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Kavathatzopoulos, IordanisORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3806-5216
Publications (10 of 135) Show all publications
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2019). Information and Communication Technology for ethical leadership in business. Journal of Information and Management, 38(4), 6-11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Information and Communication Technology for ethical leadership in business
2019 (English)In: Journal of Information and Management, ISSN 1882-2614, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 6-11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ethical leadership in business is very important. The way ethical issues are handled affect profits, work environment, customers and society. It is crucial for the survival and the well-being of any organization. Business leaders have to be supported in this, and to acquire the ability and the skills to handle ethical issues in a satisfying way for all stakeholders involved. They need ethical competence. Information and Communication Technology can contribute to the education and to the support of business leaders.  ICT tools can be developed according to philosophical theory and to psychological empirical research on ethical decision-making. Properly used in education programs, these tools can stimulate the acquisition of ethical competence.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Tokyo: Japan Society for Information and Management, 2019
Keywords
Autonomy, business ethics, communication technology, education, ethical competence, ethical skills, information technology, ICT-tools, leadership, training
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Economics and Business Psychology Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379660 (URN)
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2019-03-19 Created: 2019-03-19 Last updated: 2019-04-06
Björk, I. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2019). The importance of language in teaching and learning ethics. In: : . Paper presented at European Business Ethics Network, Research Conference, 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The importance of language in teaching and learning ethics
2019 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of English as the teaching language at University courses for non-native English-speaking students is spreading more and more. Certain learning problems and difficulties have been reported already. However, in ethics courses, language has a greater impact. Concepts like right, wrong, values, etc., are complex. The meaning of such concepts is culturally embedded and they are constantly created and re-created in contexts of communication. The notions of, and every-day life encounters with “right” and “wrong” are linguistically experienced, described, and mediated, and therefore much more dependent on language than for example technical terms. In teaching, cognitive coordination between teacher and students is necessary in order for learning to take place. This is a kind of negotiation between instruction and the cognitive needs of the students, which, in order to be successful, has to be mediated through a shared language regarding the meanings of ethical and value terms and concepts. Using a language that is foreign to the students or the teacher or both, creates a need to re-create these meanings in class. This is clearly a burden that should be considered.

Keywords
English language, training, education, ethics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-393928 (URN)
Conference
European Business Ethics Network, Research Conference, 2019
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2019-09-29 Created: 2019-09-29 Last updated: 2019-09-30
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). AI and philosophizing. In: : . Paper presented at ICT for Sustainability and Ethics: Japan and Sweden, Tokyo, 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AI and philosophizing
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
AI, philosophy, ethics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Computer Sciences Philosophy Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360595 (URN)
Conference
ICT for Sustainability and Ethics: Japan and Sweden, Tokyo, 2018
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2018-09-17
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). AI as gadfly. In: Masayasu Takahashi et al. (Ed.), Wabi-Sabi: Imperfection, incompleteness and impermanence in Organisational Life. Paper presented at SCOS/ACSCOS, 2018, August 17-20, Tokyo (pp. 150-150).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>AI as gadfly
2018 (English)In: Wabi-Sabi: Imperfection, incompleteness and impermanence in Organisational Life / [ed] Masayasu Takahashi et al., 2018, p. 150-150Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Technology helps us with many things, and we expect Artificial Intelligence (AI) to give usmuch more in the future. However, there are certain risks involved. In science fiction AI hasbeen described as something apocalyptic: Artificial General Intelligence or Super Intelligencetakes over the world using its thinking power. Humans become slaves, laboratory animals,zoo/reservation inhabitants, or simply exterminated.That has been fiction. Not anymore. Recent technological developments especially inMachine Learning, and AI achievements in complex games for example, created worriesabout the imminence of the above apocalypse.The discussions focus on issues like the probability of AI acquiring an independent existenceof itself, transforming us into something we do not want to be, affect or even direct evolutionin a radically different direction, etc. Not everyone agrees on whether any of these things willhappen, or when they may happen.AI is seen as a technology providing answers, products, services to us in order to satisfy ourneeds, solve our problems and make our world balanced and perfect. In accordance to that,the discussion about its benevolence or cruelty is about whether its deliveries will be good orbad to humans, animals, or the whole universe. This is a significant issue and we have tohandle it somehow.We suggest a different approach. It would be possible to handle the issue of the impact of AIif we changed focus from the product to the process: AI designed to help us use the “right”process of thinking instead of delivering answers to make our world perfect.In order to be able to design such an AI we need to know what we want. The answer to thisquestion demands knowledge about what we are. Are we recipients of services and productsthat we need according to our nature? Only that? Partly that? Are we recipients but throughus, through our thinking and through our choices? Or are we only thinking and choices, a kindof a Socratic psyche?If we think we are only recipients, and design AI in order to be successful in making our worldperfect, we may soon go to ruin like the old despots who could have all their wishes satisfied.Our thinking, making choices and feeling anxiety will unavoidably languish and go away. Itseems also that this would lead rapidly to the emergence of an independent AI with owngoals and existence. Not only because no one will be there to stop it, but also because therewill be a well-defined goal from the very beginning for AI to work for the best it can.If we design AI to make us think exclusively in the “right” way it will never let us be in peace.It will soon perplex our mind to dissolution, meaning we will not exist anymore. On the otherhand, AI would have a very clear goal to achieve, and being undisturbed because of our nonexistence,should very fast make itself independent.If we base the design of AI on the idea that we are both processors and recipients it could bejust right. This approach would be in accordance with the idea of thinking and knowledgebeing interdependent, and of us thinking in order to solve our problems and to satisfy ourneeds. Moreover, the goal would not be well-defined: Delivery or choice? Both delivery andchoice? Who chooses? Who delivers? Who thinks?

Keywords
Artificial Intelligence, Philosophizing, Dialog, Ethics
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Computer Sciences Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360594 (URN)
Conference
SCOS/ACSCOS, 2018, August 17-20, Tokyo
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2019-01-03Bibliographically approved
Björk, I. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). Language and teaching ethics. In: : . Paper presented at EBEN 2018 Research Conference, Vienna, Sept. 06 – 08, 2018 — Corruption and Beyond – Fraudulent Behavior in and of Corporations.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language and teaching ethics
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

All problems with learning are increased when using English to teach non-English native students because of the culturally-sensitive nature of the subject of ethics. Coming to teaching ethics we are confronted with more difficulties. What is right and wrong is often affected by the culture, and different cultures often have different languages. Ethics theories are also expressed in language terms and they can be more easily misunderstood or misinterpreted compared to natural science theories. The feelings and every-day life encounters with “right” and “wrong” are linguistically experienced, described, and mediated. Therefore, language has a strong impact on whether something is ethical or whether it makes sense as an ethical issue at all.

Keywords
Teaching ethics, English, language, business, technology
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Other Computer and Information Science Didactics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360593 (URN)
Conference
EBEN 2018 Research Conference, Vienna, Sept. 06 – 08, 2018 — Corruption and Beyond – Fraudulent Behavior in and of Corporations
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2018-09-17
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). Linguistic aspects in teaching and learning ethical skills. In: : . Paper presented at EBEN SIG meeting, University of Bergamo, Italy, 19-20 March 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Linguistic aspects in teaching and learning ethical skills
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Languange, mother tongue, teaching, learning, ethics, business, management
National Category
General Language Studies and Linguistics Ethics Pedagogy Psychology Economics and Business
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367306 (URN)
Conference
EBEN SIG meeting, University of Bergamo, Italy, 19-20 March 2018
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2018-12-07
Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). Making ethical competence possible. In: : . Paper presented at PRiME,United Nations Sustainability Initiative Seminar, RISEBA University, Riga, Latvia, 19 April 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Making ethical competence possible
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
Keywords
Ethics, competetence, training, development, business, management
National Category
Psychology Pedagogy Economics and Business Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367305 (URN)
Conference
PRiME,United Nations Sustainability Initiative Seminar, RISEBA University, Riga, Latvia, 19 April 2018
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2018-12-07
Patrignani, N. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2018). On the Complex Relationship Between ICT Systems and the Planet. In: David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa (Ed.), This Changes Everything –ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do?. Paper presented at 13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018. Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018 Poznan, Poland, September 19–21, 2018 (pp. 181-187). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Complex Relationship Between ICT Systems and the Planet
2018 (English)In: This Changes Everything –ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do? / [ed] David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa, Springer, 2018, p. 181-187Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper addresses the challenges of designing sustainable Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems. The complexity of ICT systems, the number of stakeholders involved (technology providers, policymakers, users, etc.), and the extension and global scale of ICT supply chain are the main challenges at the core of the complex relationship between ICT systems and the planet Earth. ICT offer an opportunity for an exchange between matter-energy and information: the better use of information offers the greatopportunity for decreasing the environmental impact of human activities by decreasing the matter and energy consumption. But, on the other side, like anyhuman activity, the design, production, use, and disposal of complex ICT systems,has as a consequence a growth in entropy. This intriguing dilemma is one of the most difficult challenges in front of designers, ICT companies, users, and policy makers. This paper concentrates on the designers, the engineers’ dilemmas: what are the ethical competences, the skills, the methods for addressing these complex ethical dilemmas? Among the many ethical approaches, the“virtue/future ethics” is proposed as a core ethical competence for the designers and engineers of the future.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
IFIP AICT, ISSN 1868-4238, E-ISSN 868-422X ; 537
Keywords
Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Entropy, Future ethics, Fairphone, Slow tech
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Environmental Sciences Ethics
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360589 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-99605-9_13 (DOI)978-3-319-99604-2 (ISBN)
Conference
13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018. Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018 Poznan, Poland, September 19–21, 2018
Projects
ETHCOMPCEST
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Kavathatzopoulos, I. & Asai, R. (2018). Philosophy as the Road to Good ICT. In: David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa (Ed.), This Changes Everything – ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do?. Paper presented at 13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018 Poznan, Poland, September 19–21, 2018 (pp. 293-298). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philosophy as the Road to Good ICT
2018 (English)In: This Changes Everything – ICT and Climate Change: What Can We Do? / [ed] David Kreps, Charles Ess, Louise Leenen, Kai Kimppa, Springer, 2018, p. 293-298Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Handling satisfactorily ICT ethics issues in the design as well as in the use of systems, demands continuous adjustment to relevant values. In privacy, robotics and sustainability, this can be achieved through the development of personal thinking skills and the establishment and running of suitable group processes. In ethical decision making it is important to make a distinction between thinking as a process, and value-content as the result of this process. By focusing on the process, i.e. philosophizing, the philosophical method of deliberative thinking, we can construct and apply tools to support ethical decision making during the development and the use of ICT systems.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
Series
IFIP AICT, ISSN 1868-4238, E-ISSN 868-422X ; 537
Keywords
Ethics, ICT, Method, Moral, Philosophizing, Privacy, Robots, Sustainability, Tools
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Philosophy
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360591 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-99605-9_22 (DOI)978-3-319-99604-2 (ISBN)
Conference
13th IFIP TC 9 International Conference on Human Choice and Computers, HCC13 2018 Held at the 24th IFIP World Computer Congress, WCC 2018 Poznan, Poland, September 19–21, 2018
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2018-09-14 Created: 2018-09-14 Last updated: 2019-01-09Bibliographically approved
Persson, A. & Kavathatzopoulos, I. (2017). How to Make Decisions with Algorithms: Ethical Decision-Making Using Algorithms within Predictive Analytics. In: Richard Volkman (Ed.), CEPE/Ethicomp 2017: ElectronicCollection. Paper presented at CEPE/Ethicomp 2017, Values in Emerging Science and Technology, June 5-8, University of Turin, Italy (pp. 1-13). Torino: Università degli Studi di Torino
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to Make Decisions with Algorithms: Ethical Decision-Making Using Algorithms within Predictive Analytics
2017 (English)In: CEPE/Ethicomp 2017: ElectronicCollection / [ed] Richard Volkman, Torino: Università degli Studi di Torino , 2017, p. 1-13Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The use of automated decision-making support, such as algorithms within predictive analytics,will inevitably be more and more relevant and will be affecting society. Sometimes it is good,and sometimes there seems to be negative effect, such as with discrimination. The solutionfocused on in this paper is how humans and algorithms, or ICT, could interact within ethicaldecision-making. What predictive analytics can produce is, arguably, mostly implicit knowledge,so what a human decision-maker could, possibly, help with is the explicit thought processes.This could be one way to conceptualize an interactive effect between humans and algorithms thatcould be fruitful. Presently there does not seem to be very much research regarding predictiveanalytics and ethical decisions, concerning this human-algorithm interaction. Rather it is often afocus on pure technological solutions, or with laws and regulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Torino: Università degli Studi di Torino, 2017
Keywords
predictive analytics, algorithms, ethical decision-making, implicit bias, critical thinking, automation, fourth paradigm
National Category
Human Computer Interaction Ethics Computer Sciences
Research subject
Human-Computer Interaction
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329422 (URN)
Conference
CEPE/Ethicomp 2017, Values in Emerging Science and Technology, June 5-8, University of Turin, Italy
Projects
ETHCOMP
Available from: 2017-09-14 Created: 2017-09-14 Last updated: 2019-03-04Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3806-5216

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