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Publications (10 of 201) Show all publications
Grasset, C., Einarsdóttir, K., Catalán, N., Tranvik, L. J., Groeneveld, M., Hawkes, J. A. & Attermeyer, K. (2024). Decreasing Photoreactivity and Concurrent Change in Dissolved Organic Matter Composition With Increasing Inland Water Residence Time. Global Biogeochemical Cycles, 38(3), Article ID e2023GB007989.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreasing Photoreactivity and Concurrent Change in Dissolved Organic Matter Composition With Increasing Inland Water Residence Time
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2024 (English)In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, ISSN 0886-6236, E-ISSN 1944-9224, Vol. 38, no 3, article id e2023GB007989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Photochemical degradation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) has been the subject of numerous studies; however, its regulation along the inland water continuum is still unclear. We aimed to unravel the DOM photoreactivity and concurrent DOM compositional changes across 30 boreal aquatic ecosystems including peat waters, streams, rivers, and lakes distributed along a water residence time (WRT) gradient. Samples were subjected to a standardized exposure of simulated sunlight. We measured the apparent quantum yield (AQY), which corresponds to DOM photomineralization per photon absorbed, and the compositional change in DOM at bulk and individual compound levels in the original samples and after irradiation. AQY increased with the abundance of terrestrially derived DOM and decreased at higher WRT. Additionally, the photochemical changes in both DOM optical properties and molecular composition resembled changes along the natural boreal WRT gradient at low WRT (<3 years). Accordingly, mass spectrometry revealed that the abundance of photolabile and photoproduced molecules decreased with WRT along the boreal aquatic continuum. Our study highlights the tight link between DOM composition and DOM photodegradation. We suggest that photodegradation is an important driver of DOM composition change in waters with low WRT, where DOM is highly photoreactive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2024
Keywords
photodegradation, aquatic continuum, apparent quantum yield, dissolved organic matter quality, water retention time
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-525967 (URN)10.1029/2023GB007989 (DOI)001180797200001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2018.0191Swedish Research Council, 2014-04264German Research Foundation (DFG), AT 185/1-1European CommissionOlsson-Borghs stiftelse
Available from: 2024-04-02 Created: 2024-04-02 Last updated: 2024-04-02Bibliographically approved
Heffernan, L., Kothawala, D. N. & Tranvik, L. J. (2024). Review article: Terrestrial dissolved organic carbon in northern permafrost. The Cryosphere, 18(3), 1443-1465
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review article: Terrestrial dissolved organic carbon in northern permafrost
2024 (English)In: The Cryosphere, ISSN 1994-0416, E-ISSN 1994-0424, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 1443-1465Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As the permafrost region warms and permafrost soils thaw, vast stores of soil organic carbon (C) become vulnerable to enhanced microbial decomposition and lateral transport into aquatic ecosystems as dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The mobilization of permafrost soil C can drastically alter the net northern permafrost C budget. DOC entering aquatic ecosystems becomes biologically available for degradation as well as other types of aquatic processing. However, it currently remains unclear which landscape characteristics are most relevant to consider in terms of predicting DOC concentrations entering aquatic systems from permafrost regions. Here, we conducted a systematic review of 111 studies relating to, or including, concentrations of DOC in terrestrial permafrost ecosystems in the northern circumpolar region published between 2000 and 2022. We present a new permafrost DOC dataset consisting of 2845 DOC concentrations, collected from the top 3 m in permafrost soils across the northern circumpolar region. Concentrations of DOC ranged from 0.1 to 500 mg L−1 (median = 41 mg L−1) across all permafrost zones, ecoregions, soil types, and thermal horizons. Across the permafrost zones, the highest median DOC concentrations were in the sporadic permafrost zone (101 mg L−1), while lower concentrations were found in the discontinuous (60 mg L−1) and continuous (59 mg L−1) permafrost zones. However, median DOC concentrations varied in these zones across ecosystem type, with the highest median DOC concentrations in each ecosystem type of 66 and 63 mg L−1 found in coastal tundra and permafrost bog ecosystems, respectively. Coastal tundra (130 mg L−1), permafrost bogs (78 mg L−1), and permafrost wetlands (57 mg L−1) had the highest median DOC concentrations in the permafrost lens, representing a potentially long-term store of DOC. Other than in Yedoma ecosystems, DOC concentrations were found to increase following permafrost thaw and were highly constrained by total dissolved nitrogen concentrations. This systematic review highlights how DOC concentrations differ between organic- or mineral-rich deposits across the circumpolar permafrost region and identifies coastal tundra regions as areas of potentially important DOC mobilization. The quantity of permafrost-derived DOC exported laterally to aquatic ecosystems is an important step for predicting its vulnerability to decomposition.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Copernicus Publications, 2024
National Category
Ecology Physical Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-526679 (URN)10.5194/tc-18-1443-2024 (DOI)001192376900001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2018.0191Swedish Research Council, 2020-03249
Available from: 2024-04-15 Created: 2024-04-15 Last updated: 2024-04-15Bibliographically approved
Catalán, N., Rofner, C., Verpoorter, C., Pérez, M. T., Dittmar, T., Tranvik, L., . . . Peter, H. (2024). Treeline displacement may affect lake dissolved organic matter processing at high latitudes and altitudes. Nature Communications, 15(1), Article ID 2640.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treeline displacement may affect lake dissolved organic matter processing at high latitudes and altitudes
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2024 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 2640Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change induced shifts in treeline position, both towards higher altitudes and latitudes induce changes in soil organic matter. Eventually, soil organic matter is transported to alpine and subarctic lakes with yet unknown consequences for dissolved organic matter (DOM) diversity and processing. Here, we experimentally investigate the consequences of treeline shifts by amending subarctic and temperate alpine lake water with soil-derived DOM from above and below the treeline. We use ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) to track molecular DOM diversity (i.e., chemodiversity), estimate DOM decay and measure bacterial growth efficiency. In both lakes, soil-derived DOM from below the treeline increases lake DOM chemodiversity mainly through the enrichment with polyphenolic and highly unsaturated compounds. These compositional changes are associated with reductions in bulk and compound-level DOM reactivity and reduced bacterial growth efficiency. Our results suggest that treeline advancement has the potential to enrich a large number of lake ecosystems with less biodegradable DOM, affecting bacterial community function and potentially altering the biogeochemical cycling of carbon in lakes at high latitudes and altitudes. Shifts in the treeline may induce changes in organic matter composition of lakes at high altitude and latitude. Here, the authors experimentally unravel effects of soil-derived DOM for lake carbon biogeochemistry and bacterial carbon use efficiency.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-527254 (URN)10.1038/s41467-024-46789-5 (DOI)001191874200027 ()38531850 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2018.0191Swedish Research Council, 2018-04524EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 262693Wenner-Gren Foundations
Available from: 2024-04-26 Created: 2024-04-26 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Grasset, C., Groeneveld, M., Tranvik, L. J., Robertson, L. P. & Hawkes, J. A. (2023). Hydrophilic Species Are the Most Biodegradable Components of Freshwater Dissolved Organic Matter. Environmental Science and Technology, 57(36), 13463-13472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hydrophilic Species Are the Most Biodegradable Components of Freshwater Dissolved Organic Matter
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2023 (English)In: Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 0013-936X, E-ISSN 1520-5851, Vol. 57, no 36, p. 13463-13472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a crucial component of the global carbon cycle, and the extent to which DOM escapes mineralization is important for the transport of organic carbon from the continents to the ocean. DOM persistence strongly depends on its molecular properties, but little is known about which specific properties cause the continuum in reactivity among different dissolved molecules. We investigated how DOM fractions, separated according to their hydrophobicity, differ in biodegradability across three different inland water systems. We found a strong negative relationship between hydrophobicity and biodegradability, consistent for the three systems. The most hydrophilic fraction was poorly recovered by solid-phase extraction (SPE) (3-28% DOC recovery) and was thus selectively missed by mass spectrometry analysis during SPE. The change in DOM composition after incubation was very low according to SPE-ESI (electrospray ionization)-mass spectrometry (14% change, while replicates had 11% change), revealing that this method is sub-optimal to assess DOM biodegradability, regardless of fraction hydrophobicity. Our results demonstrate that SPE-ESI mass spectrometry does not detect the most hydrophilic and most biodegradable species. Hence, they question our current understanding of the relationships between DOM biodegradability and its molecular composition, which is built on the use of this method.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2023
Keywords
dissolved organic matter, biodegradability, mass spectrometry, electrosprayionization, freshwater
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-517287 (URN)10.1021/acs.est.3c02175 (DOI)001065004500001 ()37646447 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-04618Swedish Research Council, 2014-04264Swedish Research Council Formas, 2021-00543Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2018.0191
Available from: 2023-12-06 Created: 2023-12-06 Last updated: 2023-12-06Bibliographically approved
Groeneveld, M. M., Kothawala, D. & Tranvik, L. (2023). Seasonally variable interactions between dissolved organic matter and mineral particles in an agricultural river. Aquatic Sciences, 85, Article ID 2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seasonally variable interactions between dissolved organic matter and mineral particles in an agricultural river
2023 (English)In: Aquatic Sciences, ISSN 1015-1621, E-ISSN 1420-9055, Vol. 85, article id 2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Streams and rivers form an important link in the global carbon cycle by transporting and transforming large amounts of carbon imported from terrestrial ecosystems to the oceans. Since streams in agricultural areas often experience increased concentrations of suspended mineral particles from soil erosion, they are important sites where dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may be adsorbed to particles and retained in the sediment. As the extent of adsorption varies with the molecular composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM), which is seasonally variable, we expect also the fraction of organic material that adsorbs to mineral particles to fluctuate over time. We sampled the agriculturally impacted River Fyrisån (Sweden) monthly during 1 year, and measured DOC concentration and DOM composition based on several optical properties. At each sampling occasion, we estimated the potential for adsorption by exposing the samples to a reference clay. The potential for adsorption was greatest when riverine DOM had the most terrestrial character, as this fraction of the DOM pool was selectively adsorbed to clay surfaces. The extent of adsorption was negatively related to the concentration of base cations, most notably calcium. We suggest that the observed relationships between the potential for adsorption, DOM composition and base cations are linked by discharge. A bioavailability test at one sampling occasion suggested that DOM remaining after exposure to clay particles was more biodegradable. This implies that adsorption may alter the degradation potential of DOM remaining in solution, which could have far reaching effects on the fate of organic carbon.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-423424 (URN)10.1007/s00027-022-00898-9 (DOI)000871186100001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-4870Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091Uppsala University
Note

Title in dissertation list of papers: Seasonally variable controls on the interactions between dissolved organic matter and mineral particles in a Swedish agricultural river.

Available from: 2020-10-25 Created: 2020-10-25 Last updated: 2022-11-11Bibliographically approved
Zhou, Y., Hiller, C., Andersson, S., Jakobsson, E., Zhou, L., Hawkes, J. A., . . . Tranvik, L. J. (2023). Selective Exclusion of Aromatic Organic Carbon During Lake Ice Formation. Geophysical Research Letters, 50(4), Article ID e2022GL101414.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Selective Exclusion of Aromatic Organic Carbon During Lake Ice Formation
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2023 (English)In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 50, no 4, article id e2022GL101414Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Earth's lakes at northern latitudes are mostly ice-covered in winter. When lake water freezes, some organic matter dissolved in the water is excluded from the ice. We performed complementary field sampling and laboratory freeze-up experiments to explore how freeze-up may impact the partitioning and composition of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in boreal lakes. We found that 16.2 ± 4.7% of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) was retained in the overlying ice, 81.3 ± 5.7% of DOC was expelled to underlying unfrozen water, and 1.3 ± 0.7% was expelled as flocs. During ice formation, nitrogen (TDN, total dissolved nitrogen), ions (specific conductance), and oxidized and aromatic DOM were preferentially expelled to the underlying water column. The apparent retention factor DOCIce: DOCBefore decreased from clearwater to brownwater lakes, that is, with increasing allochthonous DOC lost from lake ice, indicating that DOM exclusion from the ice cover will become more prevalent as lakes experience browning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2023
Keywords
dissolved organic carbon, lake, freeze-up, retention factor
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-499906 (URN)10.1029/2022GL101414 (DOI)000949591400001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2018.0191Swedish Research Council, 2014-04264
Available from: 2023-04-05 Created: 2023-04-05 Last updated: 2023-04-19Bibliographically approved
Jansen, J., Woolway, R. I., Kraemer, B. M., Albergel, C., Bastviken, D., Weyhenmeyer, G. A., . . . Jennings, E. (2022). Global increase in methane production under future warming of lake bottom waters. Global Change Biology, 28(18), 5427-5440
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global increase in methane production under future warming of lake bottom waters
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2022 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 28, no 18, p. 5427-5440Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lakes are significant emitters of methane to the atmosphere, and thus are important components of the global methane budget. Methane is typically produced in lake sediments, with the rate of methane production being strongly temperature dependent. Local and regional studies highlight the risk of increasing methane production under future climate change, but a global estimate is not currently available. Here, we project changes in global lake bottom temperatures and sediment methane production rates from 1901 to 2099. By the end of the 21st century, lake bottom temperatures are projected to increase globally, by an average of 0.86-2.60 degrees C under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) 2.6-8.5, with greater warming projected at lower latitudes. This future warming of bottom waters will likely result in an increase in methane production rates of 13%-40% by the end of the century, with many low-latitude lakes experiencing an increase of up to 17 times the historical (1970-1999) global average under RCP 8.5. The projected increase in methane production will likely lead to higher emissions from lakes, although the exact magnitude of the emission increase requires more detailed regional studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
aquatic, climate change, greenhouse gases, limnology, methane, temperature, tropics
National Category
Environmental Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-485430 (URN)10.1111/gcb.16298 (DOI)000815351300001 ()35694903 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 336642EU, Horizon 2020, 725546Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2018-0191Swedish Research Council, 2020-06460Swedish Research Council, 2018-04524Swedish Research Council, 2016-04829Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council, 2017-04405Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-01794Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091German Research Foundation (DFG), AD 91/22-1
Available from: 2022-09-27 Created: 2022-09-27 Last updated: 2022-09-27Bibliographically approved
Koehler, B., Powers, L. C., Cory, R. M., Einarsdottir, K., Gu, Y., Tranvik, L., . . . Miller, W. L. (2022). Inter-laboratory differences in the apparent quantum yield for the photochemical production of dissolved inorganic carbon in inland waters and implications for photochemical rate modeling. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, 20(6), 320-337
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Inter-laboratory differences in the apparent quantum yield for the photochemical production of dissolved inorganic carbon in inland waters and implications for photochemical rate modeling
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2022 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, E-ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 320-337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Solar radiation initiates photochemical oxidation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in inland waters, contributing to their carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Models can determine photochemical DIC production over large spatiotemporal scales and assess its role in aquatic C cycling. The apparent quantum yield (AQY) spectrum for photochemical DIC production, defined as mol DIC produced per mol chromophoric dissolved organic matter-absorbed photons, is a critical model parameter. In previous studies, the principle for the determination of AQY spectra is the same but methodological specifics differ, and the extent to which these differences influence AQY spectra and simulated aquatic DIC photoproduction is unclear. Here, four laboratories determined AQY spectra from water samples of eight inland waters that are situated in Alaska, Finland, and Sweden and span a nearly 10-fold range in DOM absorption coefficients. All AQY values fell within the range previously reported for inland waters. The inter-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) for wavelength-integrated AQY spectra (300-450 nm) averaged 38% +/- 3% SE, and the inter-water CV averaged 63% +/- 1%. The inter-laboratory CV for simulated photochemical DIC production (conducted for the five Swedish lakes) averaged 49% +/- 12%, and the inter-water CV averaged 77% +/- 10%. This uncertainty is not surprising given the complexities and methodological choices involved in determining DIC AQY spectra and needs to be considered when applying photochemical rate modeling. Thus, we also highlight current methodological limitations and suggest future improvements for DIC AQY determination to reduce inter-laboratory uncertainty.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWILEY, 2022
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-485015 (URN)10.1002/lom3.10489 (DOI)000778761100001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2009-1350-15339-81Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2018-0191Swedish Research Council, 2011-3475-604 88773-67
Available from: 2022-09-22 Created: 2022-09-22 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Lindroth, A. & Tranvik, L. (2021). Accounting for all territorial emissions and sinks is important for development of climate mitigation policies. Carbon Balance and Management, 16, Article ID 10.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accounting for all territorial emissions and sinks is important for development of climate mitigation policies
2021 (English)In: Carbon Balance and Management, E-ISSN 1750-0680, Vol. 16, article id 10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Paris agreement identifies the importance of the conservation, or better, increase of the land carbon sink. In this respect, the mitigation policies of many forest rich countries rely heavily on products from forests as well as on the land sink. Here we demonstrate that Sweden's land sink, which is critical in order to achieve zero net emissions by 2045 and negative emissions thereafter, is reduced to less than half when accounting for emissions from wetlands, lakes and running waters. This should have implications for the development of Sweden's mitigation policy. National as well as the emerging global inventory of sources and sinks need to consider the entire territory to allow accurate guidance of future mitigation of climate change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC)BMC, 2021
Keywords
Territorial carbon balance, Emissions from inland waters, Sweden&#8217, s mitigation policy
National Category
Environmental Sciences Climate Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-442509 (URN)10.1186/s13021-021-00173-8 (DOI)000638855200001 ()33837862 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-05-17 Created: 2021-05-17 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Tranvik, L. (2021). Acidification of inland waters. Ambio, 50(2), 261-265
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acidification of inland waters
2021 (English)In: Ambio, ISSN 0044-7447, E-ISSN 1654-7209, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 261-265Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SpringerSPRINGER, 2021
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-439675 (URN)10.1007/s13280-020-01441-6 (DOI)000599050600005 ()33294957 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-04-09 Created: 2021-04-09 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
Degradation of natural organic matter: chemodiversity and continuum of reactivity [2011-04871_VR]; Uppsala UniversityAnsökan från David Seekell inom programmet Nordic Research Opportunity [2012-00462_VR]; Uppsala UniversityTowards a coherent understanding of the persistence of organic matter in ecosystems [2014-04264_VR]; Uppsala UniversityPersistence and degradation of organic matter [2018-04524_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-3509-8266

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