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BETA
Weyhenmeyer, Gesa A.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4013-2281
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 150) Show all publications
Block, B. D., Denfeld, B. A., Stockwell, J. D., Flaim, G., Grossart, H.-P. F., Knoll, L. B., . . . Hampton, S. E. (2019). The unique methodological challenges of winter limnology. Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, 17(1), 42-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The unique methodological challenges of winter limnology
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2019 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography: Methods, ISSN 1541-5856, E-ISSN 1541-5856, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 42-57Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Winter is an important season for many limnological processes, which can range from biogeochemical transformations to ecological interactions. Interest in the structure and function of lake ecosystems under ice is on the rise. Although limnologists working at polar latitudes have a long history of winter work, the required knowledge to successfully sample under winter conditions is not widely available and relatively few limnologists receive formal training. In particular, the deployment and operation of equipment in below 0 degrees C temperatures pose considerable logistical and methodological challenges, as do the safety risks of sampling during the ice-covered period. Here, we consolidate information on winter lake sampling and describe effective methods to measure physical, chemical, and biological variables in and under ice. We describe variation in snow and ice conditions and discuss implications for sampling logistics and safety. We outline commonly encountered methodological challenges and make recommendations for best practices to maximize safety and efficiency when sampling through ice or deploying instruments in ice-covered lakes. Application of such practices over a broad range of ice-covered lakes will contribute to a better understanding of the factors that regulate lakes during winter and how winter conditions affect the subsequent ice-free period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-376312 (URN)10.1002/lom3.10295 (DOI)000455533500004 ()
Available from: 2019-02-05 Created: 2019-02-05 Last updated: 2019-02-05Bibliographically approved
Engel, F., Farrell, K. J., McCullough, I. M., Scordo, F., Denfeld, B. A., Dugan, H. A., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). A lake classification concept for a more accurate global estimate of the dissolved inorganic carbon export from terrestrial ecosystems to inland waters. The Science of Nature: Naturwissenschaften, 105(3), Article ID 25.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A lake classification concept for a more accurate global estimate of the dissolved inorganic carbon export from terrestrial ecosystems to inland waters
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2018 (English)In: The Science of Nature: Naturwissenschaften, ISSN 0028-1042, E-ISSN 1432-1904, Vol. 105, no 3, article id 25Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The magnitude of lateral dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) export from terrestrial ecosystems to inland waters strongly influences the estimate of the global terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) sink. At present, no reliable number of this export is available, and the few studies estimating the lateral DIC export assume that all lakes on Earth function similarly. However, lakes can function along a continuum from passive carbon transporters (passive open channels) to highly active carbon transformers with efficient in-lake CO2 production and loss. We developed and applied a conceptual model to demonstrate how the assumed function of lakes in carbon cycling can affect calculations of the global lateral DIC export from terrestrial ecosystems to inland waters. Using global data on in-lake CO2 production by mineralization as well as CO2 loss by emission, primary production, and carbonate precipitation in lakes, we estimated that the global lateral DIC export can lie within the range of 0.70(-0.31)(+0.27) 1.52(-0.90)(+1.09) Pg C yr(-1) depending on the assumed function of lakes. Thus, the considered lake function has a large effect on the calculated lateral DIC export from terrestrial ecosystems to inland waters. We conclude that more robust estimates of CO2 sinks and sources will require the classification of lakes into their predominant function. This functional lake classification concept becomes particularly important for the estimation of future CO2 sinks and sources, since in-lake carbon transformation is predicted to be altered with climate change.

Keywords
Global carbon cycle, Lake functioning, Hydrologic CO2 transport, Lake carbon cycling, Earth system models, Lake primary production
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347136 (URN)10.1007/s00114-018-1547-z (DOI)000431443400005 ()29582138 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04153EU, Horizon 2020, 643052Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-03-26 Created: 2018-03-26 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
Riise, G., Müller, R. A., Haaland, S. & Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). Acid rain — a strong external driver that has suppressed water colour variability between lakes. Boreal environment research, 23(February), 69-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acid rain — a strong external driver that has suppressed water colour variability between lakes
2018 (English)In: Boreal environment research, ISSN 1239-6095, E-ISSN 1797-2469, Vol. 23, no February, p. 69-81Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing water colour observed in lakes in the northern hemisphere is frequently explained by several factors, including the decrease in acid deposition, climate change and recently increased concentrations of Fe. As the anthropogenic sulphate deposition levels off, pressure from an external lake quality driver with regional coverage declines. To inves- tigate the impact of acid rain reduction on lake colour variability, we examined 25 lakes in a lake- district of southeastern Norway by analyzing atmospheric deposition, climate and water chemistry data from 1983 to 2012. We observed a marked shift in lake colour after the wet year 2000, probably triggered by a flush of water that has lifted the base line for lake colour to a higher level. Lakes had synchronous temporal trends of many water quality vari- ables, such as conductivity and several major ions. Our data suggest that this is a response to reduced acid deposition. In contrast, lake colour and colour related variables such as Fe and TOC, showed moderate to low coherence. We propose that declined pressure from a strong external driver promotes the importance of climate variability and local catchment specific processes, giving rise to increased colour variability between lakes with time. Introduction

National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369276 (URN)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Wallin, M., Campeau, A., Audet, J., Bastviken, D., Bishop, K., Kokic, J., . . . Grabs, T. J. (2018). Carbon dioxide and methane emissions of Swedish low-order streams: a national estimate and lessons learnt from more than a decade of observations. Limnology and Oceanography: Letters, 3(3), 156-167
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbon dioxide and methane emissions of Swedish low-order streams: a national estimate and lessons learnt from more than a decade of observations
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2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography: Letters, ISSN 2378-2242, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 156-167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Low‐order streams are suggested to dominate the atmospheric CO2 source of all inland waters. Yet, many large‐scale stream estimates suffer from methods not designed for gas emission determination and rarely include other greenhouse gases such as CH4. Here, we present a compilation of directly measured CO2 and CH4 concentration data from Swedish low‐order streams (> 1600 observations across > 500 streams) covering large climatological and land‐use gradients. These data were combined with an empirically derived gas transfer model and the characteristics of a ca. 400,000 km stream network covering the entire country. The total stream CO2 and CH4 emission corresponded to 2.7 Tg C yr−1 (95% confidence interval: 2.0–3.7) of which the CH4 accounted for 0.7% (0.02 Tg C yr−1). The study highlights the importance of low‐order streams, as well as the critical need to better represent variability in emissions and stream areal extent to constrain future stream C emission estimates.

National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357196 (URN)10.1002/lol2.10061 (DOI)000456696200012 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, KAW 2013.0091Swedish Research Council Formas, 214-2009-872; 2015-1559Swedish Research Council, 2012-00048; 201604829Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, SKBEU, European Research Council, 725546Swedish Environmental Protection AgencySwedish Agency for Marine and Water ManagementSwedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
Hastie, A., Lauerwald, R., Weyhenmeyer, G. A., Sobek, S., Verpoorter, C. & Regnier, P. (2018). CO2 evasion from boreal lakes: Revised estimate, drivers of spatial variability, and future projections. Global Change Biology, 24(2), 711-728
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CO2 evasion from boreal lakes: Revised estimate, drivers of spatial variability, and future projections
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 711-728Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lakes (including reservoirs) are an important component of the global carbon (C) cycle, as acknowledged by the 5th assessment report of the IPCC. In the context of lakes, the boreal region is disproportionately important contributing to 27% of the worldwide lake area, despite representing just 14% of global land surface area. In this study, we used a statistical approach to derive a prediction equation for the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in lakes as a function of lake area, terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) and precipitation (r2 = 0.56), and to create the first high resolution, circumboreal map (0.5) of lake pCO2. The map of pCO2 was combined with lake area from the recently published GLOWABO database and three different estimates of the gas transfer velocity k to produce a resulting map of CO2 evasion (FCO2). For the boreal region we estimate an average, lake area weighted,pCO2 of 966 (678- 1325) μatm and a total FCO2 of 189 (74-347) Tg C yr−1, and evaluate the corresponding uncertainties based on Monte Carlo simulation. Our estimate of FCO2 is approximately twofold greater than previous estimates, as a result of methodological and data source differences. We use our results along with published estimates of the other C fluxes through inland waters to derive a C budget for the boreal region, and find that FCO2 from lakes is the most significant flux of the land-ocean aquatic continuum, and of a similar magnitude as emissions from forest fires. Using the model and applying it to spatially resolved projections of terrestrial NPP and precipitation while keeping everything else constant, we predict a 107% increase in boreal lake FCO2 under emission scenario RCP8.5 by 2100. Our projections are largely driven by increases in terrestrial NPP over the same period, showing the very close connection between the terrestrial and aquatic C cycle.

Keywords
Boreal, CO2, Carbon budget, Climate change, Future projections, Lake, Precipitation, Terrestrial NPP
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335068 (URN)10.1111/gcb.13902 (DOI)000423994700043 ()28892578 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 643052, 703813Swedish Research Council, 2016-04153Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 336642
Available from: 2017-11-30 Created: 2017-11-30 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved
Nydahl, A., Wallin, M., Tranvik, L., Hiller, C., Attermeyer, K., Garrison, J., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). Colored organic matter increases CO2 in meso-eutrophic lake water through altered light climate and acidity. Limnology and Oceanography
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Colored organic matter increases CO2 in meso-eutrophic lake water through altered light climate and acidity
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2018 (English)In: Limnology and Oceanography, ISSN 0024-3590, E-ISSN 1939-5590Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many surface waters across the boreal region are browning due to increased concentrations of colored allochthonous dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Browning may stimulate heterotrophic metabolism, may have a shading effect constraining primary production, and may acidify the water leading to decreased pH with a subsequent shift in the carbonate system. All these effects are expected to result in increased lake water carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. We tested here these expectations by assessing the effects of both altered allochthonous DOC input and light conditions through shading on lake water CO2 concentrations. We used two mesocosm experiments with water from the meso‐eutrophic Lake Erken, Sweden, to determine the relative importance of bacterial activities, primary production, and shifts in the carbonate system on CO2 concentrations. We found that DOC addition and shading resulted in a significant increase in partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in all mesocosms. Surprisingly, there was no relationship between bacterial activities and pCO2. Instead the experimental reduction of light by DOC and/or shading decreased the photosynthesis to respiration ratio leading to increased pCO2. Another driving force behind the observed pCO2 increase was a significant decrease in pH, caused by a decline in photosynthesis and the input of acidic DOC. Considering that colored allochthonous DOC may increase in a warmer and wetter climate, our results could also apply for whole lake ecosystems and pCO2 may increase in many lakes through a reduction in the rate of photosynthesis and decreased pH.

National Category
Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366220 (URN)10.1002/lno.11072 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-11-18 Created: 2018-11-18 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Creed, I. F., Bergström, A.-K., Trick, C. G., Grimm, N. B., Hessen, D. O., Karlsson, J., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes. Global Change Biology, 24(8), 3692-3714
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global change-driven effects on dissolved organic matter composition: Implications for food webs of northern lakes
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2018 (English)In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 24, no 8, p. 3692-3714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract Northern ecosystems are experiencing some of the most dramatic impacts of global change on Earth. Rising temperatures, hydrological intensification, changes in atmospheric acid deposition and associated acidification recovery, and changes in vegetative cover are resulting in fundamental changes in terrestrial?aquatic biogeochemical linkages. The effects of global change are readily observed in alterations in the supply of dissolved organic matter (DOM)?the messenger between terrestrial and lake ecosystems?with potentially profound effects on the structure and function of lakes. Northern terrestrial ecosystems contain substantial stores of organic matter and filter or funnel DOM, affecting the timing and magnitude of DOM delivery to surface waters. This terrestrial DOM is processed in streams, rivers, and lakes, ultimately shifting its composition, stoichiometry, and bioavailability. Here, we explore the potential consequences of these global change-driven effects for lake food webs at northern latitudes. Notably, we provide evidence that increased allochthonous DOM supply to lakes is overwhelming increased autochthonous DOM supply that potentially results from earlier ice-out and a longer growing season. Furthermore, we assess the potential implications of this shift for the nutritional quality of autotrophs in terms of their stoichiometry, fatty acid composition, toxin production, and methylmercury concentration, and therefore, contaminant transfer through the food web. We conclude that global change in northern regions leads not only to reduced primary productivity but also to nutritionally poorer lake food webs, with discernible consequences for the trophic web to fish and humans.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd (10.1111), 2018
Keywords
atmospheric change, cyanobacteria, dissolved organic matter, food webs, lake, mercury, northern
National Category
Environmental Sciences Oceanography, Hydrology and Water Resources
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369340 (URN)10.1111/gcb.14129 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Woolway, R., Carrea, L., Merchant, C., Dokulil, M., de Eyto, E., DeGasperi, C., . . . Weyhenmeyer, G. A. (2018). Lake surface temperature [in “State of the Climate in 2017”]. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 99(8), S13-15
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lake surface temperature [in “State of the Climate in 2017”]
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2018 (English)In: Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Vol. 99, no 8, p. S13-15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369352 (URN)10.1175/2018BAMSStateoftheClimate.1 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2018-12-13Bibliographically approved
Mantzouki, E., Beklioǧlu, M., Brookes, J. D., de Senerpont Domis, L. N., Dugan, H. A., Doubek, J. P., . . . Ibelings, B. W. (2018). Snapshot Surveys for Lake Monitoring, More Than a Shot in the Dark. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 6, Article ID 201.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Snapshot Surveys for Lake Monitoring, More Than a Shot in the Dark
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 6, article id 201Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Keywords
multi-lake snapshot surveys, lake monitoring, Nyquist-shannon sampling theorem, space-for-time substitution, phytoplankton ecology
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369280 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2018.00201 (DOI)000451950100002 ()
Available from: 2018-12-12 Created: 2018-12-12 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Frassl, M. A., Hamilton, D. P., Denfeld, B. A., de Eyto, E., Hampton, S. E., Keller, P. S., . . . Catalán, N. (2018). Ten simple rules for collaboratively writing a multi-authored paper. PloS Computational Biology, 14(11), Article ID e1006508.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ten simple rules for collaboratively writing a multi-authored paper
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2018 (English)In: PloS Computational Biology, ISSN 1553-734X, E-ISSN 1553-7358, Vol. 14, no 11, article id e1006508Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Science is increasingly done in large teams, making it more likely that papers will be written by several authors from different institutes, disciplines, and cultural backgrounds. A small number of “Ten simple rules” papers have been written on collaboration and on writing but not on combining the two. Collaborative writing with multiple authors has additional challenges, including varied levels of engagement of coauthors, provision of fair credit through authorship or acknowledgements, acceptance of a diversity of work styles, and the need for clear communication. Miscommunication, a lack of leadership, and inappropriate tools or writing approaches can lead to frustration, delay of publication, or even the termination of a project.

To provide insight into collaborative writing, we use our experience from the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) to frame 10 simple rules for collaboratively writing a multi-authored paper. We consider a collaborative multi-authored paper to have three or more people from at least two different institutions. A multi-authored paper can be a result of a single discrete research project or the outcome of a larger research program that includes other papers based on common data or methods. The writing of a multi-authored paper is embedded within a broader context of planning and collaboration among team members. Our recommended rules include elements of both the planning and writing of a paper, and they can be iterative, although we have listed them in numerical order. It will help to revisit the rules frequently throughout the writing process. With the 10 rules outlined below, we aim to provide a foundation for writing multi-authored papers and conducting exciting and influential science.

Keywords
collaboration, multi-authored paper, co-authorship
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367047 (URN)10.1371/journal.pcbi.1006508 (DOI)30439938 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2016-04153German Research Foundation (DFG), SP 1570/1-1
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-12-11Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4013-2281

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