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Eklöv, Peter, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8981-1453
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Publications (10 of 75) Show all publications
Jane, S. F., Johnson, R. K., Rose, K. C., Eklöv, P. & Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2024). Responses by benthic invertebrate community composition to dissolved organic matter in lakes decline substantially above a threshold concentration. Freshwater Biology, 69(2), 288-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responses by benthic invertebrate community composition to dissolved organic matter in lakes decline substantially above a threshold concentration
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2024 (English)In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 288-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dissolved organic matter (DOM), often measured as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), plays a fundamental role in influencing the structure and function of lake ecosystems. Due to the myriad ecosystem effects of DOM, widespread observations of long-term increasing DOM concentrations have received much attention from ecologists. DOM positively influences primary production and consumer production at low concentrations due to the fertilising influence of bound nutrients. However, beyond a unimodal peak in production, a reduced light environment may result in a negative effect on production. This unimodal model has been largely developed and tested in lakes with low to moderate DOM concentrations (i.e., typically ≤ 10 mg/L DOC).To understand ecological responses in lakes across a larger range in DOM concentrations, we examined the response of benthic invertebrate communities in 148 Swedish lakes with DOM concentrations ranging between 0.67 and 32.77 mg/L DOC.We found that increasing DOM concentrations had a strong effect on invertebrate community composition below c. 10 mg/L. Across this range, abundances of individual taxa both increased and decreased, probably in response to environmental change induced by DOM. However, in lakes above this concentration, increasing DOM had minimal influence on community composition.As DOM concentrations continue to increase, faunal communities in lakes below this 10 mg/L DOC threshold are likely to undergo substantial change whereas those above this threshold are likely to be minimally impacted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
benthic invertebrates, browning, dissolved organic matter, lake, light limitation
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-529862 (URN)10.1111/fwb.14211 (DOI)001142195400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-05-30 Created: 2024-05-30 Last updated: 2024-05-30Bibliographically approved
Urrutia Cordero, P., Langenheder, S., Striebel, M., Angeler, D. G., Bertilsson, S., Eklöv, P., . . . Hillebrand, H. (2022). Integrating multiple dimensions of ecological stability into a vulnerability framework. Journal of Ecology, 110(2), 374-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating multiple dimensions of ecological stability into a vulnerability framework
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 374-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ecological stability encompasses multiple dimensions of functional and compositional responses to environmental change. Though no single stability dimension used in isolation can fully reflect the overall response to environmental change, a common vulnerability assessment that integrates simultaneously across multiple stability components is highly desirable for ecological risk assessment. We develop both functional and compositional counterparts of a novel, integrative metric of overall ecological vulnerability (OEV). We test the framework with data from a modularized experiment replicated in five lakes over two seasons, examining functional and compositional responses to both pulse and press disturbances across three trophic groups. OEV is measured as the area under the curve integrated over the entire observation period, with the curve delimiting the difference between the disturbance treatment and undisturbed parallel controls, expressed either as the log response ratio of biomass (functional OEV) or community dissimilarity index (compositional OEV). Both, functional and compositional OEV correlated negatively with functional and compositional ‘resistance’, ‘temporal stability’ and ‘final/extent of recovery’ following both pulse and press disturbances, though less so with ‘resilience’ following a pulse disturbance. We also found a positive correlation between functional and compositional OEV, which reveals the potential to also evaluate the intricate linkage between biodiversity and functional change. Our findings demonstrate that OEV comprises a robust framework to: (a) capture simultaneously multiple functional and compositional stability components, and (b) quantify the functional consequences of biodiversity change. Our results provide the basis for an overarching framework for quantifying the overall vulnerability of ecosystems to environmental change, opening new possibilities for ecological risk assessment and management. Synthesis. Ecological stability comprises multiple dimensions that together encapsulate how ecosystems respond to environmental change. Considering these multiple aspects of stability simultaneously often poses a problem in environmental assessments, which frequently require overarching indicators of risk or vulnerability. While an analysis of multiple dimensions allows for deeper exploration of mechanisms, here we develop and test a new univariate indicator that integrates stability aspects under a broad range of disturbance regimes. Using a modularized experiment in Swedish lakes, we show that this integrative measure captures multiple stability dimensions reflecting compositional and functional vulnerability and their relationships between them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
biodiversity, disturbances, communities, dimensionality, ecological risk assessment, ecological stability, ecosystem management, vulnerability
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-461032 (URN)10.1111/1365-2745.13804 (DOI)000728237500001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-06421German Research Foundation (DFG), HI848/26-1
Available from: 2021-12-10 Created: 2021-12-10 Last updated: 2023-07-14Bibliographically approved
Andersson, M. L., Scharnweber, K. & Eklöv, P. (2022). The interaction between metabolic rate, habitat choice, and resource use in a polymorphic freshwater species. Ecology and Evolution, 12(8)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The interaction between metabolic rate, habitat choice, and resource use in a polymorphic freshwater species
2022 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 12, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1.      Resource polymorphism is common across taxa and can result in alternate ecotypes with specific morphologies, feeding modes, and behaviours that increase performance in a specific habitat. This can result in high intraspecific variation in the expression of specific traits and the extent to which these traits are correlated within a single population. Although metabolic rate influences resource acquisition and the overall pace of life of individuals it is not clear how metabolic rate interact with the larger suite of traits to ultimately determine individual fitness.

2.      We examined the relationship between metabolic rates and the major differences (habitat use, morphology, and resource use) between littoral and pelagic ecotypes of European perch (Perca fluviatilis) from a single lake in Central Sweden.

3.      Standard metabolic rate (SMR) was significantly higher in pelagic perch but did not correlate with resource use or morphology. Maximum metabolic rate (MMR) was not correlated with any of our explanatory variables or with SMR. Aerobic scope (AS) showed the same pattern as SMR, differing across habitats, but contrary to expectations was lower in pelagic perch.

4.      This study helps to establish a framework for future experiments further exploring the drivers of intraspecific differences in metabolism. In addition, since metabolic rates scale with temperature and determine predator energy requirements, our observed differences in SMR across habitats will help determine ecotype-specific vulnerabilities to climate change and differences in top-down predation pressure across habitats.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWiley Online Library, 2022
Keywords
intraspecific variation, metabolic rate, morphometrics, plasticity, Perca fluviatilis, resource use, respirometry, stable isotopes
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-450551 (URN)10.1002/ece3.9129 (DOI)000833916500001 ()35923943 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, Dnr. 942-2015-365
Available from: 2021-08-16 Created: 2021-08-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Scharnweber, K., Chaguaceda, F. & Eklöv, P. (2021). Fatty acid accumulation in feeding types of a natural freshwater fish population. Oecologia, 196(1), 53-63
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatty acid accumulation in feeding types of a natural freshwater fish population
2021 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 196, no 1, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fatty acids are widely used to study trophic interactions in food web assemblages. Generally, it is assumed that there is a very small modification of fatty acids from one trophic step to another, making them suitable as trophic biomarkers. However, recent literature provides evidence that many fishes possess genes encoding enzymes with a role in bioconversion, thus the capability for bioconversion might be more widespread than previously assumed. Nonetheless, empirical evidence for biosynthesis occurring in natural populations remains scarce. In this study, we investigated different feeding types of perch (Perca fluviatilis) that are specialized on specific resources with different levels of highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs), and analyzed the change between HUFA proportions in perch muscle tissue compared to their resources. Perch showed matching levels to their resources for EPA, but ARA and especially DHA were accumulated. Compound-specific stable isotope analyses helped us to identify the origin of HUFA carbon. Our results suggest that perch obtain a substantial amount of DHA via bioconversion when feeding on DHA-poor benthic resources. Thus, our data indicate the capability of bioconversion of HUFAs in a natural freshwater fish population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer NatureSpringer Nature, 2021
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404188 (URN)10.1007/s00442-021-04913-y (DOI)000644257500001 ()33900451 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 502 2013.0091
Available from: 2020-02-14 Created: 2020-02-14 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Urrutia Cordero, P., Langenheder, S., Striebel, M., Eklöv, P., Angeler, D. G., Bertilsson, S., . . . Hillebrand, H. (2021). Functionally reversible impacts of disturbances on lake food webs linked to spatial and seasonal dependencies. Ecology, 102(4), Article ID 03283.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Functionally reversible impacts of disturbances on lake food webs linked to spatial and seasonal dependencies
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2021 (English)In: Ecology, ISSN 0012-9658, E-ISSN 1939-9170, Vol. 102, no 4, article id 03283Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing human impact on the environment is causing drastic changes in disturbance regimes and how they prevail over time. Of increasing relevance is to further our understanding on biological responses to pulse disturbances (short duration) and how they interact with other ongoing press disturbances (constantly present). Because the temporal and spatial contexts of single experiments often limit our ability to generalize results across space and time, we conducted a modularized mesocosm experiment replicated in space (five lakes along a latitudinal gradient in Scandinavia) and time (two seasons, spring and summer) to generate general predictions on how the functioning and composition of multitrophic plankton communities (zoo-, phyto- and bacterioplankton) respond to pulse disturbances acting either in isolation or combined with press disturbances. As pulse disturbance, we used short-term changes in fish presence, and as press disturbance, we addressed the ongoing reduction in light availability caused by increased cloudiness and lake browning in many boreal and subarctic lakes. First, our results show that the top-down pulse disturbance had the strongest effects on both functioning and composition of the three trophic levels across sites and seasons, with signs for interactive impacts with the bottom-up press disturbance on phytoplankton communities. Second, community composition responses to disturbances were highly divergent between lakes and seasons: temporal accumulated community turnover of the same trophic level either increased (destabilization) or decreased (stabilization) in response to the disturbances compared to control conditions. Third, we found functional recovery from the pulse disturbances to be frequent at the end of most experiments. In a broader context, these results demonstrate that top-down, pulse disturbances, either alone or with additional constant stress upon primary producers caused by bottom-up disturbances, can induce profound but often functionally reversible changes across multiple trophic levels, which are strongly linked to spatial and temporal context dependencies. Furthermore, the identified dichotomy of disturbance effects on the turnover in community composition demonstrates the potential of disturbances to either stabilize or destabilize biodiversity patterns over time across a wide range of environmental conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWILEY, 2021
Keywords
biodiversity, community composition, community turnover, disturbances, ecosystem functioning, global change, lakes, plankton, recovery
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-446645 (URN)10.1002/ecy.3283 (DOI)000623058600001 ()33428769 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council, 2017-06421
Available from: 2021-06-22 Created: 2021-06-22 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Scharnweber, K., Andersson, M. L., Chaguaceda, F. & Eklöv, P. (2021). Intraspecific differences in metabolic rates shape carbon stable isotope trophic discrimination factors of muscle tissue in the common teleost Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis). Ecology and Evolution, 11(14), 9804-9814
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraspecific differences in metabolic rates shape carbon stable isotope trophic discrimination factors of muscle tissue in the common teleost Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis)
2021 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 11, no 14, p. 9804-9814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

1. Stable isotopes represent a unique approach to provide insights into the ecology of organisms. delta C-13 and delta N-15 have specifically been used to obtain information on the trophic ecology and food-web interactions. Trophic discrimination factors (TDF, Delta C-13 and Delta N-15) describe the isotopic fractionation occurring from diet to consumer tissue, and these factors are critical for obtaining precise estimates within any application of delta C-13 and delta N-15 values. It is widely acknowledged that metabolism influences TDF, being responsible for different TDF between tissues of variable metabolic activity (e.g., liver vs. muscle tissue) or species body size (small vs. large). However, the connection between the variation of metabolism occurring within a single species during its ontogeny and TDF has rarely been considered.

2. Here, we conducted a 9-month feeding experiment to report Delta C-13 and Delta N-15 of muscle and liver tissues for several weight classes of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), a widespread teleost often studied using stable isotopes, but without established TDF for feeding on a natural diet. In addition, we assessed the relationship between the standard metabolic rate (SMR) and TDF by measuring the oxygen consumption of the individuals.

3. Our results showed a significant negative relationship of SMR with Delta C-13, and a significant positive relationship of SMR with Delta N-15 of muscle tissue, but not with TDF of liver tissue. SMR varies inversely with size, which translated into a significantly different TDF of muscle tissue between size classes.

4. In summary, our results emphasize the role of metabolism in shaping-specific TDF (i.e., Delta C-13 and Delta N-15 of muscle tissue) and especially highlight the substantial differences between individuals of different ontogenetic stages within a species. Our findings thus have direct implications for the use of stable isotope data and the applications of stable isotopes in food-web studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWILEY, 2021
Keywords
fractionation factors, metabolism, ontogeny, standard metabolic rate, tissue types, delta C-13, delta N-15
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-452328 (URN)10.1002/ece3.7809 (DOI)000667975400001 ()34306663 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 502 2013.0091Swedish Research Council Formas, 942--2015-365
Available from: 2021-09-06 Created: 2021-09-06 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Höök, T. O., Svanbäck, R. & Eklöv, P. (2021). Sex-specific plasticity in a trophic polymorphic aquatic predator: a modeling approach. Oecologia, 195(2), 341-354
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific plasticity in a trophic polymorphic aquatic predator: a modeling approach
2021 (English)In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 195, no 2, p. 341-354Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Phenotypic plasticity is common among animal taxa. While there are clearly limits and likely costs to plasticity, these costs are unknown for most organisms. Further, as plasticity is partially genetically determined, the potential magnitude of exhibited plasticity may vary among individuals. In addition to phenotypic plasticity, various animal taxa also display sexual size dimorphism, a feature ultimately thought to arise due to differential size-dependent fitness costs and benefits between sexes. We hypothesized that differential selection acting on males and females can indirectly select for unequal genetically defined plasticity potential between the sexes. We evaluate this possibility for Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis), a species that displays modest sexual size dimorphism and habitat-related morphological plasticity. Using 500-year simulations of an ecogenetic agent-based model, we demonstrate that genetically determined morphological plasticity potential may evolve differently for males and females, leading to greater realized morphological variation between habitats for one sex over the other. Genetically determined potential for plasticity evolved differently between sexes across (a) various sex-specific life-history differences and (b) a variety of assumed costs of plasticity acting on both growth and survival. Morphological analyses of Eurasian perch collected in situ were consistent with model predictions: realized morphological variation between habitats was greater for females than males. We suggest that due to sex-specific selective pressures, differences in male and female genetically defined potential for plasticity may be a common feature across organisms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SpringerSPRINGER, 2021
Keywords
Morphology, Eurasian perch, Phenotypic plasticity, Life histories, Ecogenetic
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-450309 (URN)10.1007/s00442-020-04843-1 (DOI)000606216000004 ()33420521 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-08-20 Created: 2021-08-20 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Chaguaceda, F., Scharnweber, K., Tranvik, L. & Eklöv, P. (2021). Short-term apparent mutualism drives responses of aquatic prey at increasing productivity. Journal of Animal Ecology, 90(4), 834-845
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Short-term apparent mutualism drives responses of aquatic prey at increasing productivity
2021 (English)In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 90, no 4, p. 834-845Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

According to apparent competition theory, sharing a predator should cause indirect interactions among prey that can substantially influence food-web responses to environmental drivers. However, empirical evidence of apparent competition under ongoing environmental change is still scarce. In an 8-week mesocosm experiment, we found that short-term responses of aquatic food webs to increasing productivity were strongly regulated by apparent mutualism between benthic and pelagic prey in the presence of a generalist fish. Following trends in natural systems, increasing productivity in our mesocosms favored the relative abundance of benthic prey. This elicited a shift in fish selectivity from pelagic to benthic prey driven by fish switching behavior which resulted in lower and delayed top-down control on pelagic prey. Our results highlight that apparent competition theory may explain food-web responses across environmental gradients, whereby resulting prey dynamics and stability may highly depend on the foraging behavior exhibited by generalist predators.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
Apparent competition, top-down control, trophic cascade, food web, resource coupling, eutrophication, indirect interactions, crucian carp, mesocosm
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Limnology; Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-404054 (URN)10.1111/1365-2656.13413 (DOI)000606532200001 ()33340096 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091
Available from: 2020-02-08 Created: 2020-02-08 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Urrutia Cordero, P., Langvall, O., Blomkvist, P., Angeler, D. G., Bertilsson, S., Colom-Montero, W., . . . Langenheder, S. (2021). SITES AquaNet: An open infrastructure for mesocosm experiments with high frequency sensor monitoring across lakes. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, 19(6), 385-400
Open this publication in new window or tab >>SITES AquaNet: An open infrastructure for mesocosm experiments with high frequency sensor monitoring across lakes
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2021 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, E-ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 385-400Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For aquatic scientists mesocosm experiments are important tools for hypothesis testing as they offer a compromise between experimental control and realism. Here we present a new mesocosm infrastructure-SITES AquaNET-located in five lakes connected to field stations in Sweden that cover a similar to 760 km latitudinal gradient. SITES AquaNet overcomes major hindrances in aquatic experimental research through: (i) openness to the scientific community, (ii) the potential to implement coordinated experiments across sites and time, and (iii) high-frequency measurements (temperature, photosynthetic photon flux density, turbidity and dissolved oxygen, chlorophyll a and phycocyanin concentrations) with an autonomous sensor system. Moreover, the infrastructure provides operational guidance and sensor expertise from technical staff, and connections to a multi-layered monitoring programme ("SITES Water") for each lake. This enables ecological observations from whole lake ecosystems to be compared with experimental studies aiming at disentangling major drivers and mechanisms underlying observed changes. Here we describe the technical properties of the infrastructure along with possibilities for experimental manipulations to tackle pressing issues in aquatic ecology and global change science. As a proof of concept, we also present a first mesocosm experiment across all five field sites with a cross-factorial design to evaluate responses of the sensor measurements to press/bottom-up (constant light reduction) and pulse/top-down (temporary fish predation) disturbances. This demonstrates the suitability of the infrastructure and autonomous sensor system to host modularized experiments and exemplifies the power and advantages of the approach to integrate a network of mecsocosm facilities with manageable costs across large geographic areas.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWILEY, 2021
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-454291 (URN)10.1002/lom3.10432 (DOI)000647918900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-06421
Available from: 2021-09-28 Created: 2021-09-28 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Chaguaceda, F., Eklöv, P. & Scharnweber, K. (2020). Chaguaceda et al. (2020) Oecologia dataset.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chaguaceda et al. (2020) Oecologia dataset
2020 (English)Data set
Abstract [en]

Fatty acids (FAs) are key nutrients for fitness which take part in multiple physiological processes over the ontogeny of organisms. Yet, we lack evidence on how FA nutrition mediates life-history trade-offs and ontogenetic niche shifts in natural populations. In a field study, we analyzed ontogenetic changes in the FAs of Eurasian perch (Perca fluviatilis L.), a widespread fish that goes through ontogenetic niche shifts and can have high individual niche specialization. Diet explained most of the variation in the FA composition of perch dorsal muscle over early ontogeny (28%), while the total length explained 23%, suggesting that perch significantly regulated FA composition over early ontogeny. Condition explained 1% of the remaining variation. 18:3n-3 (ALA) and 18:4n-3 (SDA) indicated planktivory; 18:1n-7, benthivory; and 22:6n-3 (DHA), piscivory in perch diet. Conversely, perch regulated long-chained polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), such as 20:5n-3 (EPA), 20:4n-6 (ARA) and 22:6n-3 (DHA) over ontogeny, emphasizing the role of such FAs in early growth and sexual maturation. Adult perch increasingly retained 16:1n-7 and 18:1n-9 suggesting higher energy storage in older perch. Furthermore, differences in DHA availability in diet correlated with intra-cohort differences in perch growth, potentially hindering the overall use of benthic resources and promoting earlier shifts to piscivory in littoral habitats. Overall, this study indicates that in addition to diet, internal regulation may be more important for FA composition than previously thought. Differences between FA needs and FA availability may lead to life-history trade-offs that affect the ecology of consumers, including their niche

National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Limnology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-411601 (URN)
Note

This dataset contains a series of variables over the ontogeny of a polymorphic perch (Perca fluviatilis) that live in pelagic and littoral habitats. The variables include: body size, growth, condition factor, C and N stable isotopes, diet estimations and % of different fatty acids in the dorsal muscle of perch. It also shows the isotope values of the food sources that were used as endpoints in the isotope mixing model. The dataset provides metadata of each variable.

Available from: 2020-06-03 Created: 2020-06-03 Last updated: 2020-06-08Bibliographically approved
Projects
Effects of phenotypic plasticity on consumer resource interactions in spatially separated aquatic food webs [2009-04764_VR]; Uppsala UniversityClimate change effects on top-down predation in aquatic ecosystems [2017-04311_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8981-1453

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