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Sarkadi, Anna, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6594-2291
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Publications (10 of 87) Show all publications
Ssegonja, R., Alaie, I., Philipson, A., Hagberg, L., Sampaio, F., Möller, M., . . . Feldman, I. (2019). Depressive disorders in adolescence, recurrence in early adulthood, and healthcare usage in mid-adulthood: A longitudinal cost-of-illness study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 258, 33-41
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Depressive disorders in adolescence, recurrence in early adulthood, and healthcare usage in mid-adulthood: A longitudinal cost-of-illness study
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 258, p. 33-41Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Depression in adolescence is associated with increased healthcare consumption in adulthood, but prior research has not recognized the heterogeneity of depressive disorders. This paper investigated the additional healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood for individuals with adolescent depression, and examined the mediating role of subsequent depression in early adulthood.

Methods: This study was based on the Uppsala Longitudinal Adolescent Depression Study, initiated in Sweden in the early 1990s. Depressive disorders were assessed in adolescence (age 16-17) and early adulthood (age 19-30). Healthcare usage and related costs in mid-adulthood (age 31-40) were estimated using nationwide population-based registries. Participants with specific subtypes of adolescent depression (n = 306) were compared with matched non-depressed peers (n = 213).

Results: Women with persistent depressive disorder (PDD) in adolescence utilized significantly more healthcare resources in mid-adulthood. The association was not limited to psychiatric care, and remained after adjustment for individual and parental characteristics. The total additional annual cost for a single age group of females with a history of PDD at a population level was estimated at 3.10 million USD. Depression recurrence in early adulthood mediated the added costs for psychiatric care, but not for somatic care.

Limitations: Primary health care data were not available, presumably resulting in an underestimation of the true healthcare consumption. Estimates for males had limited precision due to a relatively small male proportion.

Conclusions: On a population level, the additional healthcare costs incurred in mid-adulthood in females with a history of adolescent PDD are considerable. Early treatment and prevention should be prioritized.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER, 2019
Keywords
Adolescence, Depression, Direct costs, Adulthood, Psychiatric healthcare, Non-psychiatric healthcare
National Category
Psychiatry Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393715 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2019.07.077 (DOI)000482176400004 ()31382102 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10092Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council FormasVinnova
Available from: 2019-09-30 Created: 2019-09-30 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Warner, G., Zaruhi, B., Osman, F., Lampa, E. & Sarkadi, A. (2019). ‘I felt like a human being’—An exploratory, multi‐method study of refugee involvement in the development of mental health intervention research. Health Expectations
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘I felt like a human being’—An exploratory, multi‐method study of refugee involvement in the development of mental health intervention research
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2019 (English)In: Health Expectations, ISSN 1369-6513, E-ISSN 1369-7625Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Great advancements have been made in patient and public involvement (PPI), including the development of guidance on how to conduct, report and evaluate PPI. Despite these efforts, the evidence base remains relatively weak. A substantive methodological development is required. This is particularly important for vulnerable groups within society, for whom PPI can be challenging but has the potential to play a transformative role in shaping research.

Objectives: To describe the group dynamic characteristics and immediate impact of PPI from the user representatives’ perspective in a case study of refugee involvement in the development of mental health intervention research. To pilot and methodologically appraise the Active Involvement of Users in Research Observation Schedule and Questionnaire.

Design: The Active Involvement of Users in Research Observation Schedule and Questionnaire were administered together with a focus group discussion. Setting: ‘Refugee Advisors’ were involved in the development of a randomized con‐ trolled trial protocol evaluating a brief group intervention for refugee children expe‐ riencing symptoms of post‐traumatic stress in Sweden.

Results: The multi‐method approach demonstrated good feasibility. There were clear examples of how the advisors influenced research development. The advisors described a perceived impact on the research, equality and acceptance, and knowledge gain. A sense of appreciation and empowerment was also interpreted. However, potential issues relating to the relevance of contributions and use of an interpreter were identified.

Discussion and conclusion: The methodological approach piloted in this study offers a promising, rigorous way to evaluate PPI. The research tools require further refinement and validation.

Keywords
group dynamics, mental health, observation, patient and public involvement, refugees
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396996 (URN)10.1111/hex.12990 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-11-13 Created: 2019-11-13 Last updated: 2019-11-14Bibliographically approved
Ssegonja, R., Nystrand, C., Feldman, I., Sarkadi, A., Langenskiöld, S. & Jonsson, U. (2019). Indicated preventive interventions for depression in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis and meta-regression. Preventive Medicine, 118, 7-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicated preventive interventions for depression in children and adolescents: A meta-analysis and meta-regression
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2019 (English)In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 118, p. 7-15Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression contributes about 2% to the global burden of disease. A first onset of depressive disorder or subsyndromal depressive symptoms is common in adolescence, indicating that early prevention is a priority. However, trials of preventive interventions for depression in youths show conflicting results. This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioral therapy (GB-CBT) as a preventive intervention targeting subsyndromal depression in children and adolescents. In addition, the impact of different covariates (type of comparator and use of booster sessions) was assessed. Relevant articles were identified from previous systematic reviews, and supplemented with an electronic search spanning from 01/09/2014 to 28/02/2018. The retrieved articles were assessed for eligibility and risk of bias. Relevant data were extracted. Intervention effectiveness was pooled using a random-effects model and the impact of covariates assessed using meta-regression. 38 eligible articles (34 trials) were obtained. The analysis showed GB-CBT to significantly reduce the incidence (relative risk 0.43, 95% CI 0.21-0.87) and symptoms (Cohen's d -0.22, 95% CI -0.32 to -0.11) of depression at post-test compared to all controls. Comparisons with passive comparators suggested that the effect decayed over time. However, compared to active controls, a significant intervention effect was evident only after 12 month or more. Our results suggest that the preventive effect of GB-CBT wears off, but still lasts longer than the effect of active comparators. Only a few studies included booster sessions, precluding firm conclusions. Future studies should clarify to what extent maintenance strategies can prolong the preventive effect of GB-CBT.

Keywords
Depression, Dysthymia, Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Meta-analysis, Meta-regression, Indicated prevention interventions
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375899 (URN)10.1016/j.ypmed.2018.09.021 (DOI)000454933300002 ()30287331 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-10092Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Research Council FormasVINNOVA
Available from: 2019-02-04 Created: 2019-02-04 Last updated: 2019-02-04Bibliographically approved
Nayeb, L., Lagerberg, D., Westerlund, M., Sarkadi, A., Lucas, S. & Eriksson, M. (2019). Modifying a language screening tool for three-year-old children identified severe language disorders six months earlier. Acta Paediatrica, 108(9), 1642-1648
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Modifying a language screening tool for three-year-old children identified severe language disorders six months earlier
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2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 9, p. 1642-1648Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim We examined if routine Swedish language screening for developmental language disorder (DLD) carried out at three years of age could be performed as effectively six months earlier. Methods This study observed 105 monolingual Swedish-speaking children (53% boys) aged 29-31 months at three Swedish child health centres. We compared their ability to combine three words, as per the existing protocol, and two words. They also underwent a comprehension task. Speech and language pathologists clinically assessed the children for DLD and their results were compared with the nurse-led screening. Results The results for the three-word and two-word criterion were the following: sensitivity (100% versus 91%) specificity (81% versus 91%), positive predictive (38% versus 56%) and negative predictive value (100% versus 99%). The three-word criterion identified 29 children with possible DLD, including 11 cases later confirmed, and the two-word criterion identified 18 possible cases, including 10 confirmed cases. DLD was overrepresented in the 10% of children who did not cooperate with the nurse-led screening. Conclusion Changing the required word combinations from three to two words worked well. The three-word test identified one extra confirmed case, but resulted in 10 more false positives. Lack of cooperation during screening constituted an increased risk for DLD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
Childhealth care, Developmental language disorder, Language screening, Monolingual children, Word production
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393651 (URN)10.1111/apa.14790 (DOI)000479320100015 ()30896050 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-09-25 Created: 2019-09-25 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Dahlberg, A., Ghaderi, A., Sarkadi, A. & Salari, R. (2019). SDQ in the Hands of Fathers and Preschool Teachers: Psychometric Properties in a Non-clinical Sample of 3-5-Year-Olds. Child Psychiatry and Human Development, 50(1), 132-141
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SDQ in the Hands of Fathers and Preschool Teachers: Psychometric Properties in a Non-clinical Sample of 3-5-Year-Olds
2019 (English)In: Child Psychiatry and Human Development, ISSN 0009-398X, E-ISSN 1573-3327, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 132-141Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) is a well-established instrument for measuring social and behavioural problems among children, with good psychometric properties for older children, but less validity reports on pre-schoolers. In addition, there is a knowledge gap concerning fathers as informants. The present work is one of the few validity studies to include preschool teachers and the first on preschool children where fathers are included as separate informants. In this study, SDQs were collected from a large community sample (n = 17,752) of children aged 3-5, rated by mothers, fathers, and preschool teachers and analysed using confirmatory factor analysis. Our results revealed acceptable fit for all informant groups and measurement invariance across child gender, child age, and parental education level. Our findings suggest good construct validity of the SDQ for a non-clinical preschool population and imply that it may be used for assessing child behaviour problems from different informant perspectives.

Keywords
Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), Construct validity, Fathers, Preschool children, Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355978 (URN)10.1007/s10578-018-0826-4 (DOI)000458372000012 ()29959588 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasVINNOVA, 259-2012-68Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-07-10 Created: 2018-07-10 Last updated: 2019-03-12Bibliographically approved
Bergström, M., Sarkadi, A., Hjern, A. & Fransson, E. (2019). "We also communicate through a book in the diaper bag"-Separated parents' ways to coparent and promote adaptation of their 1-4 year olds in equal joint physical custody. PLoS ONE, 14(4), Article ID e0214913.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"We also communicate through a book in the diaper bag"-Separated parents' ways to coparent and promote adaptation of their 1-4 year olds in equal joint physical custody
2019 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e0214913Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Joint physical custody (JPC) refers to a practice where children with separated parents share their time between the parents' respective homes. Studies on parents' views of JPC for young children are scarce. The aim of this interview study was to explore parents' perceptions on how they experience and practice equally shared JPC for their 1-4 year-olds in Sweden. Forty-six parents (18 fathers and 28 mothers) of 50 children (31 boys and 19 girls) under 5 years of age were interviewed. Parents were recruited through information in the media and represented a broad range of socioeconomic backgrounds, as well as both voluntary and court-ordered custody arrangements. The interviews were semi-structured and analyzed using systematic text condensation. Two themes emerged regarding the research question. In the first theme, Always free, never free, parents described their striving to coparent without a love relationship. While they appreciated the freedom of being a "half-time parent", doing things one's own way, they felt constrained by the long-term commitment to live close to and keep discussing child rearing issues with the ex-partner. Good communication was key and lessened parent's feelings of being cut-off from half of the child's life. When JPC was ordered by court or conflicts were intense, parents tried to have less contact and worried when the children were in the other home. The second theme, Is it right, is it good?, included descriptions of how the parents monitored the child's responses to the living arrangement and made changes to optimize their adjustment. Adaptations included visits for the child with the other parent mid-week, shared meals or adapting schedules. In conclusion, these parents worked hard to make JPC work and cause minimal damage to their children. Most parents were pleased with the arrangements with the notable exception of couples experiencing ongoing conflict.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382554 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0214913 (DOI)000463992600041 ()30970037 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2014-0843
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-05-03Bibliographically approved
Fält, E., Wallby, T., Sarkadi, A., Salari, R. & Fabian, H. (2018). Agreement between mothers', fathers', and teachers' ratings of behavioural and emotional problems in 3-5-year-old children. PLoS ONE, 13(11), Article ID e0206752.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Agreement between mothers', fathers', and teachers' ratings of behavioural and emotional problems in 3-5-year-old children
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 11, article id e0206752Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a valid and reliable instrument for measuring children's mental health, is available in parent- and teacher versions, making it an ideal tool for assessing behavioural and emotional problems in young children. However, few studies have evaluated inter-parent agreement on the SDQ, and in most studies on SDQ agreement, parent scores are either provided by only one parent or have been combined into one parent score. Furthermore, studies on SDQ inter-rater agreement usually only reflect degree of correlation, leaving the agreement between measurements unknown. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine both degree of correlation and agreement between parent and teacher SDQ reports, in a community sample of preschool-aged children in Sweden.

Methods: Data were obtained from the Children and Parents in Focus trial. The sample comprised 4,46 children 3-5-years-old. Mothers, fathers and preschool teachers completed the SDQ as part of the routine health check-ups at Child Health Centres. Inter-rater agreement was measured using Pearson correlation coefficient and intraclass correlation (ICC).

Results: Results revealed poor/fair agreement between parent and teacher ratings (ICC 0.25-0.54) and good/excellent agreement between mother and father ratings (ICC 0.66-0.76). The highest level of agreement between parents and teachers was found for the hyperactivity and peer problem subscales, whereas the strongest agreement between parents was found for the hyperactivity and conduct subscales.

Conclusions: Low inter-rater agreement between parent and teacher ratings suggests that information from both teachers and parents is important when using the SDQ as a method to identify mental health problems in preschool children. Although mothers and fathers each provide unique information about their child's behaviour, good inter-parent agreement indicates that a single parent informant may be sufficient and simplify data collection.

National Category
Psychiatry Pediatrics Other Medical Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369597 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0206752 (DOI)000449027600094 ()30383861 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 259-2012-68Swedish Research Council, 259-2012-68Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 259-2012-68VINNOVA, 259-2012-68
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-06-04Bibliographically approved
Quach, J., Sarkadi, A., Napiza, N., Wake, M., Loughman, A. & Goldfeld, S. (2018). Do Fathers' Home Reading Practices at Age 2 Predict Child Language and Literacy at Age 4?. Academic pediatrics, 18(2), 179-187
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Fathers' Home Reading Practices at Age 2 Predict Child Language and Literacy at Age 4?
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2018 (English)In: Academic pediatrics, ISSN 1876-2859, E-ISSN 1876-2867, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 179-187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Maternal shared reading practices predict emergent literacy, but fathers' contributions are less certain. We examined whether fathers' shared home reading activities at 2 years (1) predict language and emergent literacy at age 4 years, when controlling for maternal contributions; and (2) differentially benefit these outcomes in disadvantaged children.

METHODS: Design: Two-parent families recruited from 5 relatively disadvantaged communities for the universal Let's Read literacy promotion population-based trial (ISRCTN 04602902) in Melbourne, Australia. Exposure, 2 years: Home reading practices via self-reported maternal and paternal StimQ-Toddler questionnaires, dichotomised at study median (high vs. low). Outcomes, 4 years: Receptive and expressive language (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals-4), emergent literacy (Sunderland Phonological Awareness Test-Revised).

ANALYSES: Aim 1: Linear regression, adjusted for mothers' home reading, 2-year-old vocabulary and communication skills and family disadvantage. Aim 2: Interaction of disadvantage [yes vs. no] with high home reading by (a) fathers and (b) at least one parent.

RESULTS: Data were available for 405 (62.3%) families. High father reading at 2 years (reference: low) predicted better expressive (mean difference 8.0, 95%CI 4.5 to 11.5) and receptive (mean difference 7.3, 95%CI 4.1 to 10.5) language at 4 years (both p<0.001) but not emergent literacy skills. Similar patterns were observed in families with at least one parent with high home reading. Father reading did not differentially benefit outcomes in disadvantaged children.

CONCLUSION: Fathers' involvement in reading at 2 years predicted better language but not emergent literacy at 4 years, and did not protect against adverse effects of socioeconomic disadvantage.

Keywords
fathers, reading, language, literacy, longitudinal
National Category
Specific Languages Other Basic Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335484 (URN)10.1016/j.acap.2017.10.001 (DOI)000426804700010 ()29056402 (PubMedID)
Funder
Australian Research Council, DE140100751, LP0561522
Available from: 2017-12-05 Created: 2017-12-05 Last updated: 2018-05-15Bibliographically approved
Sarkadi, A., Ådahl, K., Ssegonja, R., Fängström, K. & Salari, R. (2018). Evaluation of a group intervention for unaccompanied refugee minors with PTSD symptoms in Sweden. Paper presented at 1st World Congress on Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Health, 17-19 May 2018, Edinburgh, UK.. European Journal of Public Health, 28(Supplement: 1), 105-105
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of a group intervention for unaccompanied refugee minors with PTSD symptoms in Sweden
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2018 (English)In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no Supplement: 1, p. 105-105Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2018
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-359391 (URN)10.1093/eurpub/cky047.255a (DOI)000432430700300 ()
Conference
1st World Congress on Migration, Ethnicity, Race and Health, 17-19 May 2018, Edinburgh, UK.
Note

Oral Presentations

Meeting Abstract: 7.4-O1

Available from: 2018-09-25 Created: 2018-09-25 Last updated: 2018-09-25Bibliographically approved
Ssegonja, R., Nystrand, C., Feldman, I., Sarkadi, A., Langenskiöld, S. & Jonsson, U. (2018). Indicated Preventive Interventions for Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis And Meta-Regression. Value in Health, 21, S181-S181
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Indicated Preventive Interventions for Depression in Children and Adolescents: A Meta-Analysis And Meta-Regression
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2018 (English)In: Value in Health, ISSN 1098-3015, E-ISSN 1524-4733, Vol. 21, p. S181-S181Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
National Category
Health Care Service and Management, Health Policy and Services and Health Economy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366684 (URN)10.1016/j.jval.2018.04.1234 (DOI)000438630000353 ()
Available from: 2018-11-23 Created: 2018-11-23 Last updated: 2018-11-23Bibliographically approved
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