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Helgesson, G
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Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Elmersjö, C.-Å. & Helgesson, G. (2008). Notions of just health care at three Swedish hospitals. Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, 11(2), 145-151
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Notions of just health care at three Swedish hospitals
2008 (English)In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 145-151Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article investigates what notions of “just health care” are found at three Swedish hospitals among health care personnel and whether these notions are relevant to what priorities are actually made. Fieldwork at all three hospitals and 114 in-depth interviews were conducted. Data have been subject to conceptual and ethical analysis and categorisation. According to our findings, justice is an important idea to health care personnel at the studied hospitals. Two main notions of just health care were found. The main idea was the notion of “equal treatment according to need”, the basic idea being that differences in treatment should be justified by differences in needs. The competing idea that merit should affect the treatment received is occasionally encountered, the idea here being that patients, by acting irresponsibly, may no longer deserve to be treated strictly according to needs. In practice, priorities are made on grounds that only partly comply with the basic idea of justice in health care, as it is understood by staff at the studied hospitals. Exceptions are made due to regional differences, considerations of cost-effectiveness, economic incentives, tradition, the daily patient flow, research, private alternatives, patient influence and favouritism of health care personnel.

Keywords
health care, justice, merit, need, priority
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11721 (URN)10.1007/s11019-007-9084-0 (DOI)000272155300004 ()17619111 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-10-15 Created: 2007-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Masterton, M., Hansson, M., Höglund, A. & Helgesson, G. (2007). Can the Dead be Brought into Disrepute?. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, 28(2), 137-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Can the Dead be Brought into Disrepute?
2007 (English)In: Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, ISSN 1386-7415, E-ISSN 1573-0980, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Queen Christina of Sweden was unconventional in her time, leading to hypotheses on her gender and possible hermaphroditic nature. If genetic analysis can substantiate the latter claim, could this bring the queen into disrepute 300 years after her death? Joan C. Callahan has argued that if a reputation changes, this constitutes a change only in the group of people changing their views and not in the person whose reputation it is. Is this so? This paper analyses what constitutes change and draws out the implications to the reputation of the dead. It is argued that a reputation is a relational property which can go through changes. The change is “real” for the group changing their views on Queen Christina and of a Cambridge kind for the long dead queen herself. Cambridge changes result in new properties being acquired, some of which can be of significance. Although the dead cannot go through any non-relational changes, it is possible for the dead to change properties through Cambridge changes. In this sense changes in reputation do affect the dead, and thus Queen Christina can acquire a new property, in this case possibly a worse reputation.

Keywords
Callahan Joan C, Cambridge change, posthumous change, relational change, relational properties
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-32571 (URN)10.1007/s11017-007-9028-y (DOI)000248004700004 ()17549606 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-07-09 Created: 2007-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Hansson, M. G., Helgesson, G., Wessman, R. & Jaenisch, R. (2007). Commentary: Isolated Stem Cells - Patentable as Cultural Artifacts?. Stem Cells, 25(6), 1507-1510
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Commentary: Isolated Stem Cells - Patentable as Cultural Artifacts?
2007 (English)In: Stem Cells, ISSN 1066-5099, E-ISSN 1549-4918, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 1507-1510Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article argues that an isolated embryonic stem cell basically represents a cultural artifact that has no equivalent to cells of the embryo, and that it is likely that the isolation of adult stem cells has a similar consequence. An isolated stem cell could thus be distinguished as something other than the stem cell existing as part of a human body. Since isolation of stem cells implies modification, product patents should, where the results carry enough novelty, inventive step, and potential for industrial application, as a matter of principle be a viable option for patent authorities. Questions of morality, which may affect the patentability, should also be viewed in light of the distinction between isolated result and body part. At the same time, it is essential that patent authorities do not accept broad patent claims that will be detrimental to research. Disclosure of potential conflicts of interest is found at the end of this article.

Keywords
Stem cells, Patent, Ethics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Law
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-33526 (URN)10.1634/stemcells.2006-0684 (DOI)000246906500020 ()17347494 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-07-09 Created: 2007-07-09 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, G., Dillner, J., Carlson, J., Bartram, C. R. & Hansson, M. G. (2007). Ethical framework for previously collected biobank samples [Letter to the editor]. Nature Biotechnology, 25(9), 973-976
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethical framework for previously collected biobank samples
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2007 (English)In: Nature Biotechnology, ISSN 1087-0156, E-ISSN 1546-1696, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 973-976Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11718 (URN)10.1038/nbt0907-973b (DOI)000249444200015 ()17846619 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-10-15 Created: 2007-10-15 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Helgesson, G., Eriksson, S. & Swartling, U. (2007). Limited Relevance of the Right Not to Know: Reflections on a Screening Study. Accountability in Research, 14(3), 197-209
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Limited Relevance of the Right Not to Know: Reflections on a Screening Study
2007 (English)In: Accountability in Research, ISSN 0898-9621, E-ISSN 1545-5815, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 197-209Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The right not to know personal health-related information has been included in prominent human rights documents and subsequently in national legislation since the middle of the 1990s. Apart from situations where another life is at stake, the right not to know has in these documents been formulated as if it should have precedence over other interests. This article argues against giving the right not to know such a prominent position. It does so by questioning the ethical relevance of the concept for both theoretical and empirical reasons. The main focus of the article is on empirical data from a prospective population screening for Type 1 diabetes. Data indicate that research participants are not as autonomous as is generally assumed by the defenders of the right not to know.

Keywords
autonomy, children, health, population screening, right not to know
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Bioethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11282 (URN)10.1080/08989620701456322 (DOI)
Available from: 2008-12-16 Created: 2008-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-11
Masterton, M., Helgesson, G., Höglund, A. & Hansson, M. (2007). Queen Christina's moral claim on the living: Justification of a tenacious moral intuition. Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, 10(3), 321-327
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Queen Christina's moral claim on the living: Justification of a tenacious moral intuition
2007 (English)In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 321-327Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the long-running debate on the interest of the dead, Joan C. Callahan argues against such interests and although Søren Holm for practical reasons is prepared to consider posthumous interests, he does not see any moral basis to support such interests. He argues that the whole question is irresolvable, yet finds privacy interests where Tutankhamen is concerned. Callahan argues that there can be reasons to hold on to the fiction that there are posthumous interests, namely if it is comforting for the living and instrumental for society. Thus, despite arguing against the position that the dead have any interests or for any moral basis for such interests, these “interests” are still taken into consideration in the end. This shows the unsatisfactory basis of their positions and indicates the tenacity of the moral intuition that the dead can have moral claims on the living. One example of a posthumous interest is the interest in one’s good name. Here we argue that it is an interest of moral significance. This implies that if individuals restrict use of their sample when they are still alive, those restrictions apply after their death. Further, it implies that one should be concerned with the reputation of historic persons. Research that defeats these interests calls for justification. We have suggested two lines of thinking along which such a discussion could go: investigating the truth-value of the good name and the relevance of bringing it into possible disrepute.

Keywords
J. C. Callahan, the dead, duties, ethics, S. Holm, posthumous interests
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-10399 (URN)10.1007/s11019-006-9044-0 (DOI)17279433 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2007-03-22 Created: 2007-03-22 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S., Helgesson, G. & Segerdahl, P. (2006). Provide expertise or facilitate ethical reflection? A comment on the debate between Cowley and Crosthwaite. Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, 9(3), 389-392
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Provide expertise or facilitate ethical reflection? A comment on the debate between Cowley and Crosthwaite
2006 (English)In: Medicine, Health care and Philosophy, ISSN 1386-7423, E-ISSN 1572-8633, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 389-392Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
bioethics, expertise, medical ethics
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Bioethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-25551 (URN)10.1007/s11019-006-9003-9 (DOI)17120114 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-12-16 Created: 2008-12-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Hansson, M. G., Dillner, J., Bartram, C. R., Carlson, J. A. & Helgesson, G. (2006). Should donors be allowed to give broad consent to future biobank research?. Lancet Oncol, 7(3), 266-9
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Should donors be allowed to give broad consent to future biobank research?
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2006 (English)In: Lancet Oncol, ISSN 1470-2045, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 266-9Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-78532 (URN)16510336 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2006-03-24 Created: 2006-03-24 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Helgesson, G. (2005). Children, longitudinal studies, and informed consent.. Med Health Care Philos, 8(3), 307-13
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Children, longitudinal studies, and informed consent.
2005 (English)In: Med Health Care Philos, ISSN 1386-7423, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 307-13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
Child, Child; Preschool, Humans, Informed Consent/*ethics, Longitudinal Studies, Parent-Child Relations, Personal Autonomy, Research Support; Non-U.S. Gov't
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-78529 (URN)16283493 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2006-03-24 Created: 2006-03-24 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Elmersjö, C. & Helgesson, G. (2005). Etik och ekonomi på kolliskionskurs?. Socialmedicinsk tidskrift (4), 333-342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etik och ekonomi på kolliskionskurs?
2005 (Swedish)In: Socialmedicinsk tidskrift, no 4, p. 333-342Article in journal (Other scientific) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-78534 (URN)
Available from: 2006-03-24 Created: 2006-03-24 Last updated: 2011-01-11
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