uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eeg-Olofsson, Orvar
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Lourenço Dos Santos, S., Baraibar, M. A., Lundberg, S., Eeg-Olofsson, O., Larsson, L. & Friguet, B. (2015). Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing. Redox Biology, 5, 267-274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oxidative proteome alterations during skeletal muscle ageing
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Redox Biology, ISSN 0090-7324, E-ISSN 2213-2317, Vol. 5, p. 267-274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sarcopenia corresponds to the degenerative loss of skeletal muscle mass, quality, and strength associated with ageing and leads to a progressive impairment of mobility and quality of life. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in this process are not completely understood. A hallmark of cellular and tissular ageing is the accumulation of oxidatively modified (carbonylated) proteins, leading to a decreased quality of the cellular proteome that could directly impact on normal cellular functions. Although increased oxidative stress has been reported during skeletal muscle ageing, the oxidized protein targets, also referred as to the 'oxi-proteome' or 'carbonylome', have not been characterized yet. To better understand the mechanisms by which these damaged proteins build up and potentially affect muscle function, proteins targeted by these modifications have been identified in human rectus abdominis muscle obtained from young and old healthy donors using a bi-dimensional gel electrophoresis-based proteomic approach coupled with immunodetection of carbonylated proteins. Among evidenced protein spots, 17 were found as increased carbonylated in biopsies from old donors comparing to young counterparts. These proteins are involved in key cellular functions such as cellular morphology and transport, muscle contraction and energy metabolism. Importantly, impairment of these pathways has been described in skeletal muscle during ageing. Functional decline of these proteins due to irreversible oxidation may therefore impact directly on the above-mentioned pathways, hence contributing to the generation of the sarcopenic phenotype.

National Category
Medical Biotechnology (with a focus on Cell Biology (including Stem Cell Biology), Molecular Biology, Microbiology, Biochemistry or Biopharmacy)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269644 (URN)10.1016/j.redox.2015.05.006 (DOI)000367336900026 ()26073261 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 223576
Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-12-17 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Eeg-Olofsson, O. (2014). 10-Year Outcome of Childhood Epilepsy in Well-Functioning Children and Adolescents - Social and Psychological Factors. Paper presented at 11th European Congress on Epileptology, JUN 29-JUL 03, 2014, Stockholm, SWEDEN. Epilepsia, 55, 239-239
Open this publication in new window or tab >>10-Year Outcome of Childhood Epilepsy in Well-Functioning Children and Adolescents - Social and Psychological Factors
2014 (English)In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 55, p. 239-239Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology Clinical Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-229374 (URN)000337979300722 ()
Conference
11th European Congress on Epileptology, JUN 29-JUL 03, 2014, Stockholm, SWEDEN
Available from: 2014-08-06 Created: 2014-08-06 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, P., Jonsson, B. & Eeg-Olofsson, O. (2014). Psychological and social outcome of epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents. A 10-year follow-up study. European journal of paediatric neurology, 18(3), 381-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychological and social outcome of epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents. A 10-year follow-up study
2014 (English)In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 381-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: From a population based study of epilepsy in Swedish children a subgroup designated well-functioning with an epilepsy diagnosis in 1997 was worked up from a medical point of view 10 years later. Aim: To describe the psychological and social outcome in this subgroup. Methods: Thirty-one patients aged 11-22 years and their parents/partners responded to a questionnaire according to Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) to evaluate behavioural and emotional problems, and social competence. Results: Active epilepsy, diagnosed in 32%, was related to attention problems, somatic complaints, and school problems. Polytherapy, used in 16%, was related to attention problems and aggressive behaviour. School problems were found in six of seven children younger than 18 years. Internalizing, externalizing, and 'other' syndromes were found in 29% of the individuals, but a grouping of these syndromes in the clinical range only in two (6.5%), a girl with generalized tonic clonic seizures alone, and a boy with structural focal epilepsy. Both had active epilepsy and were treated with polytherapy. All ten individuals with Rolandic epilepsy were classified as normal. The answers to the ASEBA questionnaire of individuals and parents/partners were inconsistent, and parents generally stated more problems than the individuals. Summary.: This 10-year follow-up study of psychological and social outcome in well-functioning children and adolescents with childhood onset epilepsy shows some emotional, behavioural, and social problems. Thus, early information to increase knowledge about epilepsy and associated psychological co-morbidities in order to decrease risk of low self-esteem, social anxiety, and depression later in life is of importance.

Keywords
Childhood epilepsy, Adolescent epilepsy, Well-functioning individuals, Internalizing and externalizing problems, ASEBA
National Category
Pediatrics Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-228046 (URN)10.1016/j.ejpn.2014.01.010 (DOI)000336695500019 ()
Available from: 2014-07-07 Created: 2014-07-03 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Eeg-Olofsson, O. & Larsson, P. G. (2013). The way out of Babel [Letter to the editor]. Epilepsia, 54(4), 767-768
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The way out of Babel
2013 (English)In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 767-768Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-199594 (URN)10.1111/epi.12110 (DOI)000316965500029 ()
Available from: 2013-05-08 Created: 2013-05-08 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Larsson, P. G., Eeg-Olofsson, O. & Lantz, G. (2012). Alpha Frequency Estimation in Patients With Epilepsy. Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, 43(2), 97-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alpha Frequency Estimation in Patients With Epilepsy
2012 (English)In: Clinical EEG and Neuroscience, ISSN 1550-0594, E-ISSN 2169-5202, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report comparison and assessment of the clinical utility of different automated methods for the estimation of the alpha frequency in electroencephalograph (EEG) and compare them with visual evaluation. A total of 56 consecutive patients, aged 17 to 78 years, who had a routine EEG recording, were included, and they were grouped as patients with epilepsy (Ep) and without epilepsy (nEp). Five different methods were used for alpha frequency estimation: visually guided manual counting and visually guided Fourier transform, and 3 methods were fully automated: time domain estimation of alpha (automatic assessment of alpha waves in time domain [ATD]) and 2 fast Fourier transform (FFT)-based methods, a segmented (automatic assessment of EEG segments by FFT) and one full FFT (automatic assessment of whole EEG by one FFT of the full recording [AWF]). The AWF discriminated significantly between Ep and nEp. Visually guided manual counting showed an almost significant difference independently in the 2 occipital electrodes. The ATD underestimated high frequencies and returned a too low mean frequency. This study shows that AWF is the best suited method for automatic assessment of the alpha frequency.

Keywords
alpha rhythm, anticonvulsants, antiepileptic drugs, electroencephalography, epilepsy
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-178147 (URN)10.1177/1550059411433611 (DOI)000305836500002 ()
Available from: 2012-07-30 Created: 2012-07-30 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, P. & Eeg-Olofsson, O. (2011). 10-year outcome of childhood epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents. European journal of paediatric neurology, 15(4), 331-337
Open this publication in new window or tab >>10-year outcome of childhood epilepsy in well-functioning children and adolescents
2011 (English)In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 331-337Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND

A population based study of epilepsy in children from a Swedish county including all children aged 1 month to 16 years was reported in 2006.

AIM

To describe the medical outcome, seizure types, epilepsy syndromes, treatment, individual and family history in children from this study who were well-functioning in January 1997 and the outcome after 10 years.

METHODS

Forty-five individuals, 11-21 years, 19 females, and their parents responded to a questionnaire and the hospital records were reviewed.

RESULTS

At the end of the 10-year period 75.6% of the patients were in remission. Focal seizures and focal seizures with secondary generalization were found in 57.8%. Rolandic epilepsy had been diagnosed in 33.3%, other idiopathic focal epilepsies in 11.0%, cryptogenic and symptomatic focal epilepsies in 22.2%, childhood absence epilepsy in 8.9%, juvenile absence epilepsy and Jeavons syndrome in each 2.2%, West syndrome in 4.4%, and other "generalized" epilepsies in 15.5%. The patients had a history of simple febrile seizures in 15.6% and of primary headache in 24.4%. Monotherapy with antiepileptic drugs was used by 64.4%, and valproate was the most common first drug of choice. A family history of epilepsy was found in 44.4%, febrile seizures in 17.7%, and primary headache in 57.8%. A coincidence of focal and generalized epilepsy phenotypes was found in some families.

CONCLUSIONS

Longitudinal studies are of importance in epilepsy epidemiology. Our results reflect the selection of only well-functioning individuals with epilepsy from the population based original study.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-140138 (URN)10.1016/j.ejpn.2011.02.002 (DOI)000296670400009 ()21371918 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-01-04 Created: 2011-01-04 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Eeg-Olofsson, O. (2011). Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children With Benign Epilepsy and Their Siblings [Letter to the editor]. Pediatric Neurology, 45(3), 211-211
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children With Benign Epilepsy and Their Siblings
2011 (English)In: Pediatric Neurology, ISSN 0887-8994, E-ISSN 1873-5150, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 211-211Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-158471 (URN)10.1016/j.pediatrneurol.2011.06.003 (DOI)000294098900019 ()
Available from: 2011-09-09 Created: 2011-09-08 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Bakke, K. A., Larsson, P. G., Eriksson, A.-S. & Eeg-Olofsson, O. (2011). Levetiracetam reduces the frequency of interictal epileptiform discharges during NREM sleep in children with ADHD. European journal of paediatric neurology, 15(6), 532-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Levetiracetam reduces the frequency of interictal epileptiform discharges during NREM sleep in children with ADHD
2011 (English)In: European journal of paediatric neurology, ISSN 1090-3798, E-ISSN 1532-2130, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 532-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are more common in children with epilepsy than in the general paediatric population. Epileptiform discharges in EEG may be seen in children with ADHD also in those without seizure disorders. Sleep enhances these discharges which may be suppressed by levetiracetam.

AIM:

To assess the effect of levetiracetam on focal epileptiform discharges during sleep in children with ADHD.

METHOD:

In this retrospective study a new semi-automatic quantitative method based on the calculation of spike index in 24-h ambulatory EEG recordings was applied. Thirty-five ADHD children, 17 with focal epilepsy, one with generalised epilepsy, and 17 with no seizure disorder were evaluated. Follow-up 24-h EEG recordings were performed after a median time of four months.

RESULTS:

Mean spike index was 50 prior to levetiracetam treatment and 21 during treatment. Seventeen children had no focal interictal epileptiform discharges in EEG at follow-up. Five children had a more than 50% reduction in spike index. Thus, a more than 50% reduction in spike index was found in 22/35 children (63%). Out of these an improved behaviour was noticed in 13 children (59%).

CONCLUSION:

This study shows that treatment with levetiracetam reduces interictal epileptiform discharges in children with ADHD. There is a complex relationship between epilepsy, ADHD and epileptiform activity, why it is a need for prospective studies in larger sample sizes, also to ascertain clinical benefits.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-164806 (URN)10.1016/j.ejpn.2011.04.014 (DOI)000298128900010 ()21683631 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-12-27 Created: 2011-12-27 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Mefford, H. C., Yendle, S. C., Hsu, C., Cook, J., Geraghty, E., McMahon, J. M., . . . Scheffer, I. E. (2011). Rare copy number variants are an important cause of epileptic encephalopathies. Annals of Neurology, 70(6), 974-985
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rare copy number variants are an important cause of epileptic encephalopathies
Show others...
2011 (English)In: Annals of Neurology, ISSN 0364-5134, E-ISSN 1531-8249, Vol. 70, no 6, p. 974-985Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE:

Rare copy number variants (CNVs)-deletions and duplications-have recently been established as important risk factors for both generalized and focal epilepsies. A systematic assessment of the role of CNVs in epileptic encephalopathies, the most devastating and often etiologically obscure group of epilepsies, has not been performed.

METHODS:

We evaluated 315 patients with epileptic encephalopathies characterized by epilepsy and progressive cognitive impairment for rare CNVs using a high-density, exon-focused, whole-genome oligonucleotide array.

RESULTS:

We found that 25 of 315 (7.9%) of our patients carried rare CNVs that may contribute to their phenotype, with at least one-half being clearly or likely pathogenic. We identified 2 patients with overlapping deletions at 7q21 and 2 patients with identical duplications of 16p11.2. In our cohort, large deletions were enriched in affected individuals compared to controls, and 4 patients harbored 2 rare CNVs. We screened 2 novel candidate genes found within the rare CNVs in our cohort but found no mutations in our patients with epileptic encephalopathies. We highlight several additional novel candidate genes located in CNV regions.

INTERPRETATION:

Our data highlight the significance of rare CNVs in the epileptic encephalopathies, and we suggest that CNV analysis should be considered in the genetic evaluation of these patients. Our findings also highlight novel candidate genes for further study.

National Category
Neurology Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-166487 (URN)10.1002/ana.22645 (DOI)000298332300015 ()22190369 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-01-12 Created: 2012-01-12 Last updated: 2018-01-12Bibliographically approved
Larsson, P. G., Eeg-Olofsson, O., Michel, C. M., Seeck, M. & Lantz, G. (2010). Decrease in Propagation of Interictal Epileptiform Activity After Introduction of Levetiracetam Visualized with Electric Source Imaging. Brain Topography, 23(3), 269-278
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decrease in Propagation of Interictal Epileptiform Activity After Introduction of Levetiracetam Visualized with Electric Source Imaging
Show others...
2010 (English)In: Brain Topography, ISSN 0896-0267, E-ISSN 1573-6792, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 269-278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Different neuroimaging techniques (fMRI, spectroscopy, PET) are being used to evaluate candidate drugs in pharmacological development. In patients with epilepsy fast propagation of the epileptiform activity between different brain areas occurs. Electric Source Imaging (ESI), in contrast to the aforementioned techniques, has a millisecond time resolution, allowing visualization of this fast propagation. The purpose of the current project was to use ESI to investigate whether introduction of an antiepileptic drug (levetiracetam, LEV) would change the propagation patterns of the interictal epileptiform activity. Thirty patients with epilepsy were subject to an EEG recording before (pre-LEV) and after (in-LEV) introduction of LEV. Interictal spikes with similar topographic distribution were averaged within each subject, and a distributed source model was used to localize the EEG sources of the epileptiform activity. The temporal development of the activity within 20 regions of interest (ROIs) was determined, and source propagation between different regions was compared between the pre-LEV and in-LEV recordings. Patients with epileptic seizures showed propagation in 22/24 identified spike types in the pre-LEV recordings. In the in-LEV recordings only 7/15 spike types showed propagation, and six of these seven propagating spikes were recorded in patients with poor effect of treatment. Also in patients without seizures LEV tended to suppress propagation. We conclude that the observed suppression of source propagation can be considered as an indicator of effective antiepileptic treatment. ESI might thus become a useful tool in the early clinical evaluation of new candidate drugs in pharmacological development.

Keywords
EEG, Epilepsy, Electric source imaging, Propagation, Levetiracetam
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-135610 (URN)10.1007/s10548-010-0150-1 (DOI)000280619300005 ()
Available from: 2010-12-07 Created: 2010-12-07 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications