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Publications (10 of 73) Show all publications
Münzner, K., Langenheder, S., Weyhenmeyer, G. A., Csitári, B. & Lindström, E. S. (2023). Carbon dioxide reduction by photosynthesis undetectable even during phytoplankton blooms in two lakes. Scientific Reports, 13(1), Article ID 13503.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon dioxide reduction by photosynthesis undetectable even during phytoplankton blooms in two lakes
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2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lakes located in the boreal region are generally supersaturated with carbon dioxide (CO2), which emerges from inflowing inorganic carbon from the surrounding watershed and from mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon. While these CO2 sources gained a lot of attention, processes that reduce the amount of CO2 have been less studied. We therefore examined the CO2 reduction capacity during times of phytoplankton blooms. We investigated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) in two lakes at times of blooms dominated by the cyanobacterium Gloeotrichia echinulata (Erken, Sweden) or by the nuisance alga Gonyostomum semen (Erssjon, Sweden) during two years. Our results showed that pCO(2) and phytoplankton densities remained unrelated in the two lakes even during blooms. We suggest that physical factors, such as wind-induced water column mixing and import of inorganic carbon via inflowing waters suppressed the phytoplankton signal on pCO(2). These results advance our understanding of carbon cycling in lakes and highlight the importance of detailed lake studies for more precise estimates of local, regional and global carbon budgets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510983 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-40596-6 (DOI)001052369000024 ()37598248 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-01091Swedish Research Council FormasEU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Gerhard, M., Koussoroplis, A.-M., Raatz, M., Pansch, C., Fey, S. B., Vajedsamiei, J., . . . Striebel, M. (2023). Environmental variability in aquatic ecosystems: Avenues for future multifactorial experiments. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 8(2), 247-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental variability in aquatic ecosystems: Avenues for future multifactorial experiments
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2023 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 247-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The relevance of considering environmental variability for understanding and predicting biological responses to environmental changes has resulted in a recent surge in variability-focused ecological research. However, integration of findings that emerge across studies and identification of remaining knowledge gaps in aquatic ecosystems remain critical. Here, we address these aspects by: (1) summarizing relevant terms of variability research including the components (characteristics) of variability and key interactions when considering multiple environmental factors; (2) identifying conceptual frameworks for understanding the consequences of environmental variability in single and multifactorial scenarios; (3) highlighting challenges for bridging theoretical and experimental studies involving transitioning from simple to more complex scenarios; (4) proposing improved approaches to overcome current mismatches between theoretical predictions and experimental observations; and (5) providing a guide for designing integrated experiments across multiple scales, degrees of control, and complexity in light of their specific strengths and limitations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-492877 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10286 (DOI)000870973100001 ()
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 871081EU, Horizon 2020, 869296German Research Foundation (DFG), DFG STR 1383/8-1EU, Horizon 2020, 813124EU, Horizon 2020, 894941German Research Foundation (DFG), PA 2643/2/348431475
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2024-05-23Bibliographically approved
Sassenhagen, I., Langenheder, S. & Lindström, E. S. (2023). Infection strategies of different chytrids in a diatom spring bloom. Freshwater Biology, 68(6), 972-986
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Infection strategies of different chytrids in a diatom spring bloom
2023 (English)In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 68, no 6, p. 972-986Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Diatom blooms are often accompanied by an increase in parasitic chytrids that kill the host cells, which they are infecting, and can contribute to the decline of the bloom. However, host specificity and range of these chytrids are currently poorly understood. Low host specificity would enable the parasites to opportunistically infect any diatom species, while specialisation on infecting specific high-biomass species could result in high prevalence and rapid spread of infection. We investigated such host-parasite interactions by monitoring the diverse diatom spring bloom in lake Erken using amplicon sequencing. We also performed infection experiments with two different, newly isolated chytrid species and several diatom cultures from the bloom. Chytridiomycota displayed the highest relative abundance of all parasitic lineages and were probably physically attached to larger organisms. Since the chytrids reached maximum abundance shortly after a peak in diatom reads, they were probably infecting these important primary producers. Phylogenetic analyses of the isolated chytrid strains identified them as members of the classes Rhizophydiales and Lobulomycetales. The infection experiments revealed high host specificity in these two chytrids targeting different diatom species. The experimental results supported statistical analyses of the environmental sequencing data, which suggested the presence of two different infection strategies: the most abundant chytrid species were specialised on infecting dominant diatom genera (i.e. Stephanodiscus, Aulacoseira, Asterionella), while rarer chytid species infected a range of less abundant diatoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
amplicon sequencing, chytrids, infection experiments, parasitism, phytoplankton
National Category
Microbiology Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510966 (URN)10.1111/fwb.14079 (DOI)000961670800001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2017- 00635Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Hébert, M.-P., Symons, C. C., Cañedo-Argüelles, M., Arnott, S. E., Derry, A. M., Fugère, V., . . . Beisner, B. E. (2023). Lake salinization drives consistent losses of zooplankton abundance and diversity across coordinated mesocosm experiments. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 8(1), 19-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake salinization drives consistent losses of zooplankton abundance and diversity across coordinated mesocosm experiments
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2023 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human-induced salinization increasingly threatens inland waters; yet we know little about the multifaceted response of lake communities to salt contamination. By conducting a coordinated mesocosm experiment of lake salinization across 16 sites in North America and Europe, we quantified the response of zooplankton abundance and (taxonomic and functional) community structure to a broad gradient of environmentally relevant chloride concentrations, ranging from 4 to ca. 1400 mg Cl− L−1. We found that crustaceans were distinctly more sensitive to elevated chloride than rotifers; yet, rotifers did not show compensatory abundance increases in response to crustacean declines. For crustaceans, our among-site comparisons indicate: (1) highly consistent decreases in abundance and taxon richness with salinity; (2) widespread chloride sensitivity across major taxonomic groups (Cladocera, Cyclopoida, and Calanoida); and (3) weaker loss of functional than taxonomic diversity. Overall, our study demonstrates that aggregate properties of zooplankton communities can be adversely affected at chloride concentrations relevant to anthropogenic salinization in lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-492874 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10239 (DOI)000750378500001 ()
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 801370EU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2024-06-14Bibliographically approved
Arnott, S. E., Fugère, V., Symons, C. C., Melles, S. J., Beisner, B. E., Cañedo-Argüelles, M., . . . Derry, A. M. (2023). Widespread variation in salt tolerance within freshwater zooplankton species reduces the predictability of community-level salt tolerance. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 8(1), 8-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Widespread variation in salt tolerance within freshwater zooplankton species reduces the predictability of community-level salt tolerance
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2023 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 8-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The salinization of freshwaters is a global threat to aquatic biodiversity. We quantified variation in chloride (Cl−) tolerance of 19 freshwater zooplankton species in four countries to answer three questions: (1) How much variation in Cl− tolerance is present among populations? (2) What factors predict intraspecific variation in Cl− tolerance? (3) Must we account for intraspecific variation to accurately predict community Cl− tolerance? We conducted field mesocosm experiments at 16 sites and compiled acute LC50s from published laboratory studies. We found high variation in LC50s for Cl− tolerance in multiple species, which, in the experiment, was only explained by zooplankton community composition. Variation in species-LC50 was high enough that at 45% of lakes, community response was not predictable based on species tolerances measured at other sites. This suggests that water quality guidelines should be based on multiple populations and communities to account for large intraspecific variation in Cl− tolerance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-492873 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10277 (DOI)000843682900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-00635Swedish Research Council, 2017-06421EU, European Research CouncilEU, Horizon 2020, 801370
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2023-09-11Bibliographically approved
Guzman, L. M., Thompson, P. L., Viana, D. S., Vanschoenwinkel, B., Horvath, Z., Ptacnik, R., . . . Chase, J. M. (2022). Accounting for temporal change in multiple biodiversity patterns improves the inference of metacommunity processes. Ecology, 103(6), Article ID 3683.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accounting for temporal change in multiple biodiversity patterns improves the inference of metacommunity processes
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2022 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 103, no 6, article id 3683Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In metacommunity ecology, a major focus has been on combining observational and analytical approaches to identify the role of critical assembly processes, such as dispersal limitation and environmental filtering, but this work has largely ignored temporal community dynamics. Here, we develop a "virtual ecologist" approach to evaluate assembly processes by simulating metacommunities varying in three main processes: density-independent responses to abiotic conditions, density-dependent biotic interactions, and dispersal. We then calculate a number of commonly used summary statistics of community structure in space and time and use random forests to evaluate their utility for inferring the strength of these three processes. We find that (i) both spatial and temporal data are necessary to disentangle metacommunity processes based on the summary statistics we test, and including statistics that are measured through time increases the explanatory power of random forests by up to 59% compared to cases where only spatial variation is considered; (ii) the three studied processes can be distinguished with different descriptors; and (iii) each summary statistic is differently sensitive to temporal and spatial sampling effort. Including repeated observations of metacommunities over time was essential for inferring the metacommunity processes, particularly dispersal. Some of the most useful statistics include the coefficient of variation of species abundances through time and metrics that incorporate variation in the relative abundances (evenness) of species. We conclude that a combination of methods and summary statistics is probably necessary to understand the processes that underlie metacommunity assembly through space and time, but we recognize that these results will be modified when other processes or summary statistics are used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWILEY, 2022
Keywords
metacommunity ecology, random forests, simulation study, spatiotemporal dynamics, summary statistics, variation partitioning
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-485875 (URN)10.1002/ecy.3683 (DOI)000790113600001 ()35307820 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-09-29 Created: 2022-09-29 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Hintz, W. D., Arnott, S. E., Symons, C. C., Greco, D. A., McClymont, A., Brentrup, J. A., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2022). Current water quality guidelines across North America and Europe do not protect lakes from salinization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 119(9), Article ID e2115033119.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Current water quality guidelines across North America and Europe do not protect lakes from salinization
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2022 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 119, no 9, article id e2115033119Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human-induced salinization caused by the use of road deicing salts, agricultural practices, mining operations, and climate change is a major threat to the biodiversity and functioning of freshwater ecosystems. Yet, it is unclear if freshwater ecosystems are protected from salinization by current water quality guidelines. Leveraging an experimental network of land-based and in-lake mesocosms across North America and Europe, we tested how salinization-indicated as elevated chloride (C-) concentration-will affect lake food webs and if two of the lowest Cl- thresholds found globally are sufficient to protect these food webs. Our results indicated that salinization will cause substantial zooplankton mortality at the lowest Cl- thresholds established in Canada (120 mg Cl-/L) and the United States (230 mg Cl-/L) and throughout Europe where Cl- thresholds are generally higher. For instance, at 73% of our study sites, Cl- concentrations that caused a >= 50% reduction in cladoceran abundance were at or below Cl thresholds in Canada, in the United States, and throughout Europe. Similar trends occurred for copepod and rotifer zooplankton. The loss of zooplankton triggered a cascading effect causing an increase in phytoplankton biomass at 47% of study sites. Such changes in lake food webs could alter nutrient cycling and water clarity and trigger declines in fish production. Current Cl- thresholds across North America and Europe clearly do not adequately protect lake food webs. Water quality guidelines should be developed where they do not exist, and there is an urgent need to reassess existing guidelines to protect lake ecosystems from human-induced salinization.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), 2022
Keywords
biodiversity, climate change, environmental policy, land use, water quality
National Category
Environmental Sciences Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-471680 (URN)10.1073/pnas.2115033119 (DOI)000766706200014 ()35193976 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 801370EU, Horizon 2020, 2017-06421Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council, 2017-00635
Available from: 2022-04-04 Created: 2022-04-04 Last updated: 2023-03-23Bibliographically approved
Bier, R. L., Vass, M., Szekely, A. J. & Langenheder, S. (2022). Effects of ecosystem size-induced environmental fluctuations on the temporal dynamics of community assembly mechanisms. The ISME Journal, 16(12), 2635-2643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of ecosystem size-induced environmental fluctuations on the temporal dynamics of community assembly mechanisms
2022 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 16, no 12, p. 2635-2643Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding processes that determine community membership and abundance is important for many fields from theoretical community ecology to conservation. However, spatial community studies are often conducted only at a single timepoint despite the known influence of temporal variability on community assembly processes. Here we used a spatiotemporal study to determine how environmental fluctuation differences induced by mesocosm volumes (larger volumes were more stable) influence assembly processes of aquatic bacterial metacommunities along a press disturbance gradient. By combining path analysis and network approaches, we found mesocosm size categories had distinct relative influences of assembly process and environmental factors that determined spatiotemporal bacterial community composition, including dispersal and species sorting by conductivity. These processes depended on, but were not affected proportionately by, mesocosm size. Low fluctuation, large mesocosms primarily developed through the interplay of species sorting that became more important over time and transient priority effects as evidenced by more time-delayed associations. High fluctuation, small mesocosms had regular disruptions to species sorting and greater importance of ecological drift and dispersal limitation indicated by lower richness and higher taxa replacement. Together, these results emphasize that environmental fluctuations influence ecosystems over time and its impacts are modified by biotic properties intrinsic to ecosystem size.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398608 (URN)10.1038/s41396-022-01286-9 (DOI)000841713300001 ()35982230 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-12-09 Created: 2019-12-09 Last updated: 2023-01-18Bibliographically approved
Cunillera-Montcusi, D., Beklioglu, M., Canedo-Arguelles, M., Jeppesen, E., Ptacnik, R., Amorim, C. A., . . . Matias, M. (2022). Freshwater salinisation: a research agenda for a saltier world. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 37(5), 440-453
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Freshwater salinisation: a research agenda for a saltier world
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2022 (English)In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 440-453Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The widespread salinisation of freshwater ecosystems poses a major threat to the biodiversity, functioning, and services that they provide. Human activities promote freshwater salinisation through multiple drivers (e.g., agriculture, resource extraction, urbanisation) that are amplified by climate change. Due to its complexity, we are still far from fully understanding the ecological and evolutionary consequences of freshwater salinisation. Here, we assess current research gaps and present a research agenda to guide future studies. We identified different gaps in taxonomic groups, levels of biological organisation, and geographic regions. We suggest focusing on global- and landscape-scale processes, functional approaches, genetic and molecular levels, and ecoevolutionary dynamics as key future avenues to predict the consequences of freshwater salinisation for ecosystems and human societies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ElsevierElsevier BV, 2022
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-476556 (URN)10.1016/j.tree.2021.12.005 (DOI)000793800300012 ()35058082 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01825
Available from: 2022-06-10 Created: 2022-06-10 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Urrutia Cordero, P., Langenheder, S., Striebel, M., Angeler, D. G., Bertilsson, S., Eklöv, P., . . . Hillebrand, H. (2022). Integrating multiple dimensions of ecological stability into a vulnerability framework. Journal of Ecology, 110(2), 374-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating multiple dimensions of ecological stability into a vulnerability framework
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 374-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological stability encompasses multiple dimensions of functional and compositional responses to environmental change. Though no single stability dimension used in isolation can fully reflect the overall response to environmental change, a common vulnerability assessment that integrates simultaneously across multiple stability components is highly desirable for ecological risk assessment. We develop both functional and compositional counterparts of a novel, integrative metric of overall ecological vulnerability (OEV). We test the framework with data from a modularized experiment replicated in five lakes over two seasons, examining functional and compositional responses to both pulse and press disturbances across three trophic groups. OEV is measured as the area under the curve integrated over the entire observation period, with the curve delimiting the difference between the disturbance treatment and undisturbed parallel controls, expressed either as the log response ratio of biomass (functional OEV) or community dissimilarity index (compositional OEV). Both, functional and compositional OEV correlated negatively with functional and compositional ‘resistance’, ‘temporal stability’ and ‘final/extent of recovery’ following both pulse and press disturbances, though less so with ‘resilience’ following a pulse disturbance. We also found a positive correlation between functional and compositional OEV, which reveals the potential to also evaluate the intricate linkage between biodiversity and functional change. Our findings demonstrate that OEV comprises a robust framework to: (a) capture simultaneously multiple functional and compositional stability components, and (b) quantify the functional consequences of biodiversity change. Our results provide the basis for an overarching framework for quantifying the overall vulnerability of ecosystems to environmental change, opening new possibilities for ecological risk assessment and management. Synthesis. Ecological stability comprises multiple dimensions that together encapsulate how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Considering these multiple aspects of stability simultaneously often poses a problem in environmental assessments, which frequently require overarching indicators of risk or vulnerability. While an analysis of multiple dimensions allows for deeper exploration of mechanisms, here we develop and test a new univariate indicator that integrates stability aspects under a broad range of disturbance regimes. Using a modularized experiment in Swedish lakes, we show that this integrative measure captures multiple stability dimensions reflecting compositional and functional vulnerability and their relationships between them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
biodiversity, disturbances, communities, dimensionality, ecological risk assessment, ecological stability, ecosystem management, vulnerability
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-461032 (URN)10.1111/1365-2745.13804 (DOI)000728237500001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-06421German Research Foundation (DFG), HI848/26-1
Available from: 2021-12-10 Created: 2021-12-10 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Projects
Explaining changes in community composition through time and space: how important is the legacy of past environmental conditions? [2014-05140_VR]; Uppsala UniversityClimate change and trophic cascade effects on community assembly processes and ecosystem functioning in plankton [2019-03970_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5245-9935

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