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  • Bergom Larsson, Hannah
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Hedström Lövgren, Jennifer
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Barn som far illa - sjuksköterskors bedömning i samband med att orosanmäla2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The Convention on the Rights of the Child states that children in all countries must be protected against all forms of violence. Despite this, reports are made that children are suspected of being victimized in their homes. In Sweden, health care personnel account for some of these reports submitted to the Social Services annually. It is important that nurses know how to detect and identify if a child is abused, also violence against children can be detected in many different ways.

    Aim: The aim was to describe nurses assessment in connection with reporting when a child is suspected to be victimized or abused, as well as to illuminate both opportunities and difficulties associated with this.

    Method: A general literature review was used as a method where both qualitative and quantitative articles were quality checked and their result where analyzed. A total of ten studies were presented in this review.

    Result: Based on the aim, three themes were formulated and ten categories were identified from the results. The themes that were formulated were Assessment, Opportunities and Difficulties.The categories identified under Assessment werePrevalence, Meeting with the child, Parents and the home environment's influence and Colleagues' influence on the assessment. Under the theme Opportunities, three categories and three subcategories were identified, which were Factors that affect the report, Education with three associated subcategories and Legislation. Under the theme Difficulty, the three categories Fear, Mistrust of the system and Lack of time and workload were identified.

    Conclusion: More education and more distinct laws and guidelines was requested so that nurses all over the world can feel safe to identify and report concerns when children are suspected to be victimized or abused.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-23 09:15 Å4001, Uppsala
    Corrêa Filho, Luimar N.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Applied Materials Sciences.
    Functional properties of silicon nitride based materials for joint applications2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Total hip and total knee replacements are generally successful procedures for patients suffering with pain due to bone fracture or diseases affecting the joints. However, the materials that are commonly used still have limitations. In particular, corrosion products and wear debris may give rise to negative body reactions.

    In this thesis, silicon nitride based materials were investigated for use in joint implants, namely as a coating for e.g. femoral heads and the metallic modular taper junction in hip implants, as well as a bulk bioceramic for joint applications. One of the main advantages of these materials is the potential to dissolve slowly in aqueous solutions, releasing only biocompatible ions.

    To understand the mechanical and wear properties of these materials, thin film coatings were deposited using magnetron-based techniques onto Si wafers and a CoCrMo alloy, the latter frequently used in biomedical implants. Coatings up to 8.8 µm thick were deposited on 2D flat discs as well as full 3D implant heads, following a CrN interlayer for improved adhesion. The chemical composition, microstructure, surface roughness, adhesion, wear resistance, and dissolution properties of the coatings were evaluated as a function of substrate rotation, bias voltage, target power as well as the addition of different elements.

    Results show that it is possible to produce coatings with mechanical properties and a wear performance similar to bulk ceramics and other ceramic coatings already evaluated in vivo. It was evident that a high coating density is needed, to avoid premature failure in an in vivo environment. The coating density, and stability over time in solution, was found to increase when a higher target power and process heating were used.

    New bulk silicon nitride materials containing only biocompatible additives, were evaluated for potential use in joint applications by wear tests for the first time, showing very low wear rates of the counter material.

    Silicon nitride coatings and bulk materials tested in this work showed promising results for further investigation and a basis for future application in joint bearings.

    List of papers
    1. Towards Functional Silicon Nitride Coatings for Joint Replacements
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Towards Functional Silicon Nitride Coatings for Joint Replacements
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    2019 (English)In: Coatings, ISSN 2079-6412, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings are currently under investigation as bearing surfaces for joint implants, due to their low wear rate and the good biocompatibility of both coatings and their potential wear debris. The aim of this study was to move further towards functional SiNx coatings by evaluating coatings deposited onto CoCrMo surfaces with a CrN interlayer, using different bias voltages and substrate rotations. Reactive direct current magnetron sputtering was used to coat CoCrMo discs with a CrN interlayer, followed by a SiNx top layer, which was deposited by reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. The interlayer was deposited using negative bias voltages ranging between 100 and 900 V, and 1-fold or 3-fold substrate rotation. Scanning electron microscopy showed a dependence of coating morphology on substrate rotation. The N/Si ratio ranged from 1.10 to 1.25, as evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Vertical scanning interferometry revealed that the coated, unpolished samples had a low average surface roughness between 16 and 33 nm. Rockwell indentations showed improved coating adhesion when a low bias voltage of 100 V was used to deposit the CrN interlayer. Wear tests performed in a reciprocating manner against Si3N4 balls showed specific wear rates lower than, or similar to that of CoCrMo. The study suggests that low negative bias voltages may contribute to a better performance of SiNx coatings in terms of adhesion. The low wear rates found in the current study support further development of silicon nitride-based coatings towards clinical application.

    Keywords
    silicon nitride, coating, reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering, wear, joint replacements
    National Category
    Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379945 (URN)10.3390/coatings9020073 (DOI)000460700700011 ()
    Available from: 2019-03-25 Created: 2019-03-25 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved
    2. The Effect of Coating Density on Functional Properties of SiNx Coated Implants
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Effect of Coating Density on Functional Properties of SiNx Coated Implants
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    2019 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, E-ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 12, no 20, article id 3370Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramic coatings may be applied onto metallic components of joint replacements for improved wear and corrosion resistance as well as enhanced biocompatibility, especially for metal-sensitive patients. Silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings have recently been developed for this purpose. To achieve a high coating density, necessary to secure a long-term performance, is however challenging, especially for sputter deposited SiNx coatings, since these coatings are insulating. This study investigates the time-dependent performance of sputter-deposited SiNx based coatings for joint applications. SiNx coatings with a thickness in the range of 4.3–6.0 µm were deposited by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering onto flat discs as well as hip heads made of CoCrMo. SiNx compositional analysis by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed N/Si ratios between 0.8 and 1.0. Immersion of the flat disks in fetal bovine serum solution over time as well as short-term wear tests against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) discs showed that a high coating density is required to inhibit tribocorrosion. Coatings that performed best in terms of chemical stability were deposited using a higher target power and process heating.

    Keywords
    silicon nitride, coating, reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering, wear, joint replacements
    National Category
    Ceramics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396226 (URN)10.3390/ma12203370 (DOI)000498402100093 ()31618981 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-NMP-2012-310477
    Available from: 2019-10-31 Created: 2019-10-31 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved
    3. The effect of N, C, Cr, and Nb content on silicon nitride coatings for joint applications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>The effect of N, C, Cr, and Nb content on silicon nitride coatings for joint applications
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramic coatings are an alternative to achieve or maintain a high wear resistance of metallic surfaces, and simultaneously allow for a reduction in metal ion release. Silicon nitride based (SiNx) coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) have shown potential for use in joint implants seen from an improved chemical stability in combination with a good adhesion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of N, C, Cr and Nb content on the tribocorrosive performance of 3.7 to 8.8 µm thick SiNx coatings deposited by HiPIMS onto CoCrMo discs to improve  the mechanical properties and/or chemical stability of SiNx .

    Coating composition was evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the surface roughness by Vertical Scanning Interferometry (VSI). Hardness and Young’s modulus were investigated by nanoindentation and coating adhesion was measured by scratch tests. Multidirectional wear tests against UHMWPE pins were performed for 2 million cycles in bovine serum solution (25%) at 37°C, at an estimated contact pressure of 2.1 MPa.

    Coatings with a relatively low hardness tended to fail earlier in the wear test, due to chemical reactions and eventually dissolution, accelerated by the tribological contact. In fact, while no definite correlation could be observed between coating composition (N: 42.6-55.5 at%, C: 0-25.7 at%, Cr: 0 or 12.8 at%, and Nb: 0-24.5 at%) and wear performance, it was apparent that high-purity and/or -density coatings (i.e. low oxygen content and high nitrogen content) were desirable to prevent coating and/or counter surface wear. Coatings deposited with a higher energy fulfilled the target profile in terms of low surface roughness (Ra<20nm), adequate adhesion (Lc2>30N), chemical stability over time in the tribocorrosive environment, as well as low polymer wear, presenting potential for a future application in joint bearings.

    Keywords
    silicon nitride, coating, joint replacement, wear, adhesion
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396232 (URN)
    Projects
    This research was funded by the European Union, grant number FP7-NMP-2012-310477 (Life Long Joints project); EBW+ Project Erasmus Mundus Programme, Action 2 – STRAND 1, Lot 9 (Latin America), Brazil, Grant number 2014-0982 and Swedish Government Strategic Research Area in Materials Science on Advanced Functional Materials at Linköping University (Faculty Grant SFO Mat LiU No. 2009 00971).
    Available from: 2019-10-31 Created: 2019-10-31 Last updated: 2020-03-05
    4. Morphology and dissolution rate of wear debris from silicon nitride coatings
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morphology and dissolution rate of wear debris from silicon nitride coatings
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    2016 (English)In: ACS Biomaterials Science & Engineering, ISSN 2373-9878, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 998-1004Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Silicon nitride (SiNx) coatings have recentlY been introduced as a potential material for joint implant bearing surfaces, but there is no data on wear debri morphology nor their dissolution rate, something that could play a central role to implant longevity. In this study, wear debris was generated in a ball-on-disc setup in simulated body fluid. After serum digestion the debris was analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The particle dissolution rate was evaluated using inductively coupled plasma techniques, on model SiNx particlEs. The wear debris from SiNx coatings was found to be round, in the nm range and formed agglomerates in the submicrometer to micrometer range. Model particles dissolved in simulated body fluid at a rate of: c(t) = 39.45[1 - exp(-1.11 X 10(-6) t], where [c(t)] = mg/L and [t] = s. This study can be used as a preliminary prediction of size, shape, and dissolution rate of wear debris from SiNx coatings.

    Keywords
    wear, debris, silicon nitride, coatings, hip joint replacement, dissolution, particles
    National Category
    Materials Engineering Medical Materials
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-247793 (URN)10.1021/acsbiomaterials.6b00133 (DOI)000377925300013 ()
    Funder
    EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 310477
    Note

    This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in [JournalTitle], copyright © American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by t he publisher. To access the final edited and published work see http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acsbiomaterials.6b00133

    Available from: 2015-03-24 Created: 2015-03-24 Last updated: 2020-03-05Bibliographically approved
    5. Wear performance of a new biocompatible silicon nitride for biomedical applications
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wear performance of a new biocompatible silicon nitride for biomedical applications
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Ceramics are used in bearings of joint implants due to their high wear resistance and biocompatibility. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) is a biomaterial with bacteriostatic properties, high wear resistance, it shows slow dissolution in aqueous environments and contains mainly biocompatible ions. In this work sintering additives SrO, MgO and SiO2 were used in order to gain improvement in biocompatibility, over the commonly used Al2O3 and Y2O3. This substitution may however have a substantial effect on the wear properties of the material, and the aim of the study was to evaluate these properties in a relevant setting. Si3N4 was sintered by spark plasma sintering in the shape of discs for later grinding and polishing. The wear resistance was evaluated by multidirectional pin-on-disc wear tests against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene pins. Tests were performed in bovine serum solution at 37 °C for 2 million cycles. The surface roughness of the materials was measured by an optical surface profiler, phase composition by X-ray diffraction, surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy, and the pH of the wear lubricant was measured at intervals of half a million cycles. The surface roughness of the ceramic discs and UHMWPE pins was in accordance with the biomedical standard, and the XRD measurements and SEM images showed the presence of α- and β-phase silicon nitride. The multidirectional wear tests showed a low wear factor and a comparable coefficient of friction to previous work, showing promise for application in joint implants. No difference between the material groups could be found in terms of UHMWPE pin wear. However, the dissolution of the materials over time may be a concern for biotribological applications.

    Keywords
    silicon nitride; spark plasma sintering; wear; joint replacements
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Research subject
    Engineering Science with specialization in Materials Science
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405317 (URN)
    Projects
    European Union, grant number FP7-NMP-2012-310477 (Life Long Joints project)EBW+ Project Erasmus Mundus Programme, Action 2 – STRAND 1, Lot 9 (Latin America), Brazil, Grant number 2014-0982
    Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-13
  • Larsson, Linnéa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Andersson, Madeleine
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Icke-farmakologiska åtgärder som minskar agitation hos personer med demenssjukdom2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The amount of people suffering from dementia is increasing globally. A frequent symptom occurring in people with dementia is agitation. This symptom is associated with decreased quality of life as well as an increased burden for formal and informal caregivers. Agitation among people with dementia is commonly treated pharmacologically. However, this is reported to cause several negative effects and has the potential to accelerate the symptom. Consequently, there is a need to evaluate how agitation can be treated with non-pharmacological interventions.

    Aim: To investigate how agitation can be reduced with non-pharmacological interventions in people with dementia living in nursing homes.

    Methods: In this thesis with a literature review approach, the literature search was conducted using three databases. Trials investigating agitation outcomes for non-pharmacological interventions in residents with dementia were considered and assessed for quality. 14 articles were included in this thesis, forming five themes and six sub-categories.

    Results: A number of non-pharmacological interventions had reducing effects on agitation in people with dementia. Changing the delivery of care through implementation of person-centered care proved to be an effective intervention to reduce agitation. Furthermore, positive effects on agitation were achieved using various activities, animal therapy, light therapy and physical stimulation.

    Conclusions: Several non-pharmacological interventions can potentially reduce agitation in people with dementia residing in nursing homes. Making the nursing care more person-centered is a way for nurses to ease the suffering that agitation can cause. Further research regarding how person-centered care can be integrated in the daily care in nursing homes is needed.

  • Norrblom, Freja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Ljungberg, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patienters upplevelser vid Takotsubo kardiomyopati respektive hjärtinfarkt: En litteraturstudie2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: När hjärtat utsätts för en psykisk eller fysisk påfrestning kan det leda till att detblir skadat och inte fungerar som det ska. Hjärtinfarkt och Takotsubo kardiomyopati (TK) ärsjukdomar som liknar varandra i symtomen, dock har de olika patofysiologiska egenskaper.Vid sjukdomsförloppet är bemötandet från vårdpersonalen viktig och nödvändiga livsstilsändringarbehöver göras.

    Syfte: Syftet var att beskriva patienters upplevelser och bemötande från vården vid Takotsubokardiomyopati respektive hjärtinfarkt.

    Metod: Litteraturstudie baserat på 10 originalartiklar med kvalitativ metod.

    Resultat: Resultatet visade att ovissheter kring sjukdomen och sjukdomsförloppet gav känslorsom rädsla och ångest. Vid insjuknande upplevde patienterna diffusa symtom som gjordeatt de inte sökte vård. Kvarvarande symtom var besvärande för båda patientgrupperna och resulteradebland annat i att de isolerade sig och blev asociala. Känslor som rädsla över att aldrigbli frisk igen och ständigt behöva bli påminda om sjukdomen var närvarande. Det förtroendesom TK patienterna hade för personalen var starkt kopplat till hur de upplevde personalenskunskap kring sjukdomen och för hjärtinfarkts patienterna hur personalen uppmärksammadepatienternas individuella tillstånd.

    Slutsats: Emotionella förändringar och nya livsstilsbegränsningar är en utmaning för patientersom drabbats av TK respektive hjärtinfarkt. Personcentrerat bemötande från vårdpersonalenhar en positiv inverkan på patientens sjukdomsförlopp och återhämtning. Vidare kvalitativforskning inom området bör genomföras för att få djupare förståelse för hur patienter kanpåverkas och hur vårdpersonal bemöter detta på bästa sätt.

  • Jonsson, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Stridfält, Amanda
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Fysiska, psykiska och sociala upplevelser av endometrios i kvinnornas vardag2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Endometriosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that approximately 10% of women of fertile age suffer. The disease is characterized by uterine tissue grows outside the uterus and cause symptoms such as pain. If the pain is prolonged, it can develop into psychological and social consequences depending on the person´s own vulnerability and management strategy. Aim: The purpose of the study was to investigate the physical, mental and social experiences of endometriosis in women's everyday lives  Method: A general literature study including ten qualitative original articles from the database CINAHL.  Results: The women experienced pain as the most obvious physical sign. The most common types of pain in their everyday lives were dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and pelvic pain. It was individually how the pain felt and how long it lasted. The women's psychological experiences were negatively impacted because they experienced feelings such as powerlessness and anxiety because the disease controlled their lives. They also experienced frustration and fatigue because they did not receive help from the medical service. The women's social experiences were negatively affected because they felt isolated in their situation. Friendship circuits became reduced and social contexts were not prioritized.  Conclusion: Endometriosis is a disease that negatively affects women's everyday lives based on their physical, mental and social experiences. More in-depth knowledge such as qualitative research on women's experiences is needed to make the disease more visible. This way, healthcare will gain a better knowledge of endometriosis in order to improve identification and shorten the average time to get the diagnosis of the disease. This results in faster treatment and improved living conditions for the women.

  • Florman, Elin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Willehadson, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences.
    Patienters upplevelse av och preferenser för delaktighet i vården: En litteraturöversikt2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Hälso- och sjukvården har enligt lag ansvar att främja patientens delaktighet och självbestämmande. Trots detta uppstår brist i kommunikationen mellan patient och personal och upplevelser om att patienter inte får vara delaktiga i sin vård skapas. Enligt kompetensbeskrivningen för legitimerad sjuksköterska är dennes uppgifter att kunna planera och genomföra omvårdnad i partnerskap med patienten och samverka i team för ett gemensamt lärande och beslutsfattande för att uppnå en god och säker hälso- och sjukvård. Det finns flera faktorer som kan påverka upplevelsen av delaktighet.

    Syfte: Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka vad patienter har för upplevelser av och preferenser för delaktighet i sin egen vård.

    Metod: En litteraturöversikt med deskriptiv syntes av 13 vetenskapliga artiklar. Databasen PubMed användes vid datainsamlingen. En granskningsmall från SBU har används för att bedöma kvaliteten på artiklarna.

    Resultat: Resultatet delas upp i två teman: Upplevelser av delaktighet och preferenser för delaktighet. Vissa patienter hade goda upplevelser av delaktighet där ett teamarbete tillsammans med sjukvårdspersonalen och god information spelade stor roll. Andra patienter hade dock negativa upplevelser av delaktighet på grund av brister i relationen med personal, informationen och organisationen. Patienternas preferenser för delaktighet var att ges mer information kring sitt tillstånd och planering av vård och behandling. De ville även bli lyssnade på och sedda som individer och inte reduceras till sin sjukdom.

    Slutsats: En fungerande relation mellan patient och personal samt lättillgänglig och personanpassad information är vitalt för patientdelaktigheten. Ett personcentrerat förhållningssätt har potentialen att uppnå detta vilket möjliggörs av en välbemannad och välorganiserad sjukhusmiljö. Ytterligare forskning om patientdelaktighet behövs för att kunna dra starkare slutsatser.

  • Berglund, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    Pakkoruotsi - tvång eller inte+: En undersökning av finska elevers attityder till den obligatoriska skolsvenskan2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Gunnesson, Martin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Intelligens och ideologi i skolan: Intelligensforskningen och den svenska efterkrigstidens skoldebatt i ett ideologiskt ljus2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Intelligence and Ideology in School: The Science of Intelligence and the Swedish Postwar School Debate in an ideological light. In the 1940’s, Swedish progressives and conservatives alike embraced the study of human intelligence and psychometrics as a key science in the quest for improving modern society through comprehensive school reform. The Swedish school system was one of the primary targets of reform, and widespread testing of personality and cognitive traits was an important tool. Sweden had a relatively strong tradition of research in the field of experimental psychology, with good international renown. But by the 1970’s, psychometrics was shunned in progressive ideology, largely as a result of its misuse in eugenics. Meanwhile, the swedish school system had been transformed into a comprehensive and uniquely egalitarian entity, which placed great emphasis on compensating for the social ills believed to be at heart of school achievement problems. But the results for student were mixed; while average achievement was fairly strong, turmoil in schools increased, and particularly the achievement and wellbeing of gifted students suffered noticeably. This study traces the development of the science of intelligence and the ideology surrounding it, to show how a perceived conflict between a radical concept of democracy on one hand, and individual cognitive variance on the other helped mould a school based on ideology, rather than scientific best practise.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-24 09:15 A1:107a, Uppsala
    Lundberg, Stina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences.
    Adolescent behavior: Links to early-life stress and alcohol in male and female rats2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is an important developmental phase with large changes in behavior, physiology and neurobiology, which transform an individual from immature child to independent adult. Due to these changes, adolescence is a sensitive period for exposure to environmental factors such as stress and drug exposure; it is also a common age of onset for alcohol consumption as well as several psychiatric disorders. Despite these factors, less is known about this developmental period than regarding adult individuals. Behavior is regulated by the central nervous system and can be used as a lens to study these processes as well as for examination of associations between individual differences, early-life stress and alcohol. The aim of this thesis was to experimentally examine adolescent behavior and its links to early-life stress and alcohol in adolescent male and female rats. Different behavioral tests were used to profile adolescent animals together with animal models of early-life stress, voluntary alcohol consumption and alcohol exposure. In addition, stress responsiveness after early-life stress and the impact of alcohol exposure on endogenous opioid peptide levels as well as blood alcohol concentrations were examined. The adolescent behavioral profile in the multivariate concentric square field™ (MCSF) was characterized and validated against the elevated plus maze and open field tests. The main finding was subgroups based on individual variation that revealed three distinct behavioral types: Explorers, Shelter seekers and Main type animals. This pattern was replicated in an additional, independent cohort. Early-life stress, modelled by prolonged maternal separation, showed small effects on behavior in the MCSF and on social play behavior. However, an effect on stress responsiveness in males but not females subjected to prolonged maternal separation was discovered. Predisposition for high alcohol consumption did not have a shared behavioral profile among selectively bred rat lines. However, a subgroup of high drinking individuals in an outbred cohort showed behavioral similarities to one of the selectively bred lines. Alcohol exposure showed small, but sex-dependent, effects on behavior and endogenous opioid peptide levels. Together, these studies provide new information about adolescent behavior and associations to early-life stress and alcohol in males and females, relationships not extensively studied in adolescence.

    List of papers
    1. Adolescent Exploratory Strategies and Behavioral Types in the Multivariate Concentric Square Field (TM) Test
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescent Exploratory Strategies and Behavioral Types in the Multivariate Concentric Square Field (TM) Test
    2019 (English)In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5153, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 13, article id 41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescence is an important developmental phase with extensive changes in behavior due to remodeling of the brain and hormonal systems. Validation of animal behavioral tests in this age group is therefore of importance as differences to adult behavior are often not clarified. The aim of the present study was to investigate adolescent behavior in the multivariate concentric square field (TM) (MCSF) test and its relationship to other common behavioral tests as well as to a literature dataset of adult animals. Sixty adolescent male Wistar rats were tested in the MCSF and one of four reference tests; the elevated plus maze, the open field with or without start box, or the social play behavior test. Additionally, 12 animals were tested twice in the MCSF. When analyzing the first encounter with the MCSF test, a distinct grouping of the individuals into three behavioral types was observed. Approximately 20% of the animals had high levels of activity and an additional 20% had high levels of shelter seeking-behavior, these groups composed the outlying behavioral types named Explorers and Shelter seekers, respectively, which were distinct from the Main type of animals. When tested in the MCSF for a second time, the adolescent animals showed a recollection of the arena as they changed their behavior in relation to the first encounter. When comparing the MCSF performance to the reference tests, a relationship was found between the MCSF and the other behavioral test entailing forced exploration, while no relationship was found between the MCSF and social play. The adolescent behavioral profile was characterized by decreased risk assessment and a different activity profile than adults. In conclusion, the MCSF test is useful for profiling adolescent rats but the behavioral interpretation differs from that of adults due to differences in behavioral manifestation during adolescence and the presence of natural subgroups. Adolescent exploration shows a relationship across tests, but the MCSF gives more information than any of the other behavioral tests based on forced exploration. Further studies into the neurobiology behind the behavioral types and how different manipulations affect the distribution into the behavioral types are of interest.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2019
    Keywords
    behavior, elevated plus maze, open field, phenotyping, risk taking, social play, validation, Wistar rat
    National Category
    Neurosciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379899 (URN)10.3389/fnbeh.2019.00041 (DOI)000460350200001 ()30886574 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2019-03-22 Created: 2019-03-22 Last updated: 2020-03-06Bibliographically approved
    2. Behavioral profiling in early adolescence and early adulthood of male Wistar rats after short and prolonged maternal separation
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral profiling in early adolescence and early adulthood of male Wistar rats after short and prolonged maternal separation
    2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5153, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 14Article in journal (Refereed) In press
    National Category
    Neurosciences Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405312 (URN)10.3389/fnbeh.2020.00037 (DOI)
    Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-06
    3. Altered corticosterone levels and social play behavior after prolonged maternal separation in adolescent male but not female Wistar rats
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altered corticosterone levels and social play behavior after prolonged maternal separation in adolescent male but not female Wistar rats
    2017 (English)In: Hormones and Behavior, ISSN 0018-506X, E-ISSN 1095-6867, Vol. 87, p. 137-144Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Early-life socio-environmental factors are crucial for normal developmental processes; adverse experiences early in life can therefore lead to detrimental effects in several physiological systems. The aim of this study was to examine short-term effects of early adverse experiences in a maternal separation (MS) rodent model. In this study two separation conditions were used: daily 15-(MS15) or 360-min (MS360) separation of the litter from the dam during postnatal day 1-21. In early adolescence, male and female offspring were subjected to a single-isolation procedure with analysis of corticosterone levels prior to and after isolation. In addition, social play behavior was assessed during mid-adolescence. There was a clear difference between male and female offspring in both tests performed. There was no difference in corticosterone levels between the female MS groups, whereas MS360 males showed higher baseline and recovery corticosterone levels than MS15 males. The amount of pinning, a specific social play behavior, was affected by rearing with MS360 males having a higher frequency than MS15 males, while there was no difference between the female MS groups. The observation that males but not females are affected by MS360 has previously been reported for adult animals, and herein we show that this difference is present already in adolescence. Changes in corticosterone levels and social behavior following early-life adversity have been associated with adult behavioral alterations, and our results confirm that these changes emerge already within adolescence.

    National Category
    Endocrinology and Diabetes
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316957 (URN)10.1016/j.yhbeh.2016.11.016 (DOI)000392905500016 ()27884596 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, K2012-61 x-22090-01-3
    Available from: 2017-03-08 Created: 2017-03-08 Last updated: 2020-03-06Bibliographically approved
    4. Behavioral profiles of adolescent alcohol-preferring/non-preferring (P/NP) and high/low alcohol-drinking (HAD/LAD) rats are dependent on line but not sex
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behavioral profiles of adolescent alcohol-preferring/non-preferring (P/NP) and high/low alcohol-drinking (HAD/LAD) rats are dependent on line but not sex
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Neurosciences Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405308 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
    5. Adolescents and alcohol – voluntary consumption or passive exposure and links to behavior, endogenous opioids and blood alcohol levels in male and female rats
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adolescents and alcohol – voluntary consumption or passive exposure and links to behavior, endogenous opioids and blood alcohol levels in male and female rats
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Neurosciences Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405304 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-03-11Bibliographically approved
  • Ozen, Ilknur
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund Brain Injury Lab Neurosurg Res, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Ruscher, Karsten
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund Brain Injury Lab Neurosurg Res, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lab Expt Brain Res, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Robert
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund Brain Injury Lab Neurosurg Res, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lab Expt Brain Res, S-22184 Lund, Sweden.
    Flygt, Johanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Clausen, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Marklund, Niklas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Lund Brain Injury Lab Neurosurg Res, S-22184 Lund, Sweden;Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Neurosurg, S-22185 Lund, Sweden.
    Interleukin-1 Beta Neutralization Attenuates Traumatic Brain Injury-Induced Microglia Activation and Neuronal Changes in the Globus Pallidus2020In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 21, no 2, article id 387Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) increases the risk of delayed neurodegenerative processes, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Interleukin-1beta (IL-1 beta), a key pro-inflammatory cytokine, may promote secondary injury development after TBI. Conversely, neutralizing IL-1 beta was found to improve functional recovery following experimental TBI. However, the mechanisms underlying the behavioral improvements observed by IL-1 beta neutralization are still poorly understood. The present study investigated the role of IL-1 beta on the microglia response and neuronal changes in the globus pallidus in response to diffuse TBI. Mice were subjected to sham injury or the central fluid percussion injury (cFPI) (a model of traumatic axonal injury), and were randomly administered an IL-1 beta neutralizing or a control antibody at 30 min post-injury. The animals were analyzed at 2, 7, or 14 days post-injury. When compared to controls, mice subjected to cFPI TBI had increased microglia activation and dopaminergic innervation in the globus pallidus, and a decreased number of parvalbumin (PV) positive interneurons in the globus pallidus. Neutralization of IL-1 beta attenuated the microglia activation, prevented the loss of PV+ interneurons and normalized dopaminergic fiber density in the globus pallidus of brain-injured animals. These findings argue for an important role for neuro-inflammation in the PD-like pathology observed in TBI.

  • Togo, Shodai
    et al.
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Sato, Ken
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Kawamura, Ryuzo
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Saitama 3388570, Japan;Saitama Univ, Div Strateg Res & Dev, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Kobayashi, Naritaka
    Saitama Univ, Div Strateg Res & Dev, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Noiri, Makoto
    Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Nakabayashi, Seiichiro
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Saitama 3388570, Japan;Saitama Univ, Div Strateg Res & Dev, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Teramura, Yuji
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Clinical Immunology. Univ Tokyo, Dept Bioengn, Tokyo 1138656, Japan.
    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi Y.
    Saitama Univ, Dept Chem, Saitama 3388570, Japan.
    Quantitative evaluation of the impact of artificial cell adhesion via DNA hybridization on E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion2020In: APL BIOENGINEERING, ISSN 2473-2877, Vol. 4, no 1, article id 016103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Programmable cell adhesion with DNA hybridization is a promising approach for fabricating various tissue architectures without sophisticated instrumentation. However, little is known about how this artificial interaction influences the binding of cell adhesion proteins, E-cadherin. In this work, we designed a planar and fluid lipid membrane displaying E-cadherin and/or single-strand DNA with well-defined densities. Visualization of cells on membranes by fluorescence and interference microscopy revealed cell adhesion to be a two-step process: artificial adhesion by DNA hybridization within a few minutes followed by biological adhesion via cadherin-cadherin binding within hours. Furthermore, we discovered that DNA hybridization can substantially facilitate E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. The promotive effect is probably due to the enforced binding between E-cadherin molecules in geometrical confinement between two membranes. Our in vitro model of cell adhesion can potentially be used to design functional synthetic molecules that can regulate cell adhesion via cell adhesion proteins for tissue engineering.

  • Ruge, Toralph
    et al.
    Univ Hosp Skane, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Emergency Med, S-17176 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlsson, Axel C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Family Med & Primary Care, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hellstrom, Magnus
    Umea Univ, Dept Surg & Perioperat Sci, Umea, Sweden.
    Wihlborg, Per
    Univ Hosp Skane, Dept Clin Sci Malmo, Lund, Sweden.
    Unden, Johan
    Halmstad Cty Hosp, Dept Operat & Intens Care, Halmstad, Sweden;Lund Univ, Anaesthesiol & Intens Care Med, Lund, Sweden.
    Is medical urgency of elderly patients with traumatic brain injury underestimated by emergency department triage?2020In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 125, no 1, p. 58-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mortality is high among elderly patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent data suggest that early surgical intervention and aggressive rehabilitation may reduce mortality rates even in elderly patients. Our aim was therefore to study the Rapid Emergency Triage and Treatment System-Adult (RETTS-A) triage of patients with isolated TBI and examine the differences in acute management according to age. Methods: We included 306 adult patients with isolated severe TBI and an abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score >= 3. Using a cut-off of 60 years of age, differences in triage priority according to RETTS-A, time to first computed tomography (CT) scan, length of hospital stay (LOS), and 30-day survival were studied. Results: In patients with an AIS score of 3 and 4, we observed that elderly patients had a longer time from admission to first CT scan. In addition, we observed that elderly patients were less often triaged with the highest priority level, despite similar AIS scores. LOS was significantly higher in elderly patients (median 9 days compared with 3 days for younger patients, p < 0.001). Finally, age, triage priority, and AIS score were independent risk factors for mortality. Conclusion: Elderly patients with isolated TBI are managed differently than younger patients, which could be due to an under-triage of elderly patients by RETTS-A.

  • Motta, Benedetta M.
    et al.
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Grander, Christoph
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Internal Med Gastroenterol Hepatol Endocrino, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Gogele, Martin
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Foco, Luisa
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Vukovic, Vladimir
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Melotti, Roberto
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Fuchsberger, Christian
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    De Grandi, Alessandro
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Cantaloni, Chiara
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Picard, Anne
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Mascalzoni, Deborah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Rossini, Alessandra
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Pattaro, Cristian
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Tilg, Herbert
    Med Univ Innsbruck, Dept Internal Med Gastroenterol Hepatol Endocrino, Innsbruck, Austria.
    Pramstaller, Peter P.
    Univ Lubeck, Eurac Res, Inst Biomed, I-39100 Bolzano, Italy.
    Microbiota, type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: protocol of an observational study2019In: Journal of Translational Medicine, ISSN 1479-5876, E-ISSN 1479-5876, Vol. 17, no 1, article id 408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by triglyceride accumulation in the hepatocytes in the absence of alcohol overconsumption, commonly associated with insulin resistance and obesity. Both NAFLD and type 2 diabetes (T2D) are characterized by an altered microbiota composition, however the role of the microbiota in NAFLD and T2D is not well understood. To assess the relationship between alteration in the microbiota and NAFLD while dissecting the role of T2D, we established a nested study on T2D and non-T2D individuals within the Cooperative Health Research In South Tyrol (CHRIS) study, called the CHRIS-NAFLD study. Here, we present the study protocol along with baseline and follow-up characteristics of study participants. Methods: Among the first 4979 CHRIS study participants, 227 individuals with T2D were identified and recalled, along with 227 age- and sex-matched non-T2D individuals. Participants underwent ultrasound and transient elastography examination to evaluate the presence of hepatic steatosis and liver stiffness. Additionally, sampling of saliva and faeces, biochemical measurements and clinical interviews were carried out. Results: We recruited 173 T2D and 183 non-T2D participants (78% overall response rate). Hepatic steatosis was more common in T2D (63.7%) than non-T2D (36.3%) participants. T2D participants also had higher levels of liver stiffness (median 4.8 kPa, interquartile range (IQR) 3.7, 5.9) than non-T2D participants (median 3.9 kPa, IQR 3.3, 5.1). The non-invasive scoring systems like the NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS) suggests an increased liver fibrosis in T2D (mean - 0.55, standard deviation, SD, 1.30) than non-T2D participants (mean - 1.30, SD, 1.17). Discussion: Given the comprehensive biochemical and clinical characterization of study participants, once the bio-informatics classification of the microbiota will be completed, the CHRIS-NAFLD study will become a useful resource to further our understanding of the relationship between microbiota, T2D and NAFLD.

  • Haugland, Helge
    et al.
    Norwegian Air Ambulance Fdn, Oslo, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Emergency Med & Prehosp Serv, Trondheim, Norway.
    Olkinuora, Anna
    FinnHEMS Ltd, Res & Dev Unit, Vantaa, Finland.
    Rognas, Leif
    Aarhus Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesiol, Aarhus N, Denmark;Danish Air Ambulance, Aarhus, Denmark.
    Ohlen, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Thoracic Surgery. Uppsala Univ Hosp, Dept Anaesthesia Perioperat Management & Intens C, Airborne Intens Care Unit, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Kruger, Andreas
    Norwegian Air Ambulance Fdn, Oslo, Norway;St Olavs Univ Hosp, Dept Emergency Med & Prehosp Serv, Trondheim, Norway.
    Testing quality indicators and proposing benchmarks for physician-staffed emergency medical services: a prospective Nordic multicentre study2019In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e030626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives A consensus study from 2017 developed 15 response-specific quality indicators (QIs) for physician-staffed emergency medical services (P-EMS). The aim of this study was to test these OIs for important characteristics in a real clinical setting. These characteristics were feasibility, rankability, variability, actionability and documentation. We further aimed to propose benchmarks for future quality measurements in P-EMS. Design In this prospective observational study, physician-staffed helicopter emergency services registered data for the 15 QIs. The feasibility of the QIs was assessed based on the comments of the recording physicians. The other four OI characteristics were assessed by the authors. Benchmarks were proposed based on the quartiles in the dataset. Setting Nordic physician-staffed helicopter emergency medical services. Participants 16 physician-staffed helicopter emergency services in Finland, Sweden, Denmark and Norway. Results The dataset consists of 5638 requests to the participating P-EMSs. There were 2814 requests resulting in completed responses with patient contact. All OIs were feasible to obtain. The variability of 14 out of 15 OIs was adequate. Rankability was adequate for all Us. Actionability was assessed as being adequate for 10 OIs. Documentation was adequate for 14 OIs. Benchmarks for all OIs were proposed. Conclusions All 15 OIs seem possible to use in everyday quality measurement and improvement. However, it seems reasonable to not analyse the QI 'Adverse Events' with a strictly quantitative approach because of a low rate of adverse events. Rather, this QI should be used to identify adverse events so that they can be analysed as sentinel events. The actionability of the QIs 'Able to respond immediately when alarmed', 'Time to arrival of P-EMS', 'Time to preferred destination', 'Provision of advanced treatment' and 'Significant logistical contribution' was assessed as being poor. Benchmarks for the OIs and a total quality score are proposed for future quality measurements.

  • Gallego-Abenza, Mario
    et al.
    Univ Vienna, Core Facil Behav & Cognit, Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle, Grunau Im Almtal, Austria;Univ Vienna, Dept Cognit Biol, Vienna, Austria.
    Mathevon, Nicolas
    Univ Lyon, UMR9197, CNRS, ENES NeuroPSI,Equipe Neuroethol Sensorielle, St Etienne, France.
    Wheatcroft, David
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Experience modulates an insect's response to anthropogenic noise2020In: Behavioral Ecology, ISSN 1045-2249, E-ISSN 1465-7279, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 90-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In response to anthropogenic noise, vertebrates express modified acoustic communication signals either through individual plasticity or local population adaptation. In contrast, how insects respond to this stressor is poorly studied. Field crickets Gryllus bimaculatus use acoustic signals to attract and locate mates and are commonly found in noisy roadside environments, offering a powerful system to study the effects of anthropogenic noise on insect communication. Rapid repetition of sexual calls (chirps) is essential to attract females, but calling incurs energetic costs and attracts predators. As a result, males are predicted to reduce calling rates when background noise is high. Here, we combine observations and experimental playbacks to show that the responses of field cricket males to anthropogenic noise also depend on their previous experience with passing cars. First, we show that males living on highway edges decrease their chirp rate in response to passing cars. To assess whether this behavioral response depends on previous exposure to car noise, we then broadcast recordings of car noise to males located at different distances from the road and, therefore, with different previous exposure to car noise. Although all tested individuals responded to broadcasted traffic noise, males closest to the road decreased their chirp rate less than individuals calling further from the road. These results suggest that regular exposure to anthropogenic noise may decrease individuals' sensitivity and behavioral responses to noise, allowing them to maintain effective signaling rates. Behavioral plasticity modulated by experience may thus allow some insect species to cope with human-induced environmental stressors.

  • Hakefjäll, Thor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Rättvisa inom det Sociala Kontraktet: En idékritisk studie av David Gauthiers Morals by Agreement2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Smedberg, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Halvarsson, Desirée
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Akademins dolda sida: En kvalitativ studie om allmän visstidsanställning och dess påverkan på social arbetsmiljö samt sociala relationer och interaktioner.2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Uppsala universitet är en organisation med hög personalomsättning. Universitet anställer ofta individer på tidsbegränsade kontrakt för att behålla en flexibilitet och anpassningsbarhet gentemot den oförutsedda kvantiteten studenter. En tidsbegränsad anställning bidrar till nya infallsvinklar och ideér men den kan också vara orsaken till ett bristande relationsskapande och en negativ social arbetsmiljö. Syftet med studien är att studera allmänt visstidsanställdas upplevelse av den sociala arbetsmiljön på Uppsala universitet samt att undersöka relationen mellan hög personalomsättning och sociala relationer och interaktioner. Studien har en kvalitativ ansats och studerat fenomenet genom semistrukturerade intervjuer. Teorier om sociala band och interaktionsritualer har tillämpats som generell utgångspunkt för att analysera det insamlade materialet och utforma ett avgränsat resultat. Sammanfattningsvis tyder studiens resultat på att allmänt visstidsanställda har delade uppfattningar om tidsbegränsade anställningar. Den höga personalomsättningen kan skapa konflikter, exkludering och otrygghet, men den kan även bidra till en känsla av frihet och ett större kontaktnät.

  • Public defence: 2020-04-20 10:00 Lindahlsalen, Uppsala
    Estefa, Jordi
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Organismal Biology, Evolution and Developmental Biology.
    Long bone growth and evolution revealed by three-dimensional imaging2020Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Propagation phase-contrast synchrotron radiation microtomography is a non-destructive method used for studying histology in three dimensions (3D). Using it, the 3D organization of the diaphyseal cortical vascularization in the humerus of two seymouriamorphs was analyzed in this thesis. Their vascularization suggests a combination of active growth and a long pre-reproductive period, an intermediate condition between that of Devonian tetrapods and early amniotes, reflecting a gradual change in evolution. The focus of the thesis then shifts to the metaphysis of long bones. The latter possesses complex 3D structures difficult to capture in 2D images. Observations in extant tetrapods have shown that hematopoiesis in long-bones requires the presence of tubular marrow processes opening onto an open medullary cavity with a centralized vascular system. A network of tubular marrow processes was found in connection with interconnected small cavities in the metaphyses of seymouriamorphs which may have acted as open spaces containing a centralized vascular mesh. Based on this interpretation, the long-bone marrow cavity of the Permian stem-amniotes studied here could have been the oldest evidence of possible hematopoiesis among tetrapods. As a third focus, both computer simulations (Finite Element Analysis) and empirical experiments were conducted to investigate the role of Secondary Ossification Centers (SOCs) within the epiphyses of mammals. The results indicate that the presence of a SOC protects the growth plate from mechanical stresses, allowing the cells there to withstand six times more stress. Finally, the 3D microanatomy of the metaphyses and epiphyses in the humeri of monotreme, marsupial and placental extant mammals were investigated at different developmental stages. The data were used to produce a nomenclature based on the degree of epiphyseal ossification encompassing the entire development of all the condyles within a single epiphysis. This nomenclature was used to describe the epiphyseal development in a large group of mammals and highlight differences in ossification timing between groups. These results offer a unique glimpse into the development and evolution of long-bones. They highlight the value of visualizing long-bone microstructure in both 2D and 3D, and the need to develop new nomenclatures that reflect the 3D nature of the data.

    List of papers
    1. Limb-bone development of seymouriamorphs: implications for the evolution of growth strategy in stem amniotes
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limb-bone development of seymouriamorphs: implications for the evolution of growth strategy in stem amniotes
    (English)In: Frontiers in Earth Science, ISSN 2296-6463Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Tetrapod life on land was the result of a lengthy process, the final steps of which resulted in full independence of amniotic tetrapods from the aquatic environment. Developmental strategies, including growth rate and the attainment of sexual maturity, played a major role in this transition. Early amniotes, such as Ophiacodon, tended to reach sexual maturity in a year while most non-amniotic Paleozoic tetrapods (including Devonian tetrapods and temnospondyls) became adult after 3 to 11 years. This ontogenetic transition is accompanied by a drastic change in growth rate and bone microstructure suggesting faster growth dynamics in early amniotes than in Devonian tetrapods and temnospondyls. Was the acquisition of a faster development (earlier sexual maturity and faster growth rate) a drastic evolutionary event or an extended process over geological time? To answer this question, the limb bone histology of two Early Permian (i.e. 270-290 million-year-old) stem-amniote seymouriamorphs, Seymouria sanjuanensis and Discosauriscus austriacus, were investigated. We used three-dimensional bone paleohistology based on propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography. Both seymouriamorphs display relatively fast bone growth and dynamics (even though cyclic in the humerus of D. austriacus). This significantly contrasts with the slow primary bone deposition encountered in the stylopods of temnospondyls and Devonian (i.e. 360 million-year-old) stem tetrapods of similar sizes. On the basis of skeletochronological data, the seymouriamorph D. austriacus retained a long pre-reproductive period as observed in Devonian tetrapods and most temnospondyls. The combination of characteristics (faster growth rate but long pre-reproductive period) suggests that the shift towards an amniotic developmental strategy was an extended process in the evolutionary history of amniotes.

    Keywords
    life history, early tetrapods, synchrotron imaging, three-dimensional paleohistology, cortical microstructure.
    National Category
    Other Natural Sciences
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405960 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2020-03-03
    2. NEW LIGHT SHED ON THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF  LIMB-BONE GROWTH PLATE AND BONE MARROW
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>NEW LIGHT SHED ON THE EARLY EVOLUTION OF  LIMB-BONE GROWTH PLATE AND BONE MARROW
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    (English)In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    The production of blood cells (haematopoiesis) occurs in the limb bones of most tetrapods but is absent from the fin bones of ray-finned fish. When did long bones start producing blood cells? Recent hypotheses suggested that haematopoiesis migrated into long bones prior to the water-to-land transition and protected newly-produced blood cells from harsher environmental conditions. However little fossil evidence to support these hypotheses has been provided so far. Observations of the humeral microarchitecture of stem-tetrapods, batrachians and amniotes were performed using classical sectioning and three-dimensional synchrotron virtual histology. They show that Permian tetrapods seem to be among the first to exhibit a centralised marrow organisation which allows haematopoiesis as in extant amniotes. Not only does our study demonstrate that long-bone haematopoiesis was probably not an exaptation to the water-to-land transition but it sheds light on the early evolution of limb-bone development and the sequence of bone-marrow functional acquisitions.

    Keywords
    three-dimensional virtual palaeohistology, tetrapod terrestrialisation, haematopoiesis, amphibians, stem amniotes, Permian, propagation phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography.
    National Category
    Other Biological Topics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405961 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-03-02 Created: 2020-03-02 Last updated: 2020-03-03
    3. Secondary ossification center induces and protects growth plate structure
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secondary ossification center induces and protects growth plate structure
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    (English)In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084XArticle in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    Abstract [en]

    Growth plate and articular cartilage constitute a single anatomical entity, but later separate into two distinct structures by the formation of secondary ossification center (SOC). The reason for such spatial separation remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that evolutionarily SOC first appears in amniotes. Mathematical modelling reveals that SOC reduces mechanical stress within the growth plate. Analysis of mammals with specialized extremities reveals that SOC size correlates with the extent of mechanical demands. Ex and in vivo experiments demonstrate that SOC allows epiphyseal chondrocytes to withstand a several-fold higher load before activation of the YAP-p73 signalling pathway and caspase-dependent apoptosis, with hypertrophic chondrocytes being the most load-sensitive cells. Atomic force microscopy shows  that hypertrophic chondrocytes are the least mechanically stiff cells within the growth plate. Altogether, these findings suggest that SOC is evolved to protect epiphyseal chondrocytes, especially the hypertrophic chondrocytes, from the high mechanical stress encountered in the terrestrial environment.

    National Category
    Evolutionary Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405966 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-03-03
    4. Development of the humeral proximal epiphysis of mammals
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of the humeral proximal epiphysis of mammals
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    Zoology Developmental Biology
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    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405972 (URN)
    Available from: 2020-03-03 Created: 2020-03-03 Last updated: 2020-03-03
  • Aaboud, M.
    et al.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Gradin, P. O. Joakim
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Transverse momentum and process dependent azimuthal anisotropies in root S-NN=8.16 TeV p plus Pb collisions with the ATLAS detector2020In: European Physical Journal C, ISSN 1434-6044, E-ISSN 1434-6052, Vol. 80, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The azimuthal anisotropy of charged particles produced in sNN=8.16TeV p+Pb collisions is measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 165 nb-1 that was collected in 2016. Azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, elliptic v2 and triangular v3\, extracted using two-particle correlations with a non-flow template fit procedure, are presented as a function of particle transverse momentum (pT) between 0.5 and 50 GeV. The v2 results are also reported as a function of centrality in three different particle pTintervals. The results are reported from minimum-bias events and jet-triggered events, where two jet pT thresholds are used. The anisotropies for particles with pT less than about 2 GeV are consistent with hydrodynamic flow expectations, while the significant non-zero anisotropies for pT in the range 9-50 GeV are not explained within current theoretical frameworks. In the pTrange 2-9 GeV, the anisotropies are larger in minimum-bias than in jet-triggered events. Possible origins of these effects, such as the changing admixture of particles from hard scattering and the underlying event, are discussed.

  • Aad, G.
    et al.
    Asimakopoulou, Eleni M.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bergeås Kuutmann, Elin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Bokan, Petar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Brenner, Richard
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ekelöf, Tord
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellajosyula, Venugopal
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ellert, Mattias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Ferrari, Arnaud
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Isacson, Max
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Mårtensson, Mikael U. F.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Sales De Bruin, Pedro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Zwalinski, L.
    Measurement of differential cross sections for single diffractive dissociation in root s=8 TeV pp collisions using the ATLAS ALFA spectrometer2020In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 2, article id 42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A dedicated sample of Large Hadron Collider proton-proton collision data at centre-of-mass energy s= 8 TeV is used to study inclusive single diffractive dissociation, pp -> X p. The intact final-state proton is reconstructed in the ATLAS ALFA forward spectrometer, while charged particles from the dissociated system X are measured in the central detector components. The fiducial range of the measurement is -4.0 < log(10)xi < -1.6 and 0.016 < |t| < 0.43 GeV2, where xi is the proton fractional energy loss and t is the squared four-momentum transfer. The total cross section integrated across the fiducial range is 1.59 +/- 0.13 mb. Cross sections are also measured differentially as functions of xi, t, and increment eta, a variable that characterises the rapidity gap separating the proton and the system X . The data are consistent with an exponential t dependence, d sigma/dt proportional to e(Bt) with slope parameter B = 7.65 +/- 0.34 GeV-2. Interpreted in the framework of triple Regge phenomenology, the xi dependence leads to a pomeron intercept of alpha(0) = 1.07 +/- 0.09.

  • Aartsen, M. G.
    et al.
    Botner, Olga
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Burgman, Alexander
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Hallgren, Allan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Pérez de los Heros, Carlos
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Unger, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, High Energy Physics.
    Yermia, F.
    Combined sensitivity to the neutrino mass ordering with JUNO, the IceCube Upgrade, and PINGU2020In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 101, no 3, article id 032006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ordering of the neutrino mass eigenstates is one of the fundamental open questions in neutrino physics. While current-generation neutrino oscillation experiments are able to produce moderate indications on this ordering, upcoming experiments of the next generation aim to provide conclusive evidence. In this paper we study the combined performance of the two future multi-purpose neutrino oscillation experiments JUNO and the IceCube Upgrade, which employ two very distinct and complementary routes toward the neutrino mass ordering. The approach pursued by the 20 kt medium-baseline reactor neutrino experiment JUNO consists of a careful investigation of the energy spectrum of oscillated (nu) over bar (e) produced by ten nuclear reactor cores. The IceCube Upgrade, on the other hand, which consists of seven additional densely instrumented strings deployed in the center of IceCube DeepCore, will observe large numbers of atmospheric neutrinos that have undergone oscillations affected by Earth matter. In a joint fit with both approaches, tension occurs between their preferred mass-squared differences Delta m(31)(2) = m(3)(2) - m(1)(2) in within the wrong mass ordering. In the case of JUNO and the IceCube Upgrade, this allows to exclude the wrong ordering at > 5 sigma on a timescale of 3-7 years-even under circumstances that are unfavorable to the experiments individual sensitivities. For PINGU, a 26-string detector array designed as a potential low-energy extension to IceCube, the inverted ordering could be excluded within 1.5 years (3 years for the normal ordering) in a joint analysis.

  • Lindén, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Prospektansvar: Ubi jus ibi remedium, eller enkel och effektiv kapitalanskaffning på bekostnad av investerarskyddet och förtroendet för aktiemarknaden?2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Piltonen, Terhi T.
    et al.
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland.
    Ruokojärvi, Maria
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland.
    Karro, Helle
    Univ Tartu, Fac Med, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Tartu, Estonia.
    Kujanpää, Linda
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland.
    Morin-Papunen, Laure
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland.
    Tapanainen, Juha S.
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland;Univ Helsinki, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Helsinki, Finland;Helsinki Univ Hosp, Helsinki, Finland.
    Stener-Victorin, Elisabet
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Physiol & Pharmacol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundström Poromaa, Inger
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Research group (Dept. of women´s and children´s health), Reproductive Health.
    Hirschberg, Angelica L.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Gynecol & Reprod Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ravn, Pernille
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Odense, Denmark.
    Glintborg, Dorte
    Odense Univ Hosp, Dept Endocrinol, Odense, Denmark.
    Mellembakken, Jan Roar
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Reprod Med, Div Gynaecol & Obstet, Oslo, Norway.
    Steingrimsdottir, Thora
    Univ Iceland, Landspitali Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Sch Hlth Sci,Fac Med, Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Gibson-Helm, Melanie
    Monash Univ, Monash Ctr Hlth Res & Implementat, Sch Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Vanky, Eszter
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Clin & Mol Med, Trondheim, Norway;Univ Hosp Trondheim, St Olavs Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Trondheim, Norway.
    Andersen, Marianne
    UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Dept Language & Culture, Tromso, Norway.
    Arffman, Riikka K.
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland.
    Teede, Helena
    Monash Univ, Monash Ctr Hlth Res & Implementat, Sch Publ Hlth & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Falah-Hassani, Kobra
    Univ Oulu, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Oulu, Finland;Oulu Univ Hosp, PEDEGO Res Unit, Med Res Ctr, Oulu, Finland.
    Awareness of polycystic ovary syndrome among obstetrician-gynecologists and endocrinologists in Northern Europe2019In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 12, article id e0226074Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To date, little is known about differences in the knowledge, diagnosis making and treatment strategies of health care providers regarding polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) across different disciplines in countries with similar health care systems. To inform guideline translation, we aimed to study physician reported awareness, diagnosis and management of PCOS and to explore differences between medical disciplines in the Nordic countries and Estonia.

    Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted among 382 endocrinologists and obstetrician gynaecologists in the Nordic countries and Estonia in 2015-2016. Of the participating physicians, 43% resided in Finland, 18% in Denmark, 16% in Norway, 13% in Estonia, and 10% in Sweden or Iceland, and 75% were obstetrician-gynaecologists. Multivariable logistic regression models were run to identify health care provider characteristics for awareness, diagnosis and treatment of PCOS.

    Results: Clinical features, lifestyle management and comorbidity were commonly recognized in women with PCOS, while impairment in psychosocial wellbeing was not well acknowledged. Over two-thirds of the physicians used the Rotterdam diagnostic criteria for PCOS. Medical endocrinologists more often recommended lifestyle management (OR = 3.6, CI 1.6-8.1) or metformin (OR = 5.0, CI 2.5-10.2), but less frequently OCP (OR = 0.5, CI 0.2-0.9) for non fertility concerns than general obstetrician-gynaecologists. The physicians aged <35 years were 2.2 times (95% CI 1.1-4.3) more likely than older physicians to recommend lifestyle management for patients with PCOS for fertility concerns. Physicians aged 46-55 years were less likely to recommend oral contraceptive pills (OCP) for patients with PCOS than physicians aged >56 (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.4, 95% CI 0.2-0.8).

    Conclusion: Despite well-organized healthcare, awareness, diagnosis and management of PCOS is suboptimal, especially in relation to psychosocial comorbidities, among physicians in the Nordic countries and Estonia. Physicians need more education on PCOS and evidence based information on Rotterdam diagnostic criteria, psychosocial features and treatment of PCOS, with the recently published international PCOS guideline well needed and welcomed.

  • Danielsson, Emil
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Law, Department of Law. 1995.
    Efterställningsklausuler genom intercreditor-avtal inom svensk rätt: Särskilt om giltigheten av kontraktuella efterställningar genom intercreditor-avtal i gäldenärens konkurs såväl som i de efterställda borgenärernas konkurser2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Morgan, Andrew P.
    et al.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Brazeau, Nicholas F.
    Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Ngasala, Billy
    Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Mhamilawa, Lwidiko E
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Denton, Madeline
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Msellem, Mwinyi
    Mnazi Mmoja Hosp, Training & Res, Zanzibar, Tanzania.
    Morris, Ulrika
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Filer, Dayne L.
    Univ N Carolina, Curriculum Bioinformat & Computat Biol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Aydemir, Ozkan
    Brown Univ, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Providence, RI 02912 USA.
    Bailey, Jeffrey A.
    Brown Univ, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Providence, RI 02912 USA.
    Parr, Jonathan B.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Mårtensson, Andreas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition.
    Bjorkman, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Microbiol Tumor & Cell Biol, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Juliano, Jonathan J.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Infect Dis, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA;Univ N Carolina, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA;Univ N Carolina, Curriculum Genet & Mol Biol, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 USA.
    Falciparum malaria from coastal Tanzania and Zanzibar remains highly connected despite effective control efforts on the archipelago2020In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 19, article id 47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Tanzania's Zanzibar archipelago has made significant gains in malaria control over the last decade and is a target for malaria elimination. Despite consistent implementation of effective tools since 2002, elimination has not been achieved. Importation of parasites from outside of the archipelago is thought to be an important cause of malaria's persistence, but this paradigm has not been studied using modern genetic tools.

    Methods: Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was used to investigate the impact of importation, employing population genetic analyses of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from both the archipelago and mainland Tanzania. Ancestry, levels of genetic diversity and differentiation, patterns of relatedness, and patterns of selection between these two populations were assessed by leveraging recent advances in deconvolution of genomes from polyclonal malaria infections.

    Results: Significant decreases in the effective population sizes were inferred in both populations that coincide with a period of decreasing malaria transmission in Tanzania. Identity by descent analysis showed that parasites in the two populations shared long segments of their genomes, on the order of 5 cM, suggesting shared ancestry within the last 10 generations. Even with limited sampling, two of isolates between the mainland and Zanzibar were identified that are related at the expected level of half-siblings, consistent with recent importation.

    Conclusions: These findings suggest that importation plays an important role for malaria incidence on Zanzibar and demonstrate the value of genomic approaches for identifying corridors of parasite movement to the island.

  • Illes, John
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Corporate Citizenship and H&M: A case study of business participation in society2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research based on the concept of corporate citizenship (CC) has shown that its practice has been left relatively unexplored. Despite pertaining to citizenship, its usage in literature and by corporations disregards the theoretical implications of citizenship. This study seeks to apply previous research of CC on a case study of the H&M group. This is done by using metaphors of business participation in society related to the role and behaviour of states and citizens. The analysis utilizes a descriptive classification of CC on corporate publications. The results show that the role of H&M can be contradictory in certain statements. However, the metaphor of the citizen still gives the most accurate description of H&M's role in society.

  • Wu, Ping-Hsun
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Endocrinology and mineral metabolism. Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Grad Inst Clin Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Yi-Ting, Lin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences. Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Grad Inst Clin Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Family Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Wu, Pei-Yu
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Grad Inst Clin Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Lee, Hei-Hwa
    Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Lab Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Lee, Su-Chu
    Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Hung, Szu-Chun
    Tzu Chi Univ, Taipei Tzu Chi Hosp, Buddhist Tzu Chi Med Fdn, Div Nephrol, Hualien 23142, Taiwan;Tzu Chi Univ, Sch Med, Hualien 23142, Taiwan.
    Chen, Szu-Chia
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Grad Inst Clin Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Kaohsiung Municipal Siaogang Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Kaohsiung 81267, Taiwan.
    Kuo, Mei-Chuan
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Renal Care, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Chiu, Yi-Wen
    Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Med, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Div Nephrol, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan;Kaohsiung Med Univ, Coll Med, Fac Renal Care, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan.
    Association between Circulation Indole-3-Acetic Acid Levels and Stem Cell Factor in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Study2020In: JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein-bound uremic toxin is a cardiovascular (CV) risk factor for patients with end-stage renal disease. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) was found to be associated with CV disease but the detailed pathophysiology remains unknown. Moreover, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades play an important role in the pathogenesis of CV disease. Thus, we explored the association between circulating IAA levels and forty MAPK cascade associated proteins in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Circulating total form IAA was quantified by mass spectrometry and forty MAPK cascade associated proteins by a proximity extension assay in 331 prevalent HD patients. Accounting for multiple testing, and in multivariable-adjusted linear regression models, circulating total form IAA levels were positively associated with stem cell factor (beta coefficient 0.13, 95% confidence interval 0.04 to 0.21, p = 0.004). A bioinformatics approach using the search tool for interactions of chemicals (STITCH) tool provided information that IAA may be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, hematopoietic cells, and the Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway. The knowledge gained here can be generalized, thereby impacting the non-traditional CV risk factors in patients with kidney disease. Further in vitro work is necessary to validate the translation of the mechanistic pathways.

  • Eisfeldt, Jesper
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Sci Pk, Solna, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Gustaf
    KTH Royal Inst Technol, Sch Engn Sci Chem Biotechnol & Hlth, Sci Life Lab, Div Nanobiotechnol,Dept Prot Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ameur, Adam
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Sci Life Lab, Sci Pk, Solna, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindstrand, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Ctr Mol Med, Dept Mol Med & Surg, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Genet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Discovery of Novel Sequences in 1,000 Swedish Genomes2020In: Molecular biology and evolution, ISSN 0737-4038, E-ISSN 1537-1719, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 18-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel sequences (NSs), not present in the human reference genome, are abundant and remain largely unexplored. Here, we utilize de novo assembly to study NS in 1,000 Swedish individuals first sequenced as part of the SweGen project revealing a total of 46 Mb in 61,044 distinct contigs of sequences not present in GRCh38. The contigs were aligned to recently published catalogs of Icelandic and Pan-African NSs, as well as the chimpanzee genome, revealing a great diversity of shared sequences. Analyzing the positioning of NS across the chimpanzee genome, we find that 2,807 NS align confidently within 143 chimpanzee orthologs of human genes. Aligning the whole genome sequencing data to the chimpanzee genome, we discover ancestral NS common throughout the Swedish population. The NSs were searched for repeats and repeat elements: revealing a majority of repetitive sequence (56%), and enrichment of simple repeats (28%) and satellites (15%). Lastly, we align the unmappable reads of a subset of the thousand genomes data to our collection of NS, as well as the previously published Pan-African NS: revealing that both the Swedish and Pan-African NS are widespread, and that the Swedish NSs are largely a subset of the Pan-African NS. Overall, these results highlight the importance of creating a more diverse reference genome and illustrate that significant amounts of the NS may be of ancestral origin.

  • Maruyama, Sandra R.
    et al.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto Sch Med, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil;Univ Fed Sao Carlos, Ctr Biol Sci & Hlth, Dept Genet & Evolut, Sao Carlos, SP, Brazil.
    Carvalho, Benilton
    Univ Estadual Campinas, Campinas, SP, Brazil.
    Gonzalez-Porta, Mar
    EMBL EBI, Hinxton, England;Illumina Ctr, Cambridge, England.
    Rung, Johan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. EMBL EBI, Hinxton, England.
    Brazma, Alvis
    EMBL EBI, Hinxton, England.
    Gardinassi, Luiz Gustavo
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Pharmaceut Sci Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.
    Ferreira, Beatriz R.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto Sch Nursing, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.
    Banin, Tamy M.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Sch Pharmaceut Sci Ribeirao Preto, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.
    Verissimo, Cecilia J.
    Sao Paulo Inst Anim Sci IZ, Nova Odessa, SP, Brazil.
    Katiki, Luciana M.
    Sao Paulo Inst Anim Sci IZ, Nova Odessa, SP, Brazil.
    de Miranda-Santos, Isabel K. F.
    Univ Sao Paulo, Ribeirao Preto Sch Med, Ribeirao Preto, SP, Brazil.
    Blood transcriptome profile induced by an efficacious vaccine formulated with salivary antigens from cattle ticks2019In: NPJ VACCINES, ISSN 2059-0105, Vol. 4, article id 53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ticks cause massive damage to livestock and vaccines are one sustainable alternative for the acaricide poisons currently heavily used to control infestations. An experimental vaccine adjuvanted with alum and composed by four recombinant salivary antigens mined with reverse vaccinology from a transcriptome of salivary glands from Rhipicephalus microplus ticks was previously shown to present an overall efficacy of 73.2% and cause a significant decrease of tick loads in artificially tick-infested, immunized heifers; this decrease was accompanied by increased levels of antigen-specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies, which were boosted during a challenge infestation. In order to gain insights into the systemic effects induced by the vaccine and by the tick challenge we now report the gene expression profile of these hosts' whole-blood leukocytes with RNA-seq followed by functional analyses. These analyses show that vaccination induced unique responses to infestations; genes upregulated in the comparisons were enriched for processes associated with chemotaxis, cell adhesion, T-cell responses and wound repair. Blood transcriptional modules were enriched for activation of dendritic cells, cell cycle, phosphatidylinositol signaling, and platelets. Together, the results indicate that by neutralizing the tick's salivary mediators of parasitism with vaccine-induced antibodies, the bovine host is able to mount normal homeostatic responses that hinder tick attachment and haematophagy and that the tick otherwise suppresses with its saliva.

  • Aol, Sharon
    et al.
    Mbarara Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, Mbarara, Uganda.
    Buchert, Stephan
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Uppsala Division.
    Jurua, Edward
    Mbarara Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Phys, Mbarara, Uganda.
    Traits of sub-kilometre F-region irregularities as seen with the Swarm satellites2020In: Annales Geophysicae, ISSN 0992-7689, E-ISSN 1432-0576, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 243-261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the night, in the F-region, equatorial ionospheric irregularities manifest as plasma depletions observed by satellites, and they may cause radio signals to fluctuate. In this study, the distribution characteristics of ionospheric F-region irregularities in the low latitudes were investigated using 16 Hz electron density observations made by a faceplate which is a component of the electric field instrument (EFI) onboard Swarm satellites of the European Space Agency (ESA). The study covers the period from October 2014 to October 2018 when the 16 Hz electron density data were available. For comparison, both the absolute (dN(e)) and relative (dN(e)/N-e) density perturbations were used to quantify the level of ionospheric irregularities. The two methods generally reproduced the local-time (LT), seasonal and longitudinal distribution of equatorial ionospheric irregularities as shown in earlier studies, demonstrating the ability of Swarm 16 Hz electron density data. A difference between the two methods was observed based on the latitudinal distribution of ionospheric irregularities where (dNe) showed a symmetrical distribution about the magnetic equator, while dN(e)/N-e showed a magnetic-equator-centred Gaussian distribution. High values of dNe and dN(e)/N-e were observed in spatial bins with steep gradients of electron density from a longitudinal and seasonal perspective. The response of ionospheric irregularities to geomagnetic and solar activities was also investigated using Kp index and solar radio flux index (F10.7), respectively. The reliance of dN(e)/N-e on solar and magnetic activity showed little distinction in the correlation between equatorial and off-equatorial latitudes, whereas dNe showed significant differences. With regard to seasonal and longitudinal distribution, high dNe and dN(e)/N-e values were often found during quiet magnetic periods compared to magnetically disturbed periods. The dNe increased approximately linearly from low to moderate solar activity. Using the high-resolution faceplate data, we were able to identify ionospheric irregularities on the scale of only a few hundred of metres.

  • Colonna, N.
    et al.
    INFN, Sez Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Tsinganis, A.
    European Org Nucl Res CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Vlastou, R.
    Natl Tech Univ Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Patronis, N.
    Univ Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece.
    Diakaki, M.
    CEA, DEN, DER SPRC LEPh, F-13108 Cadarache, St Paul Lez Dur, France.
    Amaducci, S.
    INFN Lab Nazl Sud, Catania, Italy.
    Barbagallo, M.
    European Org Nucl Res CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Bennett, S.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Berthoumieux, E.
    Univ Paris Saclay, Irfu, CEA Saclay, Gif Sur Yvette, France.
    Bacak, M.
    European Org Nucl Res CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Cosentino, G.
    INFN Lab Nazl Sud, Catania, Italy.
    Cristallo, S.
    Ist Nazl Astrofis INAF, Osservatorio Astron Teramo, Teramo, Italy;INFN, Sez Perugia, Perugia, Italy.
    Finocchiaro, P.
    INFN Lab Nazl Sud, Catania, Italy.
    Heyse, J.
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Directorate G, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel, Belgium.
    Lewis, D.
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Directorate G, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel, Belgium.
    Manna, A.
    Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Fis & Astron, Bologna, Italy;INFN, Sez Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Massimi, C.
    Univ Bologna, Dipartimento Fis & Astron, Bologna, Italy;INFN, Sez Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Mendoza, E.
    Ctr Invest Energet Medioambientales & Tecnol CIEM, Madrid, Spain.
    Mirea, M.
    Horia Hulubei Natl Inst Phys & Nucl Engn IFIN HH, Bucharest, Romania.
    Moens, A.
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Directorate G, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel, Belgium.
    Nolte, R.
    PTB, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Pirovano, E.
    PTB, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig, Germany.
    Sabate-Gilarte, M.
    Univ Seville, Seville, Spain.
    Sibbens, G.
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Directorate G, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel, Belgium.
    Smith, A. G.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Sosnin, N.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Stamatopoulos, A.
    Natl Tech Univ Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Tarrio, Diego
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Tassan-Got, L.
    IPN, IN2P3, CNRS, Orsay, France.
    Vanleeuw, D.
    European Commiss, Joint Res Ctr, Directorate G, Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel, Belgium.
    Ventura, A.
    INFN, Sez Bologna, Bologna, Italy.
    Vescovi, D.
    INFN, Sez Perugia, Perugia, Italy;GSSI, Laquila, Italy.
    Wright, T.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Zugec, P.
    Univ Zagreb, Fac Sci, Dept Phys, Zagreb, Croatia.
    The fission experimental programme at the CERN n_TOF facility: status and perspectives2020In: European Physical Journal A, ISSN 1434-6001, E-ISSN 1434-601X, Vol. 56, no 2Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutron-induced fission reactions play a crucial role in a variety of fields of fundamental and applied nuclear science. In basic nuclear physics they provide important information on properties of nuclear matter, while in nuclear technology they are at the basis of present and future reactor designs. Finally, there is a renewed interest in fission reactions in nuclear astrophysics due to the multi-messenger observation of neutron star mergers and the important role played by fission recycling in r-process nucleosynthesis. Although studied for several decades, many fundamental questions still remain on fission reactions, while modern applications and the development of more reliable nuclear models require high-accuracy and consistent experimental data on fission cross sections and other fission observables. To address these needs, an extensive fission research programme has been carried out at the n_TOF neutron time-of-flight facility at CERN during the last 18 years, taking advantage of the high energy resolution, high luminosity and wide energy range of the neutron beam, as well as of the detection and data acquisition systems designed for this purpose. While long-lived isotopes are studied on the 185 m long flight-path, the recent construction of a second experimental area at a distance of about 19 m has opened the way to challenging measurements of short-lived actinides. This article provides an overview of the n_TOF experimental programme on neutron-induced fission reactions along with the main characteristics of the facility, the various detection systems and data analysis techniques used. The most important results on several major and minor actinides obtained so far and the future perspectives of fission measurements at n_TOF are presented and discussed.

  • Bendle, Dominik
    et al.
    Tech Univ Kaiserslautern, Dept Math, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany;Fraunhofer Inst Ind Math ITWM, Fraunhofer Pl 1, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Böhm, Janko
    Tech Univ Kaiserslautern, Dept Math, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Decker, Wolfram
    Tech Univ Kaiserslautern, Dept Math, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Georgoudis, Alessandro
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Pfreundt, Franz-Josef
    Fraunhofer Inst Ind Math ITWM, Fraunhofer Pl 1, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Rahn, Mirko
    Fraunhofer Inst Ind Math ITWM, Fraunhofer Pl 1, D-67663 Kaiserslautern, Germany.
    Wasser, Pascal
    Johannes Gutenberg Univ Mainz, PRISMA Cluster Excellence, D-55128 Mainz, Germany.
    Zhang, Yang
    Univ Sci & Technol China, Interdisciplinary Ctr Theoret Study, Hefei 230026, Anhui, Peoples R China;Werner Heisenberg Inst, Max Planck Inst Phys, DE-80805 Munich, Germany.
    Integration-by-parts reductions of Feynman integrals using Singular and GPI-Space2020In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 2, article id 079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We introduce an algebro-geometrically motived integration-by-parts (IBP) re- duction method for multi-loop and multi-scale Feynman integrals, using a framework for massively parallel computations in computer algebra. This framework combines the com- puter algebra system Singular with the workflow management system GPI-Space, which are being developed at the TU Kaiserslautern and the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics (ITWM), respectively. In our approach, the IBP relations are first trimmed by modern tools from computational algebraic geometry and then solved by sparse linear algebra and our new interpolation method. Modelled in terms of Petri nets, these steps are efficiently automatized and automatically parallelized by GPI-Space. We demonstrate the potential of our method at the nontrivial example of reducing two-loop five-point non- planar double-pentagon integrals. We also use GPI-Space to convert the basis of IBP reductions, and discuss the possible simplification of master-integral coefficients in a uni- formly transcendental basis.

  • Müller-Sienerth, Nicole
    et al.
    Wellcome Sanger Inst, Cell Surface Signalling Lab, Cambridge, England.
    Shilts, Jarrod
    Wellcome Sanger Inst, Cell Surface Signalling Lab, Cambridge, England.
    Kadir, Khamisah Abdul
    Univ Malaysia Sarawak, Malaria Res Ctr, Sarawak, Malaysia.
    Yman, Victor
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Homann, Manijeh Vafa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Asghar, Muhammad
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ngasala, Billy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Women's and Children's Health, International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), International Child Health and Nutrition. Muhimbili Univ Hlth & Allied Sci, Dept Parasitol & Med Entomol, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania.
    Singh, Balbir
    Univ Malaysia Sarawak, Malaria Res Ctr, Sarawak, Malaysia.
    Färnert, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Div Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wright, Gavin J.
    Wellcome Sanger Inst, Cell Surface Signalling Lab, Cambridge, England.
    A panel of recombinant proteins from human-infective Plasmodium species for serological surveillance2020In: Malaria Journal, ISSN 1475-2875, E-ISSN 1475-2875, Vol. 19, article id 31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Malaria remains a global health problem and accurate surveillance of Plasmodium parasites that are responsible for this disease is required to guide the most effective distribution of control measures. Serological surveillance will be particularly important in areas of low or periodic transmission because patient antibody responses can provide a measure of historical exposure. While methods for detecting host antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax are well established, development of serological assays for Plasmodium knowlesi, Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae have been inhibited by a lack of immunodiagnostic candidates due to the limited availability of genomic information.

    Methods: Using the recently completed genome sequences from P. malariae, P. ovale and P. knowlesi, a set of 33 candidate cell surface and secreted blood-stage antigens was selected and expressed in a recombinant form using a mammalian expression system. These proteins were added to an existing panel of antigens from P. falciparum and P. vivax and the immunoreactivity of IgG, IgM and IgA immunoglobulins from individuals diagnosed with infections to each of the five different Plasmodium species was evaluated by ELISA. Logistic regression modelling was used to quantify the ability of the responses to determine prior exposure to the different Plasmodium species.

    Results: Using sera from European travellers with diagnosed Plasmodium infections, antigens showing species-specific immunoreactivity were identified to select a panel of 22 proteins from five Plasmodium species for serological profiling. The immunoreactivity to the antigens in the panel of sera taken from travellers and individuals living in malaria-endemic regions with diagnosed infections showed moderate power to predict infections by each species, including P. ovale, P. malariae and P. knowlesi. Using a larger set of patient samples and logistic regression modelling it was shown that exposure to P. knowlesi could be accurately detected (AUC=91%) using an antigen panel consisting of the P. knowlesi orthologues of MSP10, P12 and P38.

    Conclusions: Using the recent availability of genome sequences to all human-infective Plasmodium spp. parasites and a method of expressing Plasmodium proteins in a secreted functional form, an antigen panel has been compiled that will be useful to determine exposure to these parasites.

  • Hemmi, Kirsti
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Bråting, Kajsa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Lepik, Madis
    Curricular approaches to algebra in Estonia, Finland and Sweden – a comparative study2020In: Mathematical Thinking and Learning, ISSN 1098-6065, E-ISSN 1532-7833Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Andersson, Viktor
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    A Swedish Nuclear Future: Using explorative scenarios to assess energy security in low-carbon electricity systems2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Positioned within the concepts of sustainable development and energy security, this study evaluates the prospects for Swedish electricity production to assist in reaching both national and international climate targets. The main purpose is to assess the capability of nuclear energy to form part of a national climate change mitigation approach, as well as a viable energy source for Sweden to rely on in the future. Swedish energy security is quantitatively analyzed from a scheme based on the 4 As of energy security and with the use of a two-dimensional decision matrix. Swedish electricity production has a long record of being characterized by high levels of reliability and performance. It is also almost entirely fossil free, a situation largely explained by the significant shares of electricity being generated from nuclear and hydropower. However, current national market conditions are causing a strained financial situation for the existing nuclear power plants. Therefore, this study also performs an explorative scenario analysis on what could happen to the Swedish energy system if certain factors were to experience substantial changes in the years to come. The results from the energy security analysis demonstrate that, in order to facilitate reaching established climate targets, all of the current main sources of power generation are viable to include in a national electricity mix. Furthermore, in maintaining the current electricity production, the scenario analysis highlights three factors which seem to be of particular importance. These are: production costs for different energy sources; public opinion regarding significant societal developments; and rising emissions taxes. The findings also indicate that nuclear energy constitutes a suitable and reliable source of base load electricity and that maintaining a diversified energy mix, in terms of energy security, is a sound pathway for Sweden to follow.

  • Neiß (Neiss), Michael
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Archaeology.
    Ein weibliches Herrschaftszeichen?: Überlegungen zur wikingerzeitlichen Elec-Spange2019In: Sächsische Leute und Länder: Benennung und Lokalisierung von Gruppenidentitäten im ersten Jahrtausend / [ed] Melanie Augstein & Matthias Hardt, Wendeburg: Verlag Uwe Krebs , 2019, p. 133-145Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [de]

    Frühgeschichtliche Bilder sind ein besonders Quellenmaterial. Zumeist handelt es sich nicht um Zufallsprodukte, sondern um Zeichen, die Botschaften vermitteln sollten. Dies gilt nicht zuletzt für die Bilderwelt der Wikingerzeit. Jedoch sind freistehende Bildmonumente aus dieser Epoche relativ selten. Häufiger haben sich Bilder im kleineren Format erhalten, genauer gesagt als Tierornamentik auf Gebrauchsgegenständen. Den Ausgangspunkt zu meinen Überlegungen bildet eine prachtvolle Spange aus Elec im heutigen Russland. Im reichen Dekor der Spange findet sich eine Mischfigur bestehend aus einem anthropomorphen Kopf und einem vogelähnlichen Körper. Diese Bildfigur bindet die Elecer Spange möglicherweise an das Fürstenhaus der Rjurikiden. Da es sich um einen Funktionsgegenstand aus der Frauentracht handelt, muss man sich fragen, ob die Spange die Machtfülle der gesamten Dynastie symbolisiert oder sich auf eine einzigartige Frau bezieht.

  • Appelgren, Daniel
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ, Div Drug Res, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Enocsson, Helena
    Linkoping Univ, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Skogman, Barbro H.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna. Orebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth Sci, SE-70281 Orebro, Sweden.
    Nordberg, Marika
    Aland Cent Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, AX-22100 Mariehamn, Aland, Finland.
    Perander, Linda
    Aland Cent Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, AX-22100 Mariehamn, Aland, Finland.
    Nyman, Dag
    Bimelix AB, AX-22100 Mariehamn, Aland, Finland.
    Nyberg, Clara
    Aland Cent Hosp, Dept Infect Dis, AX-22100 Mariehamn, Aland, Finland.
    Knopf, Jasmin
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Dept Internal Med Rheumatol & Immunol 3, Univ Klinikum Erlangen, DE-91054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Munoz, Luis E.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nurnberg FAU, Dept Internal Med Rheumatol & Immunol 3, Univ Klinikum Erlangen, DE-91054 Erlangen, Germany.
    Sjöwall, Christopher
    Linkoping Univ, Div Neuro & Inflammat Sci, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sjöwall, Johanna
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Clin Infect Dis, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, SE-58185 Linkoping, Sweden.
    Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs) in the Cerebrospinal Fluid Samples from Children and Adults with Central Nervous System Infections2020In: CELLS, ISSN 2073-4409, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Neutrophils operate as part of the innate defence in the skin and may eliminate the Borrelia spirochaete via phagocytosis, oxidative bursts, and hydrolytic enzymes. However, their importance in Lyme neuroborreliosis (LNB) is unclear. Neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, which is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species, involves the extrusion of the neutrophil DNA to form traps that incapacitate bacteria and immobilise viruses. Meanwhile, NET formation has recently been studied in pneumococcal meningitis, the role of NETs in other central nervous system (CNS) infections has previously not been studied. Here, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from clinically well-characterised children (N = 111) and adults (N = 64) with LNB and other CNS infections were analysed for NETs (DNA/myeloperoxidase complexes) and elastase activity. NETs were detected more frequently in the children than the adults (p = 0.01). NET presence was associated with higher CSF levels of CXCL1 (p < 0.001), CXCL6 (p = 0.007), CXCL8 (p = 0.003), CXCL10 (p < 0.001), MMP-9 (p = 0.002), TNF (p = 0.02), IL-6 (p < 0.001), and IL-17A (p = 0.03). NETs were associated with fever (p = 0.002) and correlated with polynuclear pleocytosis (r(s) = 0.53, p < 0.0001). We show that neutrophil activation and active NET formation occur in the CSF samples of children and adults with CNS infections, mainly caused by Borrelia and neurotropic viruses. The role of NETs in the early phase of viral/bacterial CNS infections warrants further investigation.

  • Spronk, Inge
    et al.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands;Maasstad Hosp, Assoc Dutch Burn Ctr, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Dept Plast Reconstruct & Hand Surg, Amsterdam Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Edgar, Dale W.
    Fiona Stanley Hosp, State Adult Burn Unit, Murdoch, WA, Australia;Univ Notre Dame, Burn Injury Res Node, Fremantle, WA, Australia;Fiona Wood Fdn, Murdoch, WA, Australia.
    van Baar, Margriet E.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands;Maasstad Hosp, Assoc Dutch Burn Ctr, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Wood, Fiona M.
    Fiona Stanley Hosp, State Adult Burn Unit, Murdoch, WA, Australia;Fiona Wood Fdn, Murdoch, WA, Australia.
    Van Loey, Nancy E. E.
    Assoc Dutch Burn Ctr, Dept Behav Res, Beverwijk, Netherlands;Univ Utrecht, Dept Clin Psychol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Middelkoop, Esther
    Vrije Univ Amsterdam, Amsterdam UMC, Dept Plast Reconstruct & Hand Surg, Amsterdam Movement Sci, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Red Cross Hosp, Assoc Dutch Burn Ctr, Beverwijk, Netherlands.
    Renneberg, Babette
    Free Univ Berlin, Dept Clin Psychol & Psychotherapy, Berlin, Germany.
    Öster, Caisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Ekselius: Psychiatry.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linkoping Univ, Dept Anaesthesiol & Intens Care, Linkoping, Sweden;Linkoping Univ, Dept Clin & Expt Med, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Moi, Asgjerd L.
    Western Norway Univ Appl Sci, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Hlth & Caring Sci, Bergen, Norway;Haukeland Hosp, Natl Burn Ctr, Dept Plast Hand & Reconstruct Surg, Bergen, Norway.
    Nieuwenhuis, Marianne
    Martini Hosp, Assoc Dutch Burn Ctr, Groningen, Netherlands;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Ctr Human Movement Sci, Groningen, Netherlands.
    van der Vlies, Cornelis H.
    Maasstad Hosp, Burn Ctr, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Surg, Trauma Res Unit, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Polinder, Suzanne
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Haagsma, Juanita A.
    Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Erasmus MC, Dept Publ Hlth, POB 2040, NL-3000 CA Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Improved and standardized method for assessing years lived with disability after burns and its application to estimate the non-fatal burden of disease of burn injuries in Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands2020In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, article id 121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Burden of disease estimates are an important resource in public health. Currently, robust estimates are not available for the burn population. Our objectives are to adapt a refined methodology (INTEGRIS method) to burns and to apply this new INTEGRIS-burns method to estimate, and compare, the burden of disease of burn injuries in Australia, New Zealand and the Netherlands.

    Methods: Existing European and Western-Australian health-related quality of life (HRQL) datasets were combined to derive disability weights for three homogenous burn injury groups based on percentage total body surface area (%TBSA) burned. Subsequently, incidence data from Australia, New Zealand, and the Netherlands from 2010 to 2017 were used to compute annual non-fatal burden of disease estimates for each of these three countries. Non-fatal burden of disease was measured by years lived with disability (YLD).

    Results: The combined dataset included 7159 HRQL (EQ-5D-3 L) outcomes from 3401 patients. Disability weights ranged from 0.046 (subgroup < 5% TBSA burned > 24 months post-burn) to 0.497 (subgroup > 20% TBSA burned 0-1 months post-burn). In 2017 the non-fatal burden of disease of burns for the three countries (YLDs/100,000 inhabitants) was 281 for Australia, 279 for New Zealand and 133 for the Netherlands.

    Conclusions: This project established a method for more precise estimates of the YLDs of burns, as it is the only method adapted to the nature of burn injuries and their recovery. Compared to previous used methods, the INTEGRIS-burns method includes improved disability weights based on severity categorization of burn patients; a better substantiated proportion of patients with lifelong disability based; and, the application of burn specific recovery timeframes. Information derived from the adapted method can be used as input for health decision making at both the national and international level. Future studies should investigate whether the application is valid in low- and middle- income countries.

  • Moore, Amy
    et al.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kane, Eleanor
    Univ York, Dept Hlth Sciences, York, N Yorkshire, England.
    Wang, Zhaoming
    St Jude Childrens Res Hosp, Dept Computat Biol, 332 N Lauderdale St, Memphis, TN 38105 USA;NCI, Lab Translat Genom, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Panagiotou, Orestis A.
    Brown Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Serv Policy & Practice, Providence, RI 02912 USA;Brown Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Ctr Gerontol & Healthcare Res, Providence, RI 02912 USA.
    Teras, Lauren R.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Monnereau, Alain
    INSERM, Epidemiol Childhood & Adolescent Canc Grp, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Stat Sorbonne Paris Cite CRES, Paris, France;Univ Paris 05, Paris, France;Inst Bergonie, Registre Hemopathies Malignes Gironde, Bordeaux, France.
    Wong Doo, Nicole
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Machiela, Mitchell J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Skibola, Christine F.
    Emory Univ, Sch Med, Dept Hematol & Med Oncol, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Slager, Susan L.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Salles, Gilles
    Hosp Civils Lyon, Dept Hematol, Lyon, France;Univ Lyon 1, Dept Hematol, Lyon, France;Inst Natl Sante & Rech Med UMR1052 Pierre Benite, Canc Res Ctr Lyon, Equipe Expt & Clin Models Lymphomagenesis, Lyon, France.
    Camp, Nicola J.
    Univ Utah, Sch Med, Dept Internal Med, Div Hematol & Hematol Malignancies, Salt Lake City, UT USA;Univ Utah, Sch Med, Huntsman Canc Inst, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Bracci, Paige M.
    Univ Calif San Francisco, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Nieters, Alexandra
    Univ Med Ctr Freiburg, Ctr Chron Immunodeficiency, Freiburg, Germany.
    Vermeulen, Roel C. H.
    Univ Utrecht, Inst Risk Assessment Sci, Div Environm Epidemiol, Utrecht, Netherlands;Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Julius Ctr Hlth Sci & Primary Care, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Smedby, Karin E.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med, Solna, Solna, Sweden;Karolinska Univ Hosp, Hematol Ctr, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zhang, Yawei
    Yale Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Environm Hlth Sci, New Haven, CT USA.
    Vajdic, Claire M.
    Univ New South Wales, Ctr Big Data Res Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Cozen, Wendy
    Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Dept Prevent Med, Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA;Univ Southern Calif, Keck Sch Med, Norris Comprehens Canc Ctr, Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA.
    Spinelli, John J.
    BC Canc, Canc Control Res, Vancouver, BC, Canada;Univ British Columbia, Sch Populat & Publ Hlth, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Hjalgrim, Henrik
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Epidemiol Res, Div Hlth Surveillance & Res, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Link, Brian K.
    Univ Iowa, Carver Coll Med, Dept Internal Med, Iowa City, IA USA.
    Clavel, Jacqueline
    INSERM, Epidemiol Childhood & Adolescent Canc Grp, Ctr Res Epidemiol & Stat Sorbonne Paris Cite CRES, Paris, France;Univ Paris 05, Paris, France.
    Arslan, Alan A.
    NYU, Sch Med, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, New York, NY USA;NYU, Sch Med, Dept Environm Med, New York, NY USA;NYU, Langone Med Ctr, Perlmutter Canc Ctr, New York, NY USA.
    Purdue, Mark P.
    Ontario Hlth Study, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Tinker, Lesley F.
    Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Albanes, Demetrius
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Ferri, Giovanni M.
    Univ Bari, Interdisciplinary Dept Med, Bari, Italy.
    Habermann, Thomas M.
    Mayo Clin, Coll Med & Sci, Div Gen Internal Med, Rochester, MN USA.
    Adami, Hans-Olov
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Harvard Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidmiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Becker, Nikolaus
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidmiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Benavente, Yolanda
    Catalan Inst OncologyIDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol Res Programme, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ, Barcelona, Spain.
    Bisanzi, Simonetta
    Prevent & Res Inst ISPRO, Oncol Network, Reg Canc Prevent Lab, Florence, Italy.
    Boffetta, Paolo
    Icahn Sch Med Mt Sinai, Tisch Canc Inst, New York, NY 10029 USA.
    Brennan, Paul
    IARC, Lyon, France.
    Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.
    BC Canc, Genome Sci Ctr, Vancouver, BC, Canada;Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Biomed Physiol & Kinesiol, Burnaby, BC, Canada.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Canc Res Ctr, Genom Epidemiol Grp, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Conde, Lucia
    UCL, Inst Canc, Bill Lyons Informat Ctr, London, England.
    Cox, David G.
    Ctr Leon Berard, Canc Res Ctr Lyon, INSERM, U1052, Lyon, France.
    Curtin, Karen
    Univ Utah, Sch Med, Dept Internal Med, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Foretova, Lenka
    Masaryk Mem Canc Inst & MF MU, Dept Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Brno, Czech Republic.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Ghesquieres, Herve
    Inst Natl Sante & Rech Med UMR1052 Pierre Benite, Canc Res Ctr Lyon, Equipe Expt & Clin Models Lymphomagenesis, Lyon, France;Ctr Leon Berard, Dept Hematol, Lyon, France.
    Glenn, Martha
    Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Internal Med, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Glimelius, Bengt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Experimental and Clinical Oncology.
    Jackson, Rebecca D.
    Ohio State Univ, Div Endocrinol Diabet & Metab, Columbus, OH USA.
    Lan, Qing
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Liebow, Mark
    Mayo Clin, Coll Med & Sci, Div Gen Internal Med, Rochester, MN USA.
    Maynadie, Marc
    Univ Burgundy, Registre Hemopathies Malignes Cote dOr, INSERM, U1231, Dijon, France;Dijon Univ Hosp, Dijon, France.
    McKay, James
    IARC, Lyon, France.
    Melbye, Mads
    Statens Serum Inst, Dept Epidemiol Res, Div Hlth Surveillance & Res, Copenhagen, Denmark;Stanford Univ, Dept Med, Sch Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Miligi, Lucia
    Prevent & Res Inst ISPRO, Oncol Network, Environm & Occupat Epidemiol Unit, Florence, Italy.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol & Intelligence Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Molina, Thierry J.
    Univ Paris 05, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Necker Enfants Malades, Dept Pathol,AP HP, Paris, France.
    Morton, Lindsay M.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    North, Kari E.
    Univ N Carolina, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA;Univ N Carolina, Carolina Ctr Genome Sci, Chapel Hill, NC 27515 USA.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Padoan, Marina
    Univ Piemonte Orientale, Dept Translat Med, CPO Piemonte, Novara, Italy;Univ Piemonte Orientale, Dept Translat Med, Unit Med Stat & Epidemiol, Novara, Italy.
    Patel, Alpa V.
    Amer Canc Soc, Epidemiol Res Program, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Piro, Sara
    Prevent & Res Inst ISPRO, Oncol Network, Environm & Occupat Epidemiol Unit, Florence, Italy.
    Ravichandran, Vignesh
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Riboli, Elio
    Imperial Coll London, Sch Publ Hlth, London, England.
    de Sanjose, Silvia
    Catalan Inst OncologyIDIBELL, Canc Epidemiol Res Programme, Barcelona, Spain;CIBER Epidemiol & Salud Publ, Barcelona, Spain.
    Severson, Richard K.
    Wayne State Univ, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth Sci, Detroit, MI USA.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Univ Melbourne, Dept Pathol, Genet Epidmiol Lab, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Staines, Anthony
    Dublin City Univ, Sch Nursing & Human Sci, Dublin, Ireland.
    Stewart, Carolyn
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Travis, Ruth C.
    Univ Oxford, Canc Epidmiol Unit, Oxford, England.
    Weiderpass, Elisabete
    World Hlth Org, Int Agcy Res Canc, Lyon, France.
    Weinstein, Stephanie
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Zheng, Tongzhang
    Brown Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidmiol, Providence, RI USA.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Chatterjee, Nilanjan
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Johns Hopkins Univ, Dept Biostat, Bloomberg Sch Publ Hlth, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA;Johns Hopkins Univ, Sch Med, Dept Oncol, Baltimore, MD 21205 USA.
    Rothman, Nathaniel
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Birmann, Brenda M.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Cerhan, James R.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Berndt, Sonja I.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Genetically Determined Height and Risk of Non-hodgkin Lymphoma2020In: Frontiers in Oncology, ISSN 2234-943X, E-ISSN 2234-943X, Vol. 9, article id 1539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the evidence is not consistent, epidemiologic studies have suggested that taller adult height may be associated with an increased risk of some non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes. Height is largely determined by genetic factors, but how these genetic factors may contribute to NHL risk is unknown. We investigated the relationship between genetic determinants of height and NHL risk using data from eight genome-wide association studies (GWAS) comprising 10,629 NHL cases, including 3,857 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), 2,847 follicular lymphoma (FL), 3,100 chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and 825 marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) cases, and 9,505 controls of European ancestry. We evaluated genetically predicted height by constructing polygenic risk scores using 833 height-associated SNPs. We used logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for association between genetically determined height and the risk of four NHL subtypes in each GWAS and then used fixed-effect meta-analysis to combine subtype results across studies. We found suggestive evidence between taller genetically determined height and increased CLL risk (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 1.00-1.17, p = 0.049), which was slightly stronger among women (OR = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.01-1.31, p = 0.036). No significant associations were observed with DLBCL, FL, or MZL. Our findings suggest that there may be some shared genetic factors between CLL and height, but other endogenous or environmental factors may underlie reported epidemiologic height associations with other subtypes.

  • Källström, Jacob
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Troedsson, Joel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Programmering på lågstadiet – En kvalitativ studie om lärares upplevelser2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Programmering har införts i läroplanen och från och med sommaren 2018 ska lågstadielärare undervisa i programmering. När den här studien tar vid, våren 2019 har lågstadielärare undervisat i programmering i snart ett läsår. Syftet är att undersöka hur sju lågstadielärare upplever sina kunskaper och vilka utmaningar de ser när det kommer till att undervisa om programmering. Tidigare forskning är gjord innan ändringarna i läroplanen har tillämpats och den har visat på lärares förutsättningar, attityder, upplevda hinder och utmaningar kring att undervisa om programmering. Nu har lågstadielärare undervisat i programmering i snart ett läsår och den här studien bidrar med kunskap genom att undersöka hur situationen ser ut idag. Upplever lärare att de har den kunskap som behövs för att undervisa om programmering och vilka är utmaningarna? Studien genomfördes i maj 2019 i form av intervjuer där lågstadielärare valdes ut genom ett bekvämlighetsurval via kontakter från tidigare praktik. Studiens två frågeställningar är:

    1. Hur upplever lågstadielärare sina kunskaper inom programmering?
    2. Vilka utmaningar upplever lågstadielärare i att undervisa om programmering?

    För att synliggöra lågstadielärarnas upplevelser har en fenomenografisk utgångspunkt tillämpats vilket innebär att det är deltagarnas upplevelser kring ett fenomen som undersöks. Ett fenomen är en företeelse i omvärlden och den här studien undersöker lågstadielärares upplevelser om sin kunskap och utmaningar i att undervisa om programmering. Med en fenomenografisk utgångspunkt kategoriserades lågstadielärarnas upplevelser in i sex olika teman som utgår från studiens två frågeställningar. Dessa teman analyserades utifrån ett ramfaktorteoretiskt perspektiv för att synliggöra vilka ramfaktorer som påverkar dessa teman. Tre viktiga ramfaktorer kunde identifieras: ”Bristande fortbildning”, ”Tidsbrist” och ”Resurser”. Studiens resultat visar på lågstadielärarnas upplevelser om sin kunskap och utmaningar att undervisa i programmering och vilka ramfaktorer som påverkar dessa upplevelser.

  • Andersson, Annika
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    En komparativ studie om upplevd autonomi hos rektorer i Norge och Sverige2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a comparative survey on the experiences of autonomy of Norwegian and Swedish principals. The study uses theories and earlier research regarding teachers and autonomy. The research design that is used has in earlier research been used to study the autonomy of teachers. The experiences of autonomy is studied through questions on decision-making and control within four domains in which the principal operates: the pedagogical domain, the social domain, the domain of development and the administrative domain.

     

    The study shows that the principals in Norway and Sweden are governed in much the same manner regarding laws and curriculum in their respective countries. The level in which the principals experience themselves as autonomous in their work is approximately the same in Sweden and Norway. Although, the study suggests that there is a small discrepancy among the Norwegian principals who experience a slightly higher level of autonomy.

     

  • Sankaranarayanan, Sundar Ram
    et al.
    Jawaharlal Nehru Ctr Adv Sci Res, Mol Mycol Lab, Mol Biol & Genet Unit, Bengaluru, India.
    Ianiri, Giuseppe
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Mol Genet & Microbiol, Durham, NC 27710 USA;Univ Molise, Dept Agr Environm & Food Sci, Campobasso, Italy.
    Coelho, Marco A.
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Mol Genet & Microbiol, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Reza, Md Hashim
    Jawaharlal Nehru Ctr Adv Sci Res, Mol Mycol Lab, Mol Biol & Genet Unit, Bengaluru, India.
    Thimmappa, Bhagya C.
    Jawaharlal Nehru Ctr Adv Sci Res, Mol Mycol Lab, Mol Biol & Genet Unit, Bengaluru, India;Univ Montreal, Robert Cedergren Ctr Bioinformat & Genom, Dept Biochem, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Ganguly, Promit
    Jawaharlal Nehru Ctr Adv Sci Res, Mol Mycol Lab, Mol Biol & Genet Unit, Bengaluru, India.
    Vadnala, Rakesh Netha
    Inst Math Sci HBNI, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Sun, Sheng
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Mol Genet & Microbiol, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Siddharthan, Rahul
    Inst Math Sci HBNI, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
    Tellgren-Roth, Christian
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology. Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab.
    Dawson, Thomas L. Jnr
    ASTAR, Skin Res Inst Singapore, Singapore, Singapore;Med Univ South Carolina, Dept Drug Discovery, Charleston, SC 29425 USA.
    Heitman, Joseph
    Duke Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Mol Genet & Microbiol, Durham, NC 27710 USA.
    Sanyal, Kaustuv
    Jawaharlal Nehru Ctr Adv Sci Res, Mol Mycol Lab, Mol Biol & Genet Unit, Bengaluru, India.
    Loss of centromere function drives karyotype evolution in closely related Malassezia species2020In: eLIFE, E-ISSN 2050-084X, Vol. 9, article id e53944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Genomic rearrangements associated with speciation often result in variation in chromosome number among closely related species. Malassezia species show variable karyotypes ranging between six and nine chromosomes. Here, we experimentally identified all eight centromeres in M. sympodialis as 3-5-kb long kinetochore-bound regions that span an AT-rich core and are depleted of the canonical histone H3. Centromeres of similar sequence features were identified as CENP-A-rich regions in Malassezia furfur, which has seven chromosomes, and histone H3 depleted regions in Malassezia slooffiae and Malassezia globosa with nine chromosomes each. Analysis of synteny conservation across centromeres with newly generated chromosome-level genome assemblies suggests two distinct mechanisms of chromosome number reduction from an inferred nine-chromosome ancestral state: (a) chromosome breakage followed by loss of centromere DNA and (b) centromere inactivation accompanied by changes in DNA sequence following chromosome-chromosome fusion. We propose that AT-rich centromeres drive karyotype diversity in the Malassezia species complex through breakage and inactivation.

  • Shah, Sonia
    et al.
    Univ Queensland, Inst Mol Biosci, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia;UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England;UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England.
    Henry, Albert
    UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England;UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England;UCL, Inst Hlth Informat, London, England.
    Roselli, Carolina
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Lin, Honghuang
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Sect Computat Biomed, Boston, MA 02118 USA;NHLBI, Framingham, MA USA;Boston Univ Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA USA.
    Sveinbjornsson, Gardar
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh
    UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England;UCL, Inst Hlth Informat, London, England;UCL, Hlth Data Res UK London, London, England.
    Hedman, Asa K.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiovasc Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wilk, Jemma B.
    Pfizer Worldwide Res & Dev, 1 Portland St, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Morley, Michael P.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Penn Cardiovasc Inst, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Chaffin, Mark D.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Helgadottir, Anna
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Verweij, Niek
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Dehghan, Abbas
    Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, St Marys Campus, London W2 1PG, England;Imperial Coll London, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, MRC PHE Ctr Environm & Hlth, St Marys Campus, London W2 1PG, England.
    Almgren, Peter
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.
    Andersson, Charlotte
    NHLBI, Framingham, MA USA;Boston Univ Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA USA;Herlev Gentofte Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Herlev Ringvej 57, DK-2650 Herlev, Denmark.
    Aragam, Krishna G.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Genom Med, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Arnlov, Johan
    Karolinska Inst, Sect Family Med & Primary Care, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Stockholm, Sweden;Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden.
    Backman, Joshua D.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Biggs, Mary L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA.
    Bloom, Heather L.
    Emory Univ, Dept Med, Med Ctr, Div Cardiol, Atlanta, GA 30322 USA.
    Brandimarto, Jeffrey
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Penn Cardiovasc Inst, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Brown, Michael R.
    Univ Texas Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol Human Genet & Environm Sci, Houston, TX USA.
    Buckbinder, Leonard
    Pfizer Worldwide Res & Dev, 1 Portland St, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Carey, David J.
    Geisinger, Dept Mol & Funct Genom, Danville, PA USA.
    Chasman, Daniel I.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Chen, Xing
    Pfizer Worldwide Res & Dev, 1 Portland St, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Chen, Xu
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Chung, Jonathan
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Chutkow, William
    Novartis Inst Biomed Res, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Cook, James P.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool, Merseyside, England.
    Delgado, Graciela E.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med Nephrol Hypertensiol Endocrinol Diabetol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Denaxas, Spiros
    UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England;UCL, Inst Hlth Informat, London, England;UCL, Hlth Data Res UK London, London, England;UCL, Natl Inst Hlth Res, Hosp Biomed Res Ctr, London, England;Alan Turing Inst, London, England.
    Doney, Alexander S.
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Div Mol & Clin Med, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.
    Doerr, Marcus
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Internal Med B, Greifswald, Germany;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Dudley, Samuel C.
    Univ Minnesota, Dept Med, Cardiovasc Div, Minneapolis, MN USA.
    Dunn, Michael E.
    Regeneron Pharmaceut, Cardiovasc Res, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Engstrom, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.
    Esko, Tonu
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Univ Tartu, Inst Genom, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia.
    Felix, Stephan B.
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Internal Med B, Greifswald, Germany;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Finan, Chris
    UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England;UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England.
    Ford, Ian
    Univ Glasgow, Robertson Ctr Biostat, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Ghanbari, Mohsen
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Ghasemi, Sahar
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany;Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany.
    Giedraitis, Vilmantas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Geriatrics.
    Giulianini, Franco
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Gottdiener, John S.
    Univ Maryland, Sch Med, Dept Med, Div Cardiol, Baltimore, MD 21201 USA.
    Gross, Stefan
    Univ Med Greifswald, Dept Internal Med B, Greifswald, Germany;DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
    Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Sch Engn & Nat Sci, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Gutmann, Rebecca
    Univ Iowa, Carver Coll Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Iowa City, IA USA.
    Haggerty, Christopher M.
    Geisinger, Dept Mol & Funct Genom, Danville, PA USA.
    van der Harst, Pim
    Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Cardiol, Groningen, Netherlands;Univ Groningen, Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Dept Genet, Groningen, Netherlands;ICIN Netherlands Heart Inst, Durrer Ctr Cardiogenet Res, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Hyde, Craig L.
    Pfizer Worldwide Res & Dev, 1 Portland St, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Science for Life Laboratory, SciLifeLab. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Dept Med, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Stanford Cardiovasc Inst, Stanford, CA 94305 USA;Stanford Univ, Stanford Diabet Res Ctr, Stanford, CA 94305 USA.
    Jukema, J. Wouter
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands;LUMC, Einthoven Lab Expt Vasc Med, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Kavousi, Maryam
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Khaw, Kay-Tee
    Univ Cambridge, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Kleber, Marcus E.
    Heidelberg Univ, Med Fac Mannheim, Dept Med Nephrol Hypertensiol Endocrinol Diabetol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kober, Lars
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Cardiol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Koekemoer, Andrea
    Univ Leicester, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leicester, Leics, England;Glenfield Hosp, NIHR Leicester Biomed Res Ctr, Leicester, Leics, England.
    Langenberg, Claudia
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Lindgren, Cecilia M.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Univ Oxford, Li Ka Shing Ctr Hlth Informat & Discovery, Big Data Inst, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    London, Barry
    Univ Iowa, Div Cardiovasc Med, Iowa City, IA USA;Univ Iowa, Abboud Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Iowa City, IA USA.
    Lotta, Luca A.
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Lovering, Ruth C.
    UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England;UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England.
    Luan, Jian'an
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Magnusson, Patrik
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mahajan, Anubha
    Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Margulies, Kenneth B.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Penn Cardiovasc Inst, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Maerz, Winfried
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool, Merseyside, England;Synlab Holding Deutschland GmbH, Synlab Acad, Mannheim, Germany;Med Univ Graz, Clin Inst Med & Chem Lab Diagnost, Graz, Austria.
    Melander, Olle
    Lund Univ, Dept Internal Med, Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden.
    Mordi, Ify R.
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Div Mol & Clin Med, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.
    Morgan, Thomas
    Novartis Inst Biomed Res, Cambridge, MA USA;Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Morris, Andrew D.
    Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Morris, Andrew P.
    Univ Liverpool, Dept Biostat, Liverpool, Merseyside, England;Univ Oxford, Wellcome Trust Ctr Human Genet, Oxford, England.
    Morrison, Alanna C.
    Univ Texas Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol Human Genet & Environm Sci, Houston, TX USA.
    Nagle, Michael W.
    Pfizer Worldwide Res & Dev, 1 Portland St, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Nelson, Christopher P.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leicester, Leics, England;Glenfield Hosp, NIHR Leicester Biomed Res Ctr, Leicester, Leics, England.
    Niessner, Alexander
    Med Univ Vienna, Div Cardiol, Dept Internal Med 2, Vienna, Austria.
    Niiranen, Teemu
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland;Turku Univ Hosp, Dept Med, Turku, Finland;Univ Turku, Turku, Finland.
    O'Donoghue, Michelle L.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Cardiovasc, TIMI Study Grp, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Owens, Anjali T.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Penn Cardiovasc Inst, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Palmer, Colin N. A.
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Div Mol & Clin Med, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.
    Parry, Helen M.
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Div Mol & Clin Med, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.
    Perola, Markus
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland.
    Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Dept Internal Med, Div Vasc Med & Pharmacol, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Psaty, Bruce M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med Epidemiol & Hlth Serv, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Kaiser Permanente Washington, Kaiser Permanente Washington Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA USA.
    Rice, Kenneth M.
    Univ Washington, Dept Biostat, Seattle, WA 98195 USA.
    Ridker, Paul M.
    Brigham & Womens Hosp, Div Prevent Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Romaine, Simon P. R.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leicester, Leics, England;Glenfield Hosp, NIHR Leicester Biomed Res Ctr, Leicester, Leics, England.
    Rotter, Jerome I.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Dept Pediat, Torrance, CA 90509 USA;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Los Angeles Biomed Res Inst, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Dept Med, Torrance, CA 90509 USA.
    Salo, Perttu
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland.
    Salomaa, Veikko
    Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Helsinki, Finland.
    van Setten, Jessica
    Univ Utrecht, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Shalaby, Alaa A.
    Univ Pittsburgh, Med Ctr, Dept Med, Div Cardiol, Pittsburgh, PA USA;VA Pittsburgh HCS, Pittsburgh, VA USA.
    Smelser, Diane T.
    Geisinger, Dept Mol & Funct Genom, Danville, PA USA.
    Smith, Nicholas L.
    Kaiser Permanente Washington, Kaiser Permanente Washington Hlth Res Inst, Seattle, WA USA;Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Dept Vet Affairs Off Res & Dev, Seattle Epidemiol Res & Informat Ctr, Seattle, WA USA.
    Stender, Steen
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stott, David J.
    Univ Glasgow, Coll Med Vet & Life Sci, Inst Cardiovasc & Med Sci, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Svensson, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Cardiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tammesoo, Mari-Liis
    Univ Tartu, Inst Genom, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia.
    Taylor, Kent D.
    Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, LABiomed, Inst Translat Genom & Populat Sci, Torrance, CA 90502 USA;Harbor UCLA Med Ctr, Dept Pediat, Torrance, CA 90502 USA.
    Teder-Laving, Maris
    Univ Tartu, Inst Genom, Estonian Genome Ctr, EE-51010 Tartu, Estonia.
    Teumer, Alexander
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany;Univ Med Greifswald, Inst Community Med, Greifswald, Germany.
    Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Natl Univ Hosp Iceland, Landspitali, Dept Internal Med, Div Cardiol, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Dept Med, Fac Med, Saemundargata 2, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Torp-Pedersen, Christian
    Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Epidemiol & Biostat, Aalborg, Denmark;Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Hlth Sci & Technol, Aalborg, Denmark;Aalborg Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Trompet, Stella
    Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Cardiol, Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Sect Gerontol & Geriatr, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Tyl, Benoit
    Servier Cardiovasc Ctr Therapeut Innovat, Translat & Clin Res, 50 Rue Carnot, F-92284 Suresnes, France.
    Uitterlinden, Andre G.
    Erasmus Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Epidemiol, Rotterdam, Netherlands;Erasmus MC, Univ Med Ctr Rotterdam, Dept Internal Med, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Veluchamy, Abirami
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Div Mol & Clin Med, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.
    Voelker, Uwe
    DZHK German Ctr Cardiovasc Res, Partner Site Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany;Univ Med Greifswald, Interfac Inst Genet & Funct Genom, Greifswald, Germany.
    Voors, Adriaan A.
    Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Sect Computat Biomed, Boston, MA 02118 USA.
    Wang, Xiaosong
    Novartis Inst Biomed Res, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Wareham, Nicholas J.
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Waterworth, Dawn
    GlaxoSmithKline, Human Genet, Collegeville, PA USA.
    Weeke, Peter E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Rigshosp, Dept Cardiol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Weiss, Raul
    Ohio State Univ, Med Ctr, Dept Internal Med, Div Cardiovasc Med, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Wiggins, Kerri L.
    Univ Washington, Dept Med, Seattle, WA USA.
    Xing, Heming
    Novartis Inst Biomed Res, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.
    GlaxoSmithKline, Human Genet, Collegeville, PA USA.
    Yu, Bing
    Univ Texas Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol Human Genet & Environm Sci, Houston, TX USA.
    Zannad, Faiez
    Univ Lorraine, CHU Nancy, INSERM, F-54500 Nancy, France;Inst Lorrain Coeur & Vaisseaux, INI CRCT F CRIN, F-54500 Nancy, France.
    Zhao, Jing Hua
    Univ Cambridge, Sch Clin Med, Inst Metab Sci, MRC Epidemiol Unit, Cambridge CB2 0QQ, England.
    Hemingway, Harry
    UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England;UCL, Inst Hlth Informat, London, England;UCL, Hlth Data Res UK London, London, England;Univ Glasgow, BHF Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Samani, Nilesh J.
    Univ Leicester, Dept Cardiovasc Sci, Leicester, Leics, England;Glenfield Hosp, NIHR Leicester Biomed Res Ctr, Leicester, Leics, England.
    McMurray, John J. V.
    Univ Glasgow, BHF Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Yang, Jian
    Univ Queensland, Inst Mol Biosci, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia.
    Visscher, Peter M.
    Univ Queensland, Inst Mol Biosci, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia;Univ Queensland, Queensland Brain Inst, Brisbane, Qld 4072, Australia.
    Newton-Cheh, Christopher
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Ctr Human Genet Res, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Malarstig, Anders
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Solna, Cardiovasc Med Unit, Stockholm, Sweden;Pfizer Worldwide Res & Dev, 1 Portland St, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Holm, Hilma
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Lubitz, Steven A.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiac Arrhythmia Serv, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Sattar, Naveed
    Univ Glasgow, BHF Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Glasgow, Lanark, Scotland.
    Holmes, Michael V.
    Univ Oxford, Med Res Council, Populat Hlth Res Unit, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Big Data Inst, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Clin Trial Serv Unit, Oxford, England;Univ Oxford, Big Data Inst, Nuffield Dept Populat Hlth, Epidemiol Studies Unit, Oxford, England;Oxford Univ Hosp, Oxford Biomed Res Ctr, Natl Inst Hlth Res, Oxford, England.
    Cappola, Thomas P.
    Univ Penn, Perelman Sch Med, Penn Cardiovasc Inst, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Asselbergs, Folkert W.
    UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England;UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England;Univ Utrecht, Univ Med Ctr Utrecht, Div Heart & Lungs, Dept Cardiol, Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Hingorani, Aroon D.
    UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England;UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England.
    Kuchenbaecker, Karoline
    UCL, Div Psychiat, London W1T 7NF, England;UCL, Genet Inst, London WC1E 6BT, England.
    Ellinor, Patrick T.
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiovasc Res Ctr, Boston, MA 02114 USA;Massachusetts Gen Hosp, Cardiac Arrhythmia Serv, Boston, MA 02114 USA.
    Lang, Chim C.
    Univ Dundee, Ninewells Hosp & Med Sch, Div Mol & Clin Med, Dundee DD1 9SY, Scotland.
    Stefansson, Kari
    Amgen Inc, deCODE Genet, Sturlugata 8, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland;Univ Iceland, Dept Med, Fac Med, Saemundargata 2, IS-101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Smith, J. Gustav
    Broad Inst MIT & Harvard, Program Med & Populat Genet, Cambridge, MA USA;Lund Univ, Dept Cardiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden;Lund Univ, Wallenberg Ctr Mol Med, Lund, Sweden;Lund Univ, Ctr Diabet, Lund, Sweden.
    Vasan, Ramachandran S.
    NHLBI, Framingham, MA USA;Boston Univ Framingham Heart Study, Framingham, MA USA;Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Sect Cardiol, Boston, MA 02118 USA;Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Sect Prevent Med, Boston, MA 02118 USA;Boston Univ, Sch Med, Dept Med, Sect Epidemiol, Boston, MA 02118 USA;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Med, Sect Cardiol, Boston, MA USA;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Med, Sect Prevent Med, Boston, MA USA;Boston Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Med, Sect Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Swerdlow, Daniel I.
    UCL, Inst Cardiovasc Sci, London, England.
    Lumbers, R. Thomas
    UCL, British Heart Fdn Res Accelerator, London, England;UCL, Inst Hlth Informat, London, England;UCL, Hlth Data Res UK London, London, England;St Bartholomews Hosp, Barts Heart Ctr, London, England.
    Abecasis, Goncalo
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Backman, Joshua
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Bai, Xiaodong
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Balasubramanian, Suganthi
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Banerjee, Nilanjana
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Baras, Aris
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Barnard, Leland
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Beechert, Christina
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Blumenfeld, Andrew
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Cantor, Michael
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Chai, Yating
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Coppola, Giovanni
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Damask, Amy
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Dewey, Frederick
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Economides, Aris
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Eom, Gisu
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Forsythe, Caitlin
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Fuller, Erin D.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Gu, Zhenhua
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Gurski, Lauren
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Guzzardo, Paloma M.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Habegger, Lukas
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Hahn, Young
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Hawes, Alicia
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    van Hout, Cristopher
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Jones, Marcus B.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Khalid, Shareef
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Lattari, Michael
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Li, Alexander
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Lin, Nan
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Liu, Daren
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Lopez, Alexander
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Manoochehri, Kia
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Marchini, Jonathan
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Marcketta, Anthony
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Maxwell, Evan K.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    McCarthy, Shane
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Mitnaul, Lyndon J.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    O'Dushlaine, Colm
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Overton, John D.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Padilla, Maria Sotiropoulos
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Paulding, Charles
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Penn, John
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Pradhan, Manasi
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Reid, Jeffrey G.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Schleicher, Thomas D.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Schurmann, Claudia
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Shuldiner, Alan
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Staples, Jeffrey C.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Sun, Dylan
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Toledo, Karina
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Ulloa, Ricardo H.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Widom, Louis
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Wolf, Sarah E.
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Yadav, Ashish
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Ye, Bin
    Regeneron Genet Ctr, 777 Old Saw Mill River Rd, Tarrytown, NY 10591 USA.
    Genome-wide association and Mendelian randomisation analysis provide insights into the pathogenesis of heart failure2020In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 11, no 1, article id 163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure (HF) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. A small proportion of HF cases are attributable to monogenic cardiomyopathies and existing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have yielded only limited insights, leaving the observed heritability of HF largely unexplained. We report results from a GWAS meta-analysis of HF comprising 47,309 cases and 930,014 controls. Twelve independent variants at 11 genomic loci are associated with HF, all of which demonstrate one or more associations with coronary artery disease (CAD), atrial fibrillation, or reduced left ventricular function, suggesting shared genetic aetiology. Functional analysis of non-CAD-associated loci implicate genes involved in cardiac development (MYOZ1, SYNPO2L), protein homoeostasis (BAG3), and cellular senescence (CDKN1A). Mendelian randomisation analysis supports causal roles for several HF risk factors, and demonstrates CAD-independent effects for atrial fibrillation, body mass index, and hypertension. These findings extend our knowledge of the pathways underlying HF and may inform new therapeutic strategies.

  • Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Geant4 Monte Carlo calculations of gamma- and neutron flux and energy deposition in water outside the PWR 17x17 nuclear fuel assembly BT012019Data set
    Abstract [en]

    Using the Geant4 Monte Carlo framework, the flux of radiation emitted from the used nuclear fuel assembly BT01 has been estimated. The emission energy spectra for photons and neutrons calculated using SCALE for this PWR 17x17 fuel assembly were used as source for the radiation transport. The fuel assembly was modelled with the fuel rods emersed in a universe comprised of water. The photon and neutron flux and energy deposition from the source in a plane at the centre of the fuel assembly were calculated.

    This dataset contains the raw data files produced by the calculations.

  • Älvebratt, Linn
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Johansson, Nadja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Education.
    Pojkars och flickors skolprestationer inom berättande texter: En granskning av bedömningarna från nationella provet delprov F2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie syftar till att undersöka om lärares bedömning av texter skrivna av pojkar och flickor, inom den berättande genren på det nationella provet år 2015/2016 i svenska delprov F skiljer sig kvalitetsmässigt och hur genus påverkar lärarens bedömning. Vidare syftar studien till att undersöka hur genren berättande text används av pojkar och flickor. Detta undersöks genom två olika analyser, en utifrån bedömningsanvisningarna för nationella provet 2015/2016 samt genom en genreanalys. Det material som analyserats är 52 elevtexter från delprov F, 26 texter från pojkar och 26 från flickor. Analysen utifrån bedömningsanvisningarna delas in i tre kategorier där samtliga elevtexter placerats in i de olika kategorierna. Genreanalysen utgår från två genrer inom berättelse familjen, personligt återgivande genre och narrativ genre. Genusperspektivet och genrepedagogiken är studiens teoretiska utgångspunkter. Genusperspektivet används för att förklara orsaker och samband till att flickor och pojkar presterar olika i skolan. Resultatet visar att det råder skillnader i lärares bedömningar av eleverna beroende på deras kön, att flickor bedöms generösare än pojkar. Samt att det råder föreställningar om att flicktexter är bättre kvalitetsmässigt än pojktexter. Ur ett genrepedagogiskt perspektiv framkommer det att en möjlig orsak är att flickor följer berättelsestrukturen i större utsträckning då den berättande genren anses som icke-maskulin. Det är pojkar som oftast använder sig av den personligt återgivande genren medan flickor oftast skriver inom den narrativa genren. I studien framkommer det att elever som skriver inom den narrativa genren i större utsträckning når kravnivån än de elever som skrivit inom den personligt återgivande genren.

  • Johansson, Sanna
    et al.
    Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Samuelsson, Sofia
    Institutionen för pedagogik, didaktik och utbildningsstudier.
    Nationella prov + läromedel + förmågor = Sant?2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med studien har varit att genom att analysera läromedel och nationella prov belysa hur ett läromedel och nationella proven i svenska årskurs 3 förhåller sig till läroplanens formuleringar om förmågor i svenskämnet för årskurs 3. Vidare har studien syftat till att undersöka huruvida samstämmighet eller avsaknad av samstämmighet återfinns mellan läroplanen i svenska årskurs 3, nationella prov och läromedel. Syftet mynnade ut i tre frågeställningar som löd: Vilka förmågor i svenska åk 3 prövas och prövas inte i de nationella proven och ett läromedel i svenska för årskurs 3? Hur prövas förmågorna i svenska åk 3 i de nationella proven och hur förekommer förmågorna i ett läromedel i svenska för årskurs 3? På vilket sätt finns det eller finns det inte samstämmighet mellan de nationella proven i svenska, ett läromedel i svenska och kursplanens förmågor i svenska för  årskurs 3? I analysen av läromedlet Forma språket och de nationella proven användes en kvalitativ innehållsanalys. Analysen gjordes med hjälp av en tabell där meningsbärande enheter, underkategori och tema fylldes i. Den teori som användes i studien var constructive alignment med fokus på John Biggs samstämmighetsmodell. Modellen inkluderar tre faktorer för att skapa samstämmighet. De faktorer som användes i studien var hämtade från samstämmighetsmodellen men benämndes i studien som “de fem förmågorna”, “läromedel” och “nationella proven”. Resultatet visade på att alla fem förmågorna prövas i läromedlet medan fyra förmågor prövas i nationella proven. Förmågan som inte prövas i de nationella proven är att söka information. Sammanfattningsvis prövas och förekommer förmågorna i nationella proven och läromedlet genom sju olika kategorier som är högläsningsstrukturer, läsförståelse, metakunskap, textens innehåll, textens form, stödstrukturer och söka information. Resultatet visade även på att det fanns samstämmighet mellan läromedlet, nationella proven och förmågorna då hänsyn tas till förmågorna i båda materialen samt att läromedlet förbereder eleverna inför nationella proven då mycket av det som förekommer i läromedlet prövas i nationella proven.

  • Jammal, Salma
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Skilsmässor bland framgångsrika kvinnor: En kvalitativ studie om heterosexuella pars förhållanden när kvinnan har högre ekonomi2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna uppsats presenterar framgångsrika heterosexuella kvinnor som har i någon form separerats eller upplevd skilsmässa. Uppsatsen studerar vad orsaken av separationen kan bero på, då flera studier menar att chansen för skilsmässa hos par med en framgångsrik kvinna ökar, desto mer framgång en kvinna blir eller har en högre arbetsinkomst än hennes partner. Uppsatsen lyfter upp tre frågeställningar som fokuserar på dynamiken i relationen, kvinnan syn på följden av hennes framgång och vad hon hävdar är orsaken för separation. Uppsatsen använder en kvalitativ metod genom att intervjua sju framgångsrika kvinnor som har separerat från sina partners. Detta för att få en närmare bild på hur framgång hos kvinnan påverkar dynamiken och maktordningen i hennes relation samt hur konflikter uppstår. Intervjun består av semistrukturerade intervjufrågor, eftersom den upplevdes mest lämpligt till denna studie. Vidare använder uppsatsen den hermeneutiska ansatsen, som bland annat fokuserar på att tolka och finna dolda sammanhang. Uppsatsen fördjupar sig i kvinnornas syn på patriarkal, tradition och samhällsnormer, för att finna orsak till skilsmässa i deras liv. Uppsatsen belyser flera aspekter som kan vara orsaken till skilsmässa. Flera av respondenterna menar att; det fortfarande anses vara ovanligt när en kvinna lägger flera timmar på arbete som är utanför hemmet och att det uppstår konkurrens mellan paren. Slutsatsen med denna uppsats är att medan stora framsteg har uppnåtts för att få kvinnan mer accepterad på arbetsmarknaden, så är synen på henne som underordnad i privatlivet fortfarande oförändrat på grund av kultur och gamla traditioner.  

  • Wallin, Johan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Jatko Nilsson, Tom
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Business Studies.
    Annonsering av nyemissioner: En jämförelse mellan avvikelseavkastningen vid riktade- och företrädesemissioner samt förklarande faktorer2020Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie undersöker om det finns en skillnad i kortsiktig avvikelseavkastning mellan riktade och företrädesemissioner vid annonsering av nyemission. Utöver det undersöks även faktorer som kan påverka avvikelseavkastningen. Dessa faktorer är syftet med emissionen och emissionsbeloppet. Det som motiverar studien är motsägande resultat i tidigare forskning och en brist av undersökningar på den svenska marknaden. Studien genomförs på svenska bolag listade på Nasdaq Stockholm under åren 2017-2019 och omfattar totalt 90 nyemissioner. Metoden som används är en eventstudie och regressionsanalys. Studiens resultat visar att både företrädesemissioner och riktade emissioner har en negativ avvikelseavkastning vid annonsering av nyemission. Företrädesemissioner har en mer negativ avvikelseavkastning än riktade emissioner, men skillnaden kan bero på andra faktorer än emissionstyp. Syftet med emissionen påverkar avvikelseavkastningen negativt vid defensiva syften och positivt vid offensiva syften. Emissionsbeloppet har en negativ påverkan på avvikelseavkastningen. Resultaten stämmer till stor del överens med tidigare forskning.

  • Hahne, Hampus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Electrical Engineering, Electricity.
    Improvement of a load circuitfor power consumption within ananogrid application2020Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The transistion from fossile fuels to renewable energy goes in a rapidpace. A way to contribute to this process is the nanogrid applicationwith renewable energy sources. A prototyp of this application islocated on the roof of house 8 at Ångström laboratory. The ambition isto connect a wind power source to a battery bank via a MPPT device.Since the MPPT have limitations is a load circuit for power consumptionnecessary, which in its present form are not functional. Improvementsare made for the load circuit togheter with computional simulations.Necessary experimental measurements are done to evaluate itsfunctionality. The experimental results shows alignment with simulationand the load circuit can be inserted into the nanogrid system. Theinteraction between the MPPT device and the load circuit and indeed thewhole system is left as a future work.

  • Nadifa, Ali
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Jämställdhet -mål eller medel?: En studie av legitimeringen av jämställdhet i Sverigedemokraternas politik2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis