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Tibell, Leif
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Publications (10 of 83) Show all publications
Tibell, S., Tibell, L., Pang, K.-L. & E.B. Jones, G. (2019). A conspectus of the filamentous marine fungi of Sweden. Botanica Marina
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A conspectus of the filamentous marine fungi of Sweden
2019 (English)In: Botanica Marina, ISSN 1437-4323Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Marine filamentous fungi have been little studied in Sweden, which is remarkable given the depth and width of mycological studies in the country since the time of Elias Fries. Seventy-four marine fungi are listed for Sweden based on historical records and recent collections, of which 16 are new records for the country. New records for the country are based on morphological identification of species mainly from marine wood, and most of them from the Swedish West Coast. In some instances, the identifications have been made by comparisons of sequences obtained from cultures with reference sequences in GenBank. Corollospora angusta, Corollospora filiformis, and Corollospora pulchella, previously known from tropical/subtropical areas, are recorded for the first time for Sweden. The arctic Havispora longyearbyensis was also found. Kalmusia longispora and Neocamarosporium calvescens were reported for the first time from marine habitats.

Keywords
aquatic fungi; checklist; diversity; ecology; new records
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388626 (URN)10.1515/bot-2018-0114 (DOI)
Projects
Marina svampar i Sverige
Funder
The Swedish Taxonomy Initiative (ArtDatabanken, SLU)
Available from: 2019-07-02 Created: 2019-07-02 Last updated: 2019-07-02
Tibell, L., Tibell Savić, S. & Van Der Pluijm, A. (2019). Chaenotheca biesboschii a new calicioid lichen from willow forests in the Netherlands. The Lichenologist, 51(2), 123-135, Article ID PII S0024282919000021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chaenotheca biesboschii a new calicioid lichen from willow forests in the Netherlands
2019 (English)In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 123-135, article id PII S0024282919000021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new species of Chaenotheca, C. biesboschii, has been found in the freshwater tidal area of the Biesbosch in the Netherlands, a national park well known for harbouring several rare and threatened mosses and lichens. A phylogenetic analysis of the ITS region revealed some strongly supported infrageneric clades in Chaenotheca which were given informal names, and some were assigned provisional names in anticipation of generic recognition. The analysis also showed that the new species differed in the sequenced region from other European Chaenotheca species. Chaenotheca biesboschii might be mistaken for C. gracillima but, in addition to a considerable difference in the ITS region, it also differs from this species in morphology. It is also similar to C. servitii but again differs in morphology. Chaenotheca biesboschii inhabits decorticated wood in the oldest stages of forest development of abandoned willow coppices. In 2016 and 2017 a fairly large population was found in an area comprising several square kilometres. In the Biesbosch area, extensive woodlands have developed only since the 1950s and therefore C. biesboschii might have been recently established in the area, possibly following climatic warming. The new species is characterized by having an immersed, glaucous green thallus; apothecia 0 center dot 9-1 center dot 4 mm high; capitulum on the lower side when young with a ring-like thickening covered by a yellow pruina; when mature with a rusty brown pruina on the capitulum and upper part of stalk; spherical spores, 3 center dot 5-5 center dot 5 mu m diam., ornamented by irregular cracks, medium brown; photobiont Stichococcus. A key to the European species of Chaenotheca is provided.

Keywords
Chaenotheca, climate change, Europe, freshwater tidal areas, phylogeny, taxonomy
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383483 (URN)10.1017/S0024282919000021 (DOI)000466131600003 ()
Available from: 2019-05-16 Created: 2019-05-16 Last updated: 2019-05-16Bibliographically approved
Naesborg, R. R., Peterson, E. B. & Tibell, L. (2019). Chaenotheca longispora (Coniocybaceae), a new lichen from coast redwood trees in California, USA. The Bryologist, 122(1), 31-37
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chaenotheca longispora (Coniocybaceae), a new lichen from coast redwood trees in California, USA
2019 (English)In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 122, no 1, p. 31-37Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chaenotheca longispora is described as a new species from the central coast of California, U.S.A. It is similar in morphology to C. laevigata but is distinguished by the long (up to 25 mu m) and spirally ornamented ascospores as well as chemically by the PD+ orange and K+ yellow reaction of the thallus. Thus far, C. longispora has been collected only from the crowns of large coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) trees in Armstrong Redwoods State Natural Reserve, where it occurs on the thick, fibrous bark of the trunks. A key to Chaenotheca species in North America, including C. longispora, is provided.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OMAHA: AMER BRYOLOGICAL LICHENOLOGICAL SOC INC, 2019
Keywords
Calicioid lichen, Chaenotheca, corticolous, epiphyte, pin lichen, spirally ornamented ascospores, taxonomy
National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-386364 (URN)10.1639/0007-2745-122.1.031 (DOI)000468440600004 ()
Available from: 2019-06-19 Created: 2019-06-19 Last updated: 2019-06-24
Jones, G., Devadatha, B., Abdel-Wahab, M., Dayarathne, M., Zhang, S.-N., Hyde, K., . . . Cai, L. (2019). Phylogeny of new marine Dothideomycetesand Sordariomycetes from mangrovesand deep-sea sediments. Botanica Marina
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogeny of new marine Dothideomycetesand Sordariomycetes from mangrovesand deep-sea sediments
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2019 (English)In: Botanica Marina, ISSN 0006-8055, E-ISSN 1437-4323Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Keywords
Coniochaetales; deep sea; estuarine palm; Hypocreales; Pleosporales
National Category
Biological Sciences Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391000 (URN)10.1515/bot-2019-0014 (DOI)
Projects
Marine fungi in Sweden
Funder
The Swedish Taxonomy Initiative (ArtDatabanken, SLU)
Available from: 2019-08-16 Created: 2019-08-16 Last updated: 2019-08-16
Temu, S., Clerc, P., Tibell, L., Tibuhwa, D. & Tibell, S. (2019). Phylogeny of the subgenus Eumitria in Tanzania. Mycology: An International Journal on Fungal Biology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Phylogeny of the subgenus Eumitria in Tanzania
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2019 (English)In: Mycology: An International Journal on Fungal Biology, E-ISSN 2150-1211Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Several Usnea species in subgenus Eumitria (Parmeliaceae, lichenized Ascomycota) have been described from East Africa in the past decades. These have been based on morphology and chemistry data while molecular studies remain very limited. In this paper we are for the first time publishing phylogenetic analyses along with morphological and chemical data for Eumitria. ‬A total of 62 new sequences of Eumitria (26 ITS, 20 nuLSU, 6 MCM7, 10 RPB1) were generated in this study. nuLSU, MCM7 and RPB1 sequences are here for the first time reported for U. baileyi. A phylogeny of subgenus Eumitria from Tanzania based on Bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses of a concatenated four-loci data set is presented, confirming the monophyly of Eumitria. Further, secondary chemistry and variation in characters, such as the pigmentation of the central axis and branch shape were investigated.

Keywords
Lichens; molecular phylogeny; morphology; secondary chemistry
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388858 (URN)10.1080/21501203.2019.1635217 (DOI)
Projects
Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA) – UDSM-SIDA, Project No. 2221.
Available from: 2019-07-05 Created: 2019-07-05 Last updated: 2019-08-16Bibliographically approved
Wanasinghe, D. N., Phukhamsakda, C., Hyde, K. D., Jeewon, R., Lee, H. B., Jones, E. B., . . . Karunarathna, S. (2018). Fungal diversity notes 709–839: taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa with an emphasis on fungi on Rosaceae. Fungal diversity, 89(1), 1-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fungal diversity notes 709–839: taxonomic and phylogenetic contributions to fungal taxa with an emphasis on fungi on Rosaceae
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2018 (English)In: Fungal diversity, ISSN 1560-2745, E-ISSN 1878-9129, Vol. 89, no 1, p. 1-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper is the seventh in the Fungal Diversity Notes series, where 131 taxa accommodated in 28 families are mainly described from Rosa (Rosaceae) and a few other hosts. Novel fungal taxa are described in the present study, including 17 new genera, 93 new species, four combinations, a sexual record for a species and new host records for 16 species. Bhatiellae, Cycasicola, Dactylidina, Embarria, Hawksworthiana, Italica, Melanocucurbitaria, Melanodiplodia, Monoseptella, Uzbekistanica, Neoconiothyrium, Neopaucispora, Pararoussoella, Paraxylaria, Marjia, Sporormurispora and Xenomassariosphaeria are introduced as new ascomycete genera. We also introduce the new species Absidia jindoensis, Alternaria doliconidium, A. hampshirensis, Angustimassarina rosarum, Astragalicola vasilyevae, Backusella locustae, Bartalinia rosicola, Bhatiellae rosae, Broomella rosae, Castanediella camelliae, Coelodictyosporium rosarum, Comoclathris rosae, C. rosarum, Comoclathris rosigena, Coniochaeta baysunika, C. rosae, Cycasicola goaensis, Dactylidina shoemakeri, Dematiopleospora donetzica, D. rosicola, D. salsolae, Diaporthe rosae, D. rosicola, Endoconidioma rosae-hissaricae, Epicoccum rosae, Hawksworthiana clematidicola, H. lonicerae, Italica achilleae, Keissleriella phragmiticola, K. rosacearum, K. rosae, K. rosarum, Lophiostoma rosae, Marjia tianschanica, M. uzbekistanica, Melanocucurbitaria uzbekistanica, Melanodiplodia tianschanica, Monoseptella rosae, Mucor fluvius, Muriformistrickeria rosae, Murilentithecium rosae, Neoascochyta rosicola, Neoconiothyrium rosae, Neopaucispora rosaecae, Neosetophoma rosarum, N. rosae, N. rosigena, Neostagonospora artemisiae, Ophiobolus artemisiicola, Paraconiothyrium rosae, Paraphaeosphaeria rosae, P. rosicola, Pararoussoella rosarum, Parathyridaria rosae, Paraxylaria rosacearum, Penicillium acidum, P. aquaticum, Phragmocamarosporium rosae, Pleospora rosae, P. rosae-caninae, Poaceicola agrostina, P. arundinicola, P. rosae, Populocrescentia ammophilae, P. rosae, Pseudocamarosporium pteleae, P. ulmi-minoris, Pseudocercospora rosae, Pseudopithomyces rosae, Pseudostrickeria rosae, Sclerostagonospora lathyri, S. rosae, S. rosicola, Seimatosporium rosigenum, S. rosicola, Seiridium rosarum, Setoseptoria arundelensis, S. englandensis, S. lulworthcovensis, Sigarispora agrostidis, S. caryophyllacearum, S. junci, S. medicaginicola, S. rosicola, S. scrophulariae, S. thymi, Sporormurispora atraphaxidis, S. pruni, Suttonomyces rosae, Umbelopsis sinsidoensis, Uzbekistanica rosae-hissaricae, U. yakutkhanika, Wojnowicia rosicola, Xenomassariosphaeria rosae. New host records are provided for Amandinea punctata, Angustimassarina quercicola, Diaporthe rhusicola, D. eres, D. foeniculina, D. rudis, Diplodia seriata, Dothiorella iberica, Lasiodiplodia theobromae, Lecidella elaeochroma, Muriformistrickeria rubi, Neofusicoccum australe, Paraphaeosphaeria michotii, Pleurophoma pleurospora, Sigarispora caulium and Teichospora rubriostiolata. The new combinations are Dactylidina dactylidis (=Allophaeosphaeria dactylidis), Embarria clematidis (=Allophaeosphaeria clematidis), Hawksworthiana alliariae (=Dematiopleospora alliariae) and Italica luzulae (=Dematiopleospora luzulae).

This study also provides some insights into the diversity of fungi on Rosa species and especially those on Rosa spines that resulted in the characterisation of eight new genera, 45 new species, and nine new host records. We also collected taxa from Rosa stems and there was 31% (20/65) overlap with taxa found on stems with that on spines.

Because of the limited and non-targeted sampling for comparison with collections from spines and stems of the same host and location, it is not possible to say that the fungi on spines of Rosa differ from those on stems. The study however, does illustrate how spines are interesting substrates with high fungal biodiversity. This may be because of their hard structure resulting in slow decay and hence are suitable substrates leading to fungal colonisation. All data presented herein are based on morphological examination of specimens, coupled with phylogenetic sequence data to better integrate taxa into appropriate taxonomic ranks and infer their evolutionary relationships.

Keywords
Ascomycota, Dothideomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Italy, Lecanoromycetes, Mucoromycetes, Phylogeny, Rosa, Rosaceae, Russia, Sordariomycetes, Taxonomy, UK, Uzbekistan
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346572 (URN)10.1007/s13225-018-0395-7 (DOI)000427929700001 ()
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Brännström, I. O., Johannesson, H. & Tibell, L. (2018). Thamnolia tundrae sp nov., a cryptic species and putative glacial relict. The Lichenologist, 50(1), 59-75
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Thamnolia tundrae sp nov., a cryptic species and putative glacial relict
2018 (English)In: The Lichenologist, ISSN 0024-2829, E-ISSN 1096-1135, Vol. 50, no 1, p. 59-75Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The lichen species of the genus Thamnolia, with their striking wormlike thalli and frequent occurrence in arctic and tundra environments, have often been debated with regard to the use of chemistry in lichen taxonomy. Phylogenetic studies have arrived at different conclusions as to the recognition of species in the genus, but in a recent study based on the analyses of six nuclear markers (genes or noncoding regions) of a worldwide sample of Thamnolia, we showed the existence of three well-supported lineages with two different chemistries and geographical distributions. Here, we present two analyses based on ITS and three markers, respectively, which were extended from the study mentioned above to include type specimens and additional Thamnolia strains and taxa. In these analyses the same three clades were retrieved. A putative DEAD-box helicase is used here for the first time as an informative phylogenetic marker to provide taxonomic resolution at species level. The distribution of morphological and chemical characters across the phylogeny was analyzed and it was concluded that three morphologically cryptic, but genetically well supported, species occur: T. vermicularis s. str., T. subuliformis s. str. and T. tundrae sp. nov. Thamnolia vermicularis s. str. contains individuals with uniform secondary chemistry (producing thamnolic acid) and a rather limited distribution in the European Alps, Tatra Mts and the Western Carpathians, a distribution which might result from glacial survival in an adjacent refugium/refugia. Thamnolia subuliformis s. str. is widely distributed in all hemispheres and the samples contain two chemotypes (either with thamnolic or squamatic acids). Thamnolia tundrae is described as new; it produces baeomycesic and squamatic acids, and has a distribution limited to the arctic tundra of Eurasia extending to the Aleutian Islands in North America. It may have survived the latest glaciation in coastal refugia near its present distribution. Thus, secondary chemistry alone is not suitable for characterizing species in Thamnolia, secondary chemistry and geographical origin are informative, and the ITS region can be confidently used for species recognition. Nomenclatural notes are given on several other names that have been used in Thamnolia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2018
Keywords
lichens, molecular phylogeny, new species, nomenclature, secondary chemistry, taxonomy
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319635 (URN)10.1017/S0024282917000615 (DOI)000427733800004 ()
Note

Title in Thesis list of papers: Thamnolia tundrae n. sp., a cryptic species and putative glacial relict

Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Onuţ-Brännström, I., Tibell, L. & Johannesson, H. (2017). A worldwide phylogeography of the whiteworm lichens Thamnolia reveals three lineages with distinct habitats and evolutionary histories. Ecology and Evolution, 7(10), 3602-3615
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A worldwide phylogeography of the whiteworm lichens Thamnolia reveals three lineages with distinct habitats and evolutionary histories
2017 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 7, no 10, p. 3602-3615Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Thamnolia is a lichenized fungus with an extremely wide distribution, being encountered in arctic and alpine environments in most continents. In this study, we used molecular markers to investigate the population structure of the fungal symbiont and the associated photosynthetic partner of Thamnolia. By analyzing molecular, morphological, and chemical variation among 253 specimens covering the species distribution range, we revealed the existence of three mycobiont lineages. One lineage (Lineage A) is confined to the tundra region of Siberia and the Aleutian Islands, a second (Lineage B) is found in the high alpine region of the Alps and the Carpathians Mountains, and a third (Lineage C) has a worldwide distribution and covers both the aforementioned ecosystems. Molecular dating analysis indicated that the split of the three lineages is older than the last glacial maximum, but the distribution ranges and the population genetic analyses suggest an influence of last glacial period on the present-day population structure of each lineage. We found a very low diversity of Lineage B, but a higher and similar one in Lineages A and C. Demographic analyses suggested that Lineage C has its origin in the Northern Hemisphere, possibly Scandinavia, and that it has passed through a bottleneck followed by a recent population expansion. While all three lineages reproduce clonally, recombination tests suggest rare or past recombination in both Lineages A and C. Moreover, our data showed that Lineage C has a comparatively low photobiont specificity, being found associated with four widespread Trebouxia lineages (three of them also shared with other lichens), while Lineages A and B exclusively harbor T. simplex s. lat. Finally, we did not find support for the recognition of taxa in Thamnolia based on either morphological or chemical characters.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2017
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology Other Biological Topics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319636 (URN)10.1002/ece3.2917 (DOI)000402554700030 ()28515896 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2018-03-29Bibliographically approved
Paukov, A., Nordin, A., Tibell, L., Frolov, I. & Vondrak, J. (2017). Aspicilia goettweigensis (Megasporaceae, lichenized Ascomycetes) – a poorly known and overlooked species in Europe and Russia. Nordic Journal of Botany, 35(5), 595-601
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aspicilia goettweigensis (Megasporaceae, lichenized Ascomycetes) – a poorly known and overlooked species in Europe and Russia
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2017 (English)In: Nordic Journal of Botany, ISSN 0107-055X, E-ISSN 1756-1051, Vol. 35, no 5, p. 595-601Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aspicilia goettweigensis is a poorly known species from xerothermic siliceous rocks in Europe. It is considered to be common in the Czech Republic and it is new to Hungary and Russia. The main diagnostic character is formation of cracked, popcorn-like, areoles in the central parts of the thalli. Analysis of nrITS sequences revealed its close relationship to Aspicilia subdepressa and A. volcanica. TLC revealed stictic acid in analysed A. goettweigensis samples. A key to non-lobate Aspicilia with stictic acid known from Europe is provided.

National Category
Botany
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340096 (URN)10.1111/njb.01222 (DOI)000413169200012 ()
Available from: 2018-02-02 Created: 2018-02-02 Last updated: 2018-03-29Bibliographically approved
Tibell, L. & Knutsson, T. (2016). Calicium episcalaris (Caliciaceae), a new lichen species from Sweden. Symbolae Botanicae Upsalienses, 38, 49-52
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Calicium episcalaris (Caliciaceae), a new lichen species from Sweden
2016 (English)In: Symbolae Botanicae Upsalienses, ISSN 0082-0644, Vol. 38, p. 49-52Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A new species of lichens, Calicium episcalaris Tibell & Knutsson, is described from  Sweden. It is one of few Calicium species being parasitic or ‘Jugendparasit’, occurring on Hypocenomyce scalaris (Ach.) M.Choisy growing on an old wooden building in South Sweden.

Keywords
Calicium, lichen, new species, Sweden
National Category
Other Biological Topics
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313744 (URN)
Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2018-03-29Bibliographically approved
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