Logo: to the web site of Uppsala University

uu.sePublications from Uppsala University
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A., ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4013-2281
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 200) Show all publications
Lewis, A. S. L., Lau, M. P., Jane, S. F., Rose, K. C., Be'eri-Shlevin, Y., Burnet, S. H., . . . Carey, C. C. (2024). Anoxia begets anoxia: A positive feedback to the deoxygenation of temperate lakes. Global Change Biology, 30(1), Article ID e17046.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anoxia begets anoxia: A positive feedback to the deoxygenation of temperate lakes
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 30, no 1, article id e17046Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Declining oxygen concentrations in the deep waters of lakes worldwide pose a pressing environmental and societal challenge. Existing theory suggests that low deep-water dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations could trigger a positive feedback through which anoxia (i.e., very low DO) during a given summer begets increasingly severe occurrences of anoxia in following summers. Specifically, anoxic conditions can promote nutrient release from sediments, thereby stimulating phytoplankton growth, and subsequent phytoplankton decomposition can fuel heterotrophic respiration, resulting in increased spatial extent and duration of anoxia. However, while the individual relationships in this feedback are well established, to our knowledge, there has not been a systematic analysis within or across lakes that simultaneously demonstrates all of the mechanisms necessary to produce a positive feedback that reinforces anoxia. Here, we compiled data from 656 widespread temperate lakes and reservoirs to analyze the proposed anoxia begets anoxia feedback. Lakes in the dataset span a broad range of surface area (1–126,909 ha), maximum depth (6–370 m), and morphometry, with a median time-series duration of 30 years at each lake. Using linear mixed models, we found support for each of the positive feedback relationships between anoxia, phosphorus concentrations, chlorophyll a concentrations, and oxygen demand across the 656-lake dataset. Likewise, we found further support for these relationships by analyzing time-series data from individual lakes. Our results indicate that the strength of these feedback relationships may vary with lake-specific characteristics: For example, we found that surface phosphorus concentrations were more positively associated with chlorophyll a in high-phosphorus lakes, and oxygen demand had a stronger influence on the extent of anoxia in deep lakes. Taken together, these results support the existence of a positive feedback that could magnify the effects of climate change and other anthropogenic pressures driving the development of anoxia in lakes around the world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
air temperature, anoxia, chlorophyll a, dissolved oxygen, feedback, hypolimnion, lake, oxygen demand, phosphorus, residence time
National Category
Ecology Geosciences, Multidisciplinary Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-519022 (URN)10.1111/gcb.17046 (DOI)001151213000060 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091German Research Foundation (DFG), GR1540/37-1
Available from: 2024-01-02 Created: 2024-01-02 Last updated: 2024-04-15Bibliographically approved
Weyhenmeyer, G. A., Chukwuka, A. V., Anneville, O., Brookes, J., Carvalho, C. R., Cotner, J. B., . . . Zhou, Y. (2024). Global Lake Health in the Anthropocene: Societal Implications and Treatment Strategies. Earth's Future, 12(4), Article ID e2023EF004387.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global Lake Health in the Anthropocene: Societal Implications and Treatment Strategies
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Earth's Future, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e2023EF004387Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The world's 1.4 million lakes (>= 10 ha) provide many ecosystem services that are essential for human well-being; however, only if their health status is good. Here, we reviewed common lake health issues and classified them using a simple human health-based approach to outline that lakes are living systems that are in need of oxygen, clean water and a balanced energy and nutrient supply. The main reason for adopting some of the human health terminology for the lake health classification is to increase the awareness and understanding of global lake health issues. We show that lakes are exposed to various anthropogenic stressors which can result in many lake health issues, ranging from thermal, circulatory, respiratory, nutritional and metabolic issues to infections and poisoning. Of particular concern for human well-being is the widespread lake drying, which is a severe circulatory issue with many cascading effects on lake health. We estimated that similar to 115,000 lakes evaporate twice as much water as they gain from direct precipitation, making them vulnerable to potential drying if inflowing waters follow the drying trend, putting more than 153 million people at risk who live in close vicinity to those lakes. Where lake health issues remain untreated, essential ecosystem services will decline or even vanish, posing a threat to the well-being of millions of people. We recommend coordinated multisectoral and multidisciplinary prevention and treatment strategies, which need to include a follow-up of the progress and an assessment of the resilience of lakes to intensifying threats. Priority should be given to implementing sewage water treatment, mitigating climate change, counteracting introductions of non-native species to lakes and decreasing uncontrolled anthropogenic releases of chemicals into the hydro-, bio-, and atmosphere. Lakes around the world come in an array of sizes, shapes and colors, each telling a unique story of geological history and environmental importance. When lakes are healthy they contribute to the achievement of the global sustainable development goals by providing many important ecosystem services. Lakes are, however, not always healthy. Here, it is shown that lakes can suffer from a large variety of health issues, ranging from thermal, circulatory, respiratory, nutritional and metabolic issues to infections and poisoning. Without improved treatment strategies, many of the health issues may become chronic, affecting millions of people who are dependent on the ecosystem services from the lakes. To prevent and cure lakes from critical health conditions, strategies that are similar to those used in human healthcare should be applied: intervention and preventative actions before health problems occur, regular screening and early identification of lake health issues, and remediation and mitigation efforts at an appropriate scale, spanning from local to global. Anthropogenic stressors can cause lake health issues that range from thermal, circulatory, respiratory, nutritional and metabolic issues to infections and poisoning Lake health varies geographically, with the highest risk of critical conditions occurring in densely populated low-income countries There is an urgent need to follow-up the progress of treatments and to make adjustments whenever needed

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Geophysical Union (AGU), 2024
Keywords
lake health, Anthropocene, stressors, human health, sustainability, treatment
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-527723 (URN)10.1029/2023EF004387 (DOI)001204269400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091Australian Research Council, 42322104EU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2024-05-06 Created: 2024-05-06 Last updated: 2024-05-06Bibliographically approved
Richardson, D. C., Filazzola, A., Woolway, R. I., Imrit, M. A., Bouffard, D., Weyhenmeyer, G. A., . . . Sharma, S. (2024). Nonlinear responses in interannual variability of lake ice to climate change. Limnology and Oceanography, 69(4), 789-801
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nonlinear responses in interannual variability of lake ice to climate change
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590, Vol. 69, no 4, p. 789-801Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change is contributing to rapid changes in lake ice cover across the Northern Hemisphere, thereby impacting local communities and ecosystems. Using lake ice cover time-series spanning over 87 yr for 43 lakes across the Northern Hemisphere, we found that the interannual variability in ice duration, measured as standard deviation, significantly increased in only half of our studied lakes. We observed that the interannual variability in ice duration peaked when lakes were, on average, covered by ice for about 1 month, while both longer and shorter long-term mean ice cover duration resulted in lower interannual variability in ice duration. These results demonstrate that the ice cover duration can become so short that the interannual variability rapidly declines. The interannual variability in ice duration showed a strong dependency on global temperature anomalies and teleconnections, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation and El Nino-Southern Oscillation. We conclude that many lakes across the Northern Hemisphere will experience a decline in interannual ice cover variability and shift to open water during the winter under a continued global warming trend which will affect lake biological, cultural, and economic processes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, 2024
National Category
Climate Research Physical Geography Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-531591 (URN)10.1002/lno.12527 (DOI)001170169000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091
Available from: 2024-06-14 Created: 2024-06-14 Last updated: 2024-06-14Bibliographically approved
Jane, S. F., Johnson, R. K., Rose, K. C., Eklöv, P. & Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2024). Responses by benthic invertebrate community composition to dissolved organic matter in lakes decline substantially above a threshold concentration. Freshwater Biology, 69(2), 288-299
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Responses by benthic invertebrate community composition to dissolved organic matter in lakes decline substantially above a threshold concentration
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Freshwater Biology, ISSN 0046-5070, E-ISSN 1365-2427, Vol. 69, no 2, p. 288-299Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Dissolved organic matter (DOM), often measured as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), plays a fundamental role in influencing the structure and function of lake ecosystems. Due to the myriad ecosystem effects of DOM, widespread observations of long-term increasing DOM concentrations have received much attention from ecologists. DOM positively influences primary production and consumer production at low concentrations due to the fertilising influence of bound nutrients. However, beyond a unimodal peak in production, a reduced light environment may result in a negative effect on production. This unimodal model has been largely developed and tested in lakes with low to moderate DOM concentrations (i.e., typically ≤ 10 mg/L DOC).To understand ecological responses in lakes across a larger range in DOM concentrations, we examined the response of benthic invertebrate communities in 148 Swedish lakes with DOM concentrations ranging between 0.67 and 32.77 mg/L DOC.We found that increasing DOM concentrations had a strong effect on invertebrate community composition below c. 10 mg/L. Across this range, abundances of individual taxa both increased and decreased, probably in response to environmental change induced by DOM. However, in lakes above this concentration, increasing DOM had minimal influence on community composition.As DOM concentrations continue to increase, faunal communities in lakes below this 10 mg/L DOC threshold are likely to undergo substantial change whereas those above this threshold are likely to be minimally impacted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
benthic invertebrates, browning, dissolved organic matter, lake, light limitation
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-529862 (URN)10.1111/fwb.14211 (DOI)001142195400001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2024-05-30 Created: 2024-05-30 Last updated: 2024-05-30Bibliographically approved
Harris, T. D., Reinl, K. L., Azarderakhsh, M., Berger, S. A., Berman, M. C., Bizic, M., . . . Zhan, Q. (2024). What makes a cyanobacterial bloom disappear?: A review of the abiotic and biotic cyanobacterial bloom loss factors. Harmful Algae, 133, Article ID 102599.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What makes a cyanobacterial bloom disappear?: A review of the abiotic and biotic cyanobacterial bloom loss factors
Show others...
2024 (English)In: Harmful Algae, ISSN 1568-9883, E-ISSN 1878-1470, Vol. 133, article id 102599Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cyanobacterial blooms present substantial challenges to managers and threaten ecological and public health. Although the majority of cyanobacterial bloom research and management focuses on factors that control bloom initiation, duration, toxicity, and geographical extent, relatively little research focuses on the role of loss processes in blooms and how these processes are regulated. Here, we define a loss process in terms of population dynamics as any process that removes cells from a population, thereby decelerating or reducing the development and extent of blooms. We review abiotic (e.g., hydraulic flushing and oxidative stress/UV light) and biotic factors (e.g., allelopathic compounds, infections, grazing, and resting cells/programmed cell death) known to govern bloom loss. We found that the dominant loss processes depend on several system specific factors including cyanobacterial genera -specific traits, in situ physicochemical conditions, and the microbial, phytoplankton, and consumer community composition. We also address loss processes in the context of bloom management and discuss perspectives and challenges in predicting how a changing climate may directly and indirectly affect loss processes on blooms. A deeper understanding of bloom loss processes and their underlying mechanisms may help to mitigate the negative consequences of cyanobacterial blooms and improve current management strategies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
cyanobacteria, HABs, cell death, sedimentation, grazing, loss processes
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-528001 (URN)10.1016/j.hal.2024.102599 (DOI)001206288800001 ()38485445 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 871081EU, Horizon 2020, 101004186EU, Horizon 2020, 722518Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091
Available from: 2024-05-13 Created: 2024-05-13 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved
Reinl, K. L., Harris, T. D., North, R. L., Almela, P., Berger, S. A., Bizic, M., . . . Yokota, K. (2023). Blooms also like it cold. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 8(4), 546-564
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Blooms also like it cold
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 4, p. 546-564Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cyanobacterial blooms have substantial direct and indirect negative impacts on freshwater ecosystems including releasing toxins, blocking light needed by other organisms, and depleting oxygen. There is growing concern over the potential for climate change to promote cyanobacterial blooms, as the positive effects of increasing lake surface temperature on cyanobacterial growth are well documented in the literature; however, there is increasing evidence that cyanobacterial blooms are also being initiated and persisting in relatively cold-water temperatures (< 15 °C), including ice-covered conditions. In this work, we provide evidence of freshwater cold-water cyanobacterial blooms, review abiotic drivers and physiological adaptations leading to these blooms, offer a typology of these lesser-studied cold-water cyanobacterial blooms, and discuss their occurrence under changing climate conditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Ecology Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-513132 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10316 (DOI)000934614000001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01825German Research Foundation (DFG), 1987/2-1European Science Foundation (ESF), CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_025/0007417European Regional Development Fund (ERDF), CZ.02.1.01/0.0/0.0/16_025/0007417
Available from: 2023-10-03 Created: 2023-10-03 Last updated: 2023-10-03Bibliographically approved
Münzner, K., Langenheder, S., Weyhenmeyer, G. A., Csitári, B. & Lindström, E. S. (2023). Carbon dioxide reduction by photosynthesis undetectable even during phytoplankton blooms in two lakes. Scientific Reports, 13(1), Article ID 13503.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon dioxide reduction by photosynthesis undetectable even during phytoplankton blooms in two lakes
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 13503Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lakes located in the boreal region are generally supersaturated with carbon dioxide (CO2), which emerges from inflowing inorganic carbon from the surrounding watershed and from mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon. While these CO2 sources gained a lot of attention, processes that reduce the amount of CO2 have been less studied. We therefore examined the CO2 reduction capacity during times of phytoplankton blooms. We investigated partial pressure of CO2 (pCO(2)) in two lakes at times of blooms dominated by the cyanobacterium Gloeotrichia echinulata (Erken, Sweden) or by the nuisance alga Gonyostomum semen (Erssjon, Sweden) during two years. Our results showed that pCO(2) and phytoplankton densities remained unrelated in the two lakes even during blooms. We suggest that physical factors, such as wind-induced water column mixing and import of inorganic carbon via inflowing waters suppressed the phytoplankton signal on pCO(2). These results advance our understanding of carbon cycling in lakes and highlight the importance of detailed lake studies for more precise estimates of local, regional and global carbon budgets.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510983 (URN)10.1038/s41598-023-40596-6 (DOI)001052369000024 ()37598248 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2020-01091Swedish Research Council FormasEU, Horizon 2020
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Golub, M., Koupaei-Abyazani, N., Vesala, T., Mammarella, I., Ojala, A., Bohrer, G., . . . Desai, A. R. (2023). Diel, seasonal, and inter-annual variation in carbon dioxide effluxes from lakes and reservoirs. Environmental Research Letters, 18(3), Article ID 034046.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diel, seasonal, and inter-annual variation in carbon dioxide effluxes from lakes and reservoirs
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Environmental Research Letters, E-ISSN 1748-9326, Vol. 18, no 3, article id 034046Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Accounting for temporal changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) effluxes from freshwaters remains a challenge for global and regional carbon budgets. Here, we synthesize 171 site-months of flux measurements of CO2 based on the eddy covariance method from 13 lakes and reservoirs in the Northern Hemisphere, and quantify dynamics at multiple temporal scales. We found pronounced sub-annual variability in CO2 flux at all sites. By accounting for diel variation, only 11% of site-months were net daily sinks of CO2. Annual CO2 emissions had an average of 25% (range 3%–58%) interannual variation. Similar to studies on streams, nighttime emissions regularly exceeded daytime emissions. Biophysical regulations of CO2 flux variability were delineated through mutual information analysis. Sample analysis of CO2 fluxes indicate the importance of continuous measurements. Better characterization of short- and long-term variability is necessary to understand and improve detection of temporal changes of CO2 fluxes in response to natural and anthropogenic drivers. Our results indicate that existing global lake carbon budgets relying primarily on daytime measurements yield underestimates of net emissions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Physics Publishing (IOPP), 2023
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-500036 (URN)10.1088/1748-9326/acb834 (DOI)000953683700001 ()
Funder
Academy of Finland, 337549Academy of Finland, 337552EU, Horizon Europe, 101056921Swedish Research Council, 2016-04153Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222
Note

Correction in: Environmental Research Letters, vol. 18, issue 10, article number 109501

DOI: 10.1088/1748-9326/acfb97

Available from: 2023-04-11 Created: 2023-04-11 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Hébert, M.-P., Symons, C. C., Cañedo-Argüelles, M., Arnott, S. E., Derry, A. M., Fugère, V., . . . Beisner, B. E. (2023). Lake salinization drives consistent losses of zooplankton abundance and diversity across coordinated mesocosm experiments. Limnology and Oceanography Letters, 8(1), 19-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake salinization drives consistent losses of zooplankton abundance and diversity across coordinated mesocosm experiments
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography Letters, E-ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Human-induced salinization increasingly threatens inland waters; yet we know little about the multifaceted response of lake communities to salt contamination. By conducting a coordinated mesocosm experiment of lake salinization across 16 sites in North America and Europe, we quantified the response of zooplankton abundance and (taxonomic and functional) community structure to a broad gradient of environmentally relevant chloride concentrations, ranging from 4 to ca. 1400 mg Cl− L−1. We found that crustaceans were distinctly more sensitive to elevated chloride than rotifers; yet, rotifers did not show compensatory abundance increases in response to crustacean declines. For crustaceans, our among-site comparisons indicate: (1) highly consistent decreases in abundance and taxon richness with salinity; (2) widespread chloride sensitivity across major taxonomic groups (Cladocera, Cyclopoida, and Calanoida); and (3) weaker loss of functional than taxonomic diversity. Overall, our study demonstrates that aggregate properties of zooplankton communities can be adversely affected at chloride concentrations relevant to anthropogenic salinization in lakes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-492874 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10239 (DOI)000750378500001 ()
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 801370EU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2023-01-10 Created: 2023-01-10 Last updated: 2024-06-14Bibliographically approved
Nava, V., Chandra, S., Aherne, J., Alfonso, M. B., Antao-Geraldes, A. M., Attermeyer, K., . . . Leoni, B. (2023). Plastic debris in lakes and reservoirs. Nature, 619(7969), 317-322
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Plastic debris in lakes and reservoirs
Show others...
2023 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 619, no 7969, p. 317-322Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plastic debris is thought to be widespread in freshwater ecosystems globally(1). However, a lack of comprehensive and comparable data makes rigorous assessment of its distribution challenging(2,3). Here we present a standardized cross-national survey that assesses the abundance and type of plastic debris (>250 mu m) in freshwater ecosystems. We sample surface waters of 38 lakes and reservoirs, distributed across gradients of geographical position and limnological attributes, with the aim to identify factors associated with an increased observation of plastics. We find plastic debris in all studied lakes and reservoirs, suggesting that these ecosystems play a key role in the plastic-pollution cycle. Our results indicate that two types of lakes are particularly vulnerable to plastic contamination: lakes and reservoirs in densely populated and urbanized areas and large lakes and reservoirs with elevated deposition areas, long water-retention times and high levels of anthropogenic influence. Plastic concentrations vary widely among lakes; in the most polluted, concentrations reach or even exceed those reported in the subtropical oceanic gyres, marine areas collecting large amounts of debris(4). Our findings highlight the importance of including lakes and reservoirs when addressing plastic pollution, in the context of pollution management and for the continued provision of lake ecosystem services.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510354 (URN)10.1038/s41586-023-06168-4 (DOI)001032441500020 ()37438590 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 965367Australian Research Council, DP190101848Swedish Research Council, 2020-03222Swedish Research Council Formas, 2020-01091
Available from: 2023-08-28 Created: 2023-08-28 Last updated: 2023-08-28Bibliographically approved
Projects
Regional differences in the quality of DOC in boreal lakes: drivers and consequences for the global carbon cycle [2009-02711_VR]; Uppsala UniversityIntegrating differences in the functioning of lakes in the global carbon cycle for improved estimates of the terrestrial carbon sink [2016-04153_VR]; Uppsala UniversityRapid ice quality changes in the Northern Hemisphere and consequences for the achievement of several global sustainable development goals [2020-03222_VR]; Uppsala University; Publications
Lewis, A. S. L., Lau, M. P., Jane, S. F., Rose, K. C., Be'eri-Shlevin, Y., Burnet, S. H., . . . Carey, C. C. (2024). Anoxia begets anoxia: A positive feedback to the deoxygenation of temperate lakes. Global Change Biology, 30(1), Article ID e17046. Weyhenmeyer, G. A., Chukwuka, A. V., Anneville, O., Brookes, J., Carvalho, C. R., Cotner, J. B., . . . Zhou, Y. (2024). Global Lake Health in the Anthropocene: Societal Implications and Treatment Strategies. Earth's Future, 12(4), Article ID e2023EF004387. Richardson, D. C., Filazzola, A., Woolway, R. I., Imrit, M. A., Bouffard, D., Weyhenmeyer, G. A., . . . Sharma, S. (2024). Nonlinear responses in interannual variability of lake ice to climate change. Limnology and Oceanography, 69(4), 789-801
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4013-2281

Search in DiVA

Show all publications