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Andersson, Leif
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Publications (10 of 211) Show all publications
Lamichhaney, S. & Andersson, L. (2019). A comparison of the association between large haplotype blocks under selection and the presence/absence of inversions. Ecology and Evolution, 9(8), 4888-4896
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison of the association between large haplotype blocks under selection and the presence/absence of inversions
2019 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 9, no 8, p. 4888-4896Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inversions may contribute to ecological adaptation and phenotypic diversity, and with the advent of second and third generation sequencing technologies, the ability to detect inversion polymorphisms has been enhanced dramatically. A key molecular consequence of an inversion is the suppression of recombination allowing independent accumulation of genetic changes between alleles over time. This may lead to the development of divergent haplotype blocks maintained by balancing selection. Thus, divergent haplotype blocks are often considered as indicating the presence of an inversion. In this paper, we first review the features of a 7.7Mb inversion causing the Rose-comb phenotype in chicken, as a model for how inversions evolve and directly affect phenotypes. Second, we compare the genetic basis for alternative mating strategies in ruff and timing of reproduction in Atlantic herring, both associated with divergent haplotype blocks. Alternative male mating strategies in ruff are associated with a 4.5Mb inversion that occurred about 4 million years ago. In fact, the ruff inversion shares some striking features with the Rose-comb inversion such as disruption of a gene at one of the inversion breakpoints and generation of a new allele by recombination between the inverted and noninverted alleles. In contrast, inversions do not appear to be a major reason for the fairly large haplotype blocks (range 10-200kb) associated with ecological adaptation in the herring. Thus, it is important to note that divergent haplotypes may also be maintained by natural selection in the absence of structural variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
adaptation, haplotypes, inversion
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387565 (URN)10.1002/ece3.5094 (DOI)000466104200045 ()31031951 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-24 Created: 2019-06-24 Last updated: 2019-06-24Bibliographically approved
Li, J., Bed'hom, B., Marthey, S., Valade, M., Dureux, A., Moroldo, M., . . . Tixier-Boichard, M. (2019). A missense mutation in TYRP1 causes the chocolate plumage color in chicken and alters melanosome structure. Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, 32(3), 381-390
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A missense mutation in TYRP1 causes the chocolate plumage color in chicken and alters melanosome structure
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2019 (English)In: Pigment Cell & Melanoma Research, ISSN 1755-1471, E-ISSN 1755-148X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 381-390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The chocolate plumage color in chickens is due to a sex-linked recessive mutation, choc, which dilutes eumelanin pigmentation. Because TYRP1 is sex-linked in chickens, and TYRP1 mutations determine brown coat color in mammals, TYRP1 appeared as the obvious candidate gene for the choc mutation. By combining gene mapping with gene capture, a complete association was identified between the chocolate phenotype and a missense mutation leading to a His214Asn change in the ZnA zinc-binding domain of the protein. A diagnostic test confirmed complete association by screening 428 non-chocolate chickens of various origins. This is the first TYRP1 mutation described in the chicken. Electron microscopy analysis showed that melanosomes were more numerous in feather follicles of chocolate chickens but exhibited an abnormal structure characterized by a granular content and an irregular shape. A similar altered morphology was observed on melanosomes of another TYRP1 mutant in birds, the roux mutation of the quail.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
bird, eumelanin, feather colour, melanosome, TYRP1
National Category
Genetics and Breeding in Agricultural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383148 (URN)10.1111/pcmr.12753 (DOI)000465607700006 ()30457703 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-13 Created: 2019-05-13 Last updated: 2019-05-13Bibliographically approved
Bendazzoli, S., Brusini, I., Damberg, P., Smedby, Ö., Andersson, L. & Wang, C. (2019). Automatic rat brain segmentation from MRI using statistical shape models and random forest. In: Angelini, ED Landman, BA (Ed.), MEDICAL IMAGING 2019: IMAGE PROCESSING. Paper presented at Conference on Medical Imaging: Image Processing, FEB 19-21, 2019, San Diego, CA. SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, Article ID 109492O.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Automatic rat brain segmentation from MRI using statistical shape models and random forest
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2019 (English)In: MEDICAL IMAGING 2019: IMAGE PROCESSING / [ed] Angelini, ED Landman, BA, SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING , 2019, article id 109492OConference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In MRI neuroimaging, the shimming procedure is used before image acquisition to correct for inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field within the brain. To correctly adjust the field, the brain's location and edges must first be identified from quickly-acquired low resolution data. This process is currently carried out manually by an operator, which can be time-consuming and not always accurate. In this work, we implement a quick and automatic technique for brain segmentation to be potentially used during the shimming. Our method is based on two main steps. First, a random forest classifier is used to get a preliminary segmentation from an input MRI image. Subsequently, a statistical shape model of the brain, which was previously generated from ground-truth segmentations, is fitted to the output of the classifier to obtain a model-based segmentation mask. In this way, a-priori knowledge on the brain's shape is included in the segmentation pipeline. The proposed methodology was tested on low resolution images of rat brains and further validated on rabbit brain images of higher resolution. Our results suggest that the present method is promising for the desired purpose in terms of time efficiency, segmentation accuracy and repeatability. Moreover, the use of shape modeling was shown to be particularly useful when handling low-resolution data, which could lead to erroneous classifications when using only machine learning-based methods.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, 2019
Series
Proceedings of SPIE, ISSN 0277-786X, E-ISSN 1996-756X ; 10949
Keywords
brain MRI, image segmentation, shimming, random forest, statistical shape model
National Category
Medical Image Processing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394733 (URN)10.1117/12.2512409 (DOI)000483012700090 ()978-1-5106-2546-4 (ISBN)978-1-5106-2545-7 (ISBN)
Conference
Conference on Medical Imaging: Image Processing, FEB 19-21, 2019, San Diego, CA
Available from: 2019-10-09 Created: 2019-10-09 Last updated: 2019-10-09Bibliographically approved
Li, J., Davis, B. W., Jern, P., Dorshorst, B. J., Siegel, P. B. & Andersson, L. (2019). Characterization of the endogenous retrovirus insertion in CYP19A1 associated with henny feathering in chicken. Mobile DNA, 10(1), Article ID 38.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the endogenous retrovirus insertion in CYP19A1 associated with henny feathering in chicken
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2019 (English)In: Mobile DNA, ISSN 1759-8753, E-ISSN 1759-8753, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Henny feathering in chickens is determined by a dominant mutation that transforms male-specific plumage to female-like plumage. Previous studies indicated that this phenotype is caused by ectopic expression in skin of CYP19A1 encoding aromatase that converts androgens to estrogen and thereby inhibits the development of male-specific plumage. A long terminal repeat (LTR) from an uncharacterized endogenous retrovirus (ERV) insertion was found in an isoform of the CYP19A1 transcript from henny feathering chicken. However, the complete sequence and the genomic position of the insertion were not determined.

Results

We used publicly available whole genome sequence data to determine the flanking sequences of the ERV, and then PCR amplified the entire insertion and sequenced it using Nanopore long reads and Sanger sequencing. The 7524 bp insertion contains an intact endogenous retrovirus that was not found in chickens representing 31 different breeds not showing henny feathering or in samples of the ancestral red junglefowl. The sequence shows over 99% sequence identity to the avian leukosis virus ev-1 and ev-21 strains, suggesting a recent integration. The ERV 3’LTR, containing a powerful transcriptional enhancer and core promoter with TATA box together with binding sites for EFIII and Ig/EBP inside the CYP19A1 5′ untranslated region, was detected partially in an aromatase transcript, which present a plausible explanation for ectopic expression of aromatase in non-ovarian tissues underlying the henny feathering phenotype.

Conclusions

We demonstrate that the henny feathering allele harbors an insertion of an intact avian leukosis virus at the 5’end of CYP19A1. The presence of this ERV showed complete concordance with the henny feathering phenotype both within a pedigree segregating for this phenotype and across breeds.

Keywords
Chicken, Henny feather, Aromatase, Endogenous retrovirus, ERV, LTR
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392029 (URN)10.1186/s13100-019-0181-4 (DOI)000483302300001 ()31467598 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-28 Created: 2019-08-28 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Berg, F., Slotte, A., Andersson, L. & Folkvord, A. (2019). Genetic origin and salinity history influence the reproductive success of Atlantic herring. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 617, 81-94
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic origin and salinity history influence the reproductive success of Atlantic herring
2019 (English)In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, ISSN 0171-8630, E-ISSN 1616-1599, Vol. 617, p. 81-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Atlantic herring populations inhabit environments ranging in salinity from fully marine to nearly freshwater, but their relative reproductive success in these respective environments remains unclear. We conducted factorial crossing experiments using parents from 3 wild populations associated with different salinity environments: the Baltic Sea (similar to 6 psu), an inland brackish lake in Norway (Landvikvannet, similar to 16 psu), and the Atlantic (similar to 30 to 35 psu). Further experiments used crosses within and between Atlantic purebreds and Atlantic/Baltic hybrids reared until first maturity at 3 yr of age. Crossing experiments were conducted at 6, 16 and 35 psu. Fertilization and hatching rates were estimated, and egg sizes were measured. Fertilization rates were highest at 16 psu for all combinations. The paternal genetic and salinity origin influenced fertilization rates at 6 and 35 psu, indicating a genetic adaptation to their original environment. Fertilization rates for males originating from 16 psu were low at 35 psu. Atlantic/Baltic hybrids had lower fertilization rates than Atlantic purebreds at 35 psu. Hatching rates were not influenced by any parental factors or salinity. Maternal effects and salinity influenced egg size. Atlantic females had significantly larger eggs than the Atlantic/Baltic hybrid females. For all genetic groups, egg size decreased with increasing salinity at incubation mainly due to osmotic effects. The observed lower fertilization success at salinities other than those of the parental fish habitat would have evolutionary consequences when herring colonize new habitats with different salinities or if interbreeding occurred between populations originating from different salinity habitats.

Keywords
Common garden, Fertilization experiment, Salinity, Clupea harengus, Reproduction, Egg size, Connectivity
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395624 (URN)10.3354/meps12680 (DOI)000485730200007 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2019-10-22 Created: 2019-10-22 Last updated: 2019-10-22Bibliographically approved
Qanbari, S., Rubin, C.-J., Maqbool, K., Weigend, S., Weigend, A., Geibel, J., . . . Andersson, L. (2019). Genetics of adaptation in modern chicken. PLoS Genetics, 15(4), Article ID e1007989.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetics of adaptation in modern chicken
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2019 (English)In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 15, no 4, article id e1007989Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We carried out whole genome resequencing of 127 chicken including red jungle fowl and multiple populations of commercial broilers and layers to perform a systematic screening of adaptive changes in modern chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus). We uncovered >21 million high quality SNPs of which 34% are newly detected variants. This panel comprises >115,000 predicted amino-acid altering substitutions as well as 1,100 SNPs predicted to be stop-gain or -loss, several of which reach high frequencies. Signatures of selection were investigated both through analyses of fixation and differentiation to reveal selective sweeps that may have had prominent roles during domestication and breed development. Contrasting wild and domestic chicken we confirmed selection at the BCO2 and TSHR loci and identified 34 putative sweeps co-localized with ALX1, KITLG, EPGR, IGF1, DLK1, JPT2, CRAMP1, and GLI3, among others. Analysis of enrichment between groups of wild vs. commercials and broilers vs. layers revealed a further panel of candidate genes including CORIN, SKIV2L2 implicated in pigmentation and LEPR, MEGF10 and SPEF2, suggestive of production-oriented selection. SNPs with marked allele frequency differences between wild and domestic chicken showed a highly significant deficiency in the proportion of amino-acid altering mutations (P<2.5x10(-6)). The results contribute to the understanding of major genetic changes that took place during the evolution of modern chickens and in poultry breeding. Author summary Domestic chickens (Gallus gallus domesticus) provide a critical resource for animal proteins for human nutrition worldwide. Chickens were primarily domesticated from the red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus gallus), a bird that still runs wild in most of Southeast Asia. Human driven selection during domestication and subsequent specialization into meat type (broilers) and egg layer (layers) birds has left detectable signatures of selection within the genome of modern chicken. In this study, we performed whole genome sequencing of 127 chicken including the red jungle fowl and multiple populations of commercial broilers and layers to perform a systematic screening of adaptive changes in modern chicken. Analysis of selection provided a comprehensive list of several tens of independent loci that are likely to have contributed to domestication or improving production. SNP by SNP comparison of allele frequency between groups of wild and domestic chicken showed a highly significant deficiency of the proportion of amino acid altering mutations. This implies that commercial birds have undergone purifying selection reducing the frequency of deleterious variants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Genetics and Breeding in Agricultural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-385576 (URN)10.1371/journal.pgen.1007989 (DOI)000466866000009 ()31034467 (PubMedID)
Funder
German Research Foundation (DFG), QA55/1-1
Available from: 2019-06-17 Created: 2019-06-17 Last updated: 2019-06-17Bibliographically approved
McCoy, A. M., Beeson, S. K., Rubin, C.-J., Andersson, L., Caputo, P., Lykkjen, S., . . . McCue, M. E. (2019). Identification and validation of genetic variants predictive of gait in standardbred horses. PLoS Genetics, 15(5), Article ID e1008146.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification and validation of genetic variants predictive of gait in standardbred horses
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2019 (English)In: PLoS Genetics, ISSN 1553-7390, E-ISSN 1553-7404, Vol. 15, no 5, article id e1008146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Several horse breeds have been specifically selected for the ability to exhibit alternative patterns of locomotion, or gaits. A premature stop codon in the gene DMRT3 is permissive for gaitedness across breeds. However, this mutation is nearly fixed in both American Standardbred trotters and pacers, which perform a diagonal and lateral gait, respectively, during harness racing. This suggests that modifying alleles must influence the preferred gait at racing speeds in these populations. A genome-wide association analysis for the ability to pace was performed in 542 Standardbred horses (n = 176 pacers, n = 366 trotters) with genotype data imputed to similar to 74,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Nineteen SNPs on nine chromosomes (ECA1, 2, 6, 9, 17, 19, 23, 25, 31) reached genome-wide significance (p < 1.44 x 10(-6)). Variant discovery in regions of interest was carried out via whole-genome sequencing. A set of 303 variants from 22 chromosomes with putative modifying effects on gait was genotyped in 659 Standardbreds (n = 231 pacers, n = 428 trotters) using a high-throughput assay. Random forest classification analysis resulted in an out-of-box error rate of 0.61%. A conditional inference tree algorithm containing seven SNPs predicted status as a pacer or trotter with 99.1% accuracy and subsequently performed with 99.4% accuracy in an independently sampled population of 166 Standardbreds (n = 83 pacers, n = 83 trotters). This highly accurate algorithm could be used by owners/trainers to identify Standardbred horses with the potential to race as pacers or as trotters, according to the genotype identified, prior to initiating training and would enable fine-tuning of breeding programs with designed matings. Additional work is needed to determine both the algorithm's utility in other gaited breeds and whether any of the predictive SNPs play a physiologically functional role in the tendency to pace or tag true functional alleles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Genetics and Breeding in Agricultural Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387964 (URN)10.1371/journal.pgen.1008146 (DOI)000470208000034 ()31136578 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Hill, J., Enbody, E. D., Pettersson, M., Sprehn, C. G., Bekkevold, D., Folkvord, A., . . . Andersson, L. (2019). Recurrent convergent evolution at amino acid residue 261 in fish rhodopsin. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116(37), 18473-18478
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Recurrent convergent evolution at amino acid residue 261 in fish rhodopsin
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 37, p. 18473-18478Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The evolutionary process that occurs when a species colonizes a new environment provides an opportunity to explore the mechanisms underlying genetic adaptation, which is essential knowledge for understanding evolution and the maintenance of biodiversity. Atlantic herring has an estimated total breeding stock of about 1 trillion (10(12)) and has colonized the brackish Baltic Sea within the last 10,000 y. Minute genetic differentiation between Atlantic and Baltic herring populations at selectively neutral loci combined with this rapid adaptation to a new environment facilitated the identification of hundreds of loci underlying ecological adaptation. A major question in the field of evolutionary biology is to what extent such an adaptive process involves selection of novel mutations with large effects or genetic changes at many loci, each with a small effect on phenotype (i.e., selection on standing genetic variation). Here we show that a missense mutation in rhodopsin (Phe261Tyr) is an adaptation to the red-shifted Baltic Sea light environment. The transition from phenylalanine to tyrosine differs only by the presence of a hydroxyl moiety in the latter, but this results in an up to 10-nm red-shifted light absorbance of the receptor. Remarkably, an examination of the rhodopsin sequences from 2,056 species of fish revealed that the same missense mutation has occurred independently and been selected for during at least 20 transitions between light environments across all fish. Our results provide a spectacular example of convergent evolution and how a single amino acid change can have a major effect on ecological adaptation.

Keywords
adaptation, selective sweep, convergent evolution, natural selection
National Category
Genetics and Breeding in Agricultural Sciences Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394961 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1908332116 (DOI)000485145400052 ()31451650 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationGerman Research Foundation (DFG)
Available from: 2019-10-18 Created: 2019-10-18 Last updated: 2019-10-18Bibliographically approved
Andrade, P., Pinho, C., Perez i de lanuza, G., Afonso, S., Brejcha, J., Rubin, C.-J., . . . Carneiro, M. (2019). Regulatory changes in pterin and carotenoid genes underlie balanced color polymorphisms in the wall lizard. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 116(12), 5633-5642
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Regulatory changes in pterin and carotenoid genes underlie balanced color polymorphisms in the wall lizard
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 116, no 12, p. 5633-5642Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reptiles use pterin and carotenoid pigments to produce yellow, orange, and red colors. These conspicuous colors serve a diversity of signaling functions, but their molecular basis remains unresolved. Here, we show that the genomes of sympatric color morphs of the European common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis), which differ in orange and yellow pigmentation and in their ecology and behavior, are virtually undifferentiated. Genetic differences are restricted to two small regulatory regions near genes associated with pterin [sepiapterin reductase (SPR)] and carotenoid [beta-carotene oxygenase 2 (BCO2)] metabolism, demonstrating that a core gene in the housekeeping pathway of pterin biosynthesis has been coopted for bright coloration in reptiles and indicating that these loci exert pleiotropic effects on other aspects of physiology. Pigmentation differences are explained by extremely divergent alleles, and haplotype analysis revealed abundant transspecific allele sharing with other lacertids exhibiting color polymorphisms. The evolution of these conspicuous color ornaments is the result of ancient genetic variation and cross-species hybridization.

Keywords
Podarcis muralis, carotenoid pigmentation, pterin pigmentation, balanced polymorphism, introgression
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381075 (URN)10.1073/pnas.1820320116 (DOI)000461679000067 ()30819892 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2017-02907Swedish Research Council, E0446501EU, Horizon 2020, PTDC/BIA-EVL/30288/2017 -NORTE -01-0145-FEDER-30288EU, Horizon 2020, PTDC/BIA-EVL/30288/2017 -NORTE -01-0145-FEDER-30288EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 286431Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-04-23 Created: 2019-04-23 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
Wang, X., Jiang, L., Wallerman, O., Younis, S., Yu, Q., Klaesson, A., . . . Andersson, L. (2019). ZBED6 negatively regulates insulin production, neuronal differentiation, and cell aggregation in MIN6 cells. The FASEB Journal, 33(1), 88-100
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ZBED6 negatively regulates insulin production, neuronal differentiation, and cell aggregation in MIN6 cells
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2019 (English)In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 88-100Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Zinc finger BED domain containing protein 6 (Zbed6) has evolved from a domesticated DNA transposon and encodes a transcription factor unique to placental mammals. The aim of the present study was to investigate further the role of ZBED6 in insulin-producing cells, using mouse MIN6 cells, and to evaluate the effects of Zbed6 knockdown on basal -cell functions, such as morphology, transcriptional regulation, insulin content, and release. Zbed6-silenced cells and controls were characterized with a range of methods, including RNA sequencing, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, insulin content and release, subplasma membrane Ca2+ measurements, cAMP determination, and morphologic studies. More than 700 genes showed differential expression in response to Zbed6 knockdown, which was paralleled by increased capacity to generate cAMP, as well as by augmented subplasmalemmal calcium concentration and insulin secretion in response to glucose stimulation. We identified >4000 putative ZBED6-binding sites in the MIN6 genome, with an enrichment of ZBED6 sites at upregulated genes, such as the -cell transcription factors v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene homolog A and Nk6 homeobox 1. We also observed altered morphology/growth patterns, as indicated by increased cell clustering, and in the appearance of axon-like Neurofilament, medium polypeptide and tubulin 3, class III-positive protrusions. We conclude that ZBED6 acts as a transcriptional regulator in MIN6 cells and that its activity suppresses insulin production, cell aggregation, and neuronal-like differentiation.Wang, X., Jiang, L., Wallerman, O., Younis, S., Yu, Q., Klaesson, A., Tengholm, A., Welsh, N., Andersson, L. ZBED6 negatively regulates insulin production, neuronal differentiation, and cell aggregation in MIN6 cells.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FEDERATION AMER SOC EXP BIOL, 2019
Keywords
-cells, cell adhesion, transcriptome analysis, ChIP-seq
National Category
Cell and Molecular Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377365 (URN)10.1096/fj.201600835R (DOI)000457401500007 ()29957057 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 80576801Swedish Research Council, 70374401Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Child Diabetes FoundationNovo NordiskErnfors FoundationSwedish Diabetes Association
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19Bibliographically approved
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