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Lundin, Tom
Publications (10 of 24) Show all publications
Michel, P.-O., Lundin, T., Bergh Johannesson, K., Nilsson, D. & Arnberg, F. (2018). Psykotraumatologi (3ed.). Lund: Studentlitteratur AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psykotraumatologi
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2018 (Swedish)Book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018. p. 272 Edition: 3
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339987 (URN)9789144119939 (ISBN)
Available from: 2018-01-24 Created: 2018-01-24 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Lundin, T. & Bianchi, M. (2017). Uppsalasångens jubileumstallrik 1913. Uppsala: Universitets- och studenthistoriska sällskapet i Uppsala
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Uppsalasångens jubileumstallrik 1913
2017 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Universitets- och studenthistoriska sällskapet i Uppsala, 2017. p. 76
Series
Skrifter från Universitets- och studenthistoriska sällskapet i Uppsala
National Category
History and Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-331890 (URN)978-91-971547-2-7 (ISBN)
Available from: 2017-10-19 Created: 2017-10-19 Last updated: 2017-10-19
Nilsson, D., Nordenstam, C., Green, S., Wetterhall, A., Lundin, T. & Svedin, C. G. (2015). Acute stress among adolescents and female rape victims measured by ASC-Kids: A pilot study. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 69(7), 539-545
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acute stress among adolescents and female rape victims measured by ASC-Kids: A pilot study
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2015 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 69, no 7, p. 539-545Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Rape is considered a stressful trauma and often with durable consequences. How the aftermath of rape is for young adolescents' girls considering acute stress is an overlooked field and remains to be studied. Aims: In this study, we wanted to investigate acute stress among adolescent victims of rape and the psychometric properties of the Acute Stress Checklist for Children (ASC-Kids). Methods: A clinical sample (n = 79) of raped girls, 13 - 17 years old who had turned to a special rape victim unit for treatment, answered the ASC-Kids. ASC-Kids was also given to a group of minor stressed, non-raped adolescents in the same age range (n = 154) together with the University of California at Los Angeles Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Reaction Index (UCLA PTSD RI), and the Sense of Coherence Scale 13 (SOC-13). Results : The scores from the groups were compared and showed significant differences in mean values on all the diagnostic criteria of acute stress disorder. In the clinical group, 36.7% obtained full ASD criteria. ASC-Kids could discriminate well between groups. Cronbach's alpha was found to be excellent, and the correlation between the UCLA PTSD RI and ASC-Kids found to be good; both ASC-Kids and UCLA PTSD RI had a good and moderate negative correlation with SOC-13. Conclusion: Adolescent female rape victims were shown to have a very high level of acute stress, and the ASC-Kids was found to have sound psychometrics and can be a valuable screening instrument to support clinicians in their assessments of an indication of adolescents after potentially stressful events such as rape.

Keywords
Acute stress, Adolescents, ASC-Kids, Psychometrics, Rape
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-280975 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2015.1013056 (DOI)000369972000007 ()25732866 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-03-16 Created: 2016-03-16 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Arnberg, F. K., Michel, P.-O. & Lundin, T. (2015). Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing. PLoS ONE, 10(3), Article ID e0119732.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Posttraumatic stress in survivors 1 month to 19 years after an airliner emergency landing
2015 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 3, article id e0119732Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Posttraumatic stress (PTS) is common in survivors from life-threatening events. Little is known, however, about the course of PTS after life threat in the absence of collateral stressors (e.g., bereavement, social stigma, property loss) and there is a scarcity of studies about PTS in the long term. This study assessed the short- and long-term course of PTS, and the influence of gender, education and age on the level and course of PTS, in survivors from a non-fatal airliner emergency landing caused by engine failure at an altitude of 1 km. There were 129 persons on board. A survey including the Impact of Event Scale was distributed to 106 subjects after 1 month, 4 months, 14 months, and 25 months, and to 95 subjects after 19 years (response rates 64–83%). There were initially high levels of PTS. The majority of changes in PTS occurred from 1 to 4 months after the event. There were small changes from 4 to 25 months but further decrease in PTS thereafter. Female gender was associated with higher levels of PTS whereas gender was unrelated to the slope of the short- and long-term trajectories. Higher education was related to a quicker recovery although not to initial or long-term PTS. Age was not associated with PTS. The present findings suggest that a life-threatening experience without collateral stressors may produce high levels of acute posttraumatic stress, yet with a benign prognosis. The findings further implicate that gender is unrelated to trajectories of recovery in the context of highly similar exposure and few collateral stressors.

Keywords
Aviation disasters, Posttraumatic stress, Longitudinal studies, Long-term studies
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology
Research subject
Psychiatry; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-169279 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0119732 (DOI)000350314700063 ()25734536 (PubMedID)
Projects
Long-term posttraumatic stress in survivors from disasters and major accidents
Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Lundin, T. & Bianchi, M. (2015). Vapensköldar i Svea Orden från mitten av 1800-talet. Stockholm: Svea Orden
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vapensköldar i Svea Orden från mitten av 1800-talet
2015 (Swedish)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Stockholm: Svea Orden, 2015. p. 77
National Category
Humanities
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267404 (URN)978-91-637-9838-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2015-11-22 Last updated: 2016-01-13
Uttervall, M., Hultman, C. M., Ekerwald, H., Lindam, A. & Lundin, T. (2014). After the Flood: Resilience among Tsunami-Afflicted Adolescents. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 68(1), 38-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>After the Flood: Resilience among Tsunami-Afflicted Adolescents
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2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: About 7000 Swedish citizens were on Christmas holiday in the disaster area at the time of the South-east Asian tsunami in 2004, in many cases with children and adolescents in their families. Aims: To investigate how adolescents experience a traumatic exposure to a natural disaster. Method: Twenty adolescents aged 16-19 years, who had experienced the 2004 tsunami and participated in a follow-up study 19 months post-disaster, were randomly selected and interviewed about their reactions, their life afterwards and their families. The study combines the face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with questionnaire data on mental health for 4910 Swedish adolescents and adults. Results: The themes that emerged inductively during the analysis of the interviews were psychological reactions during the catastrophe, the coping after, changes in self-image, worldview, role in the family, risk interpretation and altruism. The disaster had profound impact on family relations, social networks and plans for the future. Many felt strengthened by the experience and by their ability to cope in comparison with other family members, but also perceived isolation and lack of understanding. The general mental health status among the adolescents did not differ significantly from those of older age at the 19-month follow-up. Conclusions: According to the adolescents', they experienced the tsunami-disaster differently than others around them. Their subjective interpretation of the event and its aftermath indicates resilience, especially among the young men. Future follow-up studies in larger samples of both symptoms and psychological functioning are warranted.

Keywords
Adolescent resilience, Coping, Natural Disasters, Post-traumatic stress, Stressful life events
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-271234 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2013.767373 (DOI)000333039100006 ()23445215 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareThe Karolinska Institutet's Research Foundation
Available from: 2016-01-07 Created: 2016-01-07 Last updated: 2017-05-11Bibliographically approved
Uttervall, M., Hultman, C. M., Ekerwald, H., Lindam, A. & Lundin, T. (2014). After the flood: Resilience among tsunami-afflicted adolescents. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 68(1), 38-43
Open this publication in new window or tab >>After the flood: Resilience among tsunami-afflicted adolescents
Show others...
2014 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 68, no 1, p. 38-43Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: About 7000 Swedish citizens were on Christmas holiday in the disaster area at the time of the South-east Asian tsunami in 2004, in many cases with children and adolescents in their families. Aims: To investigate how adolescents experience a traumatic exposure to a natural disaster. Method: Twenty adolescents aged 16-19 years, who had experienced the 2004 tsunami and participated in a follow-up study 19 months post-disaster, were randomly selected and interviewed about their reactions, their life afterwards and their families. The study combines the face-to-face, semi-structured interviews with questionnaire data on mental health for 4910 Swedish adolescents and adults. Results: The themes that emerged inductively during the analysis of the interviews were psychological reactions during the catastrophe, the coping after, changes in self-image, worldview, role in the family, risk interpretation and altruism. The disaster had profound impact on family relations, social networks and plans for the future. Many felt strengthened by the experience and by their ability to cope in comparison with other family members, but also perceived isolation and lack of understanding. The general mental health status among the adolescents did not differ significantly from those of older age at the 19-month follow-up. Conclusions: According to the adolescents', they experienced the tsunami-disaster differently than others around them. Their subjective interpretation of the event and its aftermath indicates resilience, especially among the young men. Future follow-up studies in larger samples of both symptoms and psychological functioning are warranted.

Keywords
Adolescent resilience, Coping, Natural Disasters, Post-traumatic stress, Stressful life events
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-223587 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2013.767373 (DOI)000333039100006 ()
Available from: 2014-04-22 Created: 2014-04-22 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Arnberg, F. K., Hultman, C. M., Michel, P.-O. & Lundin, T. (2013). Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 4, 20650
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fifteen years after a ferry disaster: Clinical interviews and survivors’ self-assessment of their experience
2013 (English)In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 4, p. 20650-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Disasters yield increased rates of psychological disorders decades later. Other consequences, however, have received little attention in the past.

Objective:

We aimed to examine diagnostic status and survivors’ views on disaster-related consequences and social support.

Methods:

A mixed-methods approach was used with 22 survivors (of 49 eligible) 15 years after a ferry disaster. Data collection included audiotaped interviews with open-ended questions and diagnostic assessment of Axis-I disorders.

Results:

The post-disaster incidence was 54% (12/22) for Axis-I disorders, and 45% (10/22) for full or subsyndromal posttraumatic stress disorder. Thematic analysis revealed that survivor perception of the longterm consequences included positive (character change) and negative aspects (being ascribed a survivor identity). Participants’ sought social support for several years, yet many felt hindered by experiential dissimilarity and distress of significant others.

Conclusions:

Axis-I disorders were prevalent, but not salient to survivors’ perceptions in the long-term. Postdisaster interventions need to attend to common barriers to support.

Keywords
posttraumatic stress disorder, survivors, diagnosis, social support, posttraumatic growth, mixed methods, PTSD, överlevande, posttraumatisk stress, socialt stöd, Estonia
National Category
Psychiatry Psychology
Research subject
Psychiatry; Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-169280 (URN)10.3402/ejpt.v4i0.20650 (DOI)000332099200001 ()
Projects
Long-term posttraumatic stress in survivors from disasters and major accidents
Available from: 2012-02-27 Created: 2012-02-27 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Dyster-Aas, J., Arnberg, F. K., Lindam, A., Bergh Johannesson, K., Lundin, T. & Michel, P.-O. (2012). Impact of physical injury on mental health after the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami. Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, 66(3), 203-208
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of physical injury on mental health after the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami
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2012 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Psychiatry, ISSN 0803-9488, E-ISSN 1502-4725, Vol. 66, no 3, p. 203-208Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background : The risk of developing enduring post-traumatic stress reactions and mental health problems in the aftermath of disasters is substantial. However, there are inconsistencies regarding the contribution of physical injury as an independent risk factor for developing psychiatric morbidity after disasters.

Aims : The aim was to assess whether physical injury was associated with post-traumatic stress reactions and general mental health after adjusting for perceived life-threat in the aftermath of the 2004 tsunami.

Methods : A sample of 1501 highly exposed survivors from the 2004 Southeast Asia tsunami was selected from a cohort of Swedish survivors surveyed 14 and 36 months after the event. The impact of physical injury on post-traumatic stress and general mental health was assessed by regression models accounting for subjective life-threat.

Results : Physical injury was associated with higher levels of post-traumatic stress reactions and poorer general mental health. These associations were observed at both 14 and 36 months after the disaster.

Conclusions : Physical injury has a specific contribution to the association between traumatic experience and both post-traumatic stress reactions and general mental health in victims of the 2004 tsunami. The effect is stable over several years.

Keywords
Longitudinal survey, Natural disaster, PTSD, Psychiatric morbidity, Trauma
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-176224 (URN)10.3109/08039488.2011.621975 (DOI)000304204700009 ()
Available from: 2012-06-19 Created: 2012-06-18 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Arnberg, F. K., Hultman, C. M., Michel, P.-O. & Lundin, T. (2012). Social support moderates posttraumatic stress and general distress after disaster. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 25(6), 721-727
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Social support moderates posttraumatic stress and general distress after disaster
2012 (English)In: Journal of Traumatic Stress, ISSN 0894-9867, E-ISSN 1573-6598, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 721-727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social support buffers the negative impact of stressful events. Less, however, is known about the characteristics of this association in the context of disaster and findings have been discrepant regarding direct and buffering effects. This study tested whether the protective effects of social support differed across levels of exposure severity (i.e., buffered distress) and assessed whether the buffering effect differed between event-specific and general distress. Participants were 4,600 adult Swedish tourists (44% of invited; 55% women) repatriated within 3 weeks after the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. A survey 14 months after the disaster included the Crisis Support Scale, the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R), and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Social support buffered the negative impact of exposure on both outcomes. The support and distress association ranged from very small in participants with low exposure to moderate in those with high exposure (ηp2 = .004 to .053). The buffering effect was not found to differ between the IES-R and GHQ-12, F(2, 4589) = 0.87, p = .42. The findings suggest that social support moderates the stressor-distress relationship after disasters. This study might help explain discrepant findings and point to refinements of postdisaster interventions.

Keywords
survivors, mental health, social network, moderator, adverse life events
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-179199 (URN)10.1002/jts.21758 (DOI)000312151400015 ()
Available from: 2012-08-09 Created: 2012-08-09 Last updated: 2017-12-07
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