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  • Atak, Haluk
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hacetteppe University.
    Anastasiadis, Anastasios
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jansson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Elter, Zsolt
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Andersson Sundén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Holcombe, Scott
    3Institute for Energy Technology – OECD Halden Reactor Project.
    Andersson, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    The degradation of gamma-ray mass attenuation of UO2 and MOX fuel with nuclear burnup2019In: Article in journal (Refereed)
  • Stsiapanava, Alena
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology.
    Selmer, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology.
    Crystal structure of ErmE - 23S rRNA methyltransferase in macrolide resistance2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 14607Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pathogens often receive antibiotic resistance genes through horizontal gene transfer from bacteria that produce natural antibiotics. ErmE is a methyltransferase (MTase) from Saccharopolyspora erythraea that dimethylates A2058 in 23S rRNA using S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) as methyl donor, protecting the ribosomes from macrolide binding. To gain insights into the mechanism of macrolide resistance, the crystal structure of ErmE was determined to 1.75 Å resolution. ErmE consists of an N-terminal Rossmann-like α/ß catalytic domain and a C-terminal helical domain. Comparison with ErmC' that despite only 24% sequence identity has the same function, reveals highly similar catalytic domains. Accordingly, superposition with the catalytic domain of ErmC' in complex with SAM suggests that the cofactor binding site is conserved. The two structures mainly differ in the C-terminal domain, which in ErmE contains a longer loop harboring an additional 310 helix that interacts with the catalytic domain to stabilize the tertiary structure. Notably, ErmE also differs from ErmC' by having long disordered extensions at its N- and C-termini. A C-terminal disordered region rich in arginine and glycine is also a present in two other MTases, PikR1 and PikR2, which share about 30% sequence identity with ErmE and methylate the same nucleotide in 23S rRNA.

  • Maier, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Gus'kov, Andrej
    Новые данные о переводчике Посольского приказа Леонтии Гроссе2019In: Переводчики и переводы в России конца XVI – начала XVIII столетий: Mатериалы Международной научной конференции (Москва, 12–13 сентября 2019 г.) / [ed] S. M. Shamin, Moskva, 2019, p. 45-53Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • Maier, Ingrid
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Languages, Department of Modern Languages, Slavic Languages.
    Rusakovskij, Oleg
    Institut rossijskoj istorii.
    «Книга лошадиного учения» Антуана де Плювинеля в русском переводе 1670 г.2019In: Переводчики и переводы в России конца XVI – начала XVIII столетий: Материалы Международной научной конференции (Москва, 12–13 сентября 2019 г.) / [ed] Shamin S. M., Moskva, 2019, p. 70-76Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • Morgan, Rachael
    et al.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Sundin, Josefin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology. Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Finnoen, Mette H.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Dresler, Gunnar
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Vendrell, MarcMartinez
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway;Univ Barcelona, Dept Biol, E-08028 Barcelona, Spain.
    Dey, Arpita
    Univ North Bengal, Dept Zool, Siliguri 734013, W Bengal, India.
    Sarkar, Kripan
    Rainbow Ornamental Fish Farm, Jalpaiguri 735101, W Bengal, India.
    Jutfelt, Fredrik
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Dept Biol, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway.
    Are model organisms representative for climate change research?: Testing thermal tolerance in wild and laboratory zebrafish populations2019In: Conservation Physiology, E-ISSN 2051-1434, Vol. 7, no 1, article id coz036Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Model organisms can be useful for studying climate change impacts, but it is unclear whether domestication to laboratory conditions has altered their thermal tolerance and therefore how representative of wild populations they are. Zebrafish in the wild live in fluctuating thermal environments that potentially reach harmful temperatures. In the laboratory, zebrafish have gone through four decades of domestication and adaptation to stable optimal temperatures with few thermal extremes. If maintaining thermal tolerance is costly or if genetic traits promoting laboratory fitness at optimal temperature differ from genetic traits for high thermal tolerance, the thermal tolerance of laboratory zebrafish could be hypothesized to be lower than that of wild zebrafish. Furthermore, very little is known about the thermal environment of wild zebrafish and how close to their thermal limits they live. Here, we compared the acute upper thermal tolerance (critical thermal maxima; CTmax) of wild zebrafish measured on-site in West Bengal, India, to zebrafish at three laboratory acclimation/domestication levels: wild-caught, F-1 generation wild-caught and domesticated laboratory AB-WT line. We found that in the wild, CTmax increased with increasing site temperature. Yet at the warmest site, zebrafish lived very close to their thermal limit, suggesting that they may currently encounter lethal temperatures. In the laboratory, acclimation temperature appeared to have a stronger effect on CTmax than it did in the wild. The fish in the wild also had a 0.85-1.01 degrees C lower CTmax compared to all laboratory populations. This difference between laboratory-held and wild populations shows that environmental conditions can affect zebrafish's thermal tolerance. However, there was no difference in CTmax between the laboratory-held populations regardless of the domestication duration. This suggests that thermal tolerance is maintained during domestication and highlights that experiments using domesticated laboratory-reared model species can be appropriate for addressing certain questions on thermal tolerance and global warming impacts.

  • Pinheiro Dutra Rulli, Mayra
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Biology Education Centre.
    Changes in nutrient levels influence freshwater microbial communities and their potential for chitin degradation2018Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 30 credits / 45 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Microorganisms are of great importance for the large scale elemental cycles and overallfunctioning of most natural ecosystems, and this also includes the ecology and maintenance offreshwater resources. Anthropogenic actions as well as climate change has greatly affectedfreshwaters and it is therefore important to understand how microorganisms react to suchenvironmental changes. I investigated how one such pressure, increased nutrient levels,influenced freshwater microbial communities and their potential to degrade the globallyabundant biopolymer chitin. To assess the effects of changed nutrient levels on functionalsubcommunities within the natural microbiota, I established a collection of mixed culturesoriginating from Lake Erken and two mesocosms from the same lake subjected to either highor low nutrient amendments. I observed that higher nutrient addition greatly increasedbacterial cell numbers in the source community. However, for the emerging mixed culturesgrowing on chitin as a substrate, those originating from the “Low” nutrient amendmentmesocosm treatment featured higher cell growth potential compared to cultures originatingfrom the “High” ones or inoculated with the natural lake water. Moreover, mixed culturesfrom the mesocosms presented higher chitinase extracellular enzymatic activity compared tothe lake cultures. Interestingly, “High” and “Low” mesocosm cultures were quite constrainedin bacterial growth response (low variance for the respective treatment) while the growthpotential in cultures from the lake were much more diverse, indicating a higher degree ofpatchiness and subcommunities with variable ability to profit from chitin as a substrate.Ongoing work will assess how individual microbial lineages react to variable nutrient levelsand how the composition of less diverse but fully functional subcommunities profiting fromchitin will change under such conditions.

  • Passaro, Davide
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Finiteness of Complete Intersection Calabi Yau Threefolds2019Student paper other, 10 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Of many modern constructions in geometry Calabi Yau manifolds hold special relevance in theoretical physics. These manifolds naturally arise from the study of compactification of certain string theories. In particular Calabi Yau manifolds of dimension three, commonly known as threefolds, are widely used for compactifications of heterotic string theories. Among the many constructions, that of complete intersection Calabi Yau manifolds (CICY) is generally regarded to be the simplest. Furthermore, CICY threefolds have been proven to exist only in finite number. In the following text CICY manifolds will be analyzed, with particular attention to threefolds. A general description of some of their topological quantities and their calculation is offered. Lastly, a proof of the finiteness of CICY threefolds is given.

  • Public defence: 2019-11-06 09:15 Å4101, Uppsala
    Németh, Brigitta
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Chemistry, Department of Chemistry - Ångström.
    The birth of the hydrogenase: Studying the mechanism of [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The [FeFe] hydrogenases are ancient metalloenzymes that catalyse the reversible interconversion between protons, electrons and molecular hydrogen. Despite the large structural variability within the [FeFe] hydrogenase family, the active site, the so called “H-cluster” is present in every representative. The H-cluster is composed by a four cysteine coordinated [4Fe4S] cluster, ligated via a shared cysteine to a biologically unique [2Fe] subsite decorated with CO and CN ligands and an azadithiolate bridging ligand. The biosynthesis of the [2Fe] subsite requires a maturation machinery, composed of at least three maturase enzymes, denoted HydG, HydE, and HydF. HydE and HydG are members of the radical SAM enzyme family, and are responsible for the construction of a pre-catalyst on HydF. This pre-catalyst is finally transferred from HydF to HydA, where it becomes part of the H-cluster.

    Recently, a pioneer study combined synthetic chemistry and biochemistry in order to create semi-synthetic HydF proteins. Synthetic mimics of the [2Fe] subsite were introduced to HydF, and this resulting semi-synthetic HydF was used to activate the unmatured hydrogenase (apo-HydA). This technique ushered in a new era in [FeFe] hydrogenase research.

    This thesis work is devoted to a deeper understanding of H-cluster formation and [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation, and this process is studied using standard molecular biological and biochemical techniques, and EPR, FTIR, XAS and GEMMA spectroscopic techniques combined with this new type of chemistry mentioned above. EPR spectroscopy was employed to verify the construction of a semi-synthetic [FeFe] hydrogenase inside living cells. The addition of a synthetic complex to cell cultures expressing apo-HydA resulted in a rhombic EPR signal, attributable to an Hox-like species. Moreover, the assembly mechanism of the H-cluster was probed in vitro using XAS, EPR, and FTIR spectroscopy. We verified with all three techniques that the Hox-CO state is formed on a time-scale of seconds, and this state slowly turns into the catalytically active Hox via release of a CO ligand. Furthermore, a semi-synthetic form of the HydF protein from Clostridium acetobutylicum was prepared and characterized in order to prove that such semi-synthetic forms of HydF are biologically relevant. Finally,GEMMA measurements were performed to elucidate the quaternary structure of the HydF-HydA interaction, revealing that dimeric HydF is interacting with a monomeric HydA. However, mutant HydF proteins were prepared, lacking the dimerization (as well as its GTPase) domain, and these severely truncated forms of HydF was found to still retain the capacity to both harbor the pre-catalyst as well as transferring it to apo-HydA. These observations highlight the multi-functionality of HydF, where different domains are critical in different steps of the maturation, that is the dimerization and GTPase domain are rather involved in pre-catalyst assembly rather than its transfer to apo-HydA.

    List of papers
    1. InVivo EPR Characterization of Semi-Synthetic [FeFe] Hydrogenases
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>InVivo EPR Characterization of Semi-Synthetic [FeFe] Hydrogenases
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    2018 (English)In: Angewandte Chemie International Edition, ISSN 1433-7851, E-ISSN 1521-3773, Vol. 57, no 10, p. 2596-2599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    EPR spectroscopy reveals the formation of two different semi-synthetic hydrogenases invivo. [FeFe] hydrogenases are metalloenzymes that catalyze the interconversion of molecular hydrogen and protons. The reaction is catalyzed by the H-cluster, consisting of a canonical iron-sulfur cluster and an organometallic [2Fe] subsite. It was recently shown that the enzyme can be reconstituted with synthetic cofactors mimicking the composition of the [2Fe] subsite, resulting in semi-synthetic hydrogenases. Herein, we employ EPR spectroscopy to monitor the formation of two such semi-synthetic enzymes in whole cells. The study provides the first spectroscopic characterization of semi-synthetic hydrogenases invivo, and the observation of two different oxidized states of the H-cluster under intracellular conditions. Moreover, these findings underscore how synthetic chemistry can be a powerful tool for manipulation and examination of the hydrogenase enzyme under invivo conditions.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2018
    Keywords
    [FeFe] hydrogenase, artificial enzymes, EPR spectroscopy, metalloenzymes
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348975 (URN)10.1002/anie.201710740 (DOI)000426252400010 ()29334424 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 21-2014-5670Swedish Research Council for Environment, Agricultural Sciences and Spatial Planning, 213-2014-880EU, European Research Council, 714102
    Available from: 2018-05-03 Created: 2018-05-03 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
    2. H-cluster assembly in [FeFe]-hydrogenase tracked by electron paramagnetic resonance, infrared, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>H-cluster assembly in [FeFe]-hydrogenase tracked by electron paramagnetic resonance, infrared, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Biophysics
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393551 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
    3. Monitoring H-cluster assembly using a semi-synthetic HydF protein
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Monitoring H-cluster assembly using a semi-synthetic HydF protein
    2019 (English)In: Dalton Transactions, ISSN 1477-9226, E-ISSN 1477-9234, Vol. 48, no 18, p. 5978-5986Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The [FeFe] hydrogenase enzyme interconverts protons and molecular hydrogen with remarkable efficiency. The reaction is catalysed by a unique metallo-cofactor denoted as the H-cluster containing an organometallic dinuclear Fe component, the [2Fe] subsite. The HydF protein delivers a precursor of the [2Fe] subsite to the apo-[FeFe] hydrogenase, thus completing the H-cluster and activating the enzyme. Herein we generate a semi-synthetic form of HydF by loading it with a synthetic low valent dinuclear Fe complex. We show that this semi-synthetic protein is practically indistinguishable from the native protein, and utilize this form of HydF to explore the mechanism of H-cluster assembly. More specifically, we show that transfer of the precatalyst from HydF to the hydrogenase enzyme results in the release of CO, underscoring that the pre-catalyst is a four CO species when bound to HydF. Moreover, we propose that an electron transfer reaction occurs during H-cluster assembly, resulting in an oxidation of the [2Fe] subsite with concomitant reduction of the [4Fe4S] cluster present on the HydF protein.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2019
    National Category
    Theoretical Chemistry Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390520 (URN)10.1039/c8dt04294b (DOI)000472449300013 ()30632592 (PubMedID)
    Funder
    Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-5670Swedish Research Council Formas, 213-2014-880EU, European Research Council, 714102
    Available from: 2019-08-14 Created: 2019-08-14 Last updated: 2019-09-18Bibliographically approved
    4. Studying [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation and the nature of the HydF-HydA interaction
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Studying [FeFe] hydrogenase maturation and the nature of the HydF-HydA interaction
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    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393550 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-09-24 Created: 2019-09-24 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
  • Ahmed, Elajez
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Industrial Engineering & Management.
    Global Antibiotics Supply Sector, Structure and Main Strategies2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The discovery of antibiotics in the early 1900s saved millions of lives; nevertheless, in recent years there has been an antibiotics shortage in the European market. In the effort to solve this problem, and as part of the PLATINEA project, this research focuses on understanding the global antibiotics market structure and the main strategies used by companies within the market. 

    Through archival studies, including online reports, company websites, and companies' annual reports, an exploratory study has been conducted. 

    The antibiotics supply chain progresses through several stages including delivering raw materials, manufacturing APIs, manufacturing the product and ultimately distributing the drug through market authorization holders. 

    This research identifies the main company strategies, including cost leadership, differentiation, internationalization, product range breadth, and acquisition. Four main strategic groups are identified, in which companies tend to apply the same strategies in the antibiotics supply market.

  • Betts, Marissa J.
    et al.
    Univ New England, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Armidale, NSW, Australia; Northwest Univ, Early Life Inst, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China; Northwest Univ, Dept Geol, State Key Lab Continental Dynam, Xian, Shaanxi, Peoples R China.
    Claybourn, Thomas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, Palaeobiology. Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Brock, Glenn A.
    Macquarie Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Jago, James B.
    Univ South Australia, Sch Nat & Built Environm, Adelaide, SA, Australia.
    Skovsted, Christian B.
    Swedish Museum Nat Hist, Dept Palaeobiol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Paterson, John R.
    Univ New England, Sch Environm & Rural Sci, Palaeosci Res Ctr, Armidale, NSW, Australia.
    Shelly fossils from the lower Cambrian White Point Conglomerate, Kangaroo Island, South Australia2019In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 489-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The lower Cambrian (Series 2) White Point Conglomerate (WPC) on Kangaroo Island, South Australia contains exotic clasts representing a diverse array of lithologies, including metamorphics, chert, sandstone, and abundant carbonates, notably archaeocyath-rich bioclastic limestone. Acetic acid digestion of the WPC bioclastic limestone clasts reveals a diverse shelly fauna. This assemblage includes abundant organophosphatic brachiopods such as Cordatia erinae Brock and Claybourn gen. et sp. nov., Curdus pararaensis, Eodicellomus elkaniformiis, Eohadrotreta sp. cf. E. zhenbaensis, Eoobolus sp., Kyrshabaktella davidii, and Schizopholis yorkensis. Additional shelly taxa include the solenopleurid trilobite Trachoparia? sp., the tommotiids Dailyatia odyssei, Dailyatia decobruta Betts sp. nov., Kelanella sp., and Lapworthella fasciculata, spines of the bradoriid arthropod Mongolitubulus squamifer, and several problematica, such as Stoibostrombus crenulatus and a variety of tubular forms. The upper age limit for the WPC is constrained by biostratigraphic data from the overlying Marsden Sandstone and Emu Bay Shale, which are no younger than the Pararaia janeae Trilobite Zone (Cambrian Series 2, Stage 4). The shelly fossil assemblage from the WPC limestone clasts indicates an upper Dailyatia odyssei Zone (= Pararaia tatei to lower P. janeae trilobite zones), equivalent to the Atdabanian–early Botoman of the Siberian scheme. This contrasts with the previously suggested late Botoman age for the limestone clasts, based on the diverse archaeocyath assemblage. The minor age difference between the WPC and its fossiliferous limestone clasts suggests relatively rapid reworking of biohermal buildups during tectonically-active phases of deposition in the Stansbury Basin.

  • Jansson, Christer
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Lung- allergy- and sleep research.
    Benhaddi, Hicham
    Teva Pharmaceut, Antwerp, Belgium.
    Törnblom, Michael
    IQVIA, Solna, Sweden.
    Uhde, Milica
    IQVIA, Solna, Sweden.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine.
    Real-world evidence effect of budesonide+formoterol Spiromax on patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Sweden2019In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1660565Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objective: Despite improved asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management, treatment remains inadequate in many patients. Understanding the impact of current treatment in settings outside of controlled trials would add important clinical decision-making information. This study evaluated costs and outcomes associated with budesonide+formoterol (BF) Spiromax® initiation among real-world Swedish patients with asthma and/or COPD.

    Methods:In this retrospective observational analysis of Swedish patients with asthma and/or COPD, data were collected from the National Patient Register, National Dispensed Drug Register, and Cause of Death Register 1 year before and after initiating BF Spiromax (index date). Outcomes included exacerbation occurrence, treatment patterns, inpatient care, and healthcare costs.

    Results: The study included 576 patients (asthma: 51.6%; COPD: 32.8%; and asthma and COPD: 15.6%). Following BF Spiromax initiation in asthma patients, there were significant decreases in exacerbations (41.1% to 30.0%; P < 0.001), mean comorbidity-related inpatient visits (0.5 to 0.2; P < 0.001), and inpatient days (1.9 to 0.6; P = 0.006), and a trend toward fewer asthma-related inpatient visits (mean, 0.2 to 0.1; P = 0.056) and asthma-related inpatient days (mean, 0.7 to 0.3; P = 0.060). Increased inpatient utilization was observed in patients with COPD or both diagnoses. All-cause and asthma-/COPD-related medication costs decreased in all groups.

    Conclusions: After switching to BF Spiromax, asthma patients had fewer exacerbations and hospital visits versus the prior year and COPD patients showed an increase in all-cause and COPD-related healthcare resource utilization. All-cause and asthma-/COPD-related medication costs decreased in all groups after switching to BF Spiromax.

  • Warensjö Lemming, Eva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Stattin, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Molecular epidemiology. Harvard Med Sch, Prevent Med Div, Brigham & Womens Hosp, Boston, MA USA; Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Nutr, Boston, MA USA.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Clinical Epidemiology.
    Elmsfahl, Solve
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Div Geriatr Med, Lund, Sweden.
    Larsson, Susanna C.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Div Nutr Epidemiol, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics.
    Dietary Pattern Specific Protein Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study in 2 Independent Cohorts2019In: Journal of the American Heart Association: Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease, ISSN 2047-9980, E-ISSN 2047-9980, Vol. 8, no 11, article id e011860Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Mechanisms related to the influence of diet on the development of cardiovascular disease are not entirely understood, and protein biomarkers may help to understand these pathways. Studies of biomarkers identified with multiplex proteomic methods and dietary patterns are largely lacking.

    Methods and Results: Dietary patterns were generated through principal component analysis in 2 population‐based Swedish cohorts, the EpiHealth (EpiHealth study; n=20 817 men and women) and the SMCC (Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical [n=4650 women]). A set of 184 protein cardiovascular disease biomarkers were measured with 2 high‐throughput, multiplex immunoassays. Discovery and replication multivariable linear regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between the principal component analysis–generated dietary patterns and the cardiovascular disease–associated protein biomarkers, first in the EpiHealth (n=2240) and then in the Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical. Four main dietary patterns were identified in the EpiHealth, and 3 patterns were identified in the Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical. The healthy and the Western/traditional patterns were found in both cohorts. In the EpiHealth, 57 protein biomarkers were associated with 3 of the dietary patterns, and 41 of these associations were replicated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort Clinical, with effect estimates ranging from 0.057 to 0.083 (P‐value range, 5.0×10−2–1.4×10−9) for each SD increase in the relative protein concentration. Independent associations were established between dietary patterns and the 21 protein biomarkers. Two proteins, myeloperoxidase and resistin, were associated with both the healthy and the light meal pattern but in opposite directions.

    Conclusions: We have discovered and replicated independent associations between dietary patterns and 21 biomarkers linked to cardiovascular disease, which have a role in the pathways related to inflammation, endothelial and immune function, cell adhesion, and metabolism

  • Persson-Sjödin, Emma
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hernlund, Elin
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pfau, Thilo
    Royal Vet Coll, Dept Clin Sci & Serv, Hatfield, Herts, England.
    Andersen, Pia Haubro
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Clin Sci, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Forsström, Karin Holm
    Univ Anim Hosp, Equine Clin, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Rhodin, Marie
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Anat Physiol & Biochem, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Effect of meloxicam treatment on movement asymmetry in riding horses in training2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 8, article id e0221117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantitative gait analysis has revealed that a large proportion of horses in training, perceived as free from lameness by their owners, show movement asymmetries of equal magnitude to horses with mild clinical lameness. Whether these movement asymmetries are related to orthopaedic pain and/or pathology has yet to be further investigated. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine whether movement asymmetries in riding horses in training are affected by anti-inflammatory treatment with meloxicam. In a crossover design, horses were treated with meloxicam or placebo for four days respectively, with a 14-16 day washout period between treatments. Objective movement analysis utilising body mounted accelerometers was performed on a hard and a soft surface before and on day four of each treatment. A trial mean was calculated for the differences between the two vertical displacement minima and maxima of head (HDmin, HDmax) and pelvis (PDmin, PDmax) per stride. Horses (n = 66) with trial mean asymmetries greater than 6 mm for HDmin or HDmax, or more than 3 mm for PDmin or PDmax, at baseline were included. The difference before and after each treatment in the measured movement asymmetry was assessed with linear mixed models. Treatment with meloxicam did not significantly affect the movement asymmetry in any of the models applied (all p>0.30). These results raise new questions: are the movement asymmetries in riding horses in training simply expressions of biological variation or are they related to pain/dysfunction that is non-responsive to meloxicam treatment?

  • Roshanai, Afsaneh
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Janeslätt, Gunnel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Research in Disability and Habilitation. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, centrumbildningar mm, Center for Clinical Research Dalarna.
    Suzanne, White
    Suny Downstate Med Ctr, Brooklyn, NY USA.
    Kajsa, Lidstrom Holmqvist
    Örebro Univ, Fac Med & Hlth, Univ Hlth Care Res Ctr, Örebro, Sweden.
    Time management skills in relation to general self-efficacy and parental sense of competence in individuals with and without cognitive disabilities2019In: COGENT PSYCHOLOGY, ISSN 2331-1908, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 1655981Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to investigate to what extent time management skills are associated with general self-efficacy and parental sense of competence, and if there are any differences between individuals with and without cognitive disabilities in these aspects.

    Material and Methods: The study had a comparative cross-sectional design. Totally 86 individuals with cognitive disabilities (of whom 31 were parents), and 154 without disabilities (of whom 68 were parents) were included (N = 240). The Swedish versions of the Assessment of Time Management Skills (including time management, organisation & planning, and regulation of emotion subscales), General Self-Efficacy, and Parental Sense of Competence scale (including satisfaction, efficacy, and interest subscales) were used to collect data.

    Results: There were significant differences (p < .001) between individuals with and without cognitive disabilities in all three subscales of Assessment of Time Management Skills and in General Self-Efficacy. Overall, individuals with a cognitive disability scored lower than persons without cognitive disabilities.

    A significant difference was observed between parents in all three subscales of time management skills after controlling for age and education (p < .0005). Parents with cognitive disabilities, compared to parents without cognitive disability, scored significantly lower in all measured scales, except for the interest subscale. In parents with a cognitive disability, there was a significant correlation between all three subscales of Time Management Skills and satisfaction. Among parents without a cognitive disability there was a significant correlation between time management; and organisation & planning subscales; and efficacy, and between General Self-Efficacy and time management.

    Conclusions: Poor time management, planning and organisational skills, as well as a deficit in regulation of emotions may have a negative impact on general self-efficacy and parental sense of competence.

  • Pablo, H.
    et al.
    Amer Assoc Variable Star Observers, 49 Bay State Rd, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA.
    Shultz, Matthew E.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Univ Delaware, Dept Phys & Astron, 217 Sharp Lab, Newark, DE 19716 USA.
    Fuller, J.
    CALTECH, TAPIR, Walter Burke Inst Theoret Phys, Mailcode 350-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 USA;Univ Calif Santa Barbara, Kavli Inst Theoret Phys, Kohn Hall, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 USA.
    Wade, G. A.
    Royal Mil Coll Canada, Dept Phys & Space Sci, Kingston, ON K7K 7B4, Canada.
    Paunzen, E.
    Masaryk Univ, Dept Theoret Phys & Astrophys, Kotlarska 2, CZ-61137 Brno, Czech Republic.
    Mathis, S.
    Univ Paris Saclay, CEA, IRFU, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France;Univ Paris Diderot, CEA, CNRS, AIM,Sorbonne Paris Cite, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, France;Univ Paris, Observ Paris, PSL Univ, LESIA,CNRS,Sorbonne Univ, 5 Pl Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon, France.
    Le Bouquin, J. -B
    Pigulski, A.
    Uniwersytet Wroclawski, Inst Astron, Kopernika 11, PL-51622 Wroclaw, Poland.
    Handler, G.
    Polish Acad Sci, Ctr Astron M Kopernika, Bartycka 18, PL-00716 Warsaw, Poland.
    Alecian, E.
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, IPAG, F-38000 Grenoble, France.
    Kuschnig, R.
    Graz Univ Technol, Inst Commun Networks & Satellite Commun, Inffeldgasse 12, A-8010 Graz, Austria.
    Moffat, A. F. J.
    Univ Montreal, Dept Phys, CP 6128,Succ Ctr Ville, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada;Univ Montreal, CRAQ, CP 6128,Succ Ctr Ville, Montreal, PQ H3C 3J7, Canada.
    Neiner, C.
    Univ Paris, Observ Paris, PSL Univ, LESIA,CNRS,Sorbonne Univ, 5 Pl Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon, France.
    Popowicz, A.
    Silesian Tech Univ, Inst Automat Control, Akad 16, PL-44100 Gliwice, Poland.
    Rucinski, S.
    Univ Toronto, Dept Astron & Astrophys, 50 St George St, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4, Canada.
    Smolec, R.
    Nicolaus Copernicus Astron Ctr, Bartycka 18, PL-00716 Warsaw, Poland.
    Weiss, W.
    Univ Wien, Inst Astron, Turkenschanzstr 17, A-1180 Vienna, Austria.
    Zwintz, K.
    Univ Innsbruck, Inst Astro & Teilchenphys, Technikerstr 25-8, A-6020 Innsbruck, Austria.
    epsilon Lupi: measuring the heartbeat of a doubly magnetic massive binary with BRITE Constellation2019In: Monthly notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, ISSN 0035-8711, E-ISSN 1365-2966, Vol. 488, no 1, p. 64-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    epsilon Lupi A is a binary system consisting of two main-sequence early B-type stars Aa and Ab in a short period, moderately eccentric orbit. The close binary pair is the only doubly magnetic massive binary currently known. Using photometric data from the BRITE Constellation we identify a modest heartbeat variation. Combining the photometry with radial velocities of both components we determine a full orbital solution including empirical masses and radii. These results are compared with stellar evolution models as well as interferometry and the differences discussed. We also find additional photometric variability at several frequencies, finding it unlikely these frequencies can be caused by tidally excited oscillations. We do, however, determine that these signals are consistent with gravity mode pulsations typical for slowly pulsating B stars. Finally we discuss how the evolution of this system will be affected by magnetism, determining that tidal interactions will still be dominant.

  • Chafai, A.
    et al.
    Univ Moulay Ismail, Fac Sci, Phys Dept, LP2MS,Unite Associee,CNRST,URAC 08, BP 11201, Meknes, Morocco.
    Essaoudi, I.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Univ Moulay Ismail, Fac Sci, Phys Dept, LP2MS,Unite Associee,CNRST,URAC 08, BP 11201, Meknes, Morocco.
    Ainane, A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy. Univ Moulay Ismail, Fac Sci, Phys Dept, LP2MS,Unite Associee,CNRST,URAC 08, BP 11201, Meknes, Morocco;Max Planck Inst Phys Complexer Syst, Nothnitzer Str 38, D-01187 Dresden, Germany;U.
    Ahuja, Rajeev
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Materials Theory. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Nanotechnology and Functional Materials. Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Molecular and Condensed Matter Physics. Uppsala Univ, Dept Phys & Astron, Condensed MatterTheory Grp, S-75120 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Linear and nonlinear optical properties of donors inside a CdSe/ZnTe core/shell nanodot: Role of size modulation2019In: RESULTS IN PHYSICS, ISSN 2211-3797, Vol. 14, article id 102414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The optical absorption coefficient (OAC) and the refractive index (RI), related to a confined donor, were theoretically investigated by the mean of the density matrix formalism. In order to obtain the 1s - 1p donor transition energy a variational calculation, within the context of the effective-mass approach, was deployed. Our numerical results exhibit the possibility to modulate the electronic and optical properties of confined donors by tailoring the inner and outer radii of the core/shell heterodot. Further, we have obtained that the nanodot size shrinking leads, for very small values of core radius, to reduce the magnitude of the total absorption coefficient resonance peak. It was also obtained that the resonance peak position of the absorption coefficient is redshifted with increasing the core radius for a fixed shell thickness. The same situation occurs when reducing the thickness of the shell material for a fixed core size.

  • Moraleda-Munoz, Aurelio
    et al.
    Univ Granada, Fac Ciencias, Dept Microbiol, Avda Fuentenueva S-N, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Marcos-Torres, Francisco Javier
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Structural Biology. Univ Granada, Fac Ciencias, Dept Microbiol, Avda Fuentenueva S-N, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Perez, Juana
    Univ Granada, Fac Ciencias, Dept Microbiol, Avda Fuentenueva S-N, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Munoz-Dorado, Jose
    Univ Granada, Fac Ciencias, Dept Microbiol, Avda Fuentenueva S-N, E-18071 Granada, Spain.
    Metal-responsive RNA polymerase extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors2019In: Molecular Microbiology, ISSN 0950-382X, E-ISSN 1365-2958, Vol. 112, no 2, p. 385-398Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to survive, bacteria must adapt to multiple fluctuations in their environment, including coping with changes in metal concentrations. Many metals are essential for viability, since they act as cofactors of indispensable enzymes. But on the other hand, they are potentially toxic because they generate reactive oxygen species or displace other metals from proteins, turning them inactive. This dual effect of metals forces cells to maintain homeostasis using a variety of systems to import and export them. These systems are usually inducible, and their expression is regulated by metal sensors and signal-transduction mechanisms, one of which is mediated by extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors. In this review, we have focused on the metal-responsive ECF sigma factors, several of which are activated by iron depletion (FecI, FpvI and PvdS), while others are activated by excess of metals such as nickel and cobalt (CnrH), copper (CarQ and CorE) or cadmium and zinc (CorE2). We focus particularly on their physiological roles, mechanisms of action and signal transduction pathways.

  • Petrican, Raluca
    et al.
    Rotman Res Inst,, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Söderlund, Hedvig
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Kumar, Namita
    Baycrest Ctr Geriatr Care, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Daskalakis, Zafiris J.
    Ctr Addict & Mental Hlth, Clarke Div, Toronto, ON, Canada; Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Flint, Alastair
    Univ Hlth Network, Toronto, ON, Canada; Univ Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Levine, Brian
    Univ Toronto, Rotman Res Inst, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Electroconvulsive therapy "corrects" the neural architecture of visuospatial memory: Implications for typical cognitive-affective functioning2019In: NeuroImage: Clinical, ISSN 0353-8842, E-ISSN 2213-1582, Vol. 23, article id UNSP 101816Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a widely used and effective treatment for refractory depression, the neural underpinnings of its therapeutic effects remain poorly understood. To address this issue, here, we focused on a core cognitive deficit associated with depression, which tends to be reliably ameliorated through ECT, specifically, the ability to learn visuospatial information. Thus, we pursued three goals. First, we tested whether ECT can "normalize" the functional brain organization patterns associated with visuospatial memory and whether such corrections would predict post-ECT improvements in learning visuospatial information. Second, we investigated whether, among healthy individuals, stronger expression of the neural pattern, susceptible to adjustments through ECT, would predict reduced incidence of depression-relevant cognition and affect. Third, we sought to quantify the heritability of the ECT-correctable neural profile. Thus, in a task fMRI study with a clinical and a healthy comparison sample, we characterized two functional connectome patterns: one that typifies trait depression (i.e., differentiates patients from healthy individuals) and another that is susceptible to "normalization" through ECT. Both before and after ECT, greater expression of the trait depression neural profile was associated with more frequent repetitive thinking about past personal events (affective persistence), a hallmark of depressogenic cognition. Complementarily, post-treatment, stronger expression of the ECT-corrected neural profile was linked to improvements in visuospatial learning, a mental ability which is markedly impaired in depression. Subsequently, using data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) (N = 333), we demonstrated that the functional brain organization of healthy participants with greater levels of subclinical depression and higher incidence of its associated cognitive deficits (affective persistence, impaired learning) shows greater similarity to the trait depression neural profile and reduced similarity to the ECT-correctable neural profile, as identified in the patient sample. These results tended to be specific to learning-relevant task contexts (working memory, perceptual relational processing). Genetic analyses based on HCP twin data (N = 128 pairs) suggested that, among healthy individuals, a functional brain organization similar to the one normalized by ECT in the patient sample is endogenous to cognitive contexts that require visuospatial processing that extends beyond the here-and-now. Broadly, the present findings supported our hypothesis that some of the therapeutic effects of ECT may be due to its correcting the expression of a naturally occurring pattern of functional brain organization that facilitates integration of internal and external cognition beyond the immediate present. Given their substantial susceptibility to both genetic and environmental effects, such mechanisms may be useful both for identifying at risk individuals and for monitoring progress of interventions targeting mood-related pathology.

  • Turesson, C.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Malmo, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, S-20502 Malmo, Sweden.
    Börjesson, O.
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, K.
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Mohammad, A. J.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Rheumatol, Lund, Sweden.
    Knight, Ann
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Rheumatology.
    Swedish Society of Rheumatology 2018 guidelines for investigation, treatment, and follow-up of giant cell arteritis2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Rheumatology, ISSN 0300-9742, E-ISSN 1502-7732, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 259-265Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To develop evidence-based guidelines for the management of giant cell arteritis (GCA) as a complement to guidelines in other areas of rheumatology, issued by the Swedish Society of Rheumatology.

    Methods: A working group selected key areas for recommendations, reviewed the available evidence, and wrote draft guidelines. These were discussed and revised according to standard procedures within the Swedish Society of Rheumatology, including a one-day meeting open to all members. For key recommendations, the quality of evidence was assessed according to GRADE. The final guidelines were approved by the Society board in March 2018.

    Results: The guidelines include recommendations on diagnostic procedures, pharmacological treatment, follow-up, and adjuvant treatment. Ultrasonography is complementary to temporal artery biopsy (TAB) in the diagnostic work-up. Other imaging techniques (magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography/computed tomography) are important in evaluating large-vessel involvement. Glucocorticoids (oral, or intravenous in cases with ischaemic complications) remain the first line treatment for GCA. Addition of tocilizumab is recommended for patients with relapsing disease who meet five criteria, representing active disease that has been objectively verified by TAB or imaging. Tocilizumab may also be considered in patients with newly diagnosed GCA who are at major risk of severe glucocorticoid side effects. Based on current evidence, tocilizumab treatment for >1 year cannot be recommended.

    Conclusion: These guidelines are based on current evidence and consensus within Swedish rheumatology. Following major developments in diagnostics and treatment of GCA, such guidelines are important for clinical practice, and should be updated on a regular basis.

  • Rosser, Neil
    et al.
    Univ York, Dept Biol, Wentworth Way, Heslington, England; Harvard Univ, Dept Organism & Evolutionary Biol, Cambridge, MA USA.
    Queste, Lucie M.
    Univ York, Dept Biol, Wentworth Way, Heslington, England.
    Cama, Bruna
    Univ York, Dept Biol, Wentworth Way, Heslington, England.
    Edelman, Nathaniel B.
    Harvard Univ, Dept Organism & Evolutionary Biol, Cambridge, MA 02138 USA.
    Mann, Florian
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Organ Chem, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Mori Pezo, Ronald
    URKU Estudios Amazon, Tarapoto, San Martin, Peru.
    Morris, Jake
    Univ York, Dept Biol, Wentworth Way, Heslington, England.
    Segami Marzal, Julia Carolina
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Biology, Department of Ecology and Genetics, Animal ecology.
    Velado, Patricia
    Bavarian State Res Ctr Agr, Dept Qual Assurance Analyt, Freising Weihenstephan, Germany.
    Schulz, Stefan
    Tech Univ Carolo Wilhelmina Braunschweig, Inst Organ Chem, Braunschweig, Germany.
    Mallet, James L. B.
    Harvard Univ, Dept Organism & Evolutionary Biol, Cambridge, USA.
    Dasmahapatra, Kanchon K.
    Univ York, Dept Biol, Wentworth Way, Heslington, England.
    Geographic contrasts between pre- and postzygotic barriers are consistent with reinforcement in Heliconius butterflies2019In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 73, no 9, p. 1821-1838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying the traits causing reproductive isolation and the order in which they evolve is fundamental to understanding speciation. Here, we quantify prezygotic and intrinsic postzygotic isolation among allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric populations of the butterflies Heliconius elevatus and Heliconius pardalinus. Sympatric populations from the Amazon (H. elevatus and H. p. butleri) exhibit strong prezygotic isolation and rarely mate in captivity; however, hybrids are fertile. Allopatric populations from the Amazon (H. p. butleri) and Andes (H. p. sergestus) mate freely when brought together in captivity, but the female F1 hybrids are sterile. Parapatric populations (H. elevatus and H. p. sergestus) exhibit both assortative mating and sterility of female F1s. Assortative mating in sympatric populations is consistent with reinforcement in the face of gene flow, where the driving force, selection against hybrids, is due to disruption of mimicry and other ecological traits rather than hybrid sterility. In contrast, the lack of assortative mating and hybrid sterility observed in allopatric populations suggests that geographic isolation enables the evolution of intrinsic postzygotic reproductive isolation. Our results show how the types of reproductive barriers that evolve between species may depend on geography.

  • Northoff, Georg
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Centre for Research Ethics and Bioethics. Hangzhou Normal Univ, Dept Psychol, Hangzhou 310013, Zhejiang, Peoples R China;Univ Ottawa, Inst Mental Hlth Res, Mind Brain Imaging & Neuroeth, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    Tumati, Shankar
    Univ Ottawa, Inst Mental Hlth Res, Mind Brain Imaging & Neuroeth, Ottawa, ON, Canada.
    "Average is good, extremes are bad" - Non-linear inverted U-shaped relationship between neural mechanisms and functionality of mental features2019In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, ISSN 0149-7634, E-ISSN 1873-7528, Vol. 104, p. 11-25Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally, studies emphasize differences in neural measures between pathological and healthy groups, assuming a binary distinction between the groups, and a linear relationship between neural measures and symptoms. Here, we present four examples that show a continuous relation across the divide of normal and pathological states between neural measures and mental functions. This relation can be characterized by a nonlinear inverted-U shaped curve. Along this curve, mid-range or average expression of a neural measure is associated with optimal function of a mental feature (in healthy states), whereas extreme expression, either high or low, is associated with sub-optimal function, and occurs in different neural disorders. Neural expression between the optimal or intermediate and pathological or extreme values is associated with sub-optimal function and atrisk mental states. Thus, this model of neuro-mental relationship can be summarized as "average is good, extremes are bad". By focussing on neuro-mental relationships, this model can facilitate the transition of psychiatry from a categorical to a dimensional and individualized approach needed in the era of precision medicine.

  • Elf, Kristin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Rostedt Punga: Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Ronne-Engström, Elisabeth
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Semnic, Robert
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    Rostami-Berglund, Elham
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Sundblom, Jimmy
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Zetterling, Maria
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Enblad: Neurosurgery.
    Continuous EEG monitoring after brain tumor surgery2019In: Acta Neurochirurgica, ISSN 0001-6268, E-ISSN 0942-0940, Vol. 161, no 9, p. 1835-1843Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Prolonged seizures generate cerebral hypoxia and increased intracranial pressure, resulting in an increased risk of neurological deterioration, increased long-term morbidity, and shorter survival. Seizures should be recognized early and treated promptly.

    The aim of the study was to investigate the occurrence of postoperative seizures in patients undergoing craniotomy for primary brain tumors and to determine if non-convulsive seizures could explain some of the postoperative neurological deterioration that may occur after surgery.

    Methods

    A single-center prospective study of 100 patients with suspected glioma. Participants were studied with EEG and video recording for at least 24 h after surgery.

    Results

    Seven patients (7%) displayed seizure activity on EEG recording within 24 h after surgery and another two patients (2%) developed late seizures. One of the patients with early seizures also developed late seizures. In five patients (5%), there were non-convulsive seizures. Four of these patients had a combination of clinically overt and non-convulsive seizures and in one patient, all seizures were non-convulsive. The non-convulsive seizures accounted for the majority of total seizure time in those patients. Non-convulsive seizures could not explain six cases of unexpected postoperative neurological deterioration. Postoperative ischemic lesions were more common in patients with early postoperative seizures.

    Conclusions

    Early seizures, including non-convulsive, occurred in 7% of our patients. Within this group, non-convulsive seizure activity had longer durations than clinically overt seizures, but only 1% of patients had exclusively non-convulsive seizures. Seizures were not associated with unexpected neurological deterioration.

  • Hammarsten, Peter
    et al.
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Josefsson, Andreas
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Clin Sci, Dept Urol, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Thysell, Elin
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Marie
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Hagglof, Christina
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Iglesias-Gato, Diego
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Flores-Morales, Amilcar
    Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Dept Drug Design & Pharmacol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Stattin, Pär
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Urology.
    Egevad, Lars
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol & Cytol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Granfors, Torvald
    Cent Hosp Vasteras, Dept Urol, Vasteras, Sweden.
    Wikstrom, Pernilla
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Bergh, Anders
    Umea Univ, Dept Med Biosci, Pathol, Umea, Sweden.
    Immunoreactivity for prostate specific antigen and Ki67 differentiates subgroups of prostate cancer related to outcome2019In: Modern Pathology, ISSN 0893-3952, E-ISSN 1530-0285, Vol. 32, no 9, p. 1310-1319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on gene-expression profiles, prostate tumors can be subdivided into subtypes with different aggressiveness and response to treatment. We investigated if similar clinically relevant subgroups can be identified simply by the combination of two immunohistochemistry markers: one for tumor cell differentiation (prostate specific antigen, PSA) and one for proliferation (Ki67). This was analyzed in men with prostate cancer diagnosed at transurethral resection of the prostate 1975-1991 (n = 331) where the majority was managed by watchful waiting. Ki67 and PSA immunoreactivity was related to outcome and to tumor characteristics previously associated with prognosis. Increased Ki67 and decreased PSA were associated with poor outcome, and they provided independent prognostic information from Gleason score. A combinatory score for PSA and Ki67 immunoreactivity was produced using the median PSA and Ki67 levels as cut-off (for Ki67 the upper quartile was also evaluated) for differentiation into subgroups. Patients with PSA low/Ki67 high tumors showed higher Gleason score, more advanced tumor stage, and higher risk of prostate cancer death compared to other patients. Their tumor epithelial cells were often ERG positive and expressed higher levels of ErbB2, phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (pEGF-R) and protein kinase B (pAkt), and their tumor stroma showed a reactive response with type 2 macrophage infiltration, high density of blood vessels and hyaluronic acid, and with reduced levels of caveolin-1, androgen receptors, and mast cells. In contrast, men with PSA high/Ki67 low tumors were characterized by low Gleason score, and the most favorable outcome amongst PSA/Ki67-defined subgroups. Men with PSA low/Ki67 low tumors showed clinical and tumor characteristics intermediate of the two groups above. A combinatory PSA/Ki67 immunoreactivity score identifies subgroups of prostate cancers with different epithelial and stroma phenotypes and highly different outcome but the clinical usefulness of this approach needs to be validated in other cohorts.

  • Public defence: 2019-11-01 09:15 Grönwallsalen, Uppsala
    Acosta Ruiz, Vanessa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology.
    CT Guided Ablation of T1 Renal Tumors2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The widespread use of medical imaging contributes to the increased detection of incidentally detected small renal tumors, a majority which are often indolent masses found in elderly patients with preexisting chronic kidney disease. In Sweden, partial nephrectomy with minimal invasive surgical approach is the current standard for removing these tumors, although another option is percutaneous image-guided tumor ablation that allows treatment of elderly patients with comorbidities for who surgery is a risk. Due to the lack of long-term follow-up studies and prospective randomized trials, ablation is still considered an alternative option to surgery in Sweden. The aim of this thesis was to evaluate treatment of T1 renal tumors with CT guided radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA).

    Factors affecting the efficacy rate of complete tumor ablation with RFA after a single session were evaluated (Paper I). Optimal electrode placement and a long tumor distance to the collecting system were associated with an increased primary efficacy. Renal tumor RFA was compared with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN: Papers II-III): both methods had comparable secondary efficacy rates, but RFA involved several treatment sessions. Total session times and hospitalization times were shorter and complications less frequent for RFA than for LPN (Paper II). After treatment, renal function impact was assessed by evaluation of both renal function quantity and quality through determination of the split renal function (SRF: Paper III). Standard renal function measurements were assessed and both RFA and LPN were nephron sparing when treating small renal tumors and did not affect creatinine or GFR. However, LPN involved greater SRF reduction in the affected kidney than RFA. Initial experience with microwave ablation was evaluated and this new ablation technique demonstrated high efficacy rates with fewer complications, and was comparable with the mid-term results of now established ablation techniques (Paper IV).

    In conclusion, CT guided RFA and MWA are safe and effective treatments for the removal of T1 renal tumors. This thesis provides further insights into the field of thermal ablation of small renal masses, which can aid future treatment selection and patient management.

    List of papers
    1. Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Predictive factors for complete renal tumor ablation using RFA
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    2016 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) can be used to treat renal masses in patients where surgery is preferably avoided. As tumor size and location can affect ablation results, procedural planning needs to identify these factors to limit treatment to a single session and increase ablation success.

    PURPOSE: To identify factors that may affect the primary efficacy of complete renal tumor ablation with radiofrequency after a single session.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Percutaneous RFA (using an impedance based system) was performed using computed tomography (CT) guidance. Fifty-two renal tumors (in 44 patients) were retrospectively studied (median follow-up, 7 months). Data collection included patient demographics, tumor data (modified Renal Nephrometry Score, histopathological diagnosis), RFA treatment data (electrode placement), and follow-up results (tumor relapse). Data were analyzed through generalized estimating equations.

    RESULTS: Primary efficacy rate was 83%. Predictors for complete ablation were optimal electrode placement (P = 0.002, OR = 16.67) and increasing distance to the collecting system (P = 0.02, OR = 1.18). Tumor size was not a predictor for complete ablation (median size, 24 mm; P = 0.069, OR = 0.47), but all tumors ≤2 cm were completely ablated. All papillary tumors and oncocytomas were completely ablated in a single session; the most common incompletely ablated tumor type was clear cell carcinoma (6 of 9).

    CONCLUSION: Optimal electrode placement and a long distance from the collecting system are associated with an increased primary efficacy of renal tumor RFA. These variables need to be considered to increase primary ablation success. Further studies are needed to evaluate the effect of RFA on histopathologically different renal tumors.

    Keywords
    Radiofrequency ablation (RFA); renal tumor; predict; ablation; radiofrequency; ablation success; complete ablation
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-264586 (URN)10.1177/0284185115605681 (DOI)000378051200020 ()26452975 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2015-10-15 Created: 2015-10-15 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
    2. Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors:: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison.
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Periprocedural outcome after laparoscopic partial nephrectomy versus radiofrequency ablation for T1 renal tumors:: A modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score adjusted comparison.
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    2018 (English)In: Acta Radiologica, ISSN 0284-1851, E-ISSN 1600-0455, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 260-268Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Comparable oncological outcomes have been seen after surgical nephrectomy and thermal ablation of renal tumors recently. However, periprocedural outcome needs to be assessed for aiding treatment decision.

    Purpose: To compare efficacy rates and periprocedural outcome (technical success, session time, hospitalization time, and complications) after renal tumor treatment with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy (LPN) or radiofrequency ablation (RFA).

    Material and Methods: The initial experience with 49 (treated with LPN) and 84 (treated with RFA) consecutive patients for a single renal tumor (diameter ≤ 5 cm, limited to the kidney) during 2007-2014 was evaluated. Patient and tumor characteristics, efficacy rates, and periprocedural outcome were collected retrospectively. The stratified Mantel Haenzel and Van Elteren tests, adjusted for tumor complexity (with the modified R.E.N.A.L nephrometry score [m-RNS]), were used to assess differences in treatment outcomes.

    Results: Primary efficacy rate was 98% for LPN and 85.7% for RFA; secondary efficacy rate was 93.9% for LPN and 95.2% for RFA; and technical success rate was 87.8% for LPN and 100% for RFA. Median session (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 215 min, RFA 137 min) and median hospitalization time were longer after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 5 days, RFA 2 days). Side effects were uncommon (LPN 2%, RFA 4.8%). Complications were more frequent after LPN (m-RNS adjusted P < 0.001; LPN 42.9%, RFA 10.7%).

    Conclusion: Both methods achieved equivalent secondary efficacy rates. RFA included several treatment sessions, but session and hospitalization times were shorter, and complications were less frequent than for LPN. The differences remained after adjustment for renal tumor complexity.

    Keywords
    Ablation procedures, interventional, kidney, percutaneous, primary neoplasms
    National Category
    Urology and Nephrology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354169 (URN)10.1177/0284185118780891 (DOI)000459621200017 ()29911400 (PubMedID)
    Available from: 2018-06-19 Created: 2018-06-19 Last updated: 2019-09-04Bibliographically approved
    3. Split Renal Function after Treatment of Small Renal Masses: Comparison between Radiofrequency Ablation and Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Split Renal Function after Treatment of Small Renal Masses: Comparison between Radiofrequency Ablation and Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392376 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-04
    4. Percutaneous CT Guided Microwave Ablation of 105 T1a-T1b Renal Tumors: Technique Efficacy with a Mean 2-Year Follow-up
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Percutaneous CT Guided Microwave Ablation of 105 T1a-T1b Renal Tumors: Technique Efficacy with a Mean 2-Year Follow-up
    Show others...
    (English)Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    National Category
    Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392380 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-04
  • Steinhoff, Tobias
    et al.
    Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany;NORCE Norwegian Res Ctr AS, Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Gkritzalis, Thanos
    Flanders Marine Inst, Oostende, Belgium.
    Lauvset, Siv K.
    NORCE Norwegian Res Ctr AS, Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway;Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Jones, Steve
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Schuster, Ute
    Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Olsen, Are
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Becker, Meike
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Bozzano, Roberto
    Natl Res Council Italy, Inst Study Anthrop Impacts & Sustainabil Marine E, Genoa, Italy.
    Brunetti, Fabio
    Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Trieste, Italy.
    Cantoni, Carolina
    Natl Res Council Italy, Inst Marine Sci, Trieste, Italy.
    Cardin, Vanessa
    Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Trieste, Italy.
    Diverres, Denis
    Ctr IRD Bretagne, Plouzane, France.
    Fiedler, Bjoern
    Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany.
    Fransson, Agneta
    Norwegian Polar Res Inst, Fram Ctr, Tromso, Norway.
    Giani, Michele
    Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Trieste, Italy.
    Hartman, Sue
    Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Hoppema, Mario
    Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, Alfred Wegener Inst, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Jeansson, Emil
    NORCE Norwegian Res Ctr AS, Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Johannessen, Truls
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Kitidis, Vassilis
    Plymouth Marine Lab, Plymouth, Devon, England.
    Körtzinger, Arne
    Helmholtz Ctr Ocean Res Kiel, GEOMAR, Kiel, Germany.
    Landa, Camilla
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Lefevre, Nathalie
    Univ Paris 06, UPMC, Sorbonne Univ, LOCEAN IPSL Lab,CNRS,IRD,MNHN, Paris, France.
    Luchetta, Anna
    Natl Res Council Italy, Inst Marine Sci, Trieste, Italy.
    Naudts, Lieven
    Royal Belgian Inst Nat Sci, Operat Directorate Nat Environm, Oostende, Belgium.
    Nightingale, Philip D.
    Plymouth Marine Lab, Plymouth, Devon, England.
    Omar, Abdirahman M.
    NORCE Norwegian Res Ctr AS, Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Pensieri, Sara
    Natl Res Council Italy, Inst Study Anthrop Impacts & Sustainabil Marine E, Genoa, Italy.
    Pfeil, Benjamin
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Castano-Primo, Rocio
    Univ Bergen, Geophys Inst, Bergen, Norway;Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Rehder, Gregor
    Leibniz Inst Baltic Sea Res Warnemunde, Rostock, Germany.
    Rutgersson, Anna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences, LUVAL.
    Sanders, Richard
    Natl Oceanog Ctr, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Schewe, Ingo
    Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, Alfred Wegener Inst, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    Siena, Giuseppe
    Ist Nazl Oceanog & Geofis Sperimentale, Trieste, Italy.
    Skjelvan, Ingunn
    NORCE Norwegian Res Ctr AS, Bjerknes Ctr Climate Res, Bergen, Norway.
    Soltwedel, Thomas
    Helmholtz Ctr Polar & Marine Res, Alfred Wegener Inst, Bremerhaven, Germany.
    van Heuven, Steven
    Univ Groningen, Ctr Isotope Res, Groningen, Netherlands.
    Watson, Andrew
    Univ Exeter, Coll Life & Environm Sci, Exeter, Devon, England.
    Constraining the Oceanic Uptake and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases by Building an Ocean Network of Certified Stations: The Ocean Component of the Integrated Carbon Observation System, ICOS-Oceans2019In: Frontiers in Marine Science, E-ISSN 2296-7745, Vol. 6, article id 544Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The European Research Infrastructure Consortium "Integrated Carbon Observation System" (ICOS) aims at delivering high quality greenhouse gas (GHG) observations and derived data products (e.g., regional GHG-flux maps) for constraining the GHG balance on a European level, on a sustained long-term basis. The marine domain (ICOS-Oceans) currently consists of 11 Ship of Opportunity lines (SOOP - Ship of Opportunity Program) and 10 Fixed Ocean Stations (FOSs) spread across European waters, including the North Atlantic and Arctic Oceans and the Barents, North, Baltic, and Mediterranean Seas. The stations operate in a harmonized and standardized way based on community-proven protocols and methods for ocean GHG observations, improving operational conformity as well as quality control and assurance of the data. This enables the network to focus on long term research into the marine carbon cycle and the anthropogenic carbon sink, while preparing the network to include other GHG fluxes. ICOS data are processed on a near real-time basis and will be published on the ICOS Carbon Portal (CP), allowing monthly estimates of CO2 air-sea exchange to be quantified for European waters. ICOS establishes transparent operational data management routines following the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) guiding principles allowing amongst others reproducibility, interoperability, and traceability. The ICOS-Oceans network is actively integrating with the atmospheric (e.g., improved atmospheric measurements onboard SOOP lines) and ecosystem (e.g., oceanic direct gas flux measurements) domains of ICOS, and utilizes techniques developed by the ICOS Central Facilities and the CP. There is a strong interaction with the international ocean carbon cycle community to enhance interoperability and harmonize data flow. The future vision of ICOS-Oceans includes ship-based ocean survey sections to obtain a three-dimensional understanding of marine carbon cycle processes and optimize the existing network design.

  • Welzel, Lisa
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    End-Of-Life Wind Turbines in the EU: An Estimation of the NdFeB-Magnets and Containing Rare Earth Elements in the Anthropogenic Stock of Germany and Denmark2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Securing rare earth elements (REE) for a stable supply require sustainable management strategies in Europe due to a missing local primary production and a dependence on China as the main producer of REE. These elements, like neodymium (Nd) and dysprosium (Dy), are contained in permanent magnets (PM) (mostly NdFeB-magnets) in wind turbines. Addressing the question whether PM-material, Nd- and Dy-contents from wind turbines could help to meet future demands of REE in Europe while reducing simultaneously the import dependence, the purpose of the present work was to analyze the urban mining opportunities, recovery - and recycling potentials for REE from end-of-life (EoL) wind turbines. This thesis aimed to identify current and upcoming stocks as well as material flows of the PM and their containing REE in the wind energy sector. Two European countries, Germany and Denmark, were chosen as case studies to be compared based on created future scenarios and the modeling of the theoretical recycling potential of Nd and Dy in both countries. It could have been identified that the German anthropogenic stock contains greater amounts of NdFeB-magnets and REE compared to the Danish stock. Overall it could be concluded that the countries’ demand could partly be met by using secondary Nd and Dy from the EoL-wind turbines. Although future scenarios were used, the results realistically illustrate the German and Danish anthropogenic stock until 2035 by relying on data of already installed turbines up to 2018, which makes an evaluation of capacities and EoL-turbines, which need to be decommissioned by 2035, achievable. The provided information is valuable for further investigations regarding recovery strategies, feasibility analysis, and future decision-making processes.

  • Berglund, Erik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Lytsy, Per
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Div Insurance Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Westerling, Ragnar
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Social Medicine.
    Living environment, social support, and informal caregiving are associated with healthcare seeking behaviour and adherence to medication treatment: A cross-sectional population study2019In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1260-1270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the well-known associations between local environment and health, few studies have focused on environment and healthcare utilisation, for instance healthcare seeking behaviour or adherence. This study was aimed at analysing housing type, behaviour based on perceived local outdoor safety, social support, informal caregiving, demographics, socioeconomics, and long-term illness, and associations with health-seeking and adherence behaviours at a population level. This study used data from the Swedish National Public Health Survey 2004-2014, an annually repeated, large sample, cross-sectional, population-based survey study. In all, questionnaires from 100,433 individuals were returned by post, making the response rate 52.9% (100,433/190,000). Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regressions were used to investigate associations between explanatory variables and the outcomes of refraining from seeking care and non-adherence behaviour. Living in rented apartment, lodger, a dorm or other was associated with reporting refraining from seeking care (adjusted OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.00-1.22), and non-adherence (adjusted OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.13-1.31). Refraining from going out due to a perceived unsafe neighbourhood was associated with refraining from seeking care (adjusted OR 1.59, 95% CI 1.51-1.67) and non-adherence (adjusted OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.17-1.36). Social support and status as an informal caregiver was associated with higher odds of refraining from seeking medical care and non-adherence. This study suggests that living in rental housing, refraining from going out due to neighbourhood safety concerns, lack of social support or informal caregiver status are associated with lower health-seeking behaviour and non-adherence to prescribed medication.

  • Karlsson, Ted
    Prognostic value of peritoneal metastasis localizationof colorectal origin2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Kougias, Ioannis
    et al.
    European Commiss, JRC, Ispra, Italy.
    Aggidis, George
    Univ Lancaster, Dept Engn, Lancaster, England.
    Avellan, Francois
    Ecole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Hydraul Machines Lab, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Deniz, Sabri
    Hsch Luzern, Lucerne Sch Engn & Architecture, Luzern, Switzerland.
    Lundin, Urban
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Electricity.
    Moro, Alberto
    European Commiss, JRC, Ispra, Italy.
    Muntean, Sebastian
    Romanian Acad, Ctr Adv Res Engn Sci, Bucharest, Romania.
    Novara, Daniele
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dept Civil Struct & Envir Engn, Dublin, Ireland.
    Ignacio Perez-Diaz, Juan
    Tech Univ Madrid, Dept Hydr Energy & Envir Engn, Madrid, Spain.
    Quaranta, Emanuele
    Politecn Torino, Dept Environ Land & Infrastruct Engn, Turin, Italy.
    Schild, Philippe
    European Commiss, DG Res & Innovat, Dir Energy, Brussels, Belgium.
    Theodossiou, Nicolaos
    Aristotle Univ Thessaloniki, Dept Civil Engn, Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Analysis of emerging technologies in the hydropower sector2019In: Renewable & sustainable energy reviews, ISSN 1364-0321, E-ISSN 1879-0690, Vol. 113, article id 109257Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper reviews recent research and development activities in the field of hydropower technology. It covers emerging and advanced technologies to mitigate flow instabilities (active and passive approach) as well as emerging magneto-rheological control techniques. Recent research findings on flow instabilities are also presented, especially concerning fluid-structure interaction and transient operating conditions. As a great number of the existing large-scale hydroelectric facilities were constructed decades ago using technologies that are now considered obsolete, technologies to achieve the digitalisation of hydropower are also analysed. Advances in the electro-mechanical components and generator design are presented; their potential role to adapt hydropower to the current operating conditions is also highlighted. The text explores current efforts to advance hydropower operation, mainly in terms of European projects. It provides a detailed overview of the recent efforts to increase the operational range of hydraulic turbines in order to reach exceptional levels of flexibility, a topic of several recent research projects. Variable speed hydropower generation and its application in pumped storage power plants are presented in detail. Moreover, revolutionary concepts for hydroelectric energy storage are also presented with the analysis focusing on underwater hydro storage and hydropower's hybridisation with fast energy storage systems. Efforts to minimise hydropower's environmental footprint are also presented via the utilisation of small-scale and fish-friendly installations.

  • Lundström, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Landtblom: Neurology.
    Återinsättning av trombocythämmare RESTART ger oss (nästan) hela svaret2019In: Neurologi i sverige, , p. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Återinsättning av trombocythämmare efter en spontan intrakraniell blödning ökar inte risken för en ny blödning jämfört med att avstå. Tvärtom. Återinsättning verkar till och med minska risken för framtida blödningar. Det är det oväntade resultatet av RESTART-studien som pre-senterades på den europeiska strokekongressen ESOC i Milano, maj 2019. I denna artikel sammanfattas RESTART av Erik Lundström, överläkare vid Akademiska sjukhuset. Pågåen-de studier (RESTART-Fr och STATICH) kommer sannolikt att kunna ge oss ett definitivt svar på denna viktiga kliniska fråga.

  • Elnour, Mugahid
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    The impact of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissances Dam on the Water-Energy-Food security nexus in Sudan2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Controversy in transboundary rivers usually arises due to a lack of inclusive agreement and cooperation between the basin countries. Originating from Ethiopia, the Blue Nile River contributes most of the Nile River water making it vital for water, energy, and food security at downstream Sudan and Egypt. In 2011, the Ethiopian government announced the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) along the Blue Nile 40 km away from the Sudanese borders. The dam will be the biggest in Africa and seventh-largest in the world producing 6,000 Megawatts of electricity with a reservoir volume of 74 billion cubic meters. Great concerns were raised on the impact of this megaproject for downstream countries due to the expected changes in water quantity and quality. Different studies were published regarding the potential impacts of this dam on the Eastern Nile countries. However, these studies have usually focused on one aspect of the impact (e.g. hydropower, agricultural projects, water use) despite the connection that exists between these sectors. This research aims to investigate the impact the GERD operation will have on Sudan in terms of WEF security and sustainability. The study uses the WEF security nexus framework that addresses the interconnectedness between these sectors instead of treating them in silos. A sustainability assessment is also carried out to analyze the impact of the dam operation on the environmental, social and economic areas in Sudan. The study first looked into the current state of Sudan’s WEF security nexus and highlighted the vulnerabilities that exist within these sectors. Then an analysis of the GERD operation was carried out and the results showed that water regulation and sediment reduction will reflect positively on Sudan as it will enable for expansion in agricultural projects, increase hydropower production, and provide flood control. Some negative impacts, however, are to be expected especially during the impounding phase from water level reduction and change in river characteristic which will greatly affect the environment and society downstream. The safety of the dam was found to be the biggest threat to Sudan’s security, as the case of dam failure will have catastrophic consequences for the country. The study concluded that an increase in cooperation between the Eastern Nile countries will decrease the downstream negative impacts of the GERD and increase its overall benefits ultimately leading to sustainability, peace, and welfare for these countries. Sudan also needs to take measures in accommodating the new flowing conditions including reoperation of the Sudanese dams and mitigation strategies for the potential negative impacts. 

  • Löfquist, Linn
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Mathematics and Computer Science, Department of Information Technology.
    A web-based application for ethical competence workshops2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Söderfeldt, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of History of Science and Ideas.
    Berglund, Karl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Literature, Sociology of Literature.
    Lindström, Matts
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of ALM.
    Towards mining the history of the active patient.: A mixed-methods discourse analysis of the journal Allergia, 1957–19902019Report (Other academic)
  • Descamps, Clara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Theology, Department of Theology.
    EU-LAC interregional cooperation on climate mitigation: Case study of EUROCLIMA2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is currently one of the greatest challenges of our times. Due to the urgency of the issue, a cooperation on climate mitigation has been developing at different levels in order to reach reduction emission targets. In parallel, the European Union has developed interregional ties with other regions of the globe as a strategy to strengthen its power. More specifically, it has developed its relations with the region of Latin America and the Caribbean, in many fields including climate change mitigation. The interregional relationship between the European Union (EU) and Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) on climate mitigation is of interest because it concerns two crucial regions in the field of climate change: the European Union is one of the world’s largest leaders in the fight against climate change and Latin America is of the richest regions in terms of biodiversity as well as resources, yet one of the most endangered by climate change. The present thesis analyses EU-LAC interregional relations on climate mitigation. It takes a specific case study analysis of the EU-LAC EUROCLIMA programme, the largest programme for climate mitigation between the EU and LAC. The objective of the article is to investigate the extent towards which EUROCLIMA can be considered as a practical example of EU-LAC interregional cooperation on climate mitigation, from a constructivist approach. The study is based on a discourse analysis of public reports and interviews on EUROCLIMA. The results of the empirical analysis of EUROCLIMA demonstrate that the programme features the main attributes of successful EU-LAC cooperation on climate mitigation and of EU-LAC complex interregionalism. Hence, EUROCLIMA can be considered as a clear example of EU-LAC interregional cooperation on climate mitigation. The paper draws new conclusions and implications on the way to define EUROCLIMA and provides a new perspective for the scholarship on EU-LAC relations. EUROCLIMA can be specifically defined as an EU-LAC complex interregional cooperation.

  • Public defence: 2019-11-01 10:00 Ång/10132 Häggsalen, Uppsala
    Saketi, Sara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences.
    Investigation of Topography, Adhesion and Diffusion Wear in Sliding Contacts during Steel and Titanium Alloy Machining2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present thesis work is to increase the fundamental knowledge of the tribological contact between the cutting tool and the work material in three different cutting operations, i.e. hard milling of cold work tool steels, turning in 316L stainless steel and turning in Ti6Al4V alloy, respectively. The influence of cutting parameters and tool surface topography on the initial material transfer tendency and resulting wear and wear mechanisms were investigated under well controlled cutting conditions. High resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and surface analysis, including energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), were used in order to characterize the worn cutting tools on a sub-µm scale and deepen the understanding of the wear mechanisms prevailing at the tool / work material interface. The characterization work includes the analysis of worn tool surfaces as well as cross-sections of these. Also, the back side of collected chips were analysed to further understand the contact mechanisms between the tool rake face and chip.

    The results show that the transfer tendency of work material is strongly affected by the surface topography of the rake face and that an appropriate pre- and post-coating treatment can be used in order to reduce the transfer tendency and the mechanical interaction between a coated cutting tool and 316L stainless steel. The continuous wear mechanisms of the cutting tools were found to be dependent on the work materials and the cutting parameters used. In hard milling of cold work tool steels, polycrystalline cubic boron nitride shows a combination of tribochemical wear, adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear. In the turning of 316L stainless steel and Ti6Al4V alloy, using medium to high cutting speeds/feeds, the wear of cemented carbide is mainly controlled by diffusion wear of the WC phase. Interestingly, the diffusion wear processes differ between the two work materials. In contact with 316L stainless steel crater wear is controlled by atomic diffusion of W and C into the passing chip. In contact with Ti6Al4V crater wear is controlled by the diffusion of C into a transfer work material layer generating a W layer and TiC precipitates which repeatedly is removed by the passing chip. The experimental work and results obtained illustrates the importance of in-depth characterization of the worn surfaces in order to increase the understanding of the degradation and wear of tool materials and coatings in metal cutting operations.

    List of papers
    1. Wear of a high cBN content PCBN cutting tool during hard milling of powder metallurgy cold work tool steels
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Wear of a high cBN content PCBN cutting tool during hard milling of powder metallurgy cold work tool steels
    Show others...
    2015 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 332-333, p. 752-761Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390303 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08
    2. A Methodology to Systematically Investigate the Diffusion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during Machining of a Titanium Alloy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Methodology to Systematically Investigate the Diffusion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during Machining of a Titanium Alloy
    2019 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 2271, no 12, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390306 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-16
    3. Influence of tool surface topography on the material transfer tendency and tool wear in the turning of 316L stainless steel
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of tool surface topography on the material transfer tendency and tool wear in the turning of 316L stainless steel
    2016 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 368-369, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of tool surface topography on the initiation and build-up of transfer layers in the orthogonal turning of 316L austenitic stainless steel have been studied under well controlled conditions. Tool materials include CVD Ti(C,N)-Al2O3-TiN and PVD (Ti, ADN-(Al,Cr)(2)O-3 coated cemented carbide inserts prepared using different grinding and polishing treatments. Post-test characterization of the inserts was performed using high resolution scanning electron, microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the transfer tendency of work material is strongly affected by the surface topography of the rake face. For both types of inserts, the initial transfer and the build-up of transfer layers are localised to microscopic surface irregularities on the rake face. Consequently, an appropriate surface treatment of the cemented carbide substrate before coating deposition and the as-deposited CVD and PVD coating can be used in order to reduce the transfer tendency and the mechanical interaction between the mating surfaces. Also, an improved surface finish was found to reduce coating wear and consequently the crater wear rate of the inserts investigated. This can most likely be explained by the reduced tendency to discrete chipping of coating fragments in the contact zone and the formation of a thin transfer layer composed of Al, Si, Ca, O with beneficial friction properties which are promoted by a smooth coating surface.

    Keywords
    Turning, Material transfer, Surface topography, Coatings, Stainless steel
    National Category
    Materials Engineering
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324504 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2016.09.023 (DOI)000390733400026 ()
    Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
    4. On the diffusion wear of cemented carbides in the turning of AISI 316L stainless steel
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the diffusion wear of cemented carbides in the turning of AISI 316L stainless steel
    2019 (English)In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 430-431, p. 202-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    The present work has studied the wear and wear mechanisms of three different but comparable cemented carbide grades during orthogonal turning of AISI 316L. The influences of WC grain size and cuffing speed on the resulting crater and flank wear have been evaluated by optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanisms behind the crater and flank wear have been characterized on the sub-micrometer scale using high resolution SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToE-SIMS) of the worn cutting inserts and the produced chips. In addition to a dependence on cutting speeds, wear rates were also found to be dependent on the WC grain size. High resolution SEM, AES and ToF-SIMS analysis of the worn cemented carbide within the crater and flank wear regions revealed that the degradation of cemented carbide at higher cutting speeds is mainly controlled by diffusion wear of the WC-phase. This is supported by ToF-SIMS analysis of the back-side of stainless steel chips which reveals the presence of a 10 nm thin W-containing oxide film. The results are discussed and interpreted in the light of the conditions prevailing at the tool-chip interface.

    Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
    ELSEVIER SCIENCE SA, 2019
    Keywords
    Cemented carbide, AISI 316L stainless steel, Turning, Diffusion wear, SEM, AES, ToF-SIMS
    National Category
    Manufacturing, Surface and Joining Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390081 (URN)10.1016/j.wear.2019.05.010 (DOI)000471597300021 ()
    Available from: 2019-08-06 Created: 2019-08-06 Last updated: 2019-08-08Bibliographically approved
    5. Experimental Study of Wear Mechanisms of Cemented Carbide in the Turning of Ti6Al4V
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>Experimental Study of Wear Mechanisms of Cemented Carbide in the Turning of Ti6Al4V
    2019 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390311 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-29
    6. A Methodology to Systematically Investigate the Diffusion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during Machining of a Titanium Alloy
    Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Methodology to Systematically Investigate the Diffusion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during Machining of a Titanium Alloy
    2019 (English)In: Materials, ISSN 1996-1944, Vol. 2271, no 12, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
    Abstract [en]

    A Methodology to Systematically Investigate the Diffusion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during Machining of a Titanium Alloy

    usion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during

    Machining of a Titanium Alloy

    National Category
    Engineering and Technology
    Identifiers
    urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390308 (URN)
    Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-08-08
  • Piqueras, Matias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    HERITABILITY FOR SOCIAL TRUST ACROSS SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS:: Is There a Gene-Environment Interaction?2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In political science literature, the development of social trust is often explained in terms

    of the influence of different environmental factors, socioeconomic status (SES) being

    one of the most important. Yet, even though there is empirical support of a genetic

    component in the expression of social trust, less is known about its interaction with

    environmental factors. The present study aims to explore heritability of social trust

    across socioeconomic status using a twin-design that tests potential gene-environment

    (GxE) interactions. Moreover, the study explicitly tests the hypothesis that different

    levels of SES may moderate the influence of genetic and environmental effects on social

    trust. Data comes from the Swedish Twin Registry and consist of 1535 twin pairs

    born between 1943–1959. Social trust was measured through self-report on a scale

    of 1–10. Socioeconomic status was assessed as a dichotomized variable of high/low

    SES, determined on the basis of the father’s occupation during the twin’s childhood

    or adolescence. To test whether SES interacted with genetic and environmental effects

    for social trust, I used structural equation modeling (SEM). Results from the best fitting

    model show that social trust has a significant genetic component, with an estimated

    heritability of 0.41 in low SES and 0.33 in high SES. Results showed no evidence for a

    significant difference in heritability between low and high SES. Accordingly, it can be

    concluded that the results of the study do not support the hypothesis that SES moderate

    the influence of genetic effects on social trust.

  • Mullis, Hanna
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Government.
    Financial inclusion and state capacity: A Cross-Nation Study on the Effect of Fiscal Capacity on Access to Financial Products and Services2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Karnik, Isabelle
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Earth Sciences, Department of Earth Sciences.
    Arctic Loess as an Environmental Archive: Identifying Weathering with XRF Analysis in West Greenland2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • Hallqvist, Caroline
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Åsenlöf: Physiotheraphy.
    Utvärdering avseende gångförmåga och hälsorelaterad livskvalité hos patienter med idiopatisk normaltryckshydrocefalus efter shuntoperation2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with idopatic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) that are investigated och treated with shunt surgery may improve their walking ability and health related quality of life after surgery. There is limited knowledge regarding the investigation that leads to shunt surgery at Karolinska University Hospital, and how the surgery affects walk ability and health related quality of life, in patients with iNPH. The study investigated the differences regarding gait ability as well as health related quality of life, among patients with iNPH, before and three months after surgery. The study included 118 patients with iNPH, that underwent shunt surgery. The patients performed walking tests and estimated their health related quality of life, before and three months after surgery. The patients had a significant better walking ability after surgery. No clinical significant difference was seen regarding health related quality of life. Patients with suspected iNPH who were investigated and treated with shunt surgery at Karolinska University Hospital, had a better walking ability and a higher health related quality of life after surgery. Idopatic normal pressure hydrocephalus, gait, gait ability, health related quality of life, shunt surgery.

  • Simons, Greg
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Institute for Russian and Eurasian Studies. Turiba University, Latvia; Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg, Russia.
    The Anatomy of a Moral Panic: Western Mainstream Media's Russia Scapegoat2019In: Changing Societies & Personalities, ISSN 2587-6104, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 189-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 2014, there has been a very concerted campaign launched by the neo-liberal Western mainstream mass media against Russia. The format and content suggest that this is an attempt to induce a moral panic among the Western publics. It seems to be intended to create a sense of fear and to switch the logic to a series of emotionallybased reactions to assertion propaganda. Russia has been variously blamed for many different events and trends around the world, such as the “destroying” of Western “democracy”, and democratic values. In many regards, Russia is projected as being an existential threat in both the physical and intangible realms. This paper traces the strategic messages and narratives of the “Russia threat” as it is presented in Western mainstream media. Russia is connoted as a scapegoat for the failings of the neo-liberal democratic political order to maintain its global hegemony; therefore, Russia is viewed as the “menacing” other and a desperate measure to halt this gradual decline and loss of power and influence. This ultimately means that this type of journalism fails in its supposed fourth estate role, by directly aiding the hegemonic political power.

  • Bretón, Ricardo
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Arts, Department of Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Tangata Manu: Fågelmannens uppror.2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the ceremonial village of Orongo and the sacred site of Mata Ngarau. They are located on the southern edge of the Ranu Kau volcano crater, as well as the Motu Nui islet in front of the named volcano. Orongo was the scenario of important political and religious events that submerged Rapa Nui and its inhabitants in a magical story from the mid-1500s to the mid-1800s.

    This study aims, to some extent, elucidate the context in which the legend and the ritual of the Tangata Manu originates and its importance for the development of the Rapa Nui society. The study examines archaeological, ethnohistorical and contemporary evidences of the birdman cult and contradictory theories about the catastrophe that loomed over the Rapa Nui society

    The archaeological evidence of those events is the silent testimony of the god Make Make and Tangata Manu, the birdman, the god representative on earth. These are carved on the edge and the slopes of the Ranu Kau crater, in the carved and rupestrian paintings of the stone houses of Mata Ngarau at Orongo, in the caves of the Motu Nui islet and in the one of the cannibals, Ana Kai Tangata. Ethnohistorical evidences provide data on the ritual activities in connection to the birdman cult.

    The social and environmental degradation which causes of the almost total extermination of its inhabitants as well as the eroding of its culture and with it that of the birdman, Tangata Manu. Today the birdman culture and Orongo is one of the prominent visitors’ sites on the island but interviews with Indigenous Rapanui show that the site also continue to have spiritual and political meaning in today’s society. The modern Rapa Nui society today shows contradictory features. On the one hand we see the face of a thriving, mercantilist society, with hundreds of thousands of tourists visiting it annually and buying handicrafts of dubious local creation. On the other hand, we observe the efforts of hundreds of islanders who struggle to maintain their language, their cultural heritage, their petroglyphs, their cave paintings and their legends. That is the spirit of the rebellion of Tangata Manu.

  • Mäkilä, Jenna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Waldron, Hannah
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics.
    Kostråden på en minut: En kvantitativ studie om hur kvinnor och män i åldern 45 år och äldre förhåller sig till Livsmedelsverkets kostråd2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Bakgrund: Människor i väst lever längre och den vuxna befolkningen i Sverige når inte upp till näringsrekommendationerna (Riksmaten, 2011). För att förebygga ohälsa hos den åldrande befolkningen är ett preventivt folkhälsoarbete av stor vikt. Syftet med Livsmedelsverkets kostråd är att uppmuntra den svenska befolkningen till att äta hälsosammare och således förebygga livsstilsrelaterade sjukdomar, dock är kännedom om och förtroende för kostråden en förutsättning för att de ska följas.

    Syfte: Att undersöka vad män och kvinnor i åldersgruppen 45 år och äldre har för attityder i form av förtroende, kännedom samt följsamhet till Livsmedesverkets kostråd. Syftet är även att jämföra kännedom och följsamhet mellan kön och utbildningsnivå.

    Metod: Denna kvantitativa studie utfördes som en tvärsnittsstudie och datainsamling genomfördes med hjälp av en webbaserad enkät. Enkäten spreds till svensktalande personer, 45 år eller äldre, men hjälp av ett snöbollsurval, 118 respondenter svarade. Resultatet analyserades med ett oberoende t-test.

    Resultat: Majoriteten av respondenterna hade en positiv attityd till Livsmedelsverkets kostråd. Det genomsnittliga antalet angivna kända kostråd var nio av tio. Det genomsnittliga antalet angivna följda kostråd var fem av tio. En större diskrepans kunde observeras mellan kännedom om och angiven följsamhet för kostråden "minska intaget av salt", "byt ut feta mejeriprodukter till magra", "minska intaget av alkohol" och "byt ut smör och smörbaserade matfetter mot vegetabiliska oljor, oljebaserade matfetter". Ingen signifikant skillnad kunde observeras mellan kön eller mellan utbildningsnivå vad gäller angiven följsamhet av samt kännedom om Livsmedelsverkets kostråd.

    Slutsats: Studiens resultat indikerar på att det finns ett behov för ytterligare insatser som arbetar för att underlätta följsamheten av Livsmedelsverkets kostråd för personer i åldersgruppen 45 år och äldre.

  • Tran, Tuan
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Jablonka, Lukas
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Bruckner, Barbara
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics. Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Atom Phys & Surface, A-4040 Linz, Austria.
    Rund, Stefanie
    Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Atom Phys & Surface, A-4040 Linz, Austria.
    Roth, Dietmar
    Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Atom Phys & Surface, A-4040 Linz, Austria.
    Sortica, Mauricio A.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Bauer, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, För teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakulteten gemensamma enheter, Tandem Laboratory. Johannes Kepler Univ Linz, Atom Phys & Surface, A-4040 Linz, Austria.
    Zhang, Zhen
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Technology, Department of Engineering Sciences, Solid State Electronics.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Electronic interaction of slow hydrogen and helium ions with nickel-silicon systems2019In: Physical Review A: covering atomic, molecular, and optical physics and quantum information, ISSN 2469-9926, E-ISSN 2469-9934, Vol. 100, no 3, article id 032705Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electronic stopping cross sections (SCSs) of nickel, silicon, and nickel-silicon alloys for protons and helium (He) ions are studied in the regime of medium- and low-energy ion scattering, i.e., for ion energies in the range from 500 eV to 200 keV. For protons, at velocities below the Bohr velocity the deduced SCS is proportional to the ion velocity for all investigated materials. In contrast, for He ions nonlinear velocity scaling is observed in all investigated materials. Static calculations using density functional theory (DFT) available from the literature accurately predict the SCS of Ni and Ni-Si alloy in the regime with observed velocity proportionality. At higher energies, the energy dependence of the deduced SCS of Ni for protons and He ions agrees with the prediction by recent time-dependent DFT calculations. The measured SCS of the Ni-Si alloy was compared to the SCS obtained from Bragg's rule based on SCS for Ni and Si deduced in this study, yielding good agreement for protons, but systematic deviations for He projectiles, by almost 20%. Overall, the obtained data indicate the importance of nonadiabatic processes such as charge exchange for proper modeling of electronic stopping of, in particular, medium-energy ions heavier than protons in solids.

  • Rahimi ata, Kooscha-Kevin
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy.
    Layer Of Protection Analysis: Pilotstudie, metodutveckling och tillämpning på ett konventionellt hydrauliskt bromssystem2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Within the safety analysis industry there are a variety of tools used to ensure reliability and security of systems, ranging from mostly qualitative approaches to mostly quantitative. One safety analysis method that lies in between these two is called Layers Of Protection Analysis (LOPA). LOPA is known as a “semi-quantitative” approach that uses a mix of quantitative and qualitative approaches to draw conclusions. In this masters thesis the LOPA approach is demonstrated, in addition to being developed into two alternate LOPA approaches, known as MarkovLOPA and RBDLOPA. These two developed approaches use the concept of Markov chains and Reliability block diagram (RBD) respectively, to extend the applicability of the traditional LOPA methodology. Furthermore, a conventional hydraulic braking system (CHB), which includes ABS/TCS- and ESP functionality was analysed by these three methodologies. The results of the analysis show that in the analysis by LOPA and RBDLOPA 4- and 3 out of 10 scenarios need slight improvements and only 1 scenario for MarkovLOPA. Additionally, the validity of the alternative approaches are analysed by a sensitivity analysis, showing irregularities in the results, leading to the conclusion that further research and development is required prior to industrial applications of the approaches.

  • Karlsson, Kristofer
    Restvärmetillförsel i Ludvikas Fjärrvärmesystem: Påverkan på befintlig värmeproduktion vid olika inkopplingsscenarier av 60°C restvärme2019Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Energy company Vattenfall AB has set an ambitious goal in trying to transform their business into a climate neutral and more resource effective company - all within thetime frame of one generation. Through the business concept “SamEnergi” within the heat sector, Vattenfall looks for district heating customers who are willing to sell heat at a price corresponding to Vattenfall’s own production cost. This report examines the change in ordinary heat production in the partially Vattenfall-owned district heating system in the city of Ludvika, Sweden, arising from the delivery of waste heat from a data center to the system. The data center delivers 1 MW heat at 60 degrees Celsius which is lower than the desired temperature in the district heating grid. The change in ordinary heat production is evaluated in four different scenarios where each scenario represents a way to connect the heat source to the district heating grid, so that the delivery temperature to the costumer is not affected. In two of the scenarios, the data center is placed on site of the main heat production units. For all four scenarios, the ability to deliver heat during normal annual fluctuations in flow and temperature in the district heating grid are assessed. Also, in one scenario the effecton a flue gas condenser is considered. The heat production for a normal year is then modelled and simulated using an optimization software called BoFiT, with and without the excess heat.

    The results show that the 1 MW excess heat is worth between 0,9 and 1,8 million SEK depending on how the heat is delivered. The lowest value of the excess heat source comes from the scenario requiring a heat pump. The other three scenarios yield similar savings on the ordinary production. The best scenario is when the waste heat is delivered together with the main production unit.

  • Nensén, Oskar
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Hansell, Peter
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Palm, Fredrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Cell Biology.
    Role of carbonic anhydrase in acute recovery following renal ischemia reperfusion injury2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 8, article id e0220185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury can cause acute kidney injury. It has previously been reported that kidney oxygen consumption (QO(2)) in relation to glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and thus tubular sodium load, is markedly increased following IR injury, indicating reduced electrolyte transport efficiency. Since proximal tubular sodium reabsorption (TNa) is a major contributor to overall kidney QO(2), we investigated whether inhibition of proximal tubular sodium transport through carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition would improve renal oxygenation following ischemia reperfusion. Anesthetized adult male Sprague Dawley rats were administered the CA inhibitor acetazolamide (50 mg/kg bolus iv), or volume-matched vehicle, and kidney function, hemodynamics and QO(2) were estimated before and after 45 minutes of unilateral complete warm renal ischemia. CA inhibition per se reduced GFR (-20%) and TNa (-22%), while it increased urine flow and urinary sodium excretion (36-fold). Renal blood flow was reduced (-31%) due to increased renal vascular resistance (+37%) without affecting QO(2). IR per se resulted in similar decrease in GFR and TNa, independently of CA activity. However, the QO(2)/TNa ratio following ischemia-reperfusion was profoundly increased in the group receiving CA inhibition, indicating a significant contribution of basal oxygen metabolism to the total kidney QO(2) following inhibition of proximal tubular function after IR injury. Ischemia increased urinary excretion of kidney injury molecule-1, an effect that was unaffected by CA. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that CA inhibition further impairs renal oxygenation and does not protect tubular function in the acute phase following IR injury. Furthermore, these results indicate a major role of the proximal tubule in the acute recovery from an ischemic insult.

  • Plato, N.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Occupat Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bigert, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Occupat Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsson, B-M
    Swedish Work Environm Author, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Alderling, M.
    Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svartengren, Magnus
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Gustavsson, P.
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Unit Occupat Med, Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Occupat & Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Exposure to Particles and Nitrogen Dioxide Among Workers in the Stockholm Underground Train System2019In: SH@W Safety and Health at Work, ISSN 2093-7911, E-ISSN 2093-7997, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 377-383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Exposure to fine particles in urban air has been associated with a number of negative health effects. High levels of fine particles have been detected at underground stations in big cities. We investigated the exposure conditions in four occupational groups in the Stockholm underground train system to identify high-exposed groups and study variations in exposure.

    Methods: PM1 and PM2.5 were measured during three full work shifts on 44 underground workers. Fluctuations in exposure were monitored by a real-time particle monitoring instrument, pDR, DataRAM. Qualitative analysis of particle content was performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Nitrogen dioxide was measured using passive monitors.

    Results: For all underground workers, the geometric mean (GM) of PM1 was 18 mu g/m(3) and of PM2.5 was 37 mu g/m(3). The particle exposure was highest for cleaners/platform workers, and the GM of PM1 was 31.6 mu g/m(3) [geometric standard deviation (GSD), 1.6] and of PM2.5 was 76.5 mu g/m(3) (GSD, 1.3); the particle exposure was lowest for ticket sellers, and the GM of PM1 was 4.9 mu g/m(3) (GSD, 2.1) and of PM2.5 was 9.3 mu g/m(3) (GSD, 1.5). The PM1 and PM2.5 levels were five times higher in the underground system than at the street level, and the particles in the underground had high iron content. The train driver's nitrogen dioxide exposure level was 64.1 mu g/m(3) (GSD, 1.5).

    Conclusions: Cleaners and other platform workers were statistically significantly more exposed to particles than train drivers or ticket sellers. Particle concentrations (PM2.5) in the Stockholm underground system were within the same range as in the New York underground system but were much lower than in several older underground systems around the world.

  • Joffrin, E.
    et al.
    Andersson Sundén, Erik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Binda, Federico
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Cecconello, Marco
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Conroy, Sean
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Ericsson, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Eriksson, Jacob
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Hellesen, Carl
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Hjalmarsson, Anders
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Possnert, Göran
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Primetzhofer, Daniel
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Sahlberg, Arne
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Sjöstrand, Henrik
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Skiba, Mateusz
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Weiszflog, Matthias
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Applied Nuclear Physics.
    Zychor, I
    Overview of the JET preparation for deuterium-tritium operation with the ITER like-wall2019In: Nuclear Fusion, ISSN 0029-5515, E-ISSN 1741-4326, Vol. 59, no 11, article id 112021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For the past several years, the JET scientific programme (Pamela et al 2007 Fusion Eng. Des. 82 590) has been engaged in a multi-campaign effort, including experiments in D, H and T, leading up to 2020 and the first experiments with 50%/50% D-T mixtures since 1997 and the first ever D-T plasmas with the ITER mix of plasma-facing component materials. For this purpose, a concerted physics and technology programme was launched with a view to prepare the D-T campaign (DTE2). This paper addresses the key elements developed by the JET programme directly contributing to the D-T preparation. This intense preparation includes the review of the physics basis for the D-T operational scenarios, including the fusion power predictions through first principle and integrated modelling, and the impact of isotopes in the operation and physics of D-T plasmas (thermal and particle transport, high confinement mode (H-mode) access, Be and W erosion, fuel recovery, etc). This effort also requires improving several aspects of plasma operation for DTE2, such as real time control schemes, heat load control, disruption avoidance and a mitigation system (including the installation of a new shattered pellet injector), novel ion cyclotron resonance heating schemes (such as the three-ions scheme), new diagnostics (neutron camera and spectrometer, active Alfven eigenmode antennas, neutral gauges, radiation hard imaging systems...) and the calibration of the JET neutron diagnostics at 14 MeV for accurate fusion power measurement. The active preparation of JET for the 2020 D-T campaign provides an incomparable source of information and a basis for the future D-T operation of ITER, and it is also foreseen that a large number of key physics issues will be addressed in support of burning plasmas.

  • Dörk, Thilo
    et al.
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Peterlongo, Paolo
    IFOM FIRC Inst Mol Oncol, Genome Diagnost Program, Milan, Italy.
    Mannermaa, Arto
    Univ Eastern Finland, Translat Canc Res Area, Kuopio, Finland;Univ Eastern Finland, Inst Clin Med Pathol & Forens Med, Kuopio, Finland;Kuopio Univ Hosp, Imaging Ctr, Dept Clin Pathol, Kuopio, Finland.
    Bolla, Manjeet K.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Wang, Qin
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Dennis, Joe
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England.
    Ahearn, Thomas
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Andrulis, Irene L.
    Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Res Inst Mt Sinai Hosp, Fred A Litwin Ctr Canc Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Toronto, Dept Mol Genet, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Anton-Culver, Hoda
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Irvine, CA USA.
    Arndt, Volker
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, C070, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Aronson, Kristan J.
    Queens Univ, Dept Publ Hlth Sci, Kingston, ON, Canada;Queens Univ, Canc Res Inst, Kingston, ON, Canada.
    Augustinsson, Annelie
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Freeman, Laura E. Beane
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Beckmann, Matthias W.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Behrens, Sabine
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Bermisheva, Marina
    Russian Acad Sci, Ufa Fed Res Ctr, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa, Russia.
    Blomqvist, Carl
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Helsinki, Finland;Orebro Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Orebro, Sweden.
    Bogdanova, Natalia, V
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany;Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Hannover, Germany;NN Alexandrov Res Inst Oncol & Med Radiol, Minsk, BELARUS.
    Bojesen, Stig E.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Copenhagen Gen Populat Study, Herlev, Denmark;Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Clin Biochem, Herlev, Denmark;Univ Copenhagen, Fac Hlth & Med Sci, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Brauch, Hiltrud
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Stuttgart, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Tubingen, iFIT Cluster Excellence, Tubingen, Germany.
    Brenner, Hermann
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Clin Epidemiol & Aging Res, C070, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, German Canc Consortium DKTK, Heidelberg, Germany;German Canc Res Ctr, Div Prevent Oncol, Heidelberg, Germany;Natl Ctr Tumor Dis NCT, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Burwinkel, Barbara
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Womens Clin Heidelberg, Mol Biol Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Canzian, Federico
    German Canc Res Ctr, Genom Epidemiol Grp, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Chan, Tsun L.
    Canc Genet Ctr, Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Canc Family Registry, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Hong Kong Sanat & Hosp, Dept Pathol, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Chang-Claude, Jenny
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Univ Med Ctr Hamburg Eppendorf, UCCH, Canc Epidemiol Grp, Hamburg, Germany.
    Chanock, Stephen J.
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Choi, Ji-Yeob
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Grad Sch, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Canc Res Inst, Seoul, South Korea.
    Christiansen, Hans
    Hannover Med Sch, Dept Radiat Oncol, Hannover, Germany.
    Clarke, Christine L.
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Couch, Fergus J.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Lab Med & Pathol, Rochester, MN USA.
    Czene, Kamila
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Daly, Mary B.
    Fox Chase Canc Ctr, Dept Clin Genet, 7701 Burholme Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111 USA.
    dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommunicable Dis Epidemiol, London, England.
    Dwek, Miriam
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Eccles, Diana M.
    Univ Southampton, Canc SciencesAcad Unit, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Ekici, Arif B.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Inst Human Genet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Eriksson, Mikael
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Evans, D. Gareth
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Fasching, Peter A.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany;Univ Calif Los Angeles, Dept Med, David Geffen Sch Med, Div Hematol & Oncol, Los Angeles, CA 90024 USA.
    Figueroa, Jonine
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Univ Edinburgh, Usher Inst Populat Hlth Sci & Informat, Med Sch, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland;Canc Res UK Edinburgh Ctr, Edinburgh, Midlothian, Scotland.
    Flyger, Henrik
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp, Herlev & Gentofte Hosp, Dept Breast Surg, Herlev, Denmark.
    Fritschisl, Lin
    Curtin Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Gabrielson, Marike
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gago-Dominguez, Manuela
    Complejo Hosp Univ Santiago, SERGAS, Inst Invest Sanitaria Santiago de Compostela IDIS, Genom Med Grp,Galician Fdn Genom Med, Santiago De Compostela, Spain;Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA.
    Gao, Chi
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Gapstur, Susan M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA;Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Garcia-Saenz, Jose A.
    Ctr Invest Biomed Red Canc CIBERONC, Inst Invest Sanitaria San Carlos IdISSC, Hosp Clin San Carlos, Med Oncol Dept, Madrid, Spain.
    Gaudet, Mia M.
    Amer Canc Soc, Behav & Epidemiol Res Grp, Atlanta, GA 30329 USA.
    Giles, Graham G.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Dept Epidemiol & Prevent Med, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Goldberg, Mark S.
    McGill Univ, Dept Med, Montreal, PQ, Canada;McGill Univ, Royal Victoria Hosp, Div Clin Epidemiol, Montreal, PQ, Canada.
    Goldgar, David E.
    Univ Utah, Sch Med, Huntsman Canc Inst, Dept Dermatol, Salt Lake City, UT USA.
    Guenel, Pascal
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, INSERM, Canc & Environm Grp,Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat H, Villejuif, France.
    Haeberle, Lothar
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Haiman, Christopher A.
    Univ Southern Calif, Dept Prevent Med, Keck Sch Med, Los Angeles, CA USA.
    Hakansson, Niclas
    Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hall, Per
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden;Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hamann, Ute
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Hartman, Mikael
    Natl Univ Singapore, Saw Swee Hock Sch Publ Hlth, Singapore, Singapore;Natl Univ Hlth Syst, Dept Surg, Singapore, Singapore.
    Hauke, Jan
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Familial Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CMMC, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CIO, Cologne, Germany.
    Hein, Alexander
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Comprehens Canc Ctr ER EMN, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Hillemanns, Peter
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Hogervorst, Frans B. L.
    Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Netherlands Canc Inst, Family Canc Clin, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Hooning, Maartje J.
    Erasmus MC Canc Inst, Dept Med Oncol, Family Canc Clin, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    Hopper, John L.
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Howell, Tony
    Univ Manchester, Div Canc Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Huo, Dezheng
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Ito, Hidemi
    Aichi Canc Ctr Res Inst, Div Canc Epidemiol & Prevent, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan;Nagoya Univ, Div Canc Epidemiol, Grad Sch Med, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Iwasaki, Motoki
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Div Epidemiol, Tokyo, Japan.
    Jakubowska, Anna
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland;Pomeranian Med Univ, Lab Mol Biol & Genet Diagnost, Szczecin, Poland.
    Janni, Wolfgang
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Ulm, Germany.
    John, Esther M.
    Stanford Univ, Sch Med, Stanford Canc Inst, Div Oncol,Dept Med, Stanford, CA USA.
    Jung, Audrey
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kaaks, Rudolf
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Kang, Daehee
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Grad Sch, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Canc Res Inst, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Prevent Med, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kapoor, Pooja Middha
    German Canc Res Ctr, Div Canc Epidemiol, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Fac Med, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Khusnutdinova, Elza
    Russian Acad Sci, Ufa Fed Res Ctr, Inst Biochem & Genet, Ufa, Russia;Bashkir State Univ, Dept Genet & Fundamental Med, Ufa, Russia.
    Kim, Sung-Won
    Daer St Marys Hosp, Dept Surg, Seoul, South Korea.
    Kitahara, Cari M.
    NCI, Radiat Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Koutros, Stella
    NCI, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, NIH, Dept Hlth & Human Serv, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Kraft, Peter
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA.
    Kristensen, Vessela N.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Kwon, Ava
    Canc Genet Ctr, Hong Kong Hereditary Breast Canc Family Registry, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Univ Hong Kong, Dept Surg, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong, Peoples R China;Hong Kong Sanat & Hosp, Dept Surg, Happy Valley, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Lambrechts, Diether
    VIB, VIB Ctr Canc Biol, Leuven, Belgium;Univ Leuven, Dept Human Genet, Lab Translat Genet, Leuven, Belgium.
    Le Marchand, Loic
    Univ Hawaii, Epidemiol Program, Canc Ctr, Honolulu, HI 96822 USA.
    Li, Jingmei
    Genome Inst Singapore, Human Genet Div, Singapore, Singapore.
    Lindstrom, Sara
    Univ Washington, Dept Epidemiol, Sch Publ Hlth, Seattle, WA 98195 USA;Fred Hutchinson Canc Res Ctr, Div Publ Hlth Sci, 1124 Columbia St, Seattle, WA 98104 USA.
    Linet, Martha
    NCI, Radiat Epidemiol Branch, Div Canc Epidemiol & Genet, Bethesda, MD 20892 USA.
    Lo, Wing-Yee
    Dr Margarete Fischer Bosch Inst Clin Pharmacol, Stuttgart, Germany;Univ Tubingen, Tubingen, Germany.
    Long, Jirong
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Lophatananon, Artitaya
    Univ Manchester, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Div Populat Hlth,Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Lubinski, Jan
    Pomeranian Med Univ, Dept Genet & Pathol, Szczecin, Poland.
    Manoochehri, Mehdi
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Manoukian, Siranoush
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori Milano, Dept Med Oncol & Hematol, Unit Med Genet, Milan, Italy.
    Margolin, Sara
    Soder Sjukhuset, Dept Oncol, Stockholm, Sweden;Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Martinez, Elena
    Univ Calif San Diego, Moores Canc Ctr, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA;Univ Calif San Diego, Dept Family Med & Publ Hlth, La Jolla, CA 92093 USA.
    Matsuo, Keitaro
    Aichi Canc Ctr Res Inst, Div Canc Epidemiol & Prevent, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan;Nagoya Univ, Div Canc Epidemiol, Grad Sch Med, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan.
    Mavroudis, Dimitris
    Univ Hosp Heraklion, Dept Med Oncol, Iraklion, Greece.
    Meindl, Alfons
    Ludwig Maximilian Univ Munich, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Munich, Germany.
    Menon, Usha
    UCL, Inst Clin Trials & Methodol, MRC Clin Trials Unit, London, England.
    Milne, Roger L.
    Canc Council Victoria, Canc Epidemiol Div, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, Clayton, Vic, Australia.
    Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd
    Univ Malaya, UM Canc Res Inst, Breast Canc Res Unit, Med Ctr, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
    Muir, Kenneth
    Univ Warwick, Warwick Med Sch, Div Hlth Sci, Coventry, W Midlands, England;Univ Manchester, Fac Biol Med & Hlth, Sch Hlth Sci, Div Populat Hlth,Hlth Serv Res & Primary Care, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Mulligan, Anna Marie
    Univ Toronto, Dept Lab Med & Pathobiol, Toronto, ON, Canada;Univ Hlth Network, Lab Med Program, Toronto, ON, Canada.
    Neuhausen, Susan L.
    City Hope Natl Med Ctr, Dept Populat Sci, Beckman Res Inst, Duarte, CA USA.
    Nevanlinna, Heli
    Univ Helsinki, Helsinki Univ Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Helsinki, Finland.
    Neven, Patrick
    Univ Hosp Leuven, Leuven Multidisciplinary Breast Ctr, Leuven Canc Inst, Dept OfOncol, Leuven, Belgium.
    Newman, William G.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Offit, Kenneth
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Clin Genet Res Lab, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Olopade, Olufunmilayo, I
    Univ Chicago, Ctr Clin Canc Genet, Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Olshan, Andrew F.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Dept Epidemiol, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Chapel Hill, NC USA;Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Olson, Janet E.
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Olsson, Hakan
    Lund Univ, Dept Canc Epidemiol, Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden.
    Park, Sue K.
    Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Biomed Sci, Grad Sch, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Canc Res Inst, Seoul, South Korea;Seoul Natl Univ, Dept Prevent Med, Coll Med, Seoul, South Korea.
    Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won
    Hannover Med Sch, Gynaecol Res Unit, Hannover, Germany.
    Peto, Julian
    London Sch Hyg & Trop Med, Dept Noncommunicable Dis Epidemiol, London, England.
    Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana
    Macedonian Acad Sci & Arts, Res Ctr Genet Engn & Biotechnol Georgi D Efremov, Skopje, Macedonia.
    Pohl-Rescigno, Esther
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Familial Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CMMC, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CIO, Cologne, Germany.
    Presneau, Nadege
    Univ Westminster, Fac Sci & Technol, Dept Biomed Sci, London, England.
    Rack, Brigitte
    Univ Hosp Ulm, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Ulm, Germany.
    Radice, Paolo
    Fdn IRCCS Ist Nazl Tumori INT, Dept Res, Unit Mol Bases Genet Risk & Genet Testing, Milan, Italy.
    Rashid, Muhammad U.
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany;Shaukat Khanum Mem Canc Hosp & Res Ctr SKMCH & RC, Dept Basic Sci, Lahore, Pakistan.
    Rennert, Gad
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Rennert, Hedy S.
    Carmel Hosp, Clalit Natl Canc Control Ctr, Haifa, Israel;Technion Fac Med, Haifa, Israel.
    Romero, Atocha
    Hosp Univ Puerta Hierro, Med Oncol Dept, Madrid, Spain.
    Ruebner, Matthias
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Saloustros, Emmanouil
    Univ Hosp Larissa, Dept Oncol, Larisa, Greece.
    Schmidt, Marjanka K.
    Antoni von Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Div Mol Pathol, Netherlands Canc Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands;Antoni von Leeuwenhoek Hosp, Div Psychosocial Res & Epidemiol, Netherlands Canc Inst, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Schmutzler, Rita K.
    Univ Cologne, Fac Med, Ctr Familial Breast & Ovarian Canc, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Univ Hosp Cologne, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CMMC, Cologne, Germany;Univ Cologne, Fac Med, CIO, Cologne, Germany.
    Schneider, Michael O.
    Friedrich Alexander Univ Erlangen Nuremberg, Comprehens Canc Ctr Erlangen EMN, Univ Hosp Erlangen, Dept Gynaecol & Obstet, Erlangen, Germany.
    Schoemaker, Minouk J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England.
    Scott, Christopher
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Shen, Chen-Yang
    Acad Sinica, Inst Biomed Sci, Taipei, Taiwan;China Med Univ, Sch Publ Hlth, Taichung, Taiwan.
    Shu, Xiao-Ou
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Simard, Jacques
    Univ Laval, CHU Quebec, Res Ctr, Genom Ctr, Quebec City, PQ, Canada.
    Slager, Susan
    Mayo Clin, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    Smichkoska, Snezhana
    Ss Cyril & Methodius Univ Skopje, Med Fac, Univ Clin Radiotherapy & Oncol, Skopje, Macedonia.
    Southey, Melissa C.
    Monash Univ, Sch Clin Sci, Precis Med, Monash Hlth, Clayton, Vic, Australia;Univ Melbourne, Dept Clin Pathol, Melbourne, Vic, Australia.
    Spinelli, John J.
    BC Canc, Populat Oncol, Vancouver, BC, Canada;Univ British Columbia, Sch Populat & Publ Hlth, Vancouver, BC, Canada.
    Stone, Jennifer
    Univ Melbourne, Ctr Epidemiol & Biostat, Melbourne Sch Populat & Global Hlth, Melbourne, Vic, Australia;Curtin Univ, Curtin UWA Ctr Genet Origins Hlth & Dis, Perth, WA, Australia;Univ Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Surowy, Harald
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Epidemiol Grp, C080, Heidelberg, Germany;Heidelberg Univ, Univ Womens Clin Heidelberg, Mol Biol Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany.
    Swerdlow, Anthony J.
    Inst Canc Res, Div Genet & Epidemiol, London, England;Inst Canc Res, Div Breast Canc Res, London, England.
    Tamimi, Rulla M.
    Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Program Genet Epidemiol & Stat Genet, Boston, MA USA;Harvard TH Chan Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Boston, MA USA;Brigham & Womens Hosp, Dept Med, Channing Div Network Med, 75 Francis St, Boston, MA 02115 USA;Harvard Med Sch, Boston, MA 02115 USA.
    Tapper, William J.
    Univ Southampton, Fac Med, Southampton, Hants, England.
    Teo, Soo H.
    Univ Malaya, UM Canc Res Inst, Breast Canc Res Unit, Med Ctr, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;Canc Res Malaysia, Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia.
    Terry, Mary Beth
    Columbia Univ, Mailman Sch Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, New York, NY USA.
    Toland, Amanda E.
    Ohio State Univ, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, Columbus, OH 43210 USA.
    Tollenaar, Rob A. E. M.
    Leiden Univ, Dept Surg, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Torres, Diana
    German Canc Res Ctr, Mol Genet Breast Canc, Heidelberg, Germany;Pontificia Univ Javeriana, Inst Human Genet, Bogota, Colombia.
    Torres-Mejia, Gabriela
    Natl Inst Publ Hlth, Ctr Populat Hlth Res, Mexico City, DF, Mexico.
    Troester, Melissa A.
    Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, Dept Epidemiol, Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Chapel Hill, NC USA;Univ North Carolina Chapel Hill, UNC Lineberger Comprehens Canc Ctr, Chapel Hill, NC USA.
    Truong, Therese
    Univ Paris Sud, Univ Paris Saclay, INSERM, Canc & Environm Grp,Ctr Res Epidemiol & Populat H, Villejuif, France.
    Tsugane, Shoichiro
    Natl Canc Ctr, Ctr Publ Hlth Sci, Tokyo, Japan.
    Untch, Michael
    Helios Clin Berlin Buch, Dept Gynecol & Obstet, Berlin, Germany.
    Vachon, Celine M.
    Mayo Clin, Div Epidemiol, Dept Hlth Sci Res, Rochester, MN USA.
    van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.
    Erasmus MC, Dept Clin Genet, Rotterdam, Netherlands.
    van Veen, Elke M.
    Univ Manchester, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Fac Biol, Sch Biol Sci,Div Evolut & Genom Sci, Manchester, Lancs, England;Manchester Univ Hosp NHS Fdn Trust, St Marys Hosp, Manchester Acad Hlth Sci Ctr, Manchester Ctr Genom Med, Manchester, Lancs, England.
    Vijai, Joseph
    Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Clin Genet Res Lab, Dept Canc Biol & Genet, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA;Mem Sloan Kettering Canc Ctr, Dept Med, Clin Genet Serv, 1275 York Ave, New York, NY 10021 USA.
    Wendt, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Sodersjukhuset, Dept Clin Sci & Educ, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wolk, Alicja
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgical Sciences, Orthopaedics. Karolinska Inst, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Yu, Jyh-Cherng
    Triserv Gen Hosp, Natl Def Med Ctr, Dept Surg, Taipei, Taiwan.
    Zheng, Wei
    Vanderbilt Univ, Sch Med, Vanderbilt Ingram Canc Ctr, Div Epidemiol,Dept Med,Vanderbilt Epidemiol Ctr, Nashville, TN 37212 USA.
    Ziogas, Argyrios
    Univ Calif Irvine, Dept Epidemiol, Genet Epidemiol Res Inst, Irvine, CA USA.
    Ziv, Elad
    Univ Calif San Francisco, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehens Canc Ctr, Inst Human Genet, Dept Med, San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Dunning, Alison M.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Pharoah, Paul D. P.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Schindler, Detlev
    Univ Wurzburg, Bioctr, Inst Human Genet, Wurzburg, Germany.
    Devilee, Peter
    Leiden Univ, Dept Pathol, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands;Leiden Univ, Dept Human Genet, Med Ctr, Leiden, Netherlands.
    Easton, Douglas F.
    Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Publ Hlth & Primary Care, Cambridge, England;Univ Cambridge, Ctr Canc Genet Epidemiol, Dept Oncol, Cambridge, England.
    Balleine, Rosemary
    Pathol West ICPMR, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Baxter, Robert
    Univ Sydney, Royal North Shore Hosp, Kollig Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Braye, Stephen
    John Hunter Hosp, Pathol North, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Carpenter, Jane
    Univ Sydney, Westmead Inst Med Res, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Dahlstrom, Jane
    Canberra Hosp, Dept Anat Pathol, ACT Pathol, Canberra, ACT, Australia;Australian Natl Univ, ANU Med Sch, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Forbes, John
    Univ Newcastle, Dept Surg Oncol, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hosp, Australian New Zealand Breast Canc Trials Grp, Newcastle, NSW, Australia;Univ Newcastle, Sch Med & Publ Hlth, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Lee, C. Soon
    Univ Western Sydney, Sch Sci & Hlth, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Marsh, Deborah
    Univ Sydney, Royal North Shore Hosp, Kolling Inst Med Res, Hormones & Canc Grp, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Morey, Adrienne
    Syd Path St Vincents Hosp, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Pathmanathan, Nirmala
    Westmead Hosp, Westmead Breast Canc Inst, Dept Tissue Pathol & Diagnost Oncol, Pathol West, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Scott, Rodney
    Hunter Med Res Inst, Ctr Informat Based Med, Newcastle, NSW, Australia;Univ Newcastle, Fac Hlth, Prior Res Ctr Canc, Sch Biomed Sci & Pharm, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Simpson, Peter
    Univ Queensland, UQ Ctr Clin Res & Sch Med, Brisbane, Qld, Australia.
    Spigelman, Allan
    St Vincents Hosp, Kinghorn Canc Ctr, Hereditary Canc Clin, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Wilcken, Nicholas
    Westmead Hosp, Crown Princess Mary Canc Ctr, Sydney, NSW, Australia;Univ Sydney, Sydney Med Sch Westmead, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
    Yip, Desmond
    Australian Natl Univ, ANU Med Sch, Canberra, ACT, Australia;Canberra Hosp, Dept Med Oncol, Canberra, ACT, Australia.
    Zeps, Nikolajs
    St John God Perth Northern Hosp, Perth, WA, Australia.
    Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Alnaes, Grethe I. Grenaker
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Sahlberg, Kristine K.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Vestre Viken Hosp, Dept Res, Drammen, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Breast Canc Res Consortium, Oslo, Norway.
    Ottestad, Lars
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Karesen, Rolf
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp Ulleval, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Dept Canc, Sect Breast & Endocrine Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Schlichting, Ellen
    Oslo Univ Hosp Ulleval, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Dept Canc, Sect Breast & Endocrine Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Holmen, Marit Muri
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Radiol & Nucl Med, Oslo, Norway.
    Sauer, Toril
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Pathol, Lorenskog, Norway.
    Haakensen, Vilde
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway.
    Engebraten, Olav
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Tumor Biol, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Naume, Bjorn
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Fossa, Alexander
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Natl Advisory Unit Late Effects Canc Treatment, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Kiserud, Cecile E.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Natl Advisory Unit Late Effects Canc Treatment, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Reinertsen, Kristin, V
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Natl Advisory Unit Late Effects Canc Treatment, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Helland, Aslaug
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Radiumhosp, Inst Canc Res, Dept Canc Genet, Oslo, Norway;Oslo Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Radiumhosp, Oslo, Norway.
    Riis, Margit
    Oslo Univ Hosp Ulleval, Div Surg Canc & Transplantat Med, Dept Canc, Sect Breast & Endocrine Surg, Oslo, Norway.
    Geisler, Juergen
    Univ Oslo, Fac Med, Inst Clin Med, Oslo, Norway;Akershus Univ Hosp, Dept Oncol, Lorenskog, Norway.
    Two truncating variants in FANCC and breast cancer risk2019In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 12524Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with 22 disease-causing genes reported to date. In some FA genes, monoallelic mutations have been found to be associated with breast cancer risk, while the risk associations of others remain unknown. The gene for FA type C, FANCC, has been proposed as a breast cancer susceptibility gene based on epidemiological and sequencing studies. We used the Oncoarray project to genotype two truncating FANCC variants (p.R185X and p.R548X) in 64,760 breast cancer cases and 49,793 controls of European descent. FANCC mutations were observed in 25 cases (14 with p.R185X, 11 with p.R548X) and 26 controls (18 with p.R185X, 8 with p.R548X). There was no evidence of an association with the risk of breast cancer, neither overall (odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.44-1.33, p = 0.4) nor by histology, hormone receptor status, age or family history. We conclude that the breast cancer risk association of these two FANCC variants, if any, is much smaller than for BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2 mutations. If this applies to all truncating variants in FANCC it would suggest there are differences between FA genes in their roles on breast cancer risk and demonstrates the merit of large consortia for clarifying risk associations of rare variants.

  • Banerjee, Souvik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Science and Technology, Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Theoretical Physics.
    Engelsoy, Julius
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larana-Aragon, Jorge
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sundborg, Bo
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Thorlacius, Larus
    Stockholm Univ, Oskar Klein Ctr Cosmoparticle Phys, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, AlbaNova, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden;Univ Iceland, Sci Inst, Dunhaga 3, IS-107 Reykjavik, Iceland.
    Wintergerst, Nico
    Univ Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Inst, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark.
    Quenched coupling, entangled equilibria, and correlated composite operators: a tale of two O(N) models2019In: Journal of High Energy Physics (JHEP), ISSN 1126-6708, E-ISSN 1029-8479, no 8, article id 139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A macroscopic version of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen entanglement is obtained by quenching a quadratic coupling between two O(N) vector models. A quench of the mixed vacuum produces an excited entangled state, reminiscent of purified thermal equilibrium, whose properties can be studied analytically in the free limit of the individual field theories. The decoupling of different wavelength modes in free field theory prevents true thermalisation but a more subtle difference is that the density operator obtained by a partial trace does not commute with the post-quench Hamiltonian. Generalized thermal behaviour is obtained at late times, in the limit of weak initial mixing or a smooth but rapid quench. More surprisingly, late-time correlation functions of composite operators in the post-quench free field theory share interesting properties with correlators in strongly coupled systems. We propose a holographic interpretation of our result.