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Kavathatzopoulos, IordanisORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3806-5216
Publications (10 of 143) Show all publications
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2024). Artificial intelligence and the sustainability of thinking: How AI may destroy us, or help us. In: Thomas Taro Lennerfors and Kiyoshi Murata (Ed.), Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures: (pp. 19-30). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Artificial intelligence and the sustainability of thinking: How AI may destroy us, or help us
2024 (English)In: Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures / [ed] Thomas Taro Lennerfors and Kiyoshi Murata, London: Routledge, 2024, p. 19-30Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Artificial intelligence (AI) is expected to provide answers, products, and services of increasing quality for the satisfaction of our needs. However, AI entails certain risks, some very serious, e.g., the risk of human enslavement or even extinction. In order to handle this ethical and sustainability issue properly, we need to ask questions about what we really want, what is our real goal, and what we really are. Classical philosophy defines us as thinking entities, and the main problem is the issue of how to think in the right way as persons or as groups and societies. Accordingly, the design and use of AI as a tool to support our thinking process may be the right way to take advantage of the possibilities AI offers. However, if we design and use AI as a provider of answers, services, and products, as we currently do, the risk is that an incessantly advanced AI will swiftly replace our thinking and by that undermine our existence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2024
Keywords
Artificial Intelligence; Ethics; Sustainability; Thinking; Risks; Possibilities; Life
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy Cultural Studies Psychology Sociology
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510572 (URN)10.4324/9781003367451-3 (DOI)9781032434643 (ISBN)9781032434667 (ISBN)9781003367451 (ISBN)
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2023-08-31 Created: 2023-08-31 Last updated: 2024-05-07Bibliographically approved
Nakada, M., Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2024). Truth and reality in the digital lifeworld: Departure from reductionism. In: Thomas Taro Lennerfors, Kiyoshi Murata (Ed.), Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures: (pp. 72-92). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Truth and reality in the digital lifeworld: Departure from reductionism
2024 (English)In: Ethics and Sustainability in Digital Cultures / [ed] Thomas Taro Lennerfors, Kiyoshi Murata, London: Routledge, 2024, p. 72-92Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In this chapter, we will try to find ways to overcome the so-called techno-determinism which seems to influence our life in the informatized environments. In the first half of this chapter, we will critically examine the generally accepted belief that mathematics is related to reality as a static and fixed form. We will see that mathematics is rather a plural matter including human intention, the procedures to rewrite the relation between the complex functions as the original problem, and the calculated solutions as the potential answers or so. In this sense, the belief about mathematics as a fixed truth is not stable anymore. This suggests the techno-determinism itself is not stable anymore, either. In the last half of this chapter, we will see the work of a kind of horizon enabling us to interpret matters in life not as remnants of mathematical and scientific truths. We will do this by examining our qualitative and quantitative research in Japan, Sweden, and other countries. Our research show that the robots and other technological products will encounter with us on a kind of horizon in our life where things and matters seem to remain in the form of un-differentiated situations or ‘oneness.’

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2024
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Mathematics Philosophy Ethics
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510582 (URN)10.4324/9781003367451-6 (DOI)9781032434643 (ISBN)9781032434667 (ISBN)9781003367451 (ISBN)
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2023-08-31 Created: 2023-08-31 Last updated: 2024-04-03Bibliographically approved
Asai, R., Nakada, M. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2023). Care Robots and Humanity: How Can We Cope with The Indeterminacy and Ambiguity of Robot-Human Relationships?. In: Minna M. Rantanen, Salla Westerstrand, Otto Sahlgren and Jani Koskinen (Ed.), Tethics 2023: Proceedings of the Conference on Technology Ethics 2023. Paper presented at Conference on Technology Ethics – Tethics 2023 (pp. 1-10). CEUR-WS.org
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Care Robots and Humanity: How Can We Cope with The Indeterminacy and Ambiguity of Robot-Human Relationships?
2023 (English)In: Tethics 2023: Proceedings of the Conference on Technology Ethics 2023 / [ed] Minna M. Rantanen, Salla Westerstrand, Otto Sahlgren and Jani Koskinen, CEUR-WS.org , 2023, p. 1-10Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ageing society, labour shortages in the care sector and increasing social security costs havebecome serious social problems in many countries. Sweden and Japan are, of course, noexception in this respect. In order to alleviate this situation, both countries have implementedvarious policies in different social areas, as well as promoting digitalisation and introducingcare robots in the healthcare sector. While older people are generally considered to be reluctantto adapt to new technologies, in both Japan and Sweden, the digital integration of older peopleis higher than in other countries. In the near future, care robots or robotic care would becomemore common in the care sector in both countries. This study examines how people in bothcountries perceive robots and autonomous artefacts and how they construct relationships withthese artefacts, based on the results of two surveys, one conducted in Japan 2020, and anotherin Sweden 2019, and elucidates the relationship between humans and robots from an ethicalperspective. The research findings show that people’s orientation toward the search for theexistential meaning and their complex emotions related to ephemerality and transience canaffect the relationship between humans and robots. Furthermore, this study is a new attempt toincorporate a 'care' perspective into technology ethics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CEUR-WS.org, 2023
Series
CEUR Workshop Proceedings, ISSN 1613-0073 ; Vol-3582
Keywords
Care, robots, ethics, existential meanings, ephemerality, horizon
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-511266 (URN)
Conference
Conference on Technology Ethics – Tethics 2023
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2023-09-11 Created: 2023-09-11 Last updated: 2024-04-03Bibliographically approved
Patrignani, N. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2022). The need for multiple approaches for ethics in technology education. In: Jani Koskinen, Kai K. Kimppa, Olli Heimo, Juhani Naskali, Salla Ponkala and Minna M. Rantanen (Ed.), Effectiveness of ICT ethics: How do we help solve ethical problems in the field of ICT?. Paper presented at ETHICOMP 2022 (pp. 8-15). Turku, Finland: University of Turku
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The need for multiple approaches for ethics in technology education
2022 (English)In: Effectiveness of ICT ethics: How do we help solve ethical problems in the field of ICT? / [ed] Jani Koskinen, Kai K. Kimppa, Olli Heimo, Juhani Naskali, Salla Ponkala and Minna M. Rantanen, Turku, Finland: University of Turku , 2022, p. 8-15Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The need for ethics education in technology curricula is universally recognized. The difficult question is how to deploy this principle into the real universities’ courses. This paper introduces a methodology based on multiple approaches: pneumatophores (computer experts with a high ethical profile), stakeholders’ network (the analysis of the complex relationships among the many stakeholders of a digital complex system) and a psychological awareness (the personal skills needed by responsible designers of digital complex systems). All these approaches are currently used in computer ethics courses with encouraging positive results from students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Turku, Finland: University of Turku, 2022
Keywords
Computer ethics, pneumatophores, stakeholders' network, psychology of technologists
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Educational Sciences Psychology Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-482058 (URN)978-951-29-8989-8 (ISBN)
Conference
ETHICOMP 2022
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2022-08-18 Created: 2022-08-18 Last updated: 2022-11-08Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2021). AIと私たち (AI and Us). In: K. Murata and Y. Orito (Ed.), 情報倫理入門 (Introduction to Information Ethics): ICT社会におけるウェルビーイングの探求 (Pursuing Well-being in the ICT Society) (pp. 248-253). Minerva Shobo
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AIと私たち (AI and Us)
2021 (Japanese)In: 情報倫理入門 (Introduction to Information Ethics): ICT社会におけるウェルビーイングの探求 (Pursuing Well-being in the ICT Society) / [ed] K. Murata and Y. Orito, Minerva Shobo , 2021, p. 248-253Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Minerva Shobo, 2021
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy Psychology
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-512567 (URN)978-4-623-09125-6 (ISBN)
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2023-09-27 Created: 2023-09-27 Last updated: 2023-11-16Bibliographically approved
Nakada, M., Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2021). Robots and AI Artifacts in Plural Perspective(s) of Japan and the West: The Cultural–Ethical Traditions Behind People’s Views on Robots and AI Artifacts in the Information Era. The Review of Socionetwork Strategies, 15(1), 143-168
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Robots and AI Artifacts in Plural Perspective(s) of Japan and the West: The Cultural–Ethical Traditions Behind People’s Views on Robots and AI Artifacts in the Information Era
2021 (English)In: The Review of Socionetwork Strategies, E-ISSN 1867-3236, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 143-168Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we examine the meanings of robots and AI artifacts in our societies and cultures, in particular the question: ‘How do Japanese people and Western people understand and interpret the phenomena and problems happening around them such as human–robot interaction, the encounter with AI, especially regarding plurality of meanings and wholeness of life experience in the information era?’ This is a kind of topic of information ethics or IIE (intercultural information ethics) in a broad sense. We focus our attention on world views in the informatized environments by examining the related views and theories as well as our own empirical research. In addition to these points, we will compare Japanese survey data with data from other cultural–social traditions and we will examine how the Japanese ways of seeing matters and their emphasis on the matters in process of awareness can be considered to have potentially universal connotations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Japanese existential views, Swedish existential views, Information ethics, Matters in process, Human encounter with robots
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction; Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-451882 (URN)10.1007/s12626-021-00067-8 (DOI)000635472200001 ()
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2021-08-31 Created: 2021-08-31 Last updated: 2021-10-01Bibliographically approved
Patrignani, N. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2020). What are the ingredients for an ethics education for computer scientists?. In: Jorge Pelegrín-Borondo, Mario Arias-Oliva, Kiyoshi Murata and Ana María Lara Palma (Ed.), Paradigm Shifts in ICT Ethics: Societal Challenges in the Smart Society. Paper presented at ETHICOMP 2020, Paradigm Shifts in ICT Ethics: Societal Challenges in the Smart Society, Jun 15-Jul 6, Logrono, La Rioja, Spain, online (pp. 107-109). Logroño, Spain
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What are the ingredients for an ethics education for computer scientists?
2020 (English)In: Paradigm Shifts in ICT Ethics: Societal Challenges in the Smart Society / [ed] Jorge Pelegrín-Borondo, Mario Arias-Oliva, Kiyoshi Murata and Ana María Lara Palma, Logroño, Spain, 2020, p. 107-109Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper is concentrated on the ethics education for computer scientists. They are the future  computer professionals, one of the core nodes of the Infornation and Communication Technologies (ICT) stakeholders' network. The paper is organized in five sections: a general introduction to the subject with a short review of the several approaches to this kind of education, a basic description of the theoretical foundations for ethics education, an overview of the proposed methodology, a short summary of the results from the field experience, and a conclusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Logroño, Spain: , 2020
Keywords
computer ethics, computer science, Slow Tech
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy Didactics Pedagogy Psychology
Research subject
Computer Science with specialization in Human-Computer Interaction; Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-430257 (URN)978-84-09-20272-0 (ISBN)
Conference
ETHICOMP 2020, Paradigm Shifts in ICT Ethics: Societal Challenges in the Smart Society, Jun 15-Jul 6, Logrono, La Rioja, Spain, online
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2021-01-08 Created: 2021-01-08 Last updated: 2021-08-27Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2019). Information and Communication Technology for ethical leadership in business. Journal of Information and Management, 38(4), 6-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information and Communication Technology for ethical leadership in business
2019 (English)In: Journal of Information and Management, ISSN 1882-2614, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ethical leadership in business is very important. The way ethical issues are handled affect profits, work environment, customers and society. It is crucial for the survival and the well-being of any organization. Business leaders have to be supported in this, and to acquire the ability and the skills to handle ethical issues in a satisfying way for all stakeholders involved. They need ethical competence. Information and Communication Technology can contribute to the education and to the support of business leaders.  ICT tools can be developed according to philosophical theory and to psychological empirical research on ethical decision-making. Properly used in education programs, these tools can stimulate the acquisition of ethical competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tokyo: Japan Society for Information and Management, 2019
Keywords
Autonomy, business ethics, communication technology, education, ethical competence, ethical skills, information technology, ICT-tools, leadership, training
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Economics and Business Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379660 (URN)
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2020-02-17Bibliographically approved
Björk, I. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2019). The importance of language in teaching and learning ethics. In: : . Paper presented at European Business Ethics Network, Research Conference, Roskilde, Denmark, 26-28 September, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of language in teaching and learning ethics
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of English as the teaching language at University courses for non-native English-speaking students is spreading more and more. Certain learning problems and difficulties have been reported already. However, in ethics courses, language has a greater impact. Concepts like right, wrong, values, etc., are complex. The meaning of such concepts is culturally embedded and they are constantly created and re-created in contexts of communication. The notions of, and every-day life encounters with “right” and “wrong” are linguistically experienced, described, and mediated, and therefore much more dependent on language than for example technical terms. In teaching, cognitive coordination between teacher and students is necessary in order for learning to take place. This is a kind of negotiation between instruction and the cognitive needs of the students, which, in order to be successful, has to be mediated through a shared language regarding the meanings of ethical and value terms and concepts. Using a language that is foreign to the students or the teacher or both, creates a need to re-create these meanings in class. This is clearly a burden that should be considered.

Keywords
English language, training, education, ethics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393928 (URN)
Conference
European Business Ethics Network, Research Conference, Roskilde, Denmark, 26-28 September, 2019
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2020-06-09Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). AI and philosophizing. In: : . Paper presented at ICT for Sustainability and Ethics: Japan and Sweden, Tokyo, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AI and philosophizing
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
AI, philosophy, ethics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Computer Sciences Philosophy Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360595 (URN)
Conference
ICT for Sustainability and Ethics: Japan and Sweden, Tokyo, 2018
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2018-09-17
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3806-5216

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