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Hansson, M G
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Publications (10 of 94) Show all publications
Hansson, M. G., Bouder, F. & Howard, H. C. (2018). Genetics and risk - an exploration of conceptual approaches to genetic risk. Journal of Risk Research, 21(2), 101-108
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetics and risk - an exploration of conceptual approaches to genetic risk
2018 (English)In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 101-108Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Social Sciences Medical Ethics Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347113 (URN)10.1080/13669877.2017.1382562 (DOI)000419609100001 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0260:1
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2018-03-26Bibliographically approved
Viberg, J., Segerdahl, P., Hösterey Ugander, U., Hansson, M. G. & Langenskiöld, S. (2018). Making sense of genetic risk: A qualitative focus-group study of healthy participants in genomic research. Patient Education and Counseling, 101(3), 422-427
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making sense of genetic risk: A qualitative focus-group study of healthy participants in genomic research
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2018 (English)In: Patient Education and Counseling, ISSN 0738-3991, E-ISSN 1873-5134, Vol. 101, no 3, p. 422-427Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

It is well known that research participants want to receive genetic risk information that is about high risks, serious diseases and potential preventive measures. The aim of this study was to explore, by qualitative means, something less well known: how do healthy research participants themselves make sense of genetic risk information?

Method

A phenomenographic approach was chosen to explore research participants’ understanding and assessment of genetic risk. We conducted four focus-group (N = 16) interviews with participants in a research programme designed to identify biomarkers for cardiopulmonary disease.

Results

Among the research participants, we found four ways of understanding genetic risk: as a binary concept, as an explanation, as revealing who I am (knowledge of oneself) and as affecting life ahead.

Conclusion

Research participants tend to understand genetic risk as a binary concept. This does not necessarily imply a misunderstanding of, or an irrational approach to, genetic risk. Rather, it may have a heuristic function in decision-making.

Practical implications

Risk communication may be enhanced by tailoring the communication to the participants’ own lay conceptions. For example, researchers and counselors should address risk in binary terms, maybe looking out for how individual participants search for threshold figures.

Keywords
Lay understanding; Conception of genetic risk; Making sense of genetic risk in research; Genetic risk communication
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330221 (URN)10.1016/j.pec.2017.09.009 (DOI)000427826300007 ()
Available from: 2017-09-27 Created: 2017-09-27 Last updated: 2018-08-01Bibliographically approved
Bayliss, K., Raza, K., Simons, G., Falahee, M., Hansson, M. G., Starling, B. & Stack, R. (2018). Perceptions of predictive testing for those at risk of developing a chronic inflammatory disease: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies. Journal of Risk Research, 21(2), 167-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceptions of predictive testing for those at risk of developing a chronic inflammatory disease: a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Risk Research, ISSN 1366-9877, E-ISSN 1466-4461, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 167-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The availability of tests to predict the risk of developing chronic diseases is increasing. The identification of individuals at high risk of disease can trigger early intervention to reduce the risk of disease and its severity. In order for predictive tests to be accepted and used by those at risk, there is a need to understand people's perceptions of predictive testing.

Method: A meta-synthesis of qualitative research that explored patient and public perceptions of predictive testing for chronic inflammatory diseases was conducted. Studies were coded by researchers and patient research partners, and then organised into common themes associated with the acceptability or use of predictive testing.

Results: Perceived barriers to predictive testing were identified, including a concern about a lack of confidentiality around the use of risk information; a lack of motivation for change; poor communication of information; and a possible impact on emotional well-being. In order to reduce these barriers, the literature shows that a patient-centred approach is required at each stage of the testing process. This includes the consideration of individual needs, such as accessibility and building motivation for change; readily available and easy to understand pre and post-test information; support for patients on how to deal with the implications of their results; and the development of condition specific lifestyle intervention programmes to facilitate sustainable lifestyle changes.

Conclusion: Patients and members of the public had some concerns about predictive testing; however, a number of strategies to reduce barriers and increase acceptability are available. Further research is required to inform the development of a resource that supports the individual to make an informed decision about whether to engage in a predictive test, what test results mean, and how to access post-test support.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
chronic disease, predictive testing, perceptions, risk, qualitative research, synthesis
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341315 (URN)10.1080/13669877.2015.1119183 (DOI)000419609100005 ()
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-HEALTH-F2-2012-305549Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0260:1
Available from: 2018-02-09 Created: 2018-02-09 Last updated: 2018-02-09Bibliographically approved
de Bekker-Grob, E., Berlin, C., Levitan, B., Raza, K., Christoforidi, K., Cleemput, I., . . . Hansson, M. G. (2017). Giving Patients’ Preferences a Voice in Medical Treatment Life Cycle: The PREFER Public–Private Project. Patient, 10(3), 263-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Giving Patients’ Preferences a Voice in Medical Treatment Life Cycle: The PREFER Public–Private Project
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2017 (English)In: Patient, ISSN 1178-1653, E-ISSN 1178-1661, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 263-266Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
Outcomes research, patients, drug developmetn, life-cycle, preferences
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Medical and Health Sciences Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Research subject
Social Pharmacy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317971 (URN)10.1007/s40271-017-0222-3 (DOI)000401162700001 ()28247251 (PubMedID)
Projects
IMI-PREFER
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 115966
Available from: 2017-03-22 Created: 2017-03-22 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Falahee, M., Simons, G., Buckley, C. D., Hansson, M. G., Stack, R. J. & Raza, K. (2017). Patients' Perceptions of Their Relatives' Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis and of the Potential for Risk Communication, Prediction, and Modulation. Arthritis care & research, 69(10), 1558-1565
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients' Perceptions of Their Relatives' Risk of Developing Rheumatoid Arthritis and of the Potential for Risk Communication, Prediction, and Modulation
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2017 (English)In: Arthritis care & research, ISSN 2151-464X, E-ISSN 2151-4658, Vol. 69, no 10, p. 1558-1565Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To understand the perspectives of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) about the risk of their relatives developing RA in the future, and about communicating with their relatives concerning risk and its modulation.

Methods: Twenty-one RA patients took part in semistructured interviews.

Results: Participants reported willingness to communicate with relatives about their risk of developing RA, but described choosing which relatives to communicate with, on the basis of the relatives' perceived receptivity to such risk information. Participants described the potential for risk information to cause negative emotions. Some participants did not consider RA to be hereditable, and few reported smoking as a risk factor. Patients described a lack of public awareness about the causes of RA and the negative impact that RA has on the quality of life. Awareness of this negative impact was identified as an important driver for predictive and preventive strategies. Participants held positive perceptions of predictive testing for RA, though the results of predictive tests were conceptualized as having a high degree of accuracy. Negative views of predictive testing were associated with an appreciation of the probabilistic nature of risk information. Participants felt that their relatives would prefer lifestyle modification over medication as a risk reduction strategy.

Conclusion: Information about risk factors for RA, and the potential impact of RA on the quality of life, is needed to support family communication about RA risk. Management of expectations is needed in relation to the probabilistic nature of risk information, and appropriate support should be provided for negative psychological outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336436 (URN)10.1002/acr.23179 (DOI)000411811900013 ()27998043 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0260:1EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-HEALTH-F2-2012-305549
Available from: 2017-12-14 Created: 2017-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
Schölin Bywall, K., Veldwijk, J., Hansson, M. G. & Kihlbom, U. (2017). Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients’ Perspectives On The Value Of Patient Preferences In Regulatory Decision-Making During Drug Development: A Qualitative Study. Value in Health, 20(9), A540-A540
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients’ Perspectives On The Value Of Patient Preferences In Regulatory Decision-Making During Drug Development: A Qualitative Study
2017 (English)In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 20, no 9, p. A540-A540Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345691 (URN)10.1016/j.jval.2017.08.801 (DOI)000413599901148 ()
Projects
IMI-PREFER
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-10-04Bibliographically approved
Oliveri, S., Howard, H. C., Renzi, C., Hansson, M. . & Pravettoni, G. (2016). Anxiety delivered direct-to-consumer: are we asking the right questions about the impacts of DTC genetic testing?. Journal of Medical Genetics, 53(12), 798-799
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety delivered direct-to-consumer: are we asking the right questions about the impacts of DTC genetic testing?
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Medical Genetics, ISSN 0022-2593, E-ISSN 1468-6244, Vol. 53, no 12, p. 798-799Article in journal, Editorial material (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical Ethics Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316212 (URN)10.1136/jmedgenet-2016-104184 (DOI)000391457200002 ()27647845 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-27 Created: 2017-02-27 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Silén, M., Ramklint, M., Hansson, M. G. & Haglund, K. (2016). Ethics rounds: An appreciated form of ethics support. Nursing Ethics, 23(2), 203-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethics rounds: An appreciated form of ethics support
2016 (English)In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 203-213Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Ethics rounds are one way to support healthcare personnel in handling ethically difficult situations. A previous study in the present project showed that ethics rounds did not result in significant changes in perceptions of how ethical issues were handled, that is, in the ethical climate. However, there was anecdotal evidence that the ethics rounds were viewed as a positive experience and that they stimulated ethical reflection.

AIM: The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of how the ethics rounds were experienced and why the intervention in the form of ethics rounds did not succeed in improving the ethical climate for the staff.RESEARCH DESIGN:An exploratory and descriptive design with a qualitative approach was adopted, using individual interviews.

RESEARCH DESIGN: An exploratory and descriptive design with a qualitative approach was adopted, using individual interviews.

PARTICIPANTS AND RESEARCH CONTEXT: A total of 11 healthcare personnel, working in two different psychiatry outpatient clinics and with experience of participating in ethics rounds, were interviewed.

ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The study was based on informed consent and was approved by one of the Swedish Regional Ethical Review Boards.

FINDINGS: The participants were generally positive about the ethics rounds. They had experienced changes by participating in the ethics rounds in the form of being able to see things from different perspectives as well as by gaining insight into ethical issues. However, these changes had not affected daily work.

DISCUSSION: A crucial question is whether or not increased reflection ability among the participants is a good enough outcome of ethics rounds and whether this result could have been measured in patient-related outcomes. Ethics rounds might foster cooperation among the staff and this, in turn, could influence patient care.

CONCLUSION: By listening to others during ethics rounds, a person can learn to see things from a new angle. Participation in ethics rounds can also lead to better insight concerning ethical issues.

National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244888 (URN)10.1177/0969733014560930 (DOI)000372636200008 ()25527354 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA Insurance
Available from: 2015-02-23 Created: 2015-02-23 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Viberg, J., Segerdahl, P., Langenskiöld, S. & Hansson, M. G. (2016). Freedom of Choice about Incidental Findings can frustrate participants’ true preferences. Bioethics, 30(3), 203-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Freedom of Choice about Incidental Findings can frustrate participants’ true preferences
2016 (English)In: Bioethics, ISSN 0269-9702, E-ISSN 1467-8519, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 203-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ethicists, regulators and researchers have struggled with the question of whether incidental findings in genomics studies should be disclosed to participants. In the ethical debate, a general consensus is that disclosed information should benefit participants. However, there is no agreement that genetic information will benefit participants, rather it may cause problems such as anxiety. One could get past this disagreement about disclosure of incidental findings by letting participants express their preferences in the consent form. We argue that this freedom of choice is problematic.

In transferring the decision to participants, it is assumed that participants will understand what they decide about and that they will express what they truly want. However, psychological findings about people's reaction to probabilities and risk have been shown to involve both cognitive and emotional challenges. People change their attitude to risk depending on what is at stake. Their mood affects judgments and choices, and they over- and underestimate probabilities depending on whether they are low or high. Moreover, different framing of the options can steer people to a specific choice.

Although it seems attractive to let participants express their preferences to incidental findings in the consent form, it is uncertain if this choice enables people to express what they truly prefer. In order to better understand the participants' preferences, we argue that future empirical work needs to confront the participant with the complexity of the uncertainty and the trade-offs that are connected with the uncertain predictive value of genetic risk information.

National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-244971 (URN)10.1111/bioe.12160 (DOI)000371487500010 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, PR2013-0123EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 305444Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2015-02-23 Created: 2015-02-23 Last updated: 2018-08-01Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M. G. (2016). Genomics for policy makers and for researchers. Review of: Genomics and society-Ethical, Legal, Cultural and Socioeconomic Implication. Edited by: Dhavendra Kumar and Ruth Chadwick. [Review]. European Journal of Human Genetics, 24(12), 1835-1835
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genomics for policy makers and for researchers. Review of: Genomics and society-Ethical, Legal, Cultural and Socioeconomic Implication. Edited by: Dhavendra Kumar and Ruth Chadwick.
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Human Genetics, ISSN 1018-4813, E-ISSN 1476-5438, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 1835-1835Article, book review (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-317506 (URN)10.1038/ejhg.2016.123 (DOI)000394114500030 ()
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
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