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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Redmalm, D. (2019). A bifocal perspective on the riding school: On Lévinas and equine faces. In: Jonna Bornemark, Petra Andersson, Ulla Ekström von Essen (Ed.), Equine Cultures in Transition: Ethical Questions (pp. 193-206). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A bifocal perspective on the riding school: On Lévinas and equine faces
2019 (English)In: Equine Cultures in Transition: Ethical Questions / [ed] Jonna Bornemark, Petra Andersson, Ulla Ekström von Essen, London: Routledge, 2019, p. 193-206Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Redmalm’s chapter, “A Bifocal Perspective on the Riding School: On Lévinas and Equine Faces” draws on Emmanuel Lévinas’ ethics to study the ambiguous relationship between horses and leisure riders in riding schools. For Lévinas, ethics begins in the face-to-face relationship. Being bifocal, horses do not “face” humans in an anthropomorphic sense; however, deeply meaningful relationships emerge from the embodied horse-human reciprocity. The encounters at the riding school opens up the possibility of recognizing a Lévinasian “face” in horses in a wide sense of the term, but the prevalent instrumental approach towards horses as learning tools obscures horses’ status as possible ethical others. The riding school thus creates a bifocal view of horses as both partners in embodied emphatic entanglement, and instruments that riders must learn to handle and control. The riding school as such works as an environment where these two opposing versions of the horse are accommodated so that the potential tension between the two perspectives is alleviated. Nevertheless, it is possible to imagine alternative human-horse relationships by focusing on the situations at riding schools where equine faces are allowed to emerge.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2019
Series
Routledge Advances in Sociology ; 256
Keywords
Animal studies, ethics, Donna Haraway, horses, human-animal studies, Emmanuel Lévinas, posthuman ethics, posthumanism, riding schools
National Category
Sociology Social Anthropology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376973 (URN)9781138549593 (ISBN)
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-04-26Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2019). To make pets live, and to let them die: The biopolitics of pet keeping (1ed.). In: Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm (Ed.), Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life (pp. 241-263). London: Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To make pets live, and to let them die: The biopolitics of pet keeping
2019 (English)In: Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life / [ed] Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm, London: Palgrave Macmillan , 2019, 1, p. 241-263Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Pets are often considered to be friends or part of the nuclear family, and many pets are grieved when they die. But pets are also routinely bred in abundance, bought, sold, and euthanized when they are unwanted. The aim of this chapter is to suggest a way of understanding pet keeping in the light of pets’ paradoxical status between “grievable” and “killable.” It argues that the ambiguous conceptualization of the pet as an irreplaceable individual and as a consumable resource corresponds to a biopolitical rationale for breeding, buying, selling and killing pets. The chapter suggests that pet keeping can be regarded as a demarcated zone where biopolitical norms surrounding life and death can be played with, managed and reproduced.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2019 Edition: 1
Keywords
Giorgio Agamben, animal studies, bereavement, biopolitics, biopower, Judith Butler, cats, companion animals, consumption, disciplinary power, dogs, Michel Foucault, grief, human-animal studies, pets, posthumanism, subject position, subjectification, subjectivity
National Category
Sociology Philosophy Social Anthropology
Research subject
Sociology; Philosophy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388321 (URN)978-3-030-11484-8 (ISBN)978-3-030-11485-5 (ISBN)
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-1465
Available from: 2019-06-28 Created: 2019-06-28 Last updated: 2019-06-28
Schuurman, N. & Redmalm, D. (2019). Transgressing boundaries of grievability: Ambiguous emotions at pet cemeteries. Emotion, Space and Society, 31, 32-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transgressing boundaries of grievability: Ambiguous emotions at pet cemeteries
2019 (English)In: Emotion, Space and Society, ISSN 1755-4586, E-ISSN 1878-0040, Vol. 31, p. 32-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387974 (URN)10.1016/j.emospa.2019.03.006 (DOI)000469383500005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. & Skoglund, A. (2018). Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship. In: European Group of Organization Studies: . Paper presented at EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5–7, 2018 Tallinn, Estonia.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bringing one’s self to work and back again: The role of surprises in alternative entrepreneurship
2018 (English)In: European Group of Organization Studies, 2018Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

With the increasing realization that boundaries are constructed in relation to certain “differences” that make up an organizational “inside” in relation to its “outside”, organizational scholars have intensified their studies of how identities are hosted and managed within organizations. Less known, however, is the wish of organizations to disrupt and destabilize their members’ subjectification to the organization by inviting them to with personally challenging experiences and curated surprises. To explore this type of intentional disruptions, we study a technology company that engages in a number of social issues only loosely connected to their main product, a digital presentation tool. We especially focus on one intervention: a yearly project in which the company’s employees renovate buildings in a community where most are Roma with low socio-economic status. 

Keywords
Alternative Entrepreneurship, employee, organization, subjectivity, surprises
National Category
Economics and Business Sociology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management; Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390563 (URN)
Conference
EGOS: Surprise in and around Organizations: Journeys to the Unexpected, July 5–7, 2018 Tallinn, Estonia
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E19/14
Available from: 2019-08-12 Created: 2019-08-12 Last updated: 2019-08-12Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. & Holmberg, T. (2018). Stable Genius?: The making of “good riders” and “good horses” at the riding school. In: : . Paper presented at SANT/FAS 2018 Conference: Vulnerabilities, April 19–21, 2018, Uppsala, Sweden. Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stable Genius?: The making of “good riders” and “good horses” at the riding school
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

How do riders valuate human and equine psyches and bodies?  The paper builds on a study in which riding groups are followed before, during and after riding lessons. The analysis shows that early career riders view horses partly as passive tools and partly as threatening adversaries. After a while, riding school pupils come to see horses’ vulnerable position—more experienced riders explain that they try to understand the horses’ perspective of the riding school, which includes long days, difficult pupils and sometimes violent treatment. While riders increasingly come to think of horses as persons, they begin thinking of themselves as human animals—as corporeal rather than cerebral beings. The riding school is thus a place where humans are becoming horse, and the horses emerge as human-like creatures. But while most riders contrast the liberating environment of the riding school to the alienating conditions of the work-week, some also recognize that the riding school requires that the horses are alienated from their own equine selves. Ultimately, “good horses” are the ones seen as willing to accept these conditions. “Good riders” learn to benefit from those same conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: , 2018
Keywords
Animal studies, centaurs, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, horses, human-animal studies, Karl Marx, riding schools
National Category
Social Anthropology
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376965 (URN)
Conference
SANT/FAS 2018 Conference: Vulnerabilities, April 19–21, 2018, Uppsala, Sweden
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Törnqvist, M. (2018). Stunder av total sammansmältning: Essä i programboken för teaterföreställningen Ocean. Stockholm: Unga Klara
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Stunder av total sammansmältning: Essä i programboken för teaterföreställningen Ocean
2018 (Swedish)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [sv]

Essä i programboken för teaterföreställningen Ocean. Pjäsen handlar om olika former av intimitet och utgår från forskningsprojektet "Intimitetens sociala former: Närhetspraktik och identitet i kollektivt boende, husdjursrelationer och pardans". Projektet, som finansieras av Vetenskapsrådet, undersöker kollektivboenden, relationen mellan människor och djur, ridskolor, stödgrupper för sexmissbrukare och dansentusiaster. Pjäsen inkluderar även ett särskilt fokus på relationer över nätet. Pjäsen är skriven och regisserad av Paula Stenström Öhman. Pjäsen kunde förverkligas bland annat tack vare ett anslag från Riksbankens jubileumsfond, genom projektet Sociologi för scen.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Stockholm: Unga Klara, 2018. p. 8
Keywords
Intimitet, teater, socialitet, relationer, identitet, digitalisering, sociala medier, internet, kollektivboende, husdjur, hästar, ridning, dans, dansband, tango, sexmissbruk, gruppterapi, Giorgio Agamben, Judith Butler, Sigmund Freud, Zygmunt Bauman
National Category
Sociology Performing Art Studies Gender Studies Pedagogy
Research subject
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343884 (URN)
Projects
Intimitetens sociala formerSociologi för scen
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, KOM16-1384:1
Available from: 2018-03-02 Created: 2018-03-02 Last updated: 2018-03-02
Redmalm, D. & Skoglund, A. (2018). Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions. In: : . Paper presented at Sociologidagarna, the Swedish Sociological Association Conference, March 7–9, 2018, Lund, Sweden. Lund
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Taking one’s self to work and back again: Alternative Entrepreneurship and Social interventions
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Scholars have increasingly paid interest to the way companies build a brand and an office culture by encouraging employees to talk about and cultivate their creative interests and personal values within the frames of their occupation. By bringing one’s self to work the employee contributes to a creative work environment that attracts potential candidates, and that benefits economic gain. This paper focuses on how the IT-company Prezi, founded in Hungary in 2009, creates outlets for the personal dimensions that employees bring to work. Prezi attracts employees sharing liberal and cosmopolitan views who contribute to building a brand and an office culture outside-in, in sharp contrast with the surrounding society characterized by a wave of right-wing populism and nationalist sentiments in Hungary. As a consequence, employees talk of their workplace as a protected “bubble.”

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: , 2018
Keywords
Giorgio Agamben, Alternative Entrepreneurship, Michel Foucault, identity, information and communication technology, organizational culture, Roma, Subjectivity
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Sociology; Business Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376969 (URN)
Conference
Sociologidagarna, the Swedish Sociological Association Conference, March 7–9, 2018, Lund, Sweden
Projects
Videography of "Alternative Entrepreneurship"
Funder
Ragnar Söderbergs stiftelse, E 14/19
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-09-26Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. & Redmalm, D. (2017). 'Doggy-biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog. Organization, 24(2), 240-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'Doggy-biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog
2017 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 240-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article, we turn to literatures that advance Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family – the First Dog called Bo Obama. With analytical focus on vitalisation efforts, we follow the construction of Bo in various outlets, such as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades and the negotiation thereof show how contemporary biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities. We discuss ‘cuddly management’ in relation to Foucauldian scholarship within organisation and management studies and propose that the construction of Bo facilitates interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference circumscribed by vitalisation efforts that we pinpoint as ‘doggy-biopolics'.

Keywords
Animal Studies, domestic animals, First Dog, management techniques, Michel Foucault, posthuman biopolitics, US governing
National Category
Engineering and Technology Sociology
Research subject
Engineering Science with specialization in industrial engineering and management
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-304657 (URN)10.1177/1350508416666938 (DOI)000398040100006 ()
Available from: 2016-10-06 Created: 2016-10-06 Last updated: 2017-04-25Bibliographically approved
Redmalm, D. (2016). Discipline and Puppies: Control, Discipline and Biopower in More-than-Human Homes. In: : . Paper presented at European Society for Literature, Science and the Arts, June 14–17, 2016, Stockholm, Sweden. Stockholm
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discipline and Puppies: Control, Discipline and Biopower in More-than-Human Homes
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This study draws on interviews with eighteen pet owners to conceptualize how they organize their lives in relation to their pets. I use Foucault’s notion of the bipolar technology of disciplinary power and regulatory biopower in combination with Haraway’s material-semiotics to explore the normative frameworks that structure the relationship between pet and owner and make it meaningful. The analysis shows that the boundaries of the home, the play of power between bodies, and exchanges of love and care are central to producing the pet relationship as inherently meaningful and as an indispensible part of the lives of both pet keepers and pets. While control is present in the owners’ management of the home, the operation of more subtle forms of power can be exposed in the owners’ accounts. A balance between discipline and freedom enables the construction of both human and other identities: pet owners produce their pets’ subjectivity by speaking of them as autonomous persons, while and pets presence in the home also enable their owners’ subjectivity. Pets do not only leave traces in the accounts of their owners, but are co-constituents of their owner’s accounts; in a sense using their owners as linguistic prostheses. I end the article by comparing pet keeping to Foucault’s idea of a lived critique to underline that the power dynamics of pet keeping problematize the often taken-for-granted status of one of sociology’s main objects of study: “the human.”

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: , 2016
Keywords
Biopolitics, biopower, companion animals, control, cynics, Diogenes, Michel Foucault, Donna Haraway, pets
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Sociology; Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377022 (URN)
Conference
European Society for Literature, Science and the Arts, June 14–17, 2016, Stockholm, Sweden
Projects
Intimitetens sociala former
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 421-2014-1465
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Skoglund, A. & Redmalm, D. (2016). ‘Doggy-Biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog. In: : . Paper presented at Sociologidagarna 2016: Överskridande sociologi, 10-12 mars..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘Doggy-Biopolitics’: Governing via the First Dog
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Biopolitics, traditionally understood as management of the human population, has been extended to include nonhuman animal life and posthuman life. In this article we turn to these advancements of Foucauldian biopolitics to explore the mode of government enabled by the dog of the US presidential family—the First Dog called Bo Obama. We follow the construction of Bo in various outlets from well-known and less famous sources, as the websites of the White House and an animal rights organisation. Bo’s microphysical escapades in and around the White House show how posthuman biopolitics, which targets the vitality of the dog population, is linked to seductive neoliberal management techniques and subjectivities that enhance ‘cuddly management.’ Bo also facilitates a proliferation of interspecies family norms and an empathic embrace of difference. We thus suggest that Bo makes possible a mode of government nurtured by vitality, playfulness and posthuman norms, what we call ‘doggy-biopolitics.’

Keywords
Animal studies, posthuman biopolitics, Michel Foucault, First Dog, domestic animals, management techniques, US governing
National Category
Sociology Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-285900 (URN)
Conference
Sociologidagarna 2016: Överskridande sociologi, 10-12 mars.
Available from: 2016-04-20 Created: 2016-04-20 Last updated: 2017-12-19
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9902-1191

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