uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 99) Show all publications
Karasik, D., Zillikens, M. C., Hsu, Y.-H., Aghdassi, A., Akesson, K., Amin, N., . . . Ohlsson, C. (2019). Disentangling the genetics of lean mass. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 109(2), 276-287
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Disentangling the genetics of lean mass
Show others...
2019 (English)In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 109, no 2, p. 276-287Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Lean body mass (LM) plays an important role in mobility and metabolic function. We previously identified five loci associated with LM adjusted for fat mass in kilograms. Such an adjustment may reduce the power to identify genetic signals having an association with both lean mass and fat mass. Objectives: To determine the impact of different fat mass adjustments on genetic architecture of LM and identify additional LM loci. Methods: We performed genome-wide association analyses for whole-body LM (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, age(2), and height with or without fat mass adjustments (Model 1 no fat adjustment; Model 2 adjustment for fat mass as a percentage of body mass; Model 3 adjustment for fat mass in kilograms). Results: Seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in separate loci, including one novel LM locus (TNRC6B), were successfully replicated in an additional 47,227 individuals from 29 cohorts. Based on the strengths of the associations in Model 1 vs Model 3, we divided the LM loci into those with an effect on both lean mass and fat mass in the same direction and refer to those as "sumo wrestler" loci (FTO and MC4R). In contrast, loci with an impact specifically on LMwere termed "body builder" loci (VCAN and ADAMTSL3). Using existing available genome-wide association study databases, LM increasing alleles of SNPs in sumo wrestler loci were associated with an adverse metabolic profile, whereas LM increasing alleles of SNPs in "body builder" loci were associated with metabolic protection. Conclusions: In conclusion, we identified one novel LM locus (TNRC6B). Our results suggest that a genetically determined increase in lean mass might exert either harmful or protective effects on metabolic traits, depending on its relation to fat mass.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2019
Keywords
body composition, skeletal muscle, body fat, meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies, metabolic profile
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-380499 (URN)10.1093/ajcn/nqy272 (DOI)000460615600007 ()30721968 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
Mubanga, M., Byberg, L., Egenvall, A., Sundström, J., Magnusson, P. K., Ingelsson, E. & Fall, T. (2019). Dog ownership and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: a nationwide prospective register-based cohort study. BMJ Open, 9, Article ID e023447.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dog ownership and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: a nationwide prospective register-based cohort study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, article id e023447Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
Abstract [en]

Objective To study the association between dog ownership and cardiovascular risk factors.

Design A nationwide register–based cohort study and a cross-sectional study in a subset.

Setting A cohort of 2 026 865 participants was identified from the Register of the Total Population and linked to national registers for information on dog ownership, prescribed medication, hospital admissions, education level, income and country of birth. Participants were followed from 1 October, 2006, to the end of the study on 31 December, 2012, assessing medication for a cardiovascular risk factor, emigration and death. Cross-sectional associations were further assessed in 10 110 individuals from the TwinGene study with additional adjustment for professional level, employment status, Charlson comorbidity index, disability and tobacco use.

Participants All Swedish residents aged 45–80 years on 1 October, 2006.

Main outcome measures Initiation of medication for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus.

Results After adjustment for confounders, the results indicated slightly higher likelihood of initiating antihypertensive (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.03) and lipid-lowering treatment (HR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.04) in dog owners than in non-owners, particularly among those aged 45–60 years and in those owning mixed breed or companion/toy breed dogs. No association of dog ownership with initiation of treatment for diabetes was found in the overall analysis (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.95 to 1.01). Sensitivity analyses in the TwinGene cohort indicated confounding of the association between dog ownership and prevalent treatment for hypertension, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus, respectively, from factors not available in the national cohort, such as employment status and non cardiovascularchronic disease status.

Conclusions In this large cohort study, dog ownership was associated with a minimally higher risk of initiation of treatment for hypertension and dyslipidaemia implying that the previously reported lower risk of cardiovascular mortality among dog owners in this cohort is not explained by reduced hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These observations may suffer from residual confounding despite access to multiple important covariates, and future studies may add valuable information.

Keywords
cardiovascular risk, hypertension, dog ownership, diabetes, registers
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357625 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2018-023447 (DOI)000471144900063 ()30850401 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00641Swedish Research Council Formas, 2013-1673Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and Medicine
Available from: 2018-08-19 Created: 2018-08-19 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved
Warensjö Lemming, E., Liisa, B., Wolk, A. & Michaëlsson, K. (2018). A comparison between two healthy diet scores, the modified Mediterranean diet score and the Healthy Nordic Food Index, in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality. British Journal of Nutrition, 119(7), 836-846
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison between two healthy diet scores, the modified Mediterranean diet score and the Healthy Nordic Food Index, in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 119, no 7, p. 836-846Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High adherence to healthy diets has the potential to prevent disease and prolong life span, and healthy dietary pattern scores have each been associated with disease and mortality. We studied two commonly promoted healthy diet scores (modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED) and the Healthy Nordic Food Index (HNFI)) and the combined effect of the two scores in association with all-cause and cause-specific mortality (cancer, CVD and ischaemic heart disease). The study included 38 428 women (median age of 61 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet and covariate data were collected in a questionnaire. mMED and HNFI were generated and categorised into low-, medium- and high-adherence groups, and in nine combinations of these. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of register-ascertained mortality and 95 % CI were calculated in Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. During follow-up (median: 17 years), 10 478 women died. In the high-adherence categories compared with low-adherence categories, the HR for all-cause mortality was 0·76 (95 % CI 0·70, 0·81) for mMED and 0·89 (95 % CI 0·83, 0·96) for HNFI. Higher adherence to mMED was associated with lower mortality in each stratum of HNFI in the combined analysis. In general, mMED, compared with HNFI, was more strongly associated with a lower cause-specific mortality. In Swedish women, both mMED and HNFI were inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The combined analysis, however, indicated an advantage to be adherent to the mMED. The present version of HNFI did not associate with mortality independent of mMED score.

Keywords
Modified Mediterranean diet score, Healthy Nordic Food Index, Mortality, CVD, Cohort studies
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355682 (URN)10.1017/S0007114518000387 (DOI)000431134300011 ()29569544 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-02302Swedish Research Council, 2015-03527
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Stenemo, M., Nowak, C., Byberg, L., Sundström, J., Giedraitis, V., Lind, L., . . . Ärnlöv, J. (2018). Circulating proteins as predictors of incident heart failure in the elderly. European Journal of Heart Failure, 20(1), 55-62
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating proteins as predictors of incident heart failure in the elderly
Show others...
2018 (English)In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 55-62Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims

To identify novel risk markers for incident heart failure using proteomic profiling of 80 proteins previously associated with cardiovascular pathology.

Methods and results

Proteomic profiling (proximity extension assay) was performed in two community‐based prospective cohorts of elderly individuals without heart failure at baseline: the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors [PIVUS, n = 901, median age 70.2 (interquartile range 70.0–70.3) years, 80 events]; and the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men [ULSAM, n = 685, median age 77.8 (interquartile range 76.9–78.1) years, 90 events]. Twenty‐nine proteins were associated with incident heart failure in the discovery cohort PIVUS after adjustment for age and sex, and correction for multiple testing. Eighteen associations replicated in ULSAM. In pooled analysis of both cohorts, higher levels of nine proteins were associated with incident heart failure after adjustment for established risk factors: growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF‐15), T‐cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM‐1), tumour necrosis factor‐related apoptosis‐inducing ligand receptor 2 (TRAIL‐R2), spondin‐1 (SPON1), matrix metalloproteinase‐12 (MMP‐12), follistatin (FS), urokinase‐type plasminogen activator surface receptor (U‐PAR), osteoprotegerin (OPG), and suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST2). Of these, GDF‐15, U‐PAR, MMP‐12, TRAIL‐R2, SPON1 and FS were associated with worsened echocardiographic left ventricular systolic function at baseline, while only TIM‐1 was positively associated with worsened diastolic function (P < 0.02 for all).

Conclusion

Proteomic profiling identified several novel associations between proteins involved in apoptosis, inflammation, matrix remodelling, and fibrinolysis with incident heart failure in elderly individuals. Our results encourage additional studies investigating the underlying mechanisms and the clinical utility of our findings.

Keywords
Biomarkers, Epidemiology, Heart failure, Left ventricular dysfunction, Proteomics, Risk prediction
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334416 (URN)10.1002/ejhf.980 (DOI)000423809700007 ()28967680 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 634869Swedish Research Council, 2012-2215; 2015-03477; 221-2013-1673Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 2012.0082Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20140422; 20150429; 20120169Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2013.0126Göran Gustafsson Foundation for promotion of scientific research at Uppala University and Royal Institute of Technology, 1637
Note

Tove Fall och Johan Ärnlöv delar på sistaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2019-04-09Bibliographically approved
Stattin, K., Hållmarker, U., Ärnlöv, J., James, S., Michaëlsson, K. & Byberg, L. (2018). Decreased Hip, Lower Leg, and Humeral Fractures but Increased Forearm Fractures in Highly Active Individuals. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 33(10), 1842-1850
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreased Hip, Lower Leg, and Humeral Fractures but Increased Forearm Fractures in Highly Active Individuals
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1842-1850Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is not known how physical exercise affects the risk of different types of fractures, especially in highly active individuals. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 118,204 men and 71,757 women who from 1991 to 2009 participated in Vasaloppet, a long-distance cross-country skiing race in Sweden, and 505,194 nonparticipants frequency-matched on sex, age, and county of residence from the Swedish population. Participants ranged from recreational exercisers to world-class skiers. Race participation, distance of race run, number of races participated in, and finishing time were used as proxies for physical exercise. Incident fractures from 1991 to 2010 were obtained from national Swedish registers. Over a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 53,175 fractures of any type, 2929 hip, 3107 proximal humerus, 11,875 lower leg, 11,733 forearm, and 2391 vertebral fractures occurred. In a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis using time-updated exposure and covariate information, participation in the race was associated with an increased risk of any type of fracture (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.05); forearm fractures had an HR, 1.11 with a 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.15. There was a lower risk of hip (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.83), proximal humerus (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.98), and lower leg fractures (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89 to 0.97), whereas the HR of vertebral fracture was 0.97 with a 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.07. Among participants, the risk of fracture was similar irrespective of race distance and number of races run. Participants close to the median finishing time had a lower risk of fracture compared with faster and slower participants. In summary, high levels of physical exercise were associated with a slightly higher risk of fractures of any type, including forearm fractures, but a lower risk of hip, proximal humerus, and lower leg fractures. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

Keywords
EPIDEMIOLOGY, EXERCISE, FRACTURE PREVENTION, ORTHOPEDICS, OSTEOPOROSIS
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367531 (URN)10.1002/jbmr.3476 (DOI)000448078300011 ()29933501 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Zhou, A., Taylor, A. E., Karhunen, V., Zhan, Y., Rovio, S. P., Lahti, J., . . . Hypponen, E. (2018). Habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in up to 415,530 participants. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 7526.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in up to 415,530 participants
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 7526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coffee's long-term effect on cognitive function remains unclear with studies suggesting both benefits and adverse effects. We used Mendelian randomization to investigate the causal relationship between habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function in mid-to later life. This included up to 415,530 participants and 300,760 coffee drinkers from 10 meta-analysed European ancestry cohorts. In each cohort, composite cognitive scores that capture global cognition and memory were computed using available tests. A genetic score derived using CYP1A1/2 (rs2472297) and AHR (rs6968865) was chosen as a proxy for habitual coffee consumption. Null associations were observed when examining the associations of the genetic score with global and memory cognition (beta = -0.0007, 95% C.I. -0.009 to 0.008, P = 0.87; beta = -0.001, 95% C.I. -0.005 to 0.002, P = 0.51, respectively), with high consistency between studies (P-heterogeneity > 0.4 for both). Domain specific analyses using available cognitive measures in the UK Biobank also did not support effects by habitual coffee intake for reaction time, pairs matching, reasoning or prospective memory (P >= 0.05 for all). Despite the power to detect very small effects, our meta-analysis provided no evidence for causal long-term effects of habitual coffee consumption on global cognition or memory.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356867 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-25919-2 (DOI)000431958000003 ()29760501 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Michaëlsson, K., Wolk, A., Warensjö, E., Melhus, H. & Byberg, L. (2018). Intake of milk or fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hip fracture rates: A cohort study of Swedish women.. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 33(3), 449-457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intake of milk or fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hip fracture rates: A cohort study of Swedish women.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 449-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Milk products may differ in pro-oxidant properties and their effects on fracture risk could potentially be modified by the intake of foods with antioxidant activity. In the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort study, we aimed to determine how milk and fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption are associated with hip fracture. Women born 1914-1948 (n=61 240) answered food frequency and lifestyle questionnaires in 1987-1990 and 38 071 women contributed with updated information in 1997. During a mean follow-up of 22 years, 5827 women had a hip fracture (ascertained via official register data). Compared with a low intake of milk (<1 glass/day) and a high intake of fruits and vegetables (≥5 servings/day), a high intake of milk (≥3 glasses/day) with a concomitant low intake of fruits and vegetables (<2 servings/day) resulted in a HR of 2.49 (95% CI, 2.03-3.05). This higher hip fracture rate among high consumers of milk was only modestly attenuated with a concomitant high consumption of fruit and vegetables (HR 2.14; 95% CI 1.69-2.71). The combination of fruits and vegetables with fermented milk (yogurt or soured milk) yielded a different pattern with lowest rates of hip fracture in high consumers: HR 0.81 (95% CI, 0.68-0.97) for ≥2 servings/day of fermented milk and ≥5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables compared with low consumption of both fruit and vegetables and fermented milk. We conclude that the amount and type of dairy products as well as fruit and vegetable intake are differentially associated with hip fracture rates in women.

Keywords
dairy, fruit, hip fracture, milk, vegetables
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334436 (URN)10.1002/jbmr.3324 (DOI)000426731100011 ()29083056 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-2427
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Michaëlsson, K. & Byberg, L. (2018). Interpretation of milk research results [Letter to the editor]. Osteoporosis International, 29(3), 773-775
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interpretation of milk research results
2018 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 773-775Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334430 (URN)10.1007/s00198-017-4291-x (DOI)000426646900026 ()29147751 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-12-03
Benetou, V., Orfanos, P., Feskanich, D., Michaëlsson, K., Pettersson-Kymmer, U., Byberg, L., . . . Trichopoulou, A. (2018). Mediterranean diet and hip fracture incidence among older adults: the CHANCES project. Osteoporosis International, 29(7), 1591-1599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediterranean diet and hip fracture incidence among older adults: the CHANCES project
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 7, p. 1591-1599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The association between adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) and hip fracture incidence is not yet established. In a diverse population of elderly, increased adherence to MD was associated with lower hip fracture incidence. Except preventing major chronic diseases, adhering to MD might have additional benefits in lowering hip fracture risk. Hip fractures constitute a major public health problem among older adults. Latest evidence links adherence to Mediterranean diet (MD) with reduced hip fracture risk, but still more research is needed to elucidate this relationship. The potential association of adherence to MD with hip fracture incidence was explored among older adults. A total of 140,775 adults (116,176 women, 24,599 men) 60 years and older, from five cohorts from Europe and the USA, were followed-up for 1,896,219 person-years experiencing 5454 hip fractures. Diet was assessed at baseline by validated, cohort-specific, food-frequency questionnaires, and hip fractures were ascertained through patient registers or telephone interviews/questionnaires. Adherence to MD was evaluated by a scoring system on a 10-point scale modified to be applied also to non-Mediterranean populations. In order to evaluate the association between MD and hip fracture incidence, cohort-specific hazard ratios (HR), adjusted for potential confounders, were estimated using Cox proportional-hazards regression and pooled estimates were subsequently derived implementing random-effects meta-analysis. A two-point increase in the score was associated with a significant 4% decrease in hip fracture risk (pooled adjusted HR 0.96; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.92-0.99, p(heterogeneity) = 0.446). In categorical analyses, hip fracture risk was lower among men and women with moderate (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.87-0.99) and high (HR 0.94; 95% CI 0.87-1.01) adherence to the score compared with those with low adherence. In this large sample of older adults from Europe and the USA, increased adherence to MD was associated with lower hip fracture incidence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER LONDON LTD, 2018
Keywords
Aging, Bone health, CHANCES, Dietary patterns, Hip fractures, Mediterranean diet
National Category
Orthopaedics Geriatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361112 (URN)10.1007/s00198-018-4517-6 (DOI)000437737800012 ()29656347 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-09-21 Created: 2018-09-21 Last updated: 2018-09-21Bibliographically approved
Byberg, L. & Michaëlsson, K. (2018). Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women: Comments on Feskanich et al. [Letter to the editor]. Osteoporosis International, 29(5), 1221-1222
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Milk and other dairy foods and risk of hip fracture in men and women: Comments on Feskanich et al.
2018 (English)In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 1221-1222Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-358108 (URN)10.1007/s00198-018-4397-9 (DOI)000431931400022 ()29500528 (PubMedID)
Note

Correction in: Osteoporosis International (2019) 30:699

DOI: 10.1007/s00198-019-04861-7

Available from: 2018-08-24 Created: 2018-08-24 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4421-6466

Search in DiVA

Show all publications