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Manninen, M. A., Damlien, H., Kleppe, J. I., Knutsson, K., Murashkin, A., Niemi, A. R., . . . Persson, P. (2021). First encounters in the north: cultural diversity and gene flow in Early Mesolithic Scandinavia. Antiquity, 95(380), 310-328, Article ID PII S0003598X20002525.
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>First encounters in the north: cultural diversity and gene flow in Early Mesolithic Scandinavia
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2021 (engelsk)Inngår i: Antiquity, ISSN 0003-598X, E-ISSN 1745-1744, Vol. 95, nr 380, s. 310-328, artikkel-id PII S0003598X20002525Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Population genetic studies often overlook the evidence for variability and change in past material culture. Here, the authors use a Mesolithic example to demonstrate the importance of integrating archaeological evidence into the interpretation of the Scandinavian hunter-gatherer genetic group. Genetic studies conclude that this group resulted from two single-event dispersals into Scandinavia before 7500 BC. Archaeological evidence, however, shows at least six immigration events pre-dating the earliest DNA, and that the first incoming groups arrived in Scandinavia before 9000 BC. The findings underline the importance of conducting careful archaeological analysis of prehistoric human dispersal in tandem with the study of ancient population genomics.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Antiquity Publications, 2021
Emneord
Scandinavia, Mesolithic, aDNA, lithic technology, human dispersal
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-452716 (URN)10.15184/aqy.2020.252 (DOI)000680967800011 ()
Forskningsfinansiär
The Research Council of Norway, 231305
Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-09-17 Laget: 2021-09-17 Sist oppdatert: 2021-09-17bibliografisk kontrollert
Apel, J., Olausson, D., Knutsson, K., Knutsson, H. & Taffinder, J. (2019). Errett Callahan (1937-2019) and his impact on Swedish archaeology. Fornvännen, 114(4), 258-262
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Errett Callahan (1937-2019) and his impact on Swedish archaeology
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2019 (engelsk)Inngår i: Fornvännen, ISSN 0015-7813, E-ISSN 1404-9430, Vol. 114, nr 4, s. 258-262Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
ROYAL ACADEMY LETTERS, HISTORY & ANTIQUITIES, 2019
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-407112 (URN)000510972700007 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2020-03-19 Laget: 2020-03-19 Sist oppdatert: 2021-02-10bibliografisk kontrollert
Fraser, M., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Evans, J., Storå, J., Götherström, A., Wallin, P., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2018). New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 17, 325-334
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>New insights on cultural dualism and population structure in the MiddleNeolithic Funnel Beaker culture on the island of Gotland
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2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 17, s. 325-334Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years it has been shown that the Neolithization of Europe was partly driven by migration of farming groups admixing with local hunter-gatherer groups as they dispersed across the continent. However, little research has been done on the cultural duality of contemporaneous foragers and farming populations in the same region. Here we investigate the demographic history of the Funnel Beaker culture [Trichterbecherkultur or TRB, c. 4000–2800 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture complex [PWC, c. 3300–2300 cal BCE] during the Nordic Middle Neolithic period on the island of Gotland, Sweden. We use a multidisciplinary approach to investigate individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen, the only confirmed TRB burial on the island. We present new radiocarbon dating, isotopic analyses for diet and mobility, and mitochondrial DNA haplogroup data to infer maternal inheritance. We also present a new Sr-baseline of 0.71208 ± 0.0016 for the local isotope variation. We compare and discuss our findings together with that of contemporaneous populations in Sweden and the North European mainland.

The radiocarbon dating and Strontium isotopic ratios show that the dolmen was used between c. 3300–2700 cal BCE by a population which displayed local Sr-signals. Mitochondrial data show that the individuals buried in the Ansarve dolmen had maternal genetic affinity to that of other Early and Middle Neolithic farming cultures in Europe, distinct from that of the contemporaneous PWC on the island. Furthermore, they exhibited a strict terrestrial and/or slightly varied diet in contrast to the strict marine diet of the PWC. The findings indicate that two different contemporary groups coexisted on the same island for several hundred years with separate cultural identity, lifestyles, as well as dietary patterns.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2018
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Molekylär genetik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343835 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2017.09.002 (DOI)000429561000031 ()
Forskningsfinansiär
Berit Wallenberg FoundationGunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelseHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-03-01 Laget: 2018-03-01 Sist oppdatert: 2020-06-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Fraser, M., Sjödin, P., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Evans, J., Svedjemo, G., Knutsson, K., . . . Storå, J. (2018). The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 20, 324-337
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The Stone Cist Conundrum: A multidisciplinary approach to investigate Late Neolithic/ Early Bronze Age population demography on the Island of Gotland
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2018 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, ISSN 2352-409X, E-ISSN 2352-4103, Vol. 20, s. 324-337Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The Late Neolithic period in Scandinavia [LN, c. 2350-1700 cal BCE] marks a time of considerable changes in settlement patterns, economy, and material culture. This shift also lays the foundation for the demographic developments in the Early Bronze Age [EBA, c. 1700-1100 cal BCE]. However, little is presently known regarding the developments from these time-periods on the island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. During the Middle Neolithic period [MN, c. 3300-2350 cal BCE], Gotland was inhabited by groups associated with the Funnel Beaker culture [TRB, c. 4000-2700 cal BCE], and the sub-Neolithic Pitted Ware culture [PWC, c. 3300-2300 cal BCE]. Some indications of connections with the Bathe Axe/Corded Ware cultures [BAC/CWC, c. 2800-2300 cal BCE] have also been found, but no typical BAC/CWC burials have been located on the island to date. Here, we investigate the chronological and internal relationship of twenty-three individuals buried in four LN/EBA stone cist burials; Haffinds, Hagur, Suderkvie, and Utalskog on Gotland. We present eleven mitochondrial genomes [from 23 X to 1271 X coverage], and twenty-three new radiocarbon dates, as well as stable isotope data for diet. We examine the local Sr-baseline range for Gotland, and present new Sr-data to discuss mobility patterns of the individuals. The genetic results are compared and discussed in light of earlier cultural periods from Gotland [TRB and PWC], and CWC from the European continent, as well as contemporaneous LN secondary burials in the MN Ansarve dolmen. We find that all burials were used into the EBA, but only two of the cists showed activity already during the LN. We also see some mobility to Gotland during the LN/EBA period based on Strontium and mitochondrial data. We see a shift in the dietary pattern compared to the preceding period on the island [TRB and PWC], and the two LN individuals from the Ansarve dolmen exhibited different dietary and mobility patterns compared to the individuals from the LN/EBA stone cist burials. We find that most of the cist burials were used by individuals local to the area of the burials, with the exception of the large LN/EBA Haffinds cist burial which showed higher levels of mobility. Our modeling of ancestral mitochondrial contribution from chronologically older individuals recovered in the cultural contexts of TRB, PWC and CWC show that the best model is a 55/45 mix of CWC and TRB individuals. A 3-way model with a slight influx from PWC [5%] also had a good fit. This is difficult to reconcile with the current archaeological evidence on the island. We suggest that the maternal CWC/TRB contribution we see in the local LN/EBA individuals derives from migrants after the Scandinavian MN period, which possible also admixed with smaller local groups connected with the PWC. Further genomic analyses of these groups on Gotland will help to clarify the demographic history during the MN to EBA time periods.

HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Molekylär genetik
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343836 (URN)10.1016/j.jasrep.2018.02.045 (DOI)000444281500030 ()
Forskningsfinansiär
Berit Wallenberg Foundation, BWS 2011.0090Gunvor och Josef Anérs stiftelseHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, RJ M13-0904:1
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-03-01 Laget: 2018-03-01 Sist oppdatert: 2020-06-05bibliografisk kontrollert
Gummesson, S., Sundberg, R., Knutsson, H., Zetterlund, P., Molin, F. & Knutsson, K. (2017). Lithic Raw Material Economy in the Mesolithic: An Experimental Test of Edged Tool Efficiency and Durability in Bone Tool Production. LITHIC TECHNOLOGY, 42(4), 140-154
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Lithic Raw Material Economy in the Mesolithic: An Experimental Test of Edged Tool Efficiency and Durability in Bone Tool Production
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2017 (engelsk)Inngår i: LITHIC TECHNOLOGY, ISSN 0197-7261, Vol. 42, nr 4, s. 140-154Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

The foundation of this paper is lithic economy with a focus on the actual use of different lithic raw materials for tasks at hand. Our specific focus is on the production of bone tools during the Mesolithic. The lithic and osseous assemblages from Strandvagen, Motala, in east-central Sweden provide the archaeological background for the study. Based on a series of experiments we evaluate the efficiency and durability of different tool edges of five lithic raw materials: Cambrian flint, Cretaceous flint, mylonitic quartz, quartz, and porphyry, each used to whittle bone. The results show that flint is the most efficient of the raw materials assessed. Thus, a non-local raw material offers complements of functional characteristics for bone working compared to locally available quartz and mylonitic quartz. This finding provides a new insight into lithic raw material distribution in the region, specifically for bone tool production on site.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2017
Emneord
Lithic raw material, experimental archaeology, efficiency, durability, Mesolithic
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339524 (URN)10.1080/01977261.2017.1374584 (DOI)000418332000001 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2018-01-22 Laget: 2018-01-22 Sist oppdatert: 2018-01-22bibliografisk kontrollert
Knutsson, H., Knutsson, K., Molin, F. & Zetterlund, P. (2016). From flint to quartz: Organization of lithic technology in relation to raw material availability during the pioneer process of Scandinavia. Quaternary International, 424, 32-57
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>From flint to quartz: Organization of lithic technology in relation to raw material availability during the pioneer process of Scandinavia
2016 (engelsk)Inngår i: Quaternary International, ISSN 1040-6182, E-ISSN 1873-4553, Vol. 424, s. 32-57Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Formal technologies and intensified reduction are often seen as responces to increased mobility and low abundance of lithic raw material of good flakeability and controllability. In this paper we discuss an alternative explanation to this hypothesis using the change in tool raw material experienced by flint using pioneers as they had to go from a formal blade technology to a simple flake technology as they settled in Scandinavia. The region is dominated by quartz and we used use-wear data as a means to evaluate the role of this type of raw material compared to the use profile of flint assemblages in the home territories of the pioneers. Although the technology changed through simplification and loss of formal production rules due to the low workability of quartz, we conclude that changes in the foraging range into areas of bad quality tool raw materials, does not need formalization of the technology. The quartz in our sample was used for a wide variety of activities in every aspect comparable to the range of uses identified in the contemporaneous blade assemblages based on flint. Instead of formalization of the lithic technology to cope with bad quality raw materials, it was diversified and simplified but without interfering with the organisational dimensions and design criteria of the bone technology.

 

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2016
Emneord
Pioneer settlement, Scandinavia, lithic technology, use-wear, quartz, diversification, technological organization
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Arkeologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-263561 (URN)10.1016/j.quaint.2015.10.062 (DOI)000390534400005 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2015-10-02 Laget: 2015-10-02 Sist oppdatert: 2019-01-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Manninen, M. & Knutsson, K. (2014). Lithic raw material diversification as an adaptive strategy: Technology, mobility, and site structure in Late Mesolithic northernmost Europe. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 33, 84-98
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Lithic raw material diversification as an adaptive strategy: Technology, mobility, and site structure in Late Mesolithic northernmost Europe
2014 (engelsk)Inngår i: Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, ISSN 0278-4165, E-ISSN 1090-2686, Vol. 33, s. 84-98Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [fi]

Formal technologies and intensified reduction are often seen as responses to increased mobility and low abundance of lithic raw material of good flakeability and controllability. Although patterns of lithic raw material availability and occurrence are in many ways analogous to those of subsistence resources, resource diversification, an adaptive strategy commonly discussed in relation to food procurement, is rarely discussed in connection to changes in lithic resource availability and technology. We present a case from northernmost Europe in which pronounced differences in raw material availability caused by a distinct geological setting existed within a relatively small area. We conclude that restricted availability of high-quality raw material due, for instance, to increased mobility or changes in the size or location of the foraging range does not necessarily lead to formalization and intensification and can, in certain situations, as in the studied case, lead to the application of an adaptive strategy that can be called raw material diversification. This strategy entails a widening of the raw material base to include raw materials of lower workability and a consequent alteration of existing technological concepts, often in the form of simplification and informalization.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Elsevier, 2014
Emneord
Lithic technology, mobility, site structure, diversification, intensification, adaptation, technological organization, lithic raw material properties, Fennoscandia, quartz
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Arkeologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188615 (URN)10.1016/j.jaa.2013.12.001 (DOI)000331496300005 ()
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-12-18 Laget: 2012-12-18 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Sørensen, M., Rankama, T., Kankaanpää, J., Knutsson, K., Knutsson, H., Melvold, S., . . . Glørstad, H. (2013). The first eastern migrations of people and knowledge into Scandinavia: evidence from studies of Mesolithic technology, 9th-8th millennium BC. Norwegian Archaeological Review, 46(1), 19-56
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The first eastern migrations of people and knowledge into Scandinavia: evidence from studies of Mesolithic technology, 9th-8th millennium BC
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2013 (engelsk)Inngår i: Norwegian Archaeological Review, ISSN 0029-3652, E-ISSN 1502-7678, Vol. 46, nr 1, s. 19-56Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper a team of Scandinavian researchers identifies and describes a Mesolithic technological concept, referred to as the conical core pressure blade' concept, and investigates how this concept spread intoFennoscandia and across Scandinavia. Using lithic technological, contextual archaeological and radiocarbon analyses, it is demonstrated that this blade concept arrived with post-Swiderian' hunter-gatherer groups from the Russian plain into northern Fennoscandia and the eastern Baltic during the 9th millennium bc. From there it was spread by migrating people and/or as transmitted knowledge through culture contacts into interior central Sweden, Norway and down along the Norwegian coast. However it was also spread intosouthern Scandinavia, where it was formerly identified as the Maglemosian technogroup 3 (or the Svaerdborg phase'). In this paper it is argued that theidentification and spread of the conical core pressure blade concept representsthe first migration of people, technology and ideas into Scandinavia from thesouth-eastern Baltic region and the Russian plain.

HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Arkeologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-188616 (URN)10.1080/00293652.2013.770416 (DOI)000320018500002 ()
Prosjekter
Pioneer settlement, scandinavia, pressure-blade technology, chaine operatoire
Tilgjengelig fra: 2012-12-18 Laget: 2012-12-18 Sist oppdatert: 2017-12-06bibliografisk kontrollert
Knutsson, K. & Knutsson, H. (2012). Pressure and punched blades in non-flint materials.: Chaine Opératoire analysis of Middle Mesolithic Blade Assemblages from Central Sweden. In: Pablo Arias (Ed.), Proceedings of the Eight Conference of the Mesolithic in Europe, Santander, Spain 14-18 september 2010.. Paper presented at The Mesolithic in Europe. Santander
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>Pressure and punched blades in non-flint materials.: Chaine Opératoire analysis of Middle Mesolithic Blade Assemblages from Central Sweden
2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Proceedings of the Eight Conference of the Mesolithic in Europe, Santander, Spain 14-18 september 2010. / [ed] Pablo Arias, Santander, 2012Konferansepaper, Publicerat paper (Fagfellevurdert)
Abstract [en]

In this paper a Chaine Operatoire analysis of previously only preliminary discussed blade assemblages from Central Sweden is presented. The material derive mainly from a collection of stray finds in Dalecarlia and Hä'rjedalen, Central Sweden and consists of blade cores, blades and debitage in local raw materials such as tuff, metamorphous tuff, jasper, quartzite and porphyry. Three, possibly four different core treatment practices are defined and preliminary comparative analysis shows that the material has strong resemblances to Middle mesolithic blade assemblages from southern Norway, western Sweden and with Preboreal finds from northern Finland. It is hypothesised that a major part of the blade assemblage resepresents adaption to local raw materials as the first flint using pioneers settled this area as the Weichselian ice retreated during the Preboreal and early Boreal 

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Santander: , 2012
Emneord
Chaine Operatoire, Middle Mesolithic, Lithic analysis, Blades
HSV kategori
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-162239 (URN)
Konferanse
The Mesolithic in Europe
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-11-28 Laget: 2011-11-28 Sist oppdatert: 2013-04-02
Knutsson, K. & Knutsson, H. (2012). The postglacial colonization of humans, fauna and plants in northern Sweden. Arkeologi i Norr, 13, 004618 461003
Åpne denne publikasjonen i ny fane eller vindu >>The postglacial colonization of humans, fauna and plants in northern Sweden
2012 (engelsk)Inngår i: Arkeologi i Norr, ISSN 0284-558x, Vol. 13, s. 004618 461003-Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a re-evaluation of the pioneer settlement of Scandinavia following the melting of the Weichselian ice sheet during the late Glacial/Preboreal. The preliminary results of the swedish part of an inter-Nordic research project are presented focussiong on analyses of previously only preliminary discussed assemblages from central Sweden. A preliminary comparative analysis showws that the material has resemblances to Middle Mesolithic blade assemblages from southern Norway and western Sweden and thus represents the first pioneers settling this area during the Preboreal and early Boreal.  

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
Umeå: Institutionen för idé och samhällsstudier vid Umeå Universitet, 2012
Emneord
Pioneer settlement, northern Sweden
HSV kategori
Forskningsprogram
Arkeologi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159690 (URN)
Prosjekter
Archaeological contributions to cultural analysis
Tilgjengelig fra: 2011-10-06 Laget: 2011-10-06 Sist oppdatert: 2013-07-24bibliografisk kontrollert
Organisasjoner
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3118-8216