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Langenheder, S. & Lindström, E. S. (2019). Factors influencing aquatic and terrestrial bacterial community assembly. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 11(3), 306-315
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Factors influencing aquatic and terrestrial bacterial community assembly
2019 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 306-315Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During recent years, many studies have shown that different processes including drift, environmental selection and dispersal can be important for the assembly of bacterial communities in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. However, we lack a conceptual overview about the ecological context and factors that influence the relative importance of the different assembly mechanisms and determine their dynamics in time and space. Focusing on free-living, i.e., nonhost associated, bacterial communities, this minireview, therefore, summarizes and conceptualizes findings from empirical studies about how (i) environmental factors, such as environmental heterogeneity, disturbances, productivity and trophic interactions; (ii) connectivity and dispersal rates (iii) spatial scale, (iv) community properties and traits and (v) the use of taxonomic/phylogenetic or functional metrics influence the relative importance of different community assembly processes. We find that there is to-date little consistency among studies and suggest that future studies should now address how (i)-(v) differ between habitats and organisms and how this, in turn, influences the temporal and spatial-scale dependency of community assembly processes in microorganisms.

National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-384039 (URN)10.1111/1758-2229.12731 (DOI)000468000600003 ()30618071 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-28 Created: 2019-05-28 Last updated: 2019-06-19Bibliographically approved
Suarez, C., Piculell, M., Modin, O., Langenheder, S., Persson, F. & Hermansson, M. (2019). Thickness determines microbial community structure and function in nitrifying biofilms via deterministic assembly. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 5110.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thickness determines microbial community structure and function in nitrifying biofilms via deterministic assembly
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 5110Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbial biofilms are ubiquitous in aquatic environments where they provide important ecosystem functions. A key property believed to influence the community structure and function of biofilms is thickness. However, since biofilm thickness is inextricably linked to external factors such as water flow, temperature, development age and nutrient conditions, its importance is difficult to quantify. Here, we designed an experimental system in a wastewater treatment plant whereby nitrifying biofilms with different thicknesses (50 or 400 mu m) were grown in a single reactor, and thus subjected to identical external conditions. The 50 and 400 mu m biofilm communities were significantly different. This beta-diversity between biofilms of different thickness was primarily caused by deterministic factors. Turnover (species replacement) contributed more than nestedness (species loss) to the beta-diversity, i.e. the 50 mu m communities were not simply a subset of the 400 mu m communities. Moreover, the two communities differed in the composition of nitrogen-transforming bacteria and in nitrogen transformation rates. The study illustrates that biofilm thickness alone is a key driver for community composition and ecosystem function, which has implications for biotechnological applications and for our general understanding of biofilm ecology.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381121 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-41542-1 (DOI)000462149800065 ()30911066 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 245-2014-1528Swedish Research Council Formas, 942-2015-683Swedish Research Council Formas, 2012-1433Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS 12: 374
Available from: 2019-04-04 Created: 2019-04-04 Last updated: 2019-04-04Bibliographically approved
Hillebrand, H., Langenheder, S., Lebret, K., Lindström, E. S., Östman, Ö. & Striebel, M. (2018). Decomposing multiple dimensions of stability in global change experiments. Ecology Letters, 21(1), 21-30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decomposing multiple dimensions of stability in global change experiments
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2018 (English)In: Ecology Letters, ISSN 1461-023X, E-ISSN 1461-0248, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological stability is the central framework to understand an ecosystem's ability to absorb or recover from environmental change. Recent modelling and conceptual work suggests that stability is a multidimensional construct comprising different response aspects. Using two freshwater mesocosm experiments as case studies, we show how the response to single perturbations can be decomposed in different stability aspects (resistance, resilience, recovery, temporal stability) for both ecosystem functions and community composition. We find that extended community recovery is tightly connected to a nearly complete recovery of the function (biomass production), whereas systems with incomplete recovery of the species composition ranged widely in their biomass compared to controls. Moreover, recovery was most complete when either resistance or resilience was high, the latter associated with low temporal stability around the recovery trend. In summary, no single aspect of stability was sufficient to reflect the overall stability of the system.

Keywords
Biodiversity, Biomass, Composition, Ecosystem functions, Fluctuations, Recovery, Resilience, Resistance
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334881 (URN)10.1111/ele.12867 (DOI)000418133700003 ()29106075 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 226-2012-1827
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2018-01-17Bibliographically approved
Shen, D., Langenheder, S. & Juergens, K. (2018). Dispersal Modifies the Diversity and Composition of Active Bacterial Communities in Response to a Salinity Disturbance. Frontiers in Microbiology, 9, Article ID 2188.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dispersal Modifies the Diversity and Composition of Active Bacterial Communities in Response to a Salinity Disturbance
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Microbiology, ISSN 1664-302X, E-ISSN 1664-302X, Vol. 9, article id 2188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dispersal can influence the response of bacterial communities to environmental changes and disturbances. However, the extent to which dispersal contributes to the community response in dependence of the character and strength of the disturbance remains unclear. Here, we conducted a transplant experiment using dialysis bags in which bacterioplankton originating from brackish and marine regions of the Saint Lawrence Estuary were reciprocally incubated in the two environments for 5 days. Dispersal treatments were set-up by subjecting half of the microcosms in each environment to an exchange of cells between the marine and brackish assemblages at a daily exchange rate of 6% (v/v), and the other half of microcosms were kept as the nondispersal treatments. Bacterial 16S rRNA sequencing was then used to examine the diversity and composition of the active communities. Alpha diversity of the marine communities that were exposed to the brackish environment was elevated greatly by dispersal, but declined in the absence of dispersal. This indicates that dispersal compensated the loss of diversity in the marine communities after a disturbance by introducing bacterial taxa that were able to thrive and coexist with the remaining community members under brackish conditions. On the contrary, alpha diversity of the brackish communities was not affected by dispersal in either environment. Furthermore, dispersal led to an increase in similarity between marine and brackish communities in both of the environments, with a greater similarity when the communities were incubated in the brackish environment. These results suggest that the higher initial diversity in the brackish than in the marine starting community made the resident community less susceptible to dispersing bacteria. Altogether, this study shows that dispersal modifies the diversity and composition of the active communities in response to a salinity disturbance, and enables the local adjustment of specific bacteria under brackish environmental conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FRONTIERS MEDIA SA, 2018
Keywords
bacteria, dispersal, environmental heterogeneity, transplant experiment, community similarity
National Category
Microbiology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366734 (URN)10.3389/fmicb.2018.02188 (DOI)000445010600001 ()
Available from: 2018-12-11 Created: 2018-12-11 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Svoboda, P., Lindström, E. S., Osman, O. A. & Langenheder, S. (2018). Dispersal timing determines the importance of priority effects in bacterial communities. The ISME Journal, 12(2), 644-646
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dispersal timing determines the importance of priority effects in bacterial communities
2018 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 644-646Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The order and timing of species arrival during community assembly can have long term effects on community structure due to priority effects. The importance of such processes in complex bacterial communities where dispersal involves mixing of entire communities is currently not known. Here we used a transplant experiment with two bacterioplankton communities of different origin (freshwater and brackish). Sterile medium of each origin was initially inoculated with a bacterial community of different ('alien') origin, followed by dispersal of the respective 'home' community at different time points after initial inoculation. We found that the later the dispersal with the 'home' community occurred the smaller the effect on the final community composition. This suggests that priority effects by the initially inoculated community reduce the establishment success of taxa from the later arriving community and that this effect depends on dispersal timing.

National Category
Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343666 (URN)10.1038/ismej.2017.180 (DOI)000422779100031 ()29053147 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Lebret, K., Östman, Ö., Langenheder, S., Drakare, S., Guillemette, F. & Lindström, E. S. (2018). High abundances of the nuisance raphidophyte Gonyostomum semen in brown water lakes are associated with high concentrations of iron. Scientific Reports, 8(1), Article ID 13463.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>High abundances of the nuisance raphidophyte Gonyostomum semen in brown water lakes are associated with high concentrations of iron
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2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, no 1, article id 13463Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Algal blooms occur frequently in lakes and oceans and the causes and consequences of those are often studied. In this study, we focus on a less well known type of algal bloom by the freshwater raphidophyte Gonyostomum semen. This species’ abundance and occurrence is increasing, especially in brown water lakes, the most abundant lake type in the boreal zone. The aim of the study was to investigate which environmental factors are associated with G. semen by statistical evaluation of field data of 95 Swedish lakes over five years. Although we found G. semen to be associated with dark waters it was, contrary to our expectations, mainly high concentrations of iron, and only to a lesser extent high TOC (total organic carbon) concentrations, that were associated with blooms of G. semen. In addition, high phosphorus concentrations and low pH also appear to facilitate G. semen blooms. We suggest that browning of lakes caused by increased iron concentrations may decrease net heterotrophy by fostering heavy algal blooms, i.e. the opposite to commonly assumed effects of increased DOM (dissolved organic matter).

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360865 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-31892-7 (DOI)000444022800067 ()30194445 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 226-2012-1827Swedish Research Council, 637-2014-6821
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-11-20Bibliographically approved
Lebret, K., Langenheder, S., Colinas, N., Östman, Ö. & Lindström, E. (2018). Increased water colour affects freshwater plankton communities in a mesocosm study. Aquatic Microbial Ecology, 81(1), 1-17
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased water colour affects freshwater plankton communities in a mesocosm study
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2018 (English)In: Aquatic Microbial Ecology, ISSN 0948-3055, E-ISSN 1616-1564, Vol. 81, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increases in water colour (brownification) have been observed in aquatic systems in the Northern Hemisphere, partly caused by increased loading of organic carbon from terrestrial origins. We investigated the effect of increase in water colour on the composition, structure and function of lake plankton communities (bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton) conducting a mesocosm experiment in 3 medium-coloured lakes (average absorbance at 420 nm: 0.034 cm(-1)), with different nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton community composition. To simulate an increase in water colour, we added humic substances (HuminFeed) at 3 different concentrations. The additions significantly affected the water colour of the mesocosms, but had no measurable effect on total organic carbon concentration, thus change in light conditions was the main effect of our treatment on the plankton communities. The increase in water colour did not significantly affect the measured functions (productivity, respiration) and biomass of the plankton communities (bacteria, phytoplankton and zooplankton), but led to changes in the relative abundance of some phytoplankton taxa and, to a lesser extent, the bacterial community (differences in relative abundance). The treatments had no significant effect on zooplankton biomass or composition. Our study suggests that increases in water colour favour low-light-adapted phytoplankton species, which in turn also can affect bacterial composition, whereas the change in light climate had no clear impact on the functioning of plankton communities in weakly humic lakes.

Keywords
Light climate, Plankton community, Lake, Bacteria, Phytoplankton
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Limnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343400 (URN)10.3354/ame01858 (DOI)000427677800001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 226-2012-1827
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Sjöstedt, J., Langenheder, S., Kritzberg, E., Karlsson, C. M. G. & Lindström, E. S. (2018). Repeated disturbances affect functional but not compositional resistance and resilience in an aquatic bacterioplankton community. Environmental Microbiology Reports, 10(4), 493-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated disturbances affect functional but not compositional resistance and resilience in an aquatic bacterioplankton community
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology Reports, ISSN 1758-2229, E-ISSN 1758-2229, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Disturbances are believed to be one of the main factors influencing variations in community diversity and functioning. Here we investigated if exposure to a pH press disturbance affected the composition and functional performance of a bacterial community and its resistance, recovery and resilience to a second press disturbance (salt addition). Lake bacterial assemblages were initially exposed to reduced pH in six mesocosms whereas another six mesocosms were kept as reference. Seven days after the pH disturbance, three tanks from each treatment were exposed to a salt disturbance. Both bacterial production and enzyme activity were negatively affected by the salt treatment, regardless if the communities had been subject to a previous disturbance or not. However, cell-specific enzyme activity had a higher resistance in communities pre-exposed to the pH disturbance compared to the reference treatment. In contrast, for cell-specific bacterial production resistance was not affected, but recovery was faster in the communities that had previously been exposed to the pH disturbance. Over time, bacterial community composition diverged among treatments, in response to both pH and salinity. The difference in functional recovery, resilience and resistance may depend on differences in community composition caused by the pH disturbance, niche breadth or acquired stress resistance.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360866 (URN)10.1111/1758-2229.12656 (DOI)000442577600011 ()
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation , CTS 13:432Stiftelsen Olle Engkvist Byggmästare, 2013/512
Available from: 2018-09-19 Created: 2018-09-19 Last updated: 2018-10-22Bibliographically approved
Langenheder, S., Wang, J., Karjalainen, S. M., Laamanen, T. M., Tolonen, K. T., Vilmi, A. & Heino, J. (2017). Bacterial metacommunity organization in a highly connected aquatic system. FEMS Microbiology Ecology, 93(4), Article ID fiw225.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bacterial metacommunity organization in a highly connected aquatic system
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2017 (English)In: FEMS Microbiology Ecology, ISSN 0168-6496, E-ISSN 1574-6941, Vol. 93, no 4, article id fiw225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The spatial structure and underlying assembly mechanisms of bacterial communities have been studied widely across aquatic systems, focusing primarily on isolated sites, such as different lakes, ponds and streams. Here, our main aim was to determine the underlying mechanisms for bacterial biofilm assembly within a large, highly connected lake system in Northern Finland using associative methods based on taxonomic and phylogenetic alpha- and beta-diversity and a large number of abiotic and biotic variables. Furthermore, null model approaches were used to quantify the relative importance of different community assembly processes. We found that spatial variation in bacterial communities within the lake was structured by different assembly processes, including stochasticity, species sorting and potentially even dispersal limitation. Species sorting by abiotic environmental conditions explained more of the taxonomic and particularly phylogenetic turnover in community composition compared with that by biotic variables. Finally, we observed clear differences in alpha diversity (species richness and phylogenetic diversity), which were to a stronger extent determined by abiotic compared with biotic factors, but also by dispersal effects. In summary, our study shows that the biodiversity of bacterial biofilm communities within a lake ecosystem is driven by within-habitat gradients in abiotic conditions and by stochastic and deterministic dispersal processes.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Microbiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-323605 (URN)10.1093/femsec/fiw225 (DOI)000405586200001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-06-08 Created: 2017-06-08 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Comte, J., Langenheder, S., Berga, M. & Lindström, E. S. (2017). Contribution of different dispersal sources to the metabolic response of lake bacterioplankton following a salinity change. Environmental Microbiology, 19(1), 251-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contribution of different dispersal sources to the metabolic response of lake bacterioplankton following a salinity change
2017 (English)In: Environmental Microbiology, ISSN 1462-2912, E-ISSN 1462-2920, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 251-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dispersal can modify how bacterial community composition (BCC) changes in response to environmental perturbations, yet knowledge about the functional consequences of dispersal is limited. Here we hypothesize that changes in bacterial community production in response to a salinity disturbance depend on the possibility to recruit cells from different dispersal sources. To investigate this, we conducted an in situ mesocosm experiment where bacterial communities of an oligotrophic lake were exposed to different salinities (0, 18, 36 psu) for two weeks and subjected to dispersal of cells originating from sediments, air (mesocosms open to air deposition), both or none. BCC was determined using 454 pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and bacterial production was measured by 3H leucine uptake. Bacterial production differed significantly among salinity treatments and dispersal treatments, being highest at high salinity. These changes were associated with changes in BCC and it was found that the identity of the main functional contributors differed at different salinities. Our results further showed that after a salinity perturbation, the response of bacterial communities depended on the recruitment of taxa, including marine representatives (e.g. Alphaproteobacteria Loktanella, Erythrobacter and the Gammaproteobacterium Rheiheimera) from dispersal sources, in which atmospheric deposition appeared to play a major role.

National Category
Microbiology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309470 (URN)10.1111/1462-2920.13593 (DOI)000393587200028 ()27871136 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationScience for Life Laboratory - a national resource center for high-throughput molecular bioscienceWenner-Gren FoundationsHelge Ax:son Johnsons stiftelse Swedish Research Council, 2009-5172Swedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5245-9935

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