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Heijkenskjöld, Filip
Publications (10 of 41) Show all publications
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B. & Heijkenskjöld, F. (2019). Transduction and Science Learning: Multimodality in the Physics Laboratory. Designs for Learning, 11(1), 16-29, Article ID 118.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transduction and Science Learning: Multimodality in the Physics Laboratory
2019 (English)In: Designs for Learning, ISSN 1654-7608, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 16-29, article id 118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we discuss the role of transduction in the teaching and learning of science. We video-filmed pairs of upper-secondary physics students working with a laboratory task designed to encourage transduction (Bezemer & Kress, 2008). The students were simply instructed to use a hand-held electronic measurement device (IOLab) to find the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field and mark its direction using a paper arrow.

A full multimodal transcription of the student interaction was made. In our analysis of this transcription we identify three separate transductions of meaning. In particular, we observed that student transduction of meaning to the paper arrow allowed it to function as both a persistent placeholder for all the meaning making that had occurred up until that point and as a coordinating hub for further meaning making.

Our findings lead us to recommend that teachers interrogate the set of resources necessary for appropriate disciplinary knowledge construction in the tasks they present to students. Here, teachers should think carefully about whether the introduction of a persistent placeholder would be useful and in that case what this placeholder could be. We also suggest that teachers should think about what persistent resource may function as a coordinating hub for the students.

Finally, we suggest that teachers should be on the lookout for student transductions to new semiotic resources in their classrooms as a sign that learning is taking place. We claim that the constraining and complementary nature of transduction offers a good opportunity for teachers to check student understanding, since disciplinary meanings need to be coherent across semiotic systems (modes).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Stockholm University Press, 2019
Keywords
disciplinary affordance; pedagogical affordance; transduction; coordinating hub; placeholder; critical constellation; multimodal discourse analysis
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380379 (URN)10.16993/dfl.118 (DOI)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2016-04113
Available from: 2019-03-27 Created: 2019-03-27 Last updated: 2019-04-02Bibliographically approved
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B. & Heijkenskjöld, F. (2018). Multimodal Transduction in Upper-secondary School Physics. In: : . Paper presented at International Science Education Conference (ISEC) 2018. 21 June 2018 National Institute of Education, Singapore.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multimodal Transduction in Upper-secondary School Physics
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In this study we video-filmed upper-secondary physics students working with a laboratory task designed to encourage transduction (Bezemer & Kress 2008) when learning about coordinate systems.

 

Students worked in pairs with an electronic measurement device to determine the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field. The device, IOLab, can be held in the hand and moved around. The results of this movement are graphically displayed on a computer screen as changes in the x, y and z components of the Earth’s magnetic field. The students were simply instructed to use the IOLab to find the direction of the Earth’s magnetic field and mark its direction using a red paper arrow.

 

A full multimodal transcription of the student interaction was made (Baldry & Thibault 2006). In our analysis of this transcription, three separate transductions of meaning were identified—transduction of meaning potential in the room to the computer screen, transduction of this meaning to the red arrow, and finally transduction into student gestures. We suggest that this final transduction could not have been made without the introduction of the arrow, which functioned as a coordinating hub (Fredlund et al 2012).

 

We recommend that teachers should carefully think about the resources in a task that may function as a coordinating hub and should also look for student transductions in their classrooms as confirmation that learning is taking place.

 

References

Ainsworth, S. (2006). DeFT: A conceptual framework for considering learning with multiple representations. Learning and Instruction, 16(3), 183-198.

Airey, J. (2009). Science, language, and literacy: Case studies of learning in Swedish university physics (Doctoral dissertation, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis). http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547 

Airey, J. (2015). Social Semiotics in Higher Education: Examples from teaching and learning in undergraduate physics In: SACF Singapore-Sweden Excellence Seminars, (STINT) , 2015 (pp. 103). urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266049.

Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of           modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

Airey, J. & Linder, C. (2015) Social Semiotics in Physics Education: Leveraging critical constellations of disciplinary representations ESERA          2015 From http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn%3Anbn%3Ase%3Auu%3Adiva-260209

Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2017). Social Semiotics in University Physics Education. In D. F. Treagust, R. Duit, & H. E. Fischer (Eds.), Multiple Representations in Physics Education (pp. 95-122). Cham, Switzerland: Springer.

Baldry, A., & Thibault, P. J. (2006). Multimodal Transcription and Text Analysis. London: Equinox Publishing.

Bezemer, J., & Kress, G. (2008). Writing in multimodal texts: a social semiotic account of designs for learning. Written Communication, 25(2),           166-195.

Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33, 657-666.

Kress, G. (2010). Multimodality: A social semiotic approach to contemporary communication. London: Routledge.

Lemke, J. L. (1998). Teaching all the languages of science: Words, symbols, images, and actions. In Conference on Science Education in Barcelona.

Selen, M. (2013). Pedagogy meets Technology: Optimizing Labs in Large Enrollment Introductory Courses. Bulletin of the American Physical      Society58. http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/APR13/Session/C7.3

Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorčič, B., & Heijkenskjöld, F. (2016). Multimodal transduction in secondary school physics 8th International Conference on Multimodality, 7th-9th December 2016. Cape Town, South Africa. Retrieved from http://urn.kb.se/resolve?urn=urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316982.

Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorčič, B., Heijkenskjöld, F., & Linder, C. (2018). Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools when engaging with “invisible” phenomena. PERC proceedings 2018 https://www.compadre.org/per/perc/proceedings.cfm.

Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorčič, B., & Heijkenskjöld, F. (submitted). Learning Science through Transduction: Multimodal disciplinary meaning-making in the physics laboratory. Designs for Learning.

Wu, H-K, & Puntambekar, S. (2012). Pedagogical Affordances of Multiple External Representations in Scientific Processes. Journal of Science Education and Technology, 21(6), 754-767.

Keywords
disciplinary affordance, pedagogical affordance, magnetic field, meaning potential, semiotic resource, multimodal, transduction, coordinating hub
National Category
Other Physics Topics Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354706 (URN)
Conference
International Science Education Conference (ISEC) 2018. 21 June 2018 National Institute of Education, Singapore
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04113
Available from: 2018-06-21 Created: 2018-06-21 Last updated: 2018-06-28Bibliographically approved
Heijkenskjöld, F., Edvardsson, B. & Lundberg, M. (2017). Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment (2). In: : . Paper presented at Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakultetens universitetspedagogiska konferens – TUK2017, Uppsala, 16 mars, 2017.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment (2)
2017 (Swedish)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Aktiva studenter gör demonstrationsexperiment

Filip Heijkenskjöld, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi avd. Fysikens didaktik

Bengt Edvardsson, Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, avd. Astronomi

Marcus Lundberg, Institutionen för kemi - Ångström, Teoretisk kemi

Sammanfattning

Projektet avser att aktivera studenterna och gör dem till deltagande aktörer i föreläsningarna genom att ge studenterna ansvar för att designa sina egna experiment som kan visa på centrala begrepp inom fysiken. Studenterna får använda ett mätverktyg (IOLab) för att enkelt kunna experimentera och samla in data. För information om IOLab se http://www.iolab.science

Vi låter studenterna i kursen 1KB302, Fysik för kemister, ta ansvar för en del av undervisningen. De väljer själva ut vad de vill illustrera med experiment. Studenterna bidrar med var sitt ca 5 minuter långt demonstrationsexperiment och deltar i en efterföljande diskussion på 10 minuter. Efter godkänd insats får de en tentamensdel godkänd. Detta ökar studenternas engagemang och även kopplingen till andra kurser som studeras inom programmen.

Keywords
Aktivtlärande, deltagande, undervisning
National Category
Didactics Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320442 (URN)
Conference
Teknisk-naturvetenskapliga fakultetens universitetspedagogiska konferens – TUK2017, Uppsala, 16 mars, 2017
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2017-04-26Bibliographically approved
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B., Heijkenskjöld, F. & Linder, C. (2017). Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools when engaging with “invisible” phenomena. In: L. Ding, A. Traxler, and Y. Cao (Ed.), 2017 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings: . Paper presented at American Association of Physics Teachers Physics Education 2017 Summer Meeting, Cincinnati, OH, July 26-27 (pp. 408-411). Cincinnati, Ohio: American Association of Physics Teachers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools when engaging with “invisible” phenomena
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2017 (English)In: 2017 Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings / [ed] L. Ding, A. Traxler, and Y. Cao, Cincinnati, Ohio: American Association of Physics Teachers , 2017, p. 408-411Conference paper, Published paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The construction of physics knowledge of necessity entails a range of semiotic resources, (e.g. specialized language, graphs, algebra, diagrams, equipment, gesture, etc.). In this study we documented physics students' use of different resources when working with an "invisible" phenomenon--magnetic field. Using a social semiotic framework, we show how appropriate coordination of resources not only enabled students to learn something about the Earth's magnetic field, but also about the use of an abstract mathematical tool--coordinate systems. Our work leads us to make three suggestions: 1. The potential for learning physics can be maximized by designing tasks that encourage students to use a specific set of resources.  2. Thought should be put into what this particular set of resources should be and how they may be coordinated. 3. Close attention to the different resources that students use can allow physics teachers to gauge the learning occurring in their classrooms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cincinnati, Ohio: American Association of Physics Teachers, 2017
National Category
Other Physics Topics Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339412 (URN)10.1119/perc.2017.pr.097 (DOI)000455293200102 ()
Conference
American Association of Physics Teachers Physics Education 2017 Summer Meeting, Cincinnati, OH, July 26-27
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04113
Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2019-02-28Bibliographically approved
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B., Heijkenskjöld, F. & Linder, C. (2017). Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools while engaging with “invisible” phenomena. In: : . Paper presented at Physics Education Research Conference 2017, July 26-27, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. College Park, Maryland, USA: American Association of Physics Teachers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Physics students learning about abstract mathematical tools while engaging with “invisible” phenomena
Show others...
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The construction of physics knowledge of necessity entails a range of semiotic resources, (e.g. specialized language, graphs, algebra, diagrams, equipment, gesture, etc.). In this study we documented physics students' use of different resources when working with an "invisible" phenomenon--magnetic field. Using a social semiotic framework, we show how appropriate coordination of resources not only enabled students to learn something about the Earth's magnetic field, but also about the use of an abstract mathematical tool--coordinate systems. Our work leads us to make three suggestions: 1. The potential for learning physics can be maximized by designing tasks that encourage students to use a specific set of resources. 2. Thought should be put into what this particular set of resources should be and how they may be coordinated.3. Close attention to the different resources that students use can allow physics teachers to gauge the learning occurring in their classrooms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
College Park, Maryland, USA: American Association of Physics Teachers, 2017
Keywords
mathematical tools, semiotic resources, coordinate systems
National Category
Didactics Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-344041 (URN)
Conference
Physics Education Research Conference 2017, July 26-27, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04113
Note

Peer reviewed abstract for actual poster presented at PERC 2017 in the Northern Kentucky Convention Centre, Cincinnati, Ohio/Kentucky, USA.

Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B., Heijkenskjöld, F. & Linder, C. (2017). Teaching the movability of coordinate systems: Discovering disciplinary affordances. In: : . Paper presented at American Association of Physics Teachers Physics Education 2017 Summer Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching the movability of coordinate systems: Discovering disciplinary affordances
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

When students are introduced to coordinate systems in their physics textbooks these are usually oriented in the same manner (x increases to the right). There is a real danger then, that students see coordinate systems as fixed. However, as we know, movability is one of the main disciplinary affordances of coordinate systems. Students worked with an open-ended task to find the direction of Earth’s magnetic field. This was achieved by manipulating a measurement device (IOLab) so as to maximize the signal for one component of the field, whilst at the same time keeping the other two components at zero. In the process of completing this task, students came to experience themselves as holding a movable coordinate system. From this point they spontaneously offer elaborations about the usefulness of purposefully setting up coordinate systems for problem solving. In our terms, they have discovered one of the disciplinary affordances of coordinate systems.

Keywords
movability, coordinate systems, disciplinary affordances
National Category
Other Physics Topics Didactics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339408 (URN)
Conference
American Association of Physics Teachers Physics Education 2017 Summer Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04113
Note

References

[1] Redish, E. F., & Kuo, E. (2015). Language of physics, language of math: Disciplinary culture and dynamic epistemology. Science & Education, 24(5-6), 561-590.

[2] Christensen, W. M., & Thompson, J. R. (2012). Investigating graphical representations of slope and derivative without a physics context. Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, 8(2), 023101.

[3] Baldry, A., & Thibault, P. J. (2006). Multimodal transcription and text analysis: A multimodal toolkit and coursebook with associated on-line course. Equinox.

[4] Bezemer, J., & Mavers, D. (2011). Multimodal transcription as academic practice: a social semiotic perspective. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 14(3), 191-206.

[5] Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

[6] Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2017). Social semiotics in university physics education. In Multiple Representations in Physics Education (pp. 95-122). Springer, Cham.

[7] Lemke, J. L. (1998, October). Teaching all the languages of science: Words, symbols, images, and actions. In Conference on Science Education in Barcelona. http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/education/jlemke/papers/barcelon.htm

[8] McDermott, L. C. (1991). A view from physics. M. Gardner, J. Greeno, F. Reif, AH Schoenfeld, A. diSessa, and E. Stage (Eds.), Toward a scientific practice of science education, 3-30.

[9] Kohl, P. B., & Finkelstein, N. D. (2005). Student representational competence and self-assessment when solving physics problems. Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, 1(1), 010104.

[10] Kohl, P., & Finkelstein, N. (2006, February). Student representational competence and the role of instructional environment in introductory physics. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 818, No. 1, pp. 93-96). AIP.

[11] Linder, A., Airey, J., Mayaba, N., & Webb, P. (2014). Fostering disciplinary literacy? South African physics lecturers' educational responses to their students' lack of representational competence. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 18(3), 242-252.

[12] Airey, J. (2009). Science, language, and literacy: Case studies of learning in Swedish university physics (Doctoral dissertation, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis).

[13] Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33(3), 657.

Within the social semiotic framing described here, 'disciplinary affordance' refers to the agreed meaning making functions that a representation or semiotic resource fulfils for a particular disciplinary community.

[14] Airey, J. (2015). Social Semiotics in Higher Education: Examples from teaching and learning in undergraduate physics. In Concorde Hotel/National Institute of Education, Singapore, 3-5 November 2015 (p. 103). Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research in Higher Education (STINT).

‘Pedagogical affordance’ reflects the usefulness of a semiotic resource for teaching some particular educational content. See also Ref. [6].

[15] Selen, M. (2013, April). Pedagogy meets Technology: Optimizing Labs in Large Enrollment Introductory Courses. In APS April Meeting Abstracts. http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/APR13/Event/192073

[16] Roychoudhury, A., & Roth, W. M. (1996). Interactions in an open‐inquiry physics laboratory. International Journal of Science Education, 18(4), 423-445.

Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-03-05
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B., Heijkenskjöld, F. & Linder, C. (2017). The IOLab and magnetic Field – Magnetic north versus actual direction. In: : . Paper presented at American Association of Physics Teachers Physics Education 2017 Summer Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The IOLab and magnetic Field – Magnetic north versus actual direction
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2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Most students will be familiar with the compass as a tool that points north. However, the compass only shows us one component—the terrestrial projection—of the Earth’s magnetic field. In contrast, the IOLab potentially gives students access to the actual direction of the field. We have designed an open-ended task in which pairs of students use the IOLab to determine the actual direction of the Earth’s magnetic field in a laboratory classroom. Without any prior instruction or step-by-step procedure to follow, students simultaneously coordinate a set of resources: speech (in groups; and with facilitator), interpretation of graphical readouts, physical manipulation of the IOLab and proprioception. By coordinating the resources available, the students in our study can be seen to quickly come to a moment of disciplinary insight, where they realize the true direction of the magnetic field.

Keywords
IOLab, magnetic field, proprioception, coordinating resources
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339410 (URN)
Conference
American Association of Physics Teachers Physics Education 2017 Summer Meeting, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA.
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04113
Note

References

[1] Redish, E. F., & Kuo, E. (2015). Language of physics, language of math: Disciplinary culture and dynamic epistemology. Science & Education, 24(5-6), 561-590.

[2] Christensen, W. M., & Thompson, J. R. (2012). Investigating graphical representations of slope and derivative without a physics context. Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, 8(2), 023101.

[3] Baldry, A., & Thibault, P. J. (2006). Multimodal transcription and text analysis: A multimodal toolkit and coursebook with associated on-line course. Equinox.

[4] Bezemer, J., & Mavers, D. (2011). Multimodal transcription as academic practice: a social semiotic perspective. International Journal of Social Research Methodology, 14(3), 191-206.

[5] Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

[6] Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2017). Social semiotics in university physics education. In Multiple Representations in Physics Education (pp. 95-122). Springer, Cham.

[7] Lemke, J. L. (1998, October). Teaching all the languages of science: Words, symbols, images, and actions. In Conference on Science Education in Barcelona. http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/education/jlemke/papers/barcelon.htm

[8] McDermott, L. C. (1991). A view from physics. M. Gardner, J. Greeno, F. Reif, AH Schoenfeld, A. diSessa, and E. Stage (Eds.), Toward a scientific practice of science education, 3-30.

[9] Kohl, P. B., & Finkelstein, N. D. (2005). Student representational competence and self-assessment when solving physics problems. Physical Review Special Topics-Physics Education Research, 1(1), 010104.

[10] Kohl, P., & Finkelstein, N. (2006, February). Student representational competence and the role of instructional environment in introductory physics. In AIP Conference Proceedings (Vol. 818, No. 1, pp. 93-96). AIP.

[11] Linder, A., Airey, J., Mayaba, N., & Webb, P. (2014). Fostering disciplinary literacy? South African physics lecturers' educational responses to their students' lack of representational competence. African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, 18(3), 242-252.

[12] Airey, J. (2009). Science, language, and literacy: Case studies of learning in Swedish university physics (Doctoral dissertation, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis).

[13] Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33(3), 657.

Within the social semiotic framing described here, 'disciplinary affordance' refers to the agreed meaning making functions that a representation or semiotic resource fulfils for a particular disciplinary community.

[14] Airey, J. (2015). Social Semiotics in Higher Education: Examples from teaching and learning in undergraduate physics. In Concorde Hotel/National Institute of Education, Singapore, 3-5 November 2015 (p. 103). Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research in Higher Education (STINT).

‘Pedagogical affordance’ reflects the usefulness of a semiotic resource for teaching some particular educational content. See also Ref. [6].

[15] Selen, M. (2013, April). Pedagogy meets Technology: Optimizing Labs in Large Enrollment Introductory Courses. In APS April Meeting Abstracts. http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/APR13/Event/192073

[16] Roychoudhury, A., & Roth, W. M. (1996). Interactions in an open‐inquiry physics laboratory. International Journal of Science Education, 18(4), 423-445.

Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-01-25
Volkwyn, T., Airey, J., Gregorcic, B. & Heijkenskjöld, F. (2017). Working with magnetic field to learn about coordinate systems: A social semiotic approach. In: : . Paper presented at ESERA 2017, European Science Education Research Conference, 21-25 August 2017, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Working with magnetic field to learn about coordinate systems: A social semiotic approach
2017 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the teaching and learning of physics, a wide range of semiotic resources are used, such as spoken and written language, graphs, diagrams, mathematics, hands on work with apparatus, etc. (Lemke, 1998). In this respect it has been argued that there is a critical constellation of semiotic resources that is needed for appropriate construction of any given disciplinary concept (Airey & Linder, 2009; Airey, 2009). In this social semiotic tradition, it is the development of “fluency” in the individual semiotic resource systems and the ease of transduction (movement and coordination of meaning) between the various semiotic resource systems that makes disciplinary learning possible. We report here findings from an interpretive study of physics students working with a laboratory task designed to encourage transduction when learning about coordinate systems. A hand-held electronic measurement device (IOLab) was used to display components of the Earth’s magnetic field in real time. Our intention was for students to experience the movability of coordinate systems by open-ended investigation of dynamic, real-time changes in the x, y and z components displayed on the computer screen as they manipulated the device. Building on earlier work of Fredlund et. al. (2012) our analysis identifies three types of transduction, the last of which is transduction of meaning to a new modality (iconic gesture) not previously used by the students. We suggest this final form of transduction is indicative of what students have learned and offers the teacher a chance to confirm/challenge student conceptions. Our data clearly demonstrates how careful, open-ended task design, coupled with timely instructor questions can leverage the pedagogical affordances (Airey, 2015) of a range of semiotic resources to make physics learning possible. We therefore claim that understanding the roles that different semiotic resources play for physics learning is vital and call for further research in this area.

Keywords
physics, representations, teaching learning sequences
National Category
Other Physics Topics
Research subject
Physics with specialization in Physics Education
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339549 (URN)
Conference
ESERA 2017, European Science Education Research Conference, 21-25 August 2017, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04113
Note

References List:

Airey, J. (2015). Social Semiotics in Higher Education: Examples from teaching and learning in undergraduate physics In: SACF Singapore-Sweden Excellence Seminars, Swedish Foundation for International Cooperation in Research in Higher Education (STINT) , 2015 (pp. 103). urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-266049.

Airey, J. (2009). Science, language, and literacy: Case studies of learning in Swedish university physics (Doctoral dissertation, Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis). http://publications.uu.se/theses/abstract.xsql?dbid=9547

Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2009). A disciplinary discourse perspective on university science learning: Achieving fluency in a critical constellation of modes. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 46(1), 27-49.

Baldry, A., & Thibault, P. J. (2006). Multimodal Transcription and Text Analysis. London: Equinox Publishing.

Bezemer, J., & Kress, G. (2008). Writing in multimodal texts: a social semiotic account of designs for learning. Written Communication, 25(2), 166-195.

Fredlund, T., Airey, J., & Linder, C. (2012). Exploring the role of physics representations: an illustrative example from students sharing knowledge about refraction. European Journal of Physics, 33, 657-666.

Kress, G. (2010). Multimodality: A social semiotic approach to contemporary communication. London: Routledge.

Lemke, J. L. (1998). Teaching all the languages of science: Words, symbols, images, and actions. In Conference on Science Education in Barcelona.

McDermott, L. C. (1991). A view from physics. M. Gardner, J. Greeno, F. Reif, AH Schoenfeld, A. diSessa, and E. Stage (Eds.), Toward a scientific practice of science education, 3-30. Hillsdale: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Roychoudhury, A., & Roth, W. M. (1996). Interactions in an open‐inquiry physics laboratory. International Journal of Science Education, 18(4), 423-445.

Selen, M. (2013). Pedagogy meets Technology: Optimizing Labs in Large Enrollment Introductory Courses. Bulletin of the American Physical Society, 58. http://meetings.aps.org/Meeting/APR13/Session/C7.3

Available from: 2018-01-25 Created: 2018-01-25 Last updated: 2018-01-31Bibliographically approved
Heijkenskjöld, F. (2015). Lampan, våra ögons krycka. Kosmos 2014 -2015, 91, 19-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lampan, våra ögons krycka
2015 (Swedish)In: Kosmos 2014 -2015, ISSN 0368-6213, Vol. 91, p. 19-28Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Swedish Science Press, 2015
Keywords
ljus, lampa, elektrisk urladdning, spektrum
National Category
Atom and Molecular Physics and Optics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268337 (URN)
Note

ISBN 978-91-86992-32-3

Available from: 2015-12-04 Created: 2015-12-04 Last updated: 2015-12-04
Tibbelin, J., Wallner, A., Emanuelsson, R., Heijkenskjöld, F., Rosenberg, M., Yamazaki, K., . . . Ottosson, H. (2014). 1,4-Disilacyclohexa-2,5-diene: a molecular building block that allows for remarkably strong neutral cyclic cross-hyperconjugation. Chemical Science, 5(1), 360-371
Open this publication in new window or tab >>1,4-Disilacyclohexa-2,5-diene: a molecular building block that allows for remarkably strong neutral cyclic cross-hyperconjugation
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2014 (English)In: Chemical Science, ISSN 2041-6520, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 360-371Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

2,3,5,6-Tetraethyl-1,4-disilacyclohexa-2,5-dienes with either four chloro (1a), methyl (1b), or trimethylsilyl (TMS) (1c) substituents at the two silicon atoms were examined in an effort to design rigid compounds with strong neutral cross-hyperconjugation between pi- and sigma-bonded molecular segments arranged into a cycle. Remarkable variations in the lowest electronic excitation energies, lowest ionization energies, and the first oxidation potentials were observed upon change of substituents, as determined by gas phase ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and cyclic voltammetry. A particularly strong neutral cyclic cross-hyperconjugation was observed in 1c. Its lowest electron binding energy (7.1 eV) is distinctly different from that of 1b (8.5 eV). Molecular orbital analysis reveals a stronger interaction between filled pi(C=C) and pi(SiR2) group orbitals in 1c than in 1a and 1b. The energy shift in the highest occupied molecular orbital is also reflected in the first oxidation potentials as observed in the cyclic voltammograms of the respective compounds (1.47, 0.88, and 0.46 V for 1a, 1b and 1c, respectively). Furthermore, 1,4-disilacyclohexadiene 1c absorbs strongly at 273 nm (4.55 eV), whereas 1a and 1b have no symmetry allowed excitations above 215 nm (below 5.77 eV). Thus, suitably substituted 1,4-disilacyclohexa-2,5-dienes could represent novel building blocks for the design of larger cross-hyperconjugated molecules as alternatives to traditional purely cross-p-conjugated analogues, and could allow for design of molecules with properties that are not accessible to those that are exclusively pi-conjugated.

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urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213891 (URN)10.1039/c3sc52389f (DOI)000327601600045 ()
Available from: 2014-01-06 Created: 2014-01-05 Last updated: 2016-03-08Bibliographically approved
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