermi surface with umklapp gaps opening on the Brillouin zone boundary at small lattice wave vector, or, when the wave vector is large, the Fermi surface is anisotropically deformed and the quasiparticles get significantly broadened in the direction of translation symmetry breaking. Making use of the ability of our model to smoothly extrapolate to the homogeneous Q-lattice like setup, we show that this novel effect is not due to the periodic modulation of the potential and Umklapp physics, but rather due to the anisotropic features of the holographic horizon. That means it encodes novel physics of strongly correlated critical systems which may be relevant for phenomenology of exotic states of electron matter.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-17 13:00 H:Son-Holmdahlsalen, Uppsala
    Fahlström, Markus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    On potentials and limitations of perfusion MRI in neurological disorders2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cerebral perfusion outlines several parameters which describe the status of cerebral haemodynamics. Numerous neurological diseases affect cerebral perfusion, thus the importance of diagnostic measurements. Perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a collection of non-ionizing magnetic resonance-based perfusion measurement techniques that can be used for clinical assessment of cerebral perfusion. The aim of this thesis was to investigate potentials and limitations of perfusion MRI used for clinical assessment of patients with neurological disorders. Patients with glioblastoma were examined with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) and dynamic contrast enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) before/after treatment with fractionated radiotherapy (FRT). Radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing brain tissue were found in the form of decreased cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) measured with DSC-MRI and increased vascular permeability and increased fraction of the extravascular extracellular space measured with DCE-MRI. Papers I–II provide valuable information regarding the possibility that radiation-induced changes could be a confounder in DSC-MRI and that DCE-MRI could potentially act as a biomarker for vascular damage secondary to radiation exposure. Additionally, CBF derived from arterial spin labelling (ASL) was compared to the reference standard 15O-water positron emission tomography (PET). Simultaneous measurements were acquired with an integrated PET/MR scanner using arterial blood sampling and zero-echo time-based attenuation correction in healthy subjects and patients with epilepsy. Correlation- and Bland–Altman analysis showed fair correlation and a negative relationship with wide limits of agreement in several cortical and subcortical regions. Thus, agreement with 15O-water is insufficient for absolute quantification with ASL, but ASL provides reliable relative measures that could potentially be rescaled to absolute values. Moyamoya disease (MMD) is characterized by progressive stenosis/occlusion in large brain arteries. A limitation of ASL is the sensitivity to prolonged arterial transit times, which is common in the collateral vessels of the brain in patients with MMD. Given the non-invasiveness and non-ionizing exposure, ASL has a pronounced potential for use in diagnostic imaging in patients with MMD. ASL was performed before and after administration of acetazolamide; CBF and cerebrovascular reserve capacity were derived for large vascular regions. Artefacts originating from prolonged arterial transit times were found to have negligible effects on CBF and cerebrovascular reserve capacity derived from ASL. This thesis adds to the understanding of potential and limitations of perfusion MRI in neurological diseases. 

    List of papers
    1. Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue after Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma Patients may Confound Longitudinal Evaluation of Treatment Response
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perfusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Changes in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue after Radiotherapy in Glioblastoma Patients may Confound Longitudinal Evaluation of Treatment Response
    2018 (English)In: Radiology and Oncology, ISSN 1318-2099, E-ISSN 1581-3207, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 143-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was assess acute and early delayed radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing brain tissue perfusion as measured with perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the dependence of these changes on the fractionated radiotherapy (FRT) dose level.

    Patients and methods: Seventeen patients with glioma WHO grade III-IV treated with FRT were included in this prospective study, seven were excluded because of inconsistent FRT protocol or missing examinations. Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI and contrast-enhanced 3D-T1-weighted (3D-T1w) images were acquired prior to and in average (standard deviation): 3.1 (3.3), 34.4 (9.5) and 103.3 (12.9) days after FRT. Pre-FRT 3D-T1w images were segmented into white- and grey matter. Cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) maps were calculated and co-registered patient-wise to pre-FRT 3D-T1w images. Seven radiation dose regions were created for each tissue type: 0-5 Gy, 5-10 Gy, 10-20 Gy, 20-30 Gy, 30-40 Gy, 40-50 Gy and 50-60 Gy. Mean CBV and CBF were calculated in each dose region and normalised (nCBV and nCBF) to the mean CBV and CBF in 0-5 Gy white- and grey matter reference regions, respectively.

    Results: Regional and global nCBV and nCBF in white- and grey matter decreased after FRT, followed by a tendency to recover. The response of nCBV and nCBF was dose-dependent in white matter but not in grey matter.

    Conclusions: Our data suggest that radiation-induced perfusion changes occur in normal-appearing brain tissue after FRT. This can cause an overestimation of relative tumour perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI, and can thus confound tumour treatment evaluation.

    Keywords
    malignant gliomas, normal-appearing brain tissue, perfusion MRI, radiation-induced changes
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356784 (URN)10.2478/raon-2018-0022 (DOI)000433103400004 ()30018517 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer Society
    Available from: 2018-08-07 Created: 2018-08-07 Last updated: 2020-03-01Bibliographically approved
    2. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging May Act as a Biomarker for Vascular Damage in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue after Radiotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging May Act as a Biomarker for Vascular Damage in Normal Appearing Brain Tissue after Radiotherapy in Patients with Glioblastoma
    Show others...
    2018 (English)In: Acta Radiologica Open, ISSN 2058-4601, Vol. 7, no 11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) is a promising perfusion method and may be useful in evaluating radiation-induced changes in normal-appearing brain tissue.

    Purpose: To assess whether radiotherapy induces changes in vascular permeability (Ktrans) and the fractional volume of the extravascular extracellular space (Ve) derived from DCE-MRI in normal-appearing brain tissue and possible relationships to radiation dose given.

    Material and Methods: Seventeen patients with glioblastoma treated with radiotherapy and chemotherapy were included; five were excluded because of inconsistencies in the radiotherapy protocol or early drop-out. DCE-MRI, contrast-enhanced three-dimensional (3D) T1-weighted (T1W) images and T2-weighted fluid attenuated inversion recovery (T2-FLAIR) images were acquired before and on average 3.3, 30.6, 101.6, and 185.7 days after radiotherapy. Pre-radiotherapy CE T1W and T2-FLAIR images were segmented into white and gray matter, excluding all non-healthy tissue. Ktrans and Ve were calculated using the extended Kety model with the Parker population-based arterial input function. Six radiation dose regions were created for each tissue type, based on each patient's computed tomography-based dose plan. Mean Ktrans and Ve were calculated over each dose region and tissue type.

    Results: Global Ktrans and Ve demonstrated mostly non-significant changes with mean values higher for post-radiotherapy examinations in both gray and white matter compared to pre-radiotherapy. No relationship to radiation dose was found.

    Conclusion: Additional studies are needed to validate if Ktrans and Ve derived from DCE-MRI may act as potential biomarkers for acute and early-delayed radiation-induced vascular damages. No dose-response relationship was found.

    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346813 (URN)10.1177/2058460118808811 (DOI)000450106500001 ()30542625 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Cancer Society
    Available from: 2018-03-21 Created: 2018-03-21 Last updated: 2020-03-01Bibliographically approved
    3. Evaluation of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI – agreement with 15O-water PET with arterial input function and use of integrated PET/MR
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of pseudo-continuous arterial spin labeling MRI – agreement with 15O-water PET with arterial input function and use of integrated PET/MR
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Keywords
    ASL, CBF, PET/MR, validation, 15O-water
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404602 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-05
    4. High Intravascular Signal Arterial Transit Time Artifacts Have Negligible Effects on Cerebral Blood Flow and Cerebrovascular Reserve Capacity Measurement Using Single Postlabel Delay Arterial Spin-Labeling in Patients with Moyamoya Disease
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>High Intravascular Signal Arterial Transit Time Artifacts Have Negligible Effects on Cerebral Blood Flow and Cerebrovascular Reserve Capacity Measurement Using Single Postlabel Delay Arterial Spin-Labeling in Patients with Moyamoya Disease
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    2020 (English)In: American Journal of Neuroradiology, ISSN 0195-6108, E-ISSN 1936-959XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405377 (URN)10.3174/ajnr.A6411 (DOI)
    Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-05
  • Banerjee, Pinaki
    et al.
    Tata Inst Fundamental Res, Int Ctr Theoret Sci, Bengaluru 560089, India;Indian Inst Technol Kanpur, Kanpur 208016, Uttar Pradesh, India.
    Dey, Parijat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Analytic bootstrap for logarithmic CFT2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 12, article id 114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study logarithmic conformal field theory (LogCFT) in four dimensions using conformal bootstrap techniques in the large spin limit. We focus on the constraints imposed by conformal symmetry on the four point function of certain logarithmic scalar operators and compute the leading correction to the anomalous dimension of double trace operators in the large spin limit. There exist certain holographic duals to such LogCFTs, which involve higher derivative equations of motion. The anomalous dimension is related to the binding energy of a state where two scalars rotate around each other with a large angular momentum. We compute this energy shift and compare it to the anomalous dimension of the large spin double trace operators due to stress tensor exchange in the LogCFT. Our result shows that the cluster decomposition principle is satisfied for LogCFTs as long as the dimensions of the operators are positive.

  • Tibell, Sanja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Tibell, Leif
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology.
    Pang, Ka-Lai
    Calabon, Mark
    Jones, Gareth
    Marine fungi of the Baltic Sea2020In: Mycology - An International Journal on Fungal Biology, ISSN 2150-1203 (Print) 2150-1211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vast parts of the Baltic Sea have been mycologically neglected and are still awaiting exploration. Here we summarise earlier records of marine fungi from the Baltic, supplementing them with discoveries from fieldwork in Sweden in 2019. Although marine fungal diversity is clearly attenuated in the brackish water of the Baltic Sea, a substantial number has still been discovered. Here we list 77 species from the Baltic Sea, whereas after a critical assessment a further 18 species have been excluded as records of marine fungi. The species have mainly been identified by their morphological features, supplemented by DNA-based diagnostics. Most of the species have their main distributions in temperate areas of the Atlantic Ocean. Some of the Baltic species discovered here represent far disjunctions to tropical waters while only a very few are until now only recorded for the Baltic Sea. In this paper two species belong in Basidiomycota, while the most ascomyceteous speciose classes are Sordariomycetes (with 42 species) and Dothideomycetes (24). Halosphaeriaceae is the most speciose family in marine habitats, as also in the Baltic Sea, represented here by 29 species. Three species are new to Europe, and in addition 13 to the Baltic Sea and 13 to Sweden.

  • Mesmar, Fahmi
    et al.
    Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Ctr Nucl Receptors & Cell Signaling, Houston, TX USA;KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden;Indiana Univ, Sch Informat Comp & Engn, Dept Intelligent Syst Engn, Bloomington, IN USA.
    Dai, Bingbing
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Ibrahim, Ahmed
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.
    Hases, Linnea
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Dept Biosci & Nutr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jafferali, Mohammed Hakim
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.
    Augustine, Jithesh Jose
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    DiLorenzo, Sebastian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Kang, Ya'an
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Zhao, Yang
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Biointormat & Comp Sci, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Wang, Jing
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Biointormat & Comp Sci, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Kim, Michael
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA.
    Lin, Chin-Yo
    Univ Houston, Dept Biol & Biochem, Ctr Nucl Receptors & Cell Signaling, Houston, TX USA.
    Berkenstam, Anders
    Axcentua Pharmaceut AB, Stockholm, Sweden;ABK, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fleming, Jason
    Univ Texas MD Anderson Canc Ctr, Dept Surg Oncol, Houston, TX 77030 USA;H Lee Moffitt Canc Ctr & Res Inst, Dept Gastrointestinal Oncol, Tampa, FL USA.
    Williams, Cecilia
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Dept Prot Sci, Sci Life Lab, S-17121 Solna, Sweden.
    Clinical candidate and genistein analogue AXP107-11 has chemoenhancing functions in pancreatic adenocarcinoma through G protein-coupled estrogen receptor signaling2019In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 8, no 18, p. 7705-7719Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite advances in cancer therapeutics, pancreatic cancer remains difficult to treat and often develops resistance to chemotherapies. We have evaluated a bioavailable genistein analogue, AXP107-11 which has completed phase Ib clinical trial, as an approach to sensitize tumor cells to chemotherapy. Using organotypic cultures of 14 patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, we found that addition of AXP107-11 indeed sensitized 57% of cases to gemcitabine treatment. Results were validated using PDX models in vivo. Further, RNA-Seq from responsive and unresponsive tumors proposed a 41-gene treatment-predictive signature. Functional and molecular assays were performed in cell lines and demonstrated that the effect was synergistic. Transcriptome analysis indicated activation of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER1) as the main underlying mechanism of action, which was corroborated using GPER1-selective agonists and antagonists. GPER1 expression in pancreatic tumors was indicative of survival, and our study proposes that activation of GPER1 may constitute a new avenue for pancreatic cancer therapeutics.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-17 09:15 Ångströmslaboratoriet Siegbahnsalen, Uppsala
    Fritze, Stefan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström, Inorganic Chemistry.
    Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnetron Sputtered Refractory Metal Thin Films2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The design and development of new multifunctional materials that exhibit a combination of high hardness and ductility, as well as a high corrosion resistance and thermal stability, is one of the key challenges in the field of material science. The focus of this thesis is on the development of novel multifunctional magnetron sputtered CrNbTaTiW–C based thin films. Carbon was selected as an alloying element to investigate if it could modify the microstructure (via grain refinement) and improve the properties (e.g. the hardness and ductility).

    TaW-rich and near-equimolar high entropy alloys in the CrNbTaTiW system were selected as starting points for this study. The latter alloys were predicted, based on empirical design rules, to form a single-phase solid solution. In contrast, thermodynamic calculations showed that the films at equilibrium should be composed of a mixture of several phases at temperatures below 1100 °C.  Experimentally, however, a single-phase bcc structure was observed for the deposited films and it was concluded that the films were kinetically and not entropy stabilised. A hypothesis is that the kinetics during sputtering allow a ’direct’ phase selection by tuning the process parameters and evidence of this was found in the HfNbTiVZr alloy system.

    The CrNbTaTiW–C system is, however, complex and additional studies were carried out on the W–C and TaW–C systems. All metallic films crystallised in a bcc structure with a <110> texture and the column width of these films varied between 25 nm and 80 nm. The films were very hard (~ 13 GPa), which was explained by the small grain size. A single-phase bcc structure was also obtained upon the addition of 5-10 at.% carbon for all compositions except the near-equimolar CrNbTaTiW. X-ray diffraction indicated a unit cell expansion, which was attributed to the formation of a supersaturated solid solution. Additional atom probe tomography (APT) studies on selected samples confirmed the formation of such solid solutions. The supersaturated solid solution is not thermodynamically stable and an annealing study showed that heat treatment yielded segregation and clustering of carbon at the grain boundaries. The addition of carbon had a grain refining effect in the W–C system and the multicomponent CrNbTaTiW–C system. In general, the addition of carbon increased the hardness, which was mainly caused by a reduced grain size in line with the Hall-Petch relationship. Excellent mechanical properties of carbon supersaturated films were further confirmed in pillar tests on W–C films, which showed very high yield strength (~ 9 GPa) and no brittle fracture. The results show that carbon can be used as a chemical approach to control the grain size and properties of these films. 

    Multicomponent carbides with a B1 structure were formed at high carbon concentrations (~ 40 at.%). The microstructure of these films depended strongly on the process parameters and a higher deposition temperature was found to increase the film density and hardness. The TaW-rich carbide exhibited a very high hardness of ~ 35 GPa and excellent corrosion resistance.

    List of papers
    1. Magnetron Sputtering of Carbon Supersaturated W Films - A Chemical Approach to Increase Strength and Ductility
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Magnetron Sputtering of Carbon Supersaturated W Films - A Chemical Approach to Increase Strength and Ductility
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404772 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-02-28
    2. Influence of Carbon on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnetron Sputtered TaW Coatings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Carbon on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Magnetron Sputtered TaW Coatings
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404744 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-26 Created: 2020-02-26 Last updated: 2020-02-28
    3. Hard and crack resistant carbon supersaturated refractory nanostructured multicomponent coatings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hard and crack resistant carbon supersaturated refractory nanostructured multicomponent coatings
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    2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 14508Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of ceramic hardness with high crack resistance is a major challenge in the design of protective thin films. High entropy alloys have shown in earlier studies promising mechanical properties with a potential use as thin film materials. In this study, we show that small amounts of carbon in magnetron-sputtered multicomponent CrNbTaTiW films can lead to a significant increase in hardness. The film properties were strongly dependent on the metal composition and the most promising results were observed for TaW-rich films. They crystallised in a bcc structure with a strong (110) texture and coherent grain boundaries. It was possible to deposit films with 8 at.% C in a supersaturated solid-solution into the bcc structure without carbide formation. A major effect of carbon was a significant grain refinement, reducing the column diameter from approximately 35 to 10 nm. This resulted in an increase in hardness from 14.7 to 19.1 GPa while the reduced E-modulus stayed constant at 322 GPa. The carbon-containing films exhibited extremely little plastic deformation around the indent and no cracks were observed. These results show that supersaturation of carbon into high entropy films can be a promising concept to combine superior hardness with high crack resistance.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2018
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368107 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-32932-y (DOI)000445894500011 ()30266967 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-4359Swedish Research Council, 622-2008-405Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RMA11-0029
    Available from: 2018-12-05 Created: 2018-12-05 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
    4. Elemental Distribution in CrNbTaTiW-C High Entropy Alloy Thin Films
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elemental Distribution in CrNbTaTiW-C High Entropy Alloy Thin Films
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    2019 (English)In: Microscopy and Microanalysis, ISSN 1431-9276, E-ISSN 1435-8115, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 489-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The microstructure and distribution of the elements have been studied in thin films of a near-equimolar CrNbTaTiW high entropy alloy (HEA) and films with 8 at.% carbon added to the alloy. The films were deposited by magnetron sputtering at 300 degrees C. X-ray diffraction shows that the near-equimolar metallic film crystallizes in a single-phase body centered cubic (bcc) structure with a strong (110) texture. However, more detailed analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) show a strong segregation of Ti to the grain boundaries forming a very thin Ti-Cr rich interfacial layer. The effect can be explained by the large negative formation enthalpy of Ti-Cr compounds and shows that CrNbTaTiW is not a true HEA at lower temperatures. The addition of 8 at.% carbon leads to the formation of an amorphous structure, which can be explained by the limited solubility of carbon in bcc alloys. TEM energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that all metallic elements are randomly distributed in the film. The APT investigation, however, revealed that carbide-like clusters are present in the amorphous film.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, 2019
    Keywords
    atom probe tomography, carbon clustering, high entropy alloy, segregation, thin film
    National Category
    Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385570 (URN)10.1017/S1431927618016264 (DOI)000466756600025 ()30712522 (PubMedID)
    Conference
    Atom Probe Tomography and Microscopy (APT and M) Conference, JUN 10-15, 2018, Gaithersburg, MD
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-4359Swedish Research Council, 622-2008-405Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RMA11-0029
    Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
    5. Synthesis and characterization of multicomponent (CrNbTaTiW)C films for increased hardness and corrosion resistance
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synthesis and characterization of multicomponent (CrNbTaTiW)C films for increased hardness and corrosion resistance
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    2018 (English)In: Materials & design, ISSN 0264-1275, E-ISSN 1873-4197, Vol. 149, p. 51-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Multicomponent carbide thin films of (CrNbTaTiW)C (30–40 at.% C) with different metal contents were depos-ited at different temperatures using non-reactive DC magnetron sputtering. The lattice distortion for the metallattice was estimated to vary from about 3 to 5%. Most films crystallized in the cubic B1 structure but Ta/W-rich films deposited at 600 °C exhibited a tetra gonal distortion. X-ray diffraction results sh ow that near-equimolar films exhibited a strong (111) texture. In contrast, Ta/W-rich films exhibited a shift from (111) to(100) texture at 450 °C. The in-plane relationship was determined to MC(111)[-12-1]//Al2O3(001)[110] with alattice mismatch of about 11% along the Al2O3[110] direction. A segregation of Cr to the grain boundaries was ob-served in all films. The microstructure was found to be the most important factor for high hardness. Less denseNb-rich and near-equimolar films deposited at low tem peratures exhib ited the low est hardnes s (12 GPa),while very dense Ta/W-rich high temperature films were found to be the hardest (36 GPa). No correlation wasfound between the lattice distortion and the hardness. Corrosion studies revealed that the multicomponentfilms exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, superior to that of a reference hyper-duplex stainless steel, in1.0 M HCl.

    National Category
    Inorganic Chemistry
    Research subject
    Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry; Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335985 (URN)10.1016/j.matdes.2018.03.068 (DOI)000431007500006 ()
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 621-2012-4359Swedish Research Council, 622-2008-405Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research , RMA11-0029
    Available from: 2017-12-12 Created: 2017-12-12 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
    6. Influence of Deposition Temperature on the Phase Evolution of HfNbTiVZr High-Entropy Thin Films
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of Deposition Temperature on the Phase Evolution of HfNbTiVZr High-Entropy Thin Films
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    2019 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 4, article id 587Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we show that the phase formation of HfNbTiVZr high-entropy thin films is strongly influenced by the substrate temperature. Films deposited at room temperature exhibit an amorphous microstructure and are 6.5 GPa hard. With increasing substrate temperature (room temperature to 275 degrees C), a transition from an amorphous to a single-phased body-centred cubic (bcc) solid solution occurs, resulting in a hardness increase to 7.9 GPa. A higher deposition temperature (450 degrees C) leads to the formation of C14 or C15 Laves phase precipitates in the bcc matrix and a further enhancement of mechanical properties with a peak hardness value of 9.2 GPa. These results also show that thin films follow different phase formation pathways compared to HfNbTiVZr bulk alloys.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    MDPI, 2019
    Keywords
    high-entropy alloys, physical vapour deposition (PVD), metallic glass
    National Category
    Metallurgy and Metallic Materials Materials Chemistry
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380494 (URN)10.3390/ma12040587 (DOI)000460793300037 ()30781407 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 2018-04834
    Available from: 2019-03-28 Created: 2019-03-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
  • Mugal, Carina
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology.
    Kutschera, Verena E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Stockholm Univ, Sci Life Lab, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Biochem & Biophys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Botero-Castro, Fidel
    Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Div Evolutionary Biol, Fac Biol, Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Wolf, Jochen B. W.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Evolutionary Biology. Ludwig Maximilians Univ Munchen, Div Evolutionary Biol, Fac Biol, Planegg Martinsried, Germany.
    Kaj, Ingemar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Mathematics, Analysis and Probability Theory.
    Polymorphism Data Assist Estimation of the Nonsynonymous over Synonymous Fixation Rate Ratio omega for Closely Related Species2020In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 260-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ratio of nonsynonymous over synonymous sequence divergence, dN/dS, is a widely used estimate of the nonsynonymous over synonymous fixation rate ratio omega, which measures the extent to which natural selection modulates protein sequence evolution. Its computation is based on a phylogenetic approach and computes sequence divergence of protein-coding DNA between species, traditionally using a single representative DNA sequence per species. This approach ignores the presence of polymorphisms and relies on the indirect assumption that new mutations fix instantaneously, an assumption which is generally violated and reasonable only for distantly related species. The violation of the underlying assumption leads to a time-dependence of sequence divergence, and biased estimates of omega in particular for closely related species, where the contribution of ancestral and lineage-specific polymorphisms to sequence divergence is substantial. We here use a time-dependent Poisson random field model to derive an analytical expression of dN/dS as a function of divergence time and sample size. We then extend our framework to the estimation of the proportion of adaptive protein evolution alpha. This mathematical treatment enables us to show that the joint usage of polymorphism and divergence data can assist the inference of selection for closely related species. Moreover, our analytical results provide the basis for a protocol for the estimation of omega and alpha for closely related species. We illustrate the performance of this protocol by studying a population data set of four corvid species, which involves the estimation of omega and alpha at different time-scales and for several choices of sample sizes.

  • Huseby, Douglas L
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Brandis, Gerrit
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Praski Alzrigat, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Hughes, Diarmaid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology.
    Antibiotic resistance by high-level intrinsic suppression of a frameshift mutation in an essential gene2020In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 117, no 6, p. 3185-3191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A fundamental feature of life is that ribosomes read the genetic code in messenger RNA (mRNA) as triplets of nucleotides in a single reading frame. Mutations that shift the reading frame generally cause gene inactivation and in essential genes cause loss of viability. Here we report and characterize a +1-nt frameshift mutation, centrally located in rpoB, an essential gene encoding the beta-subunit of RNA polymerase. Mutant Escherichia coli carrying this mutation are viable and highly resistant to rifampicin. Genetic and proteomic experiments reveal a very high rate (5%) of spontaneous frameshift suppression occurring on a heptanucleotide sequence downstream of the mutation. Production of active protein is stimulated to 61-71% of wild-type level by a feedback mechanism increasing translation initiation. The phenomenon described here could have broad significance for predictions of phenotype from genotype. Several frameshift mutations have been reported in rpoB in rifampicin-resistant clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). These mutations have never been experimentally validated, and no mechanisms of action have been proposed. This work shows that frameshift mutations in rpoB can be a mutational mechanism generating antibiotic resistance. Our analysis further suggests that genetic elements supporting productive frame-shifting could rapidly evolve de novo, even in essential genes.

  • Carozzi, Felipe
    et al.
    London School of Economics.
    Cipullo, Davide
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Repetto, Luca
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economics.
    Divided They Fall: Fragmented Parliaments and Government Stability2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper studies how political fragmentation affects government stability. We show that each additional party with representation in Parliament increases the probability that the incumbent government is unseated by 4 percentage points. Governments with more resources at their disposal for bargaining are less likely to be replaced. When they are, new government leaders are younger and better educated, suggesting instability may induce positive selection. We interpret our results in light of a bargaining model of coalition formation featuring government instability. Our findings indicate that the rising fragmentation in parliaments worldwide may have a substantial impact on stability and political selection.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-17 10:00 Ekmansalen, Uppsala
    Hussein, Juma Mahmud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Systematic Biology. Systematisk biologi, Systematic Biology.
    Polyporoid fungi of Tanzania: Taxonomy, transcriptomics and biochemical analyses of Kusaghiporia usambarensis and Piptoporellus baudonii2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Polyporoid fungi refers to basidiomycetes with fruiting bodies with the hymenium located to the inner surfaces of pores or narrow tubes. The majority of polyporoids belongs to Polyporales. Most Polyporales are saprobes, but some are plant pathogens. The overall aim of this thesis was to study the taxonomy, systematics and chemistry of the two species Kusaghiporia usambarensis (saprobic) and Piptoporellus baudonii (a plant pathogen) collected from Tanzania, using morphological and molecular approaches, combined with transcriptomics and pharmacognostic investigations.

    The main contribution of this thesis includes the description a new genus with the new species K. usambarensis from the Usambara Mountains, Tanzania; investigation of the chemical composition of volatile compounds from this medicinal mushroom; isolation and structure determination of a novel and most abundant peptide in K. usambarensis, and further to elucidate the phylogenetic position of Piptoporellus baudonii (formerly known as Laetiporus baudonii) by using a four molecular markers dataset.

    Paper I was conducted applying a classical taxonomic approach, including both morphological and phylogenetic analyses, to describe a new genus and species K. usambarensis. Paper II, investigated volatiles and volatile derivatives in dichloromethane extracts of K. usambarensis analysed by GC-MS and NMR spectroscopy. The main elements were phenols, and esters, compounds that may explain the formerly reported antioxidant activity and traditional medicinal use of the mushroom. In paper III, screening of peptides in K. usambarensis revealed a novel cysteine-rich peptide, highly expressed at gene level and the most abundant compound in the fruiting body. Combined LC-MS and transcriptome analyses were used to determine the peptide sequence, and subsequently NMR spectroscopy to determine the 3D structure of the novel peptide, kusaghitide. In paper IV molecular techniques were used to elucidate the phylogenetic position of the parasitic Laetiporus baudonii. Phylogenetic analyses of combined 5.8S, nrLSU, nrSSU, and TEF1 gene sequences placed L. baudonii in the genus Piptoporellus, hence the new combination Piptoporellus baudonii was proposed. This thesis has contributed to build capacity in the fields of mycology, systematics and pharmacognosy in order to reinforce ecological knowledge and ethnopharmaceutical research for future drug discovery in Tanzania and Africa at large.

    List of papers
    1. Elucidating the phylogeny of the serious plant pathogen Piptoporellus baudonii using a multigene molecular dataset
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elucidating the phylogeny of the serious plant pathogen Piptoporellus baudonii using a multigene molecular dataset
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Piptoporellus baudonii is proposed as a new combination for Laetiporus baudonii in Polyporales (Basidiomycota), based on morphological and molecular features. This parasitic macrofungus attacks cashew trees, Eucalyptus, cassava, Tectona and some indigenous trees in the Southern regions of Tanzania and poses a serious threat to agroforestry and livelihood conditions in the area. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods were applied to obtain phylogenetic trees for partial sequences of the 5.8S part of nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer, parts of 28S nuc rDNA (28S) and 18S nuc rDNA (18S), in addition to parts of gene encoding the translation elongation factor 1-α (TEF1) of Laetiporus baudonii for comparisons with additional sequences from the antrodia clade. Our results reveal a strongly supported phylogenetic clade of L. baudonii with Piptoporellus in Fomitopsidaceae. Piptoporellus baudonii shares many morphological features with other members of Piptoporellus but differs in having broadly ellipsoid or rarely ovoid basidiospores, while in other Piptoporellus species the spores are cylindrical to oblong-ellipsoid. Both morphological and phylogenetic evidence, however, justify the incorporation of L. baudonii in Piptoporellus, to join the three other species in the genus.

    Keywords
    Africa, parasitic fungus, antrodia clade, Laeptiporus baudonii, macrofungus, Piptoporellus, 1 new taxon
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405385 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28
    2. Phylogenetic position and taxonomy of Kusaghiporia usambarensis gen. et sp. nov. (Polyporales)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogenetic position and taxonomy of Kusaghiporia usambarensis gen. et sp. nov. (Polyporales)
    2018 (English)In: Mycology, ISSN 2150-1203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A large polyporoid mushroom from the West Usambara Mountains in North-eastern Tanzania produces dark brown, up to 60-cm large fruiting bodies that at maturity may weigh more than 10 kg. It has a high rate of mycelial growth and regeneration and was found growing on both dry and green leaves of shrubs; attached to the base of living trees, and it was also observed to degrade dead snakes and insects accidentally coming into contact with it. Phylogenetic analyses based on individual and concatenated data sets of nrLSU, nrSSU and the RPB2 and TEF1 genes showed it, together with Laetiporus, Phaeolus, Pycnoporellus and Wolfiporia, to form a monophyletic group in Polyporales. Based on morphological features and molecular data, it is described as Kusaghiporia usambarensis.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Taylor & Francis, 2018
    Keywords
    Kusaghiporia; molecular phylogeny; polyporales; Tanzania; taxonomy; Usambara
    National Category
    Bioinformatics and Systems Biology
    Research subject
    Biology with specialization in Systematics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348537 (URN)10.1080/21501203.2018.1461142 (DOI)
    Funder
    Sida - Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency, 2221
    Available from: 2018-04-15 Created: 2018-04-15 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
    3. Chemical composition of the medicinal mushroom Kusaghiporia usambarensis
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chemical composition of the medicinal mushroom Kusaghiporia usambarensis
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The mushroom Kusaghiporia usambarensis was recently described as a new species and the single member of a new genus. It appears endemic to Tanzania. The mushroom forms large, conspicuous fruiting bodies with an unusually high radial growth rate and an observed ability to attract insects. The mushroom is used by the local community both for food and in traditional medicine. In order to gain insight into both basic biology and the traditional use of this mushroom, we here report the first analyses of its chemical composition. A dichloromethane extract was prepared from the dried fruiting body and analysed by nuclear magnetic resonance and gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. This extract of medium polar chemical constituents of Kusaghiporia usambarensis showed a high content of phenolic compounds and esters. The main elements were phenols, which account for ~22%, and esters ~20 %). These two groups of compounds may explain formerly reported antioxidant activity and traditional medicinal use of the mushroom. Revealing the chemistry also shed light on K. usambarensi as a sought-after delicacy: presence of 1-octen-3-one, octanal, 3-octen-2-one contribute to its fruity, cheesy and chicken flavour.

    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405386 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28
    4. Cysteine-rich peptide from the gigantic edible mushroom Kusaghiporia usambarensis (Laetiporaceae)
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cysteine-rich peptide from the gigantic edible mushroom Kusaghiporia usambarensis (Laetiporaceae)
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Cysteine-rich peptides are produced by various organisms across all kingdoms and have triggered an interest in isolation of molecules for novel drug development. In this study, we report a novel cysteine-rich peptide, kusaghitide, isolated from the gigantic medicinal mushroom Kusaghiporia usambarensis. It is highly expressed in the K. usambarensis transcriptome and it is the most abundant compound in the methanol-water extract. The 54 amino acid residue long peptide was isolated through aqueous methanol 50% and a sample was reduced, alkylated and cleaved enzymatically. De novo sequencing was done by LC-MS/MS and obtained sequences were used for mining the transcriptome to search for the complete gene. The peptide was recombinantly expressed in One Shot BL21 Star Escherichia coli using lysogenic broth and minimal media. Its 3D NMR structure was determined using 2D and 3D NMR. Three hypothetical protein sequences similar to kusaghitide originate from Laetiporus sulphureusWolfiporia cocos and Sparassis crispa with per cent similarity of 76% and 58% and 53% respectively and were found by BLAST search in the NCBI database. Kusaghitide did not inhibit the growth of either Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus. This is first report of a peptide from K. usambarensis in Laetiporaceae.

    Keywords
    Kusaghiporia, medicinal mushroom, recombinant protein production, cysteine-rich peptides, peptide structure.
    National Category
    Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405387 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2020-02-28
  • Sandell, Philip
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Solid State Physics.
    Dielectric properties of soda-lime silicate glass doped with TiO22020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A survey of the dielectric properties of TiO2 doped soda-lime silicate is presented. Impedance spectroscopy was used with measurements conducted in a temperature range from 298 K to 623 K and frequencies between 10-2 and 106 Hz. A relaxation peak was observed at high frequency associated with the movement of dipoles and most likely due to the Na+ ions, which is the most mobile specie in the glass. The activation energy of the relaxation was calculated to 0.77-0.91 eV, increasing with reduced Na2O and increased CaO content. The dipole moment was however only influenced by the Na2O content. Neither the activation energy nor the dipole moment showed any significant change by the addition of TiO2. The dipole moment did however increase with increased temperature, following a square root function. Furthermore, the conductivity showed a clear increase as the temperature increased but no significant change with regards to the composition of the glass. No clear signs of electrode polarization nor dc conductivity could be observed which made it difficult to draw any conclusions about the nature of the conduction.

  • Korol, Sergiy
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Birnir: Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience.
    Jin, Zhe
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Birnir: Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience.
    Birnir, Bryndis
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Birnir: Molecular Physiology and Neuroscience.
    GABA(A) Receptor-Mediated Currents and Hormone mRNAs in Cells Expressing More Than One Hormone Transcript in Intact Human Pancreatic Islets2020In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 21, no 2, article id 600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In pancreatic islets, the major cell-types are alpha, beta and delta cells. The gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signalling system is expressed in human pancreatic islets. In single hormone transcript-expressing cells, we have previously characterized the functional properties of islet GABA(A) receptors (iGABA(A)Rs). Here, we extended these studies to islet cells expressing mRNAs for more than one hormone and sought for correlation between iGABA(A)R activity level and relative mRNA expression ratio. The single-cell RT-PCR in combination with the patch-clamp current recordings was used to examine functional properties of iGABA(A)Rs in the multiple hormone mRNA-expressing cells. We detected cells expressing double (alpha/beta, alpha/delta, beta/delta cell-types) and triple (alpha/beta/delta cell-type) hormone transcripts. The most common mixed-identity cell-type was the alpha/beta group where the cells could be grouped into beta- and alpha-like subgroups. The beta-like cells had low GCG/INS expression ratio (<0.6) and significantly higher frequency of iGABA(A)R single-channel openings than the alpha-like cells where the GCG/INS expression ratio was high (>1.2). The hormone expression levels and iGABA(A)R single-channel characteristics varied in the alpha/beta/delta cell-type. Clearly, multiple hormone transcripts can be expressed in islet cells whereas iGABA(A)R single-channel functional properties appear to be alpha or beta cell specific.

  • Rukh, Gull
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Dang, Junhua
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Olivo, Gaia
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Ciuculete, Diana-Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology.
    Rask-Andersen, Mathias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Medicinsk genetik och genomik.
    Schiöth, Helgi B.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Schiöth: Functional Pharmacology. Sechenov First Moscow State Med Univ, Inst Translat Med & Biotechnol, Moscow, Russia.
    Personality, lifestyle and job satisfaction: causal association between neuroticism and job satisfaction using Mendelian randomisation in the UK biobank cohort2020In: Translational Psychiatry, ISSN 2158-3188, E-ISSN 2158-3188, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Job-related stress has been associated with poor health outcomes but little is known about the causal nature of these findings. We employed Mendelian randomisation (MR) approach to investigate the causal effect of neuroticism, education, and physical activity on job satisfaction. Trait-specific genetic risk score (GRS) based on recent genome wide association studies were used as instrumental variables (IV) using the UK Biobank cohort (N = 315,536). Both single variable and multivariable MR analyses were used to determine the effect of each trait on job satisfaction. We observed a clear evidence of a causal association between neuroticism and job satisfaction. In single variable MR, one standard deviation (1 SD) higher genetically determined neuroticism score (4.07 units) was associated with -0.31 units lower job satisfaction (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.38 to -0.24; P = 9.5 x 10(-20)). The causal associations remained significant after performing sensitivity analyses by excluding invalid genetic variants from GRS(Neuroticism) (beta(95%CI): -0.28(-0.35 to -0.21); P = 3.4 x 10(-15)). Education (0.02; -0.08 to 0.12; 0.67) and physical activity (0.08; -0.34 to 0.50; 0.70) did not show any evidence for causal association with job satisfaction. When genetic instruments for neuroticism, education and physical activity were included together, the association of neuroticism score with job satisfaction was reduced by only -0.01 units, suggesting an independent inverse causal association between neuroticism score (P = 2.7 x 10(-17)) and job satisfaction. Our findings show an independent causal association between neuroticism score and job satisfaction. Physically active lifestyle may help to increase job satisfaction despite presence of high neuroticism scores. Our study highlights the importance of considering the confounding effect of negative personality traits for studies on job satisfaction.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-18 10:15 Ihresalen, Uppsala
    Berglind Söderqvist, Erika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of English.
    Evidential marking in spoken English: Linguistic functions and gender variation2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis investigates the marking of evidentiality in spoken British English. Evidentiality is the linguistic expression of whether and how a speaker/writer has access to evidence for or against the truth of a proposition, and it is usually manifested in the form of sensory evidentiality (e.g. I saw Sam leave), hearsay evidentiality (e.g. They say Sam left), or inferential evidentiality (e.g. Sam obviously left). In the examples, the bold words exemplify evidentiality markers. The aims of this thesis are to investigate whether there are quantitative differences between women and men in how often they mark evidentiality, and to analyze the functions of evidentiality in interaction in order to formulate an explanation of any gender differences.

    The material comes mainly from the spoken portion of the British National Corpus (BNC), but also from the Diachronic Corpus of Present-day Spoken English (DCPSE). In Article 1, women and men were compared with respect to how frequently they marked inferential evidentiality; gender preferences for specific markers were also analyzed. In Article 2, the effects of speaker gender and speaker age on how frequently evidentiality markers are used were investigated. In Article 3, the marking of evidentiality in conversation was analyzed to explore the potential of evidentiality to be instrumental in relational practice. In Article 4, speakers were ranked according to the extent to which their speech displayed stereotypically feminine or masculine features. The language of a subset of speakers was then analyzed to investigate whether evidential markers are used for different functions depending on gendered styles.

    In the studies of this thesis, women were found to mark evidentiality more frequently than men. Further, the language of women as well as language characterized by a feminine style were found more likely to feature evidential markers referencing evidence that is only accessible to the speaker, whereas the language of men and language characterized by a masculine style are more likely to feature evidential markers referencing evidence that is accessible to other interlocutors in addition to the speaker. Evidential marking was found to often perform relational functions; in particular, evidentiality enables the speaker to negotiate authority in a less face-threatening manner. Evidential marking seems likely to occur when the addressee’s interpretation of an utterance is important to the speaker. Since previous studies have found women’s language to display more often a concern for the experiences of others, this characteristic might partly explain the quantitative gender variation.

                         

     

    List of papers
    1. Gender differences and similarities in the use of inferential evidentiality in spoken British English: A corpus-based study
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gender differences and similarities in the use of inferential evidentiality in spoken British English: A corpus-based study
    2017 (English)In: Evidentiality and Modality in European Languages: Discourse-Pragmatic Perspectives / [ed] Juana I. Marín-Arrese; Julia Lavid-López; Marta Carretero, Elena Domínguez Romero; Ma Victoria Martín de la Rosa; María Pérez Blanco, Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017, p. 371-399Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates differences between men and women in their preference for inferential evidentiality markers. Using spoken language data from the British National Corpus, a number of potential markers of inferential evidentiality (for example believe, imagine, must, obviously) have been analyzed for their evidential value as well as for pragmatic dimensions such as degree of certainty and (inter)subjectivity. The findings of the study show statistically significant variation between the male and the female respondents, and the subsequent analysis indicates, among other things, that the markers preferred by males are those that produce intersubjective assessments, whereas the markers preferred by female speakers are those that produce subjective assessments.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Bern: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017
    Series
    Linguistic insights: Studies in language and communication, ISSN 1424-8689 ; 223
    Keywords
    Evidentiality, corpus linguistics, sociolinguistics
    National Category
    Specific Languages
    Research subject
    English
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356163 (URN)10.3726/b11226 (DOI)978-3-0343-2439-7 (ISBN)
    Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved
    2. Evidentiality across age and gender: A corpus-based study of variation in spoken British English
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidentiality across age and gender: A corpus-based study of variation in spoken British English
    2017 (English)In: Research in Corpus Linguistics (RiCL), ISSN 1064-4857, E-ISSN 2243-4712, ISSN 2243-4712, Vol. 5, p. 17-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the effects of age and gender on the frequency of the evidentiality categories 'sensory', 'hearsay', and 'inferential' in spontaneous spoken British English. The findings from the main data sample from the British National Corpus (BNC) are also compared to patterns in a smaller data set from the Diachronic Corpus of Present-day Spoken English (DCPSE) in order to estimate the relative effects of age-grading versus historical change. The results confirm statistically significant differences between men and women in their use of evidentiality, but show no significant effect of age or the interaction of age and gender. The comparison of the findings from the BNC data and the DCPSE data suggests that age-related patterns in evidentiality use are more diachronically stable than gender-related patterns.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Murcia: Asociación Española de Lingüística del Corpus, 2017
    Keywords
    evidentiality, corpus linguistics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics
    National Category
    Specific Languages
    Research subject
    English
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356162 (URN)
    Available from: 2018-07-17 Created: 2018-07-17 Last updated: 2020-02-21Bibliographically approved
    3. Informational and relational functions of evidentiality in interaction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Informational and relational functions of evidentiality in interaction
    (English)In: Studia Neophilologica, ISSN 0039-3274, E-ISSN 1651-2308Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Uppsala: Taylor & Francis Group
    Keywords
    Evidentiality, spoken language, relational practice
    National Category
    Humanities and the Arts General Language Studies and Linguistics
    Research subject
    English; Linguistics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404500 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-20 Created: 2020-02-20 Last updated: 2020-02-21
    4. Evidentiality in gendered styles in spoken English
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evidentiality in gendered styles in spoken English
    2020 (English)In: ICAME Journal/International Computer Archive of Modern English, ISSN 0801-5775, E-ISSN 1502-5462, Vol. 44Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    Uppsala: Walter de Gruyter, 2020
    Keywords
    Evidentiality, spoken language, style, gender
    National Category
    General Language Studies and Linguistics
    Research subject
    English
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404501 (URN)10.2478/icame-2020-000x (DOI)
    Available from: 2020-02-20 Created: 2020-02-20 Last updated: 2020-02-21
  • Pachocka, Marta
    et al.
    University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Pędziwiatr, Konrad
    University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Sobczak-Szelc, Karolina
    University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Szałańska, Justyna
    UNiversity of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland.
    Reception Policies, Practices and Responses – Poland Country Report2020Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This country research report, prepared within Work Package 4, is focused on the reception conditions and reception policy in Poland and delivered under the H2020 project RESPOND—Multilevel Governance of Mass Migration in Europe and Beyond. In Poland, reception in legal and institutional terms means assistance for foreigners applying for international protection. Its basic scope is governed by the national provisions of the Law on Protection and two ordinances regarding the amount of financial assistance for asylum seekers and rules of stay in centres for foreigners. The most important public body responsible for reception policy is the Office for Foreigners (OF, supervised by the Ministry of Interior and Administration, MIA) and its Department for Social Assistance (DSA). The structure of this report includes several key parts, the first of which is the introduction, outlining the aims and framework of the report. It is followed by a section discussing methodology and sources—the strategies used in gathering data (documents, literature, interviews, and other sources) and analysis of the collected material and the limitations encountered. The next part of the report provides a brief overview of the national legal and institutional frameworks in the field of asylum and reception in Poland as of 2018 (and 2019/2020, if justified) and summarises key developments since 2011. Particularly important for the WP4 report is the section on reception practices in specific policy areas, such as housing and allowances, healthcare (medical) services, early access to education, and early access to the labour market in Poland.