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Thulin, Mats
Publications (10 of 60) Show all publications
Thulin, M., Decarlo, A. & Johnson, S. P. (2019). Boswellia occulta (Burseraceae), a new species of frankincense tree from Somalia (Somaliland). Phytotaxa, 394(3), 219-224
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Boswellia occulta (Burseraceae), a new species of frankincense tree from Somalia (Somaliland)
2019 (English)In: Phytotaxa, ISSN 1179-3155, E-ISSN 1179-3163, Vol. 394, no 3, p. 219-224Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The new species Boswellia occulta is described from a small area in the Ceel Afweyn District of Somaliland (northwestern Somalia), where it is locally of considerable socio-economic importance. Although used for frankincense production by many generations of local harvesters, it has been unknown to science until now. Apart from the recently collected type material, it is also known from a sterile and hitherto misunderstood collection made in 1945. The simple-leaved Boswellia occulta is morphologically compared with B. sacra and B. frereana, the two major frankincense-producing species in the region, both with imparipinnate leaves, and it appears to be most closely related to B. sacra. The new species is the only simple-leaved species of Boswellia known outside Socotra.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MAGNOLIA PRESS, 2019
Keywords
Boswellia, frankincense, taxonomy, Somaliland, Eudicots
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379568 (URN)10.11646/phytotaxa.394.3.3 (DOI)000460040300003 ()
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Thulin, M. & Harley, R. M. (2019). Mollugo viscosa sp. nov. (Molluginaceae), a segregate of M. brasiliensis from Minas Gerais in eastern Brazil. Nordic Journal of Botany, 37(7), Article ID e02417.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mollugo viscosa sp. nov. (Molluginaceae), a segregate of M. brasiliensis from Minas Gerais in eastern Brazil
2019 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 37, no 7, article id e02417Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The new species Mollugo viscosa Thulin & Harley is described from Minas Gerais in eastern Brazil. It was previously part of the recently published M. brasiliensis Thulin & Harley, a species that was found to be non-monophyletic in molecular phylogenetic analyses. Mollugo brasiliensis is here divided into a northern species (M. brasiliensis s.str.) in Bahia and a southern species (M. viscosa sp. nov.) in Minas Gerais. The new species differs from M. brasiliensis in its denser and more viscous indumentum, and in its distinctly smaller seeds with smaller tubercles and a smaller hilar peg, and from its sister species M. ulei by being a perennial herb with bisexual flowers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
Brazil, Molluginaceae, Mollugo, seed morphology, taxonomy
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391955 (URN)10.1111/njb.02417 (DOI)000476948100002 ()
Available from: 2019-08-27 Created: 2019-08-27 Last updated: 2019-08-27Bibliographically approved
Sheikh, S., Thulin, M., Cavender, J. C., Escalante, R., Kawakami, S., Lado, C., . . . Baldauf, S. L. (2018). A New Classification of the Dictyostelids. Protist, 169(1), 1-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A New Classification of the Dictyostelids
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2018 (English)In: Protist, ISSN 1434-4610, E-ISSN 1618-0941, Vol. 169, no 1, p. 1-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Traditional morphology-based taxonomy of dictyostelids is rejected by molecular phylogeny. A new classification is presented based on monophyletic entities with consistent and strong molecular phylogenetic support and that are, as far as possible, morphologically recognizable. All newly named clades are diagnosed with small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) sequence signatures plus morphological synapomorphies where possible. The two major molecular clades are given the rank of order, as Acytosteliales ord. nov. and Dictyosteliales. The two major clades within each of these orders are recognized and given the rank of family as, respectively, Acytosteliaceae and Cavenderiaceae fam. nov. in Acytosteliales, and Dictyosteliaceae and Raperosteliaceae fam. nov. in Dictyosteliales. Twelve genera are recognized: Cavenderia gen. nov. in Cavenderiaceae, Acytostelium, Rostrostelium gen. nov. and Heterostelium gen. nov. in Acytosteliaceae, Tieghemostelium gen. nov., Hagiwaraea gen. nov., Raperostelium gen. nov. and Speleostelium gen. nov. in Raperosteliaceae, and Dictyostelium and Polysphondylium in Dictyosteliaceae. The “polycephalum” complex is treated as Coremiostelium gen. nov. (not assigned to family) and the “polycarpum” complex as Synstelium gen. nov. (not assigned to order and family). Coenonia, which may not be a dictyostelid, is treated as a genus incertae sedis. Eighty-eight new combinations are made at species and variety level, and Dictyostelium ammophilum is validated.

Keywords
Classification, dictyostelids, molecular characters, nomenclature, phylogeny, taxonomy
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320430 (URN)10.1016/j.protis.2017.11.001 (DOI)000427418800002 ()29367151 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2019-08-28Bibliographically approved
Thulin, M., Heidari, N. & Larsson, A. (2018). Cucumis omissus sp nov (Cucurbitaceae) from southern Arabia and Ethiopia and its phylogenetic position. Nordic Journal of Botany, 36(10), Article ID UNSP e02056.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cucumis omissus sp nov (Cucurbitaceae) from southern Arabia and Ethiopia and its phylogenetic position
2018 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 36, no 10, article id UNSP e02056Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The new species Cucumis omissus Thulin from Yemen, Oman and Ethiopia is described and illustrated. According to phylogenetic analyses based mainly on nuclear ribosomal ITS sequences and chloroplast trnG sequences, the new species is sister to C. hastatus from Somalia and Ethiopia. A map showing the distributions of both C. omissus and C. hastatus is provided and morphological differences between these two species are highlighted. Cucumis omissus has been confused with C. pustulatus and C. prophetarum in the literature and in herbaria, and morphological differences from these two species are provided as well. Oreosyce africana is nested within Cucumis in this, as well as in several previous studies. We clarify that when O. africana is treated as a Cucumis, its correct name is C. subsericeus.

Keywords
Cucumis, Cucurbitaceae, Ethiopia, molecular phylogenetics, Oman, Oreosyce, Yemen
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371060 (URN)10.1111/njb.02056 (DOI)000450267400015 ()
Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Thulin, M. (2018). En ny lokal för gotlandsranunkel upptäckt i Ardre. Rindi: tidskrift för gotländsk botanik, 38(2), 47-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>En ny lokal för gotlandsranunkel upptäckt i Ardre
2018 (Swedish)In: Rindi: tidskrift för gotländsk botanik, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 47-49Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-371984 (URN)
Note

Framöver kommer äldre utgåvor av Rindi komma att bli tillgängliga i PDF-format på http://gotlandsflora.se/rindi/.

Available from: 2019-01-04 Created: 2019-01-04 Last updated: 2019-05-21Bibliographically approved
Thulin, M., Larsson, A., Edwards, E. J. & Moore, A. J. (2018). Phylogeny and Systematics of Kewa (Kewaceae). Systematic Botany, 43(3), 689-700
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogeny and Systematics of Kewa (Kewaceae)
2018 (English)In: Systematic Botany, ISSN 0363-6445, E-ISSN 1548-2324, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 689-700Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The genus Kewa in the monogeneric family Kewaceae (Caryophyllales) is revised. Six species are recognized, K. acida on St. Helena, K. angrae-pequenae in Namibia and South Africa, K. arenicola (incl. K. trachysperma) in South Africa, K. bowkeriana (incl. K. suffruticosa) widespread in eastern and southern Africa and in Madagascar, K. caespitosa in Angola and Namibia, and K. salsoloides in Namibia, Botswana, and South Africa. Kewa is morphologically distinctive, notably by its simple perianth where the two outer perianth-segments are more or less sepaloid and the three inner ones more or less petaloid, and by its indumentum of short glandular hairs, often with prominent, persistent, wart-like bases. All species have an acid taste, apparently due to the presence of oxalic acid. All names are typified, including one lectotype designated here. An identification key and distribution maps for all species are provided. The phylogeny of Kewa is reconstructed based on plastid trnK-matK and rbcL and nuclear ITS sequences. Kewa is strongly supported and the included species have strong to no support, whereas the relationships between the species are mostly unsupported. The phylogeny is dated and the estimated age of the Kewa stem clade is (37.5-)45.0(-57.0) million years and of the crown lade (3.0-)3.9(-7.4) million years. The age of the crown lade would also be the estimated date when K. acida on the approximately 14 million years old St. Helena diverged from its potential sister group on the African continent, and would coincide with the earliest possible date for the introduction of the ancestor of K. acida to St. Helena.

Keywords
Caryophyllales, Hypertelis, molecular dating, St. Helena, taxonomy, typification
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364057 (URN)10.1600/036364418X697409 (DOI)000441869800005 ()
Available from: 2018-12-07 Created: 2018-12-07 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Kool, A. & Thulin, M. (2017). A giant spurrey on a tiny island: On the phylogenetic position of Sanctambrosia manicata (Caryophyllaceae) and the generic circumscriptions of Spergula, Spergularia and Rhodalsine. Taxon, 66(3), 615-622
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A giant spurrey on a tiny island: On the phylogenetic position of Sanctambrosia manicata (Caryophyllaceae) and the generic circumscriptions of Spergula, Spergularia and Rhodalsine
2017 (English)In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 615-622Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The only member of the generally herbaceous family Caryophyllaceae that may grow to a small tree is Sanctambrosia manicata, endemic to remote San Ambrosio Island, off the coast of Chile. The monospecific Sanctambrosia has been suggested to be closely related to Spergula and Spergularia (spurreys) on the basis of morphology, despite its treelike habit and gynodioecy. A plastid DNA dataset (ndhF, rps16, trnL-F) is used to investigate the relationships of Sanctambrosia and other members of Sperguleae. Sanctambrosia manicata is shown to be nested in a clade of New World and Australian Spergularia and the new combination Spergularia manicata is proposed. The volcanic San Ambrosio has been estimated to be almost three million years old, and S. manicata presumably evolved its treelike habit and gynodioecy over a short period of time. Spergula and Spergularia are monophyletic and recognizable by their number of carpels, five in Spergula and three in Spergularia. Spergularia fallax, which resembles Spergula in leaf characters, is shown to be sister to all other species of Spergularia. Minuartia subg. Rhodalsine belongs in Sperguleae and is sister to Spergula and Spergularia together, which supports the recent resurrection of Rhodalsine at the generic level.

Keywords
Desventuradas Islands, molecular phylogenetics, RAxML, Rhodalsine, Sanctambrosia, Spergula, Spergularia
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332207 (URN)10.12705/663.6 (DOI)000405738400006 ()
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation
Available from: 2017-10-26 Created: 2017-10-26 Last updated: 2017-10-30Bibliographically approved
Kool, A. & Thulin, M. (2017). A plant that Linnaeus forgot: taxonomic revision of Rhodalsine (Caryophyllaceae). Willdenowia, 47(3), 317-323
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A plant that Linnaeus forgot: taxonomic revision of Rhodalsine (Caryophyllaceae)
2017 (English)In: Willdenowia, ISSN 0511-9618, E-ISSN 1868-6397, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mainly Mediterranean genus Rhodalsine (Caryophyllaceae) is revised and a single species, R. geniculata, is recognized, distributed from the Canary Islands in the west to Somalia in the east. The history of the taxon, which was known already during the 17th century but entirely overlooked by Linnaeus, is outlined. Variation and taxonomy are discussed and illustrations and a distribution map are provided. Many names are placed in synonymy and most of the names are typified, including six lectotypes designated here.

National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336915 (URN)10.3372/wi.47.47313 (DOI)000416010500012 ()
Funder
Carl Tryggers foundation
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-02Bibliographically approved
Thulin, M. & Razafimandimbison, S. (2017). Bourreria scabra (Boraginaceae), a new species from southern Madagascar. Candollea, 72(2), 345-350
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bourreria scabra (Boraginaceae), a new species from southern Madagascar
2017 (English)In: Candollea, ISSN 0373-2967, E-ISSN 2235-3658, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 345-350Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bourreria scabra Thulin & Razafim. (Boraginaceae), a new species from southern Madagascar, is described and illustrated. The plant was previously sometimes treated as conspecific with Bourreria lyciacea Thulin [≡ Hilsenbergia lyciacea (Thulin) J.S. Mill.] in Somalia and Kenya. However, Bourreria scabra differs markedly from Bourreria lyciacea by its smaller corolla, finely pubescent outside and with shorter lobes, by its practically unbranched style, by its smaller fruits more or less enclosed by the calyx, and by its smaller pyrenes with several low ridges forming an irregular reticulation on the outside. Bourreria scabra differs from all other species of Bourreria P. Browne in Madagascar by the very rough upper surface of the leaves. The species is widespread in spiny dry forests in southern Madagascar, with occurrences in the Andohahela and Tsimanampetsotsa National Parks and the Beza Mahafaly Reserve. The new species is assigned the category of “Near Threatened” using the IUCN Red List Criteria.

National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336910 (URN)10.15553/c2017v722a12 (DOI)000417607800012 ()
Available from: 2017-12-18 Created: 2017-12-18 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
Ollerton, J., Dötterl, S., Ghorpadé, K., Heiduk, A., Liede-Schumann, S., Masinde, S., . . . Whittington, A. (2017). Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: An update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses. Flora: Morphologie, Geobotanik, Oekophysiologie, 234, 233-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diversity of Diptera families that pollinate Ceropegia (Apocynaceae) trap flowers: An update in light of new data and phylogenetic analyses
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2017 (English)In: Flora: Morphologie, Geobotanik, Oekophysiologie, ISSN 0367-2530, E-ISSN 1618-0585, Vol. 234, p. 233-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pollination by flies (Diptera) has been important to the diversification and ecology of the flowering plants, but is poorly understood in contrast to pollination by other groups such as bees, butterflies and birds. Within the Apocynaceae the genera Ceropegia and Riocreuxia temporarily trap flies, releasing them after a fixed, species-specific period of time, during which pollination and/or pollen removal occurs. This "trap flower" pollination system shows convergent evolution with unrelated species in other families and fascinated Stefan Vogel for much of his career, leading to ground-breaking work on floral function in Ceropegia (Apocynaceae). In this new study we extend the work of the latest broad analysis published by some of the authors (Ollerton et al., 2009 − Annals of Botany). This incorporates previously unpublished data from India and Africa, as well as recently published information, on the diversity of pollinators exploited by Ceropegia. The analyses are based on a more accurate phylogenetic understanding of the relationships between the major groups, and significantly widens the biogeographic scope of our understanding of fly pollination within Ceropegia. Information about the pollinators of 69 taxa (species, subspecies and natural varieties) of Ceropegia is now available. Twenty five families of Diptera are known to visit the flowers of Ceropegia, of which sixteen are confirmed as pollinators. Most taxa are pollinated by species from a single family. Overall, there were no major biogeographic differences in the types of Diptera that were used in particular regions, though some subtle differences were apparent. Likewise there were no differences between the two major clades of Ceropegia, but clear differences when comparing the range of Diptera exploited by Ceropegia with that of the stapeliads. This clade, one of the largest in the Asclepiadoideae, is a fascinating example of a species radiation driven by an apparently relatively uniform set of pollinators.

National Category
Biological Systematics
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341335 (URN)10.1016/j.flora.2017.07.013 (DOI)000416738300025 ()
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-03-07Bibliographically approved
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