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Nyberg, Fred
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Publications (10 of 150) Show all publications
Karlsson, B., Burell, G., Kristiansson, P., Björkegren, K., Nyberg, F. & Svärdsudd, K. (2019). Decline of substance P levels after stress management with cognitive behaviour therapy in women with the fibromyalgia syndrome. Scandinavian Journal of Pain, 19(3), 473-482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decline of substance P levels after stress management with cognitive behaviour therapy in women with the fibromyalgia syndrome
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2019 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Pain, ISSN 1877-8860, E-ISSN 1877-8879, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 473-482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and aims: Substance P (CSF-SP) is known to be elevated in females with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS). The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) on plasma SP levels in women with FMS and to find possible clinical behavioural correlates to plasma SP level changes. Methods: Forty-eight women with FMS were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received the CBT treatment intervention over the course of 6 months while group 2 was waitlisted. CBT was given with a protocol developed to diminish stress and pain. After 6 months, group 2 was given the same CBT treatment as well. All were followed up 1 year after the start of CBT treatment. This approach allowed for two analytical designs a randomised controlled trial (RCT) (n=24 vs. n=24) and a before-and-after treatment design (n=48). All women were repeatedly evaluated by the West Haven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI) and three other psychometric questionnaires and plasma SP was analysed. Results: In the RCT design, the plasma SP level was 8.79 fmol/mL in both groups at the start of the trial, after adjustment for initial differences. At the end of the RCT, the plasma SP level was 5.25 fmol/mL in the CBT intervention group compared to 8.39 fmol/mL in the control group (p=0.02). In the before-and-after design, the plasma SP was reduced by 33% (p <0.01) after CBT, but returned to the pre-treatment level at follow-up 1 year after the start of CBT treatment. Plasma SP was associated with the MPI dimensions experienced "support from spouses or significant others" and "life control". Conclusions: Plasma SP might be a marker of the effect of CBT in FMS associated with better coping strategies and reduced stress rather than a biochemical marker of pain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Walter de Gruyter, 2019
Keywords
fibromyalgia, substance P, cognitive behaviour therapy, stress, Westhaven-Yale Multidimensional Pain Inventory, Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale
National Category
Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390922 (URN)10.1515/sjpain-2018-0324 (DOI)000473300500007 ()30796851 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 9459Swedish Rheumatism Association, 51/04Swedish Social Insurance Agency, 11124
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Zetterström, A., Hämäläinen, M. D., Karlberg, E., Winkvist, M., Söderquist, M., Öhagen, P., . . . Nyberg, F. (2019). Maximum Time Between Tests: A Digital Biomarker to Detect Therapy Compliance and Assess Schedule Quality in Measurement-Based eHealth Systems for Alcohol Use Disorder. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 54(1), 70-72
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maximum Time Between Tests: A Digital Biomarker to Detect Therapy Compliance and Assess Schedule Quality in Measurement-Based eHealth Systems for Alcohol Use Disorder
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2019 (English)In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 70-72Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To evaluate, in a breathalyzer-based eHealth system, whether the time-based digital biomarker maximum time between tests' (MTBT) brings valuable information on alcohol consumption patterns as confirmed by correlation with blood phosphatidyl ethanol (PEth), serum carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) and timeline follow-back data.

Method: Data on 54 patients in follow-up for treatment of alcohol use disorder were analysed.

Results: The model of weekly averages of 24-log transformed MTBT adequately described timeline follow-back data (P < 0.0001, R = 0.27-0.38, n = 650). Significant correlations were noted between MTBT and PEth (P < 0.0001, R = 0.41, n = 148) and between MTBT and CDT (P < 0.0079, R = 0.22, n = 120).

Conclusions: The time-based digital biomarker maximum time between tests' described here has the potential to become a generally useful metric for all scheduled measurement-based eHealth systems to monitor test behaviour and compliance, factors important for dosing' of eHealth systems and for early prediction and interventions of lapse/relapse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2019
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381927 (URN)10.1093/alcalc/agy086 (DOI)000462547100012 ()30541059 (PubMedID)
Funder
Vinnova, 2014-03659
Available from: 2019-04-18 Created: 2019-04-18 Last updated: 2019-04-18Bibliographically approved
Gedeon, C., Sandell, M., Birkemose, I., Kakko, J., Runarsdottir, V., Simojoki, K., . . . Alho, H. (2019). Standards for opioid use disorder care: An assessment of Nordic approaches. Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 36(3), 286-298
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Standards for opioid use disorder care: An assessment of Nordic approaches
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2019 (English)In: Nordic Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, ISSN 1455-0725, E-ISSN 1458-6126, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 286-298Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Outcomes in opioid use disorder (OUD) in Nordic countries have improved with integrated treatment and harm-reduction programmes. Approaches and the standard of care are different across the region. Evidence of treatment needs and current approaches are defined from evidence to inform development of a common standard. Method: Evidence of population sizes and treatment approach collected. Common standards for care (harm reduction, pharmacotherapy, psychology/social therapy) defined for each country. Results: Evidence defines number in treatment; potential population needing treatment not defined for all countries. Populations sizes, treatment access (ratio in treatment programme compared to total country population) defined: Sweden 4,000 in OUD care (access ratio 40); Finland 3,000 (55); Norway 8,000 (154); Denmark 7,500 (132). Approach to treatment similar: integrated treatment programmes standard. Care provided by specialists in outpatient clinics/primary care; secondary care/inpatient services are available. Harm reduction is limited in Sweden but available and more accessible elsewhere. Treatment entry criteria: access relatively unlimited in Norway and Denmark, more limited in Finland and Sweden. Standards of care defined: easy access to high-quality services, individual planning, care not limited by time, management of relapse, education for patients, continuous engagement, holistic approach including management of comorbidities, needle equipment programmes without limit, treatment in prisons as community. Conclusion: There are opportunities to improve OUD care in the Nordics. Policy makers and clinicians can advance OUD care and share common success factors. Collaborative work across the Nordic countries is valuable. Further research in clinical practice development can yield important results for the benefit of patients with OUD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, 2019
Keywords
comparison, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, opioid use disorder, Sweden
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390036 (URN)10.1177/1455072518815322 (DOI)000471689700006 ()
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
Zelleroth, S., Nylander, E., Nyberg, F., Grönbladh, A. & Hallberg, M. (2019). Toxic Impact of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids in Primary Rat Cortical Cell Cultures. Neuroscience, 397, 172-183
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toxic Impact of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids in Primary Rat Cortical Cell Cultures
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2019 (English)In: Neuroscience, ISSN 0306-4522, E-ISSN 1873-7544, Vol. 397, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AASs) among non-athletes is a public health-problem, as abusers underestimate the negative effects associated with these drugs. The present study investigated the toxic effects of testosterone, nandrolone, stanozolol, and trenbolone, and aimed to understand how AAS abuse affects the brain. Mixed cortical cultures from embryonic rats were grown in vitro for 7 days and thereafter treated with increasing concentrations of AASs for 24 h (single-dose) or 3 days (repeated exposure). Cells were co-treated with the androgen-receptor (AR) antagonist flutamide, to determine whether the potential adverse effects observed were mediated by the AR. Cellular toxicity was determined by measuring mitochondrial activity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, and caspase-3/7 activity. Nandrolone, unlike the other AASs studied, indicated an effect on mitochondrial activity after 24 h. Furthermore, single-dose exposure with testosterone, nandrolone and trenbolone increased LDH release, while no effect was detected with stanozolol. However, all of the four steroids negatively affected mitochondrial function and resulted in LDH release after repeated exposure. Testosterone, nandrolone, and trenbolone caused their toxic effects by induction of apoptosis, unlike stanozolol that seemed to induce necrosis. Flutamide almost completely prevented AAS-induced toxicity by maintaining mitochondrial function, cellular integrity, and inhibition of apoptosis. Overall, we found that supra-physiological concentrations of AASs induce cell death in mixed primary cortical cultures, but to different extents, and possibly through various mechanisms. The data presented herein suggest that the molecular interactions of the AASs with the AR are primarily responsible for the toxic outcomes observed.

Keywords
mitochondrial function membrane integrity cell death androgen-receptor flutamide
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research subject
Pharmaceutical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-370111 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroscience.2018.11.035 (DOI)000454922800016 ()30500611 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 9459The Swedish Brain Foundation
Note

Även finansierat av Kjell och Märta Beijers stiftelse

Available from: 2018-12-19 Created: 2018-12-19 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Skogh, A., Lesniak, A., Sköld, C., Karlgren, M., Gaugaz, F. Z., Svensson, R., . . . Johansson, A. (2018). An imidazole based H-Phe-Phe-NH2 peptidomimetic with anti-allodynic effect in spared nerve injury mice. Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, 28(14), 2446-2450
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An imidazole based H-Phe-Phe-NH2 peptidomimetic with anti-allodynic effect in spared nerve injury mice
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2018 (English)In: Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters, ISSN 0960-894X, E-ISSN 1090-2120, Vol. 28, no 14, p. 2446-2450Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The dipeptide amide H-Phe-Phe-NH2 (1) that previously was identified as a ligand for the substance P 1-7 (SP1-7) binding site exerts intriguing results in animal models of neuropathic pain after central but not after peripheral administration. The dipeptide 1 is derived from stepwise modifications of the anti-nociceptive heptapeptide SP1-7 and the tetrapeptide endomorphin-2 that is also binding to the SP1-7 site. We herein report a strong anti-allodynic effect of a new H-Phe-Phe-NH2 peptidomimetic (4) comprising an imidazole ring as a bioisosteric element, in the spare nerve injury (SNI) mice model after peripheral administration. Peptidomimetic 4 was stable in plasma, displayed a fair membrane permeability and a favorable neurotoxic profile. Moreover, the effective dose (ED50) of 4 was superior as compared to gabapentin and morphine that are used in clinic.

National Category
Medicinal Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343682 (URN)10.1016/j.bmcl.2018.06.009 (DOI)000438467200020 ()29929882 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 9459
Note

Title in dissertation reference list: An Imidazole-Based H-Phe-Phe-NH2 Peptidomimetic with Anti-Allodynic Effect in Spared Nerve Injury Mice and without Neurotoxic Liability

Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-09-24Bibliographically approved
Lesniak, A., Aarnio, M., Diwakarla, S., Norberg, T., Nyberg, F. & Gordh, T. (2018). Characterization of the binding site for d-deprenyl in human inflamed synovial membrane.. Life Sciences, 194, 26-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Characterization of the binding site for d-deprenyl in human inflamed synovial membrane.
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2018 (English)In: Life Sciences, ISSN 0024-3205, E-ISSN 1879-0631, Vol. 194, p. 26-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: D-Deprenyl when used as a positron emission tomography tracer visualizes peripheral inflammation. The major aim of the current study was to identify and investigate the properties of the binding target for D-deprenyl in synovial membrane explants from arthritic patients.

Main methods: Thirty patients diagnosed with arthritis or osteoarthritis were enrolled into the study. Homologous and competitive radioligand binding assays utilizing [H-3]D-deprenyl were performed to investigate the biochemical characteristics of the binding site and assess differences in the binding profile in synovial membranes exhibiting varying levels of inflammation.

Key findings: The [H-3]D-deprenyl binding assay confirmed the existence of a single, saturable population of membrane-bound protein binding sites in synovial membrane homogenates. The macroscopically determined level of inflammation correlated with an increase in [H-3]D-deprenyl binding affinity, without significant alterations in binding site density. Selective monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, selegiline competed for the same site as [H-3]D-deprenyl, but failed to differentiate the samples with regard to their inflammation grade. A monoamine oxidase A inhibitor, pirlindole mesylate showed only weak displacement of [H-3]D-deprenyl binding. No significant alterations in monoamine oxidase B expression was detected, thus it was not confirmed whether it could serve as a marker for ongoing inflammation.

Significance: Our study was the first to show the biochemical characteristics of the [H-3]D-deprenyl binding site in inflamed human synovium. We confirmed that d-deprenyl could differentiate between patients with varying severity of synovitis in the knee joint by binding to a protein target distinct from monoamine oxidase B.

Keywords
Arthritis, Binding target, Monoamine oxidase B, Synovium, d-Deprenyl
National Category
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Research subject
Pharmaceutical Biochemistry; Medical Biochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347601 (URN)10.1016/j.lfs.2017.12.003 (DOI)000425052000004 ()29221756 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 9459
Available from: 2018-04-04 Created: 2018-04-04 Last updated: 2018-04-18Bibliographically approved
Brolin, E., Zelleroth, S., Jonsson, A., Hallberg, M., Grönbladh, A. & Nyberg, F. (2018). Chronic administration of morphine using mini-osmotic pumps affects spatial memory in the male rat. Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, 167, 1-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic administration of morphine using mini-osmotic pumps affects spatial memory in the male rat
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2018 (English)In: Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, ISSN 0091-3057, E-ISSN 1873-5177, Vol. 167, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The use of opioid analgesics to treat non-cancer pain has increased over the years. Many chronic pain patients suffer from numerous adverse effects, such as reduced quality of life, development of dependence, and cognitive impairments. Cognitive processes are regulated by several systems, one of which involves growth hormone (GH) and its secondary mediator insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), but also glutamatergic transmission, including receptors such as the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor complex. In the laboratory, repeated injections are commonly used to establish animal models of long-term or chronic drug exposure. However, in the present study, we aimed to mimic a more human dose regimen using constant drug delivery provided by mini-osmotic pumps implanted subcutaneously in male Sprague Dawley rats. After developing opioid tolerance the cognitive function of rats was studied. Spatial learning and memory capabilities were evaluated using the rat Morris water maze (MWM). Moreover, gene expression related to the GH/IGF-1-axis and the NMDA-receptor system was analyzed using quantitative PCR (qPCR) and plasma levels of IGF-1 were assessed using the ELISA technique. Our results demonstrate that rats exposed to morphine for 27 days display memory impairments in the MWM probe trial. However, the behavioral effects of chronic morphine treatment were not accompanied by any significant differences in terms of mRNA expression or IGF-1 plasma concentration. The animal model used in this study provides a simple and suitable way to investigate the behavioral and neurochemical effects of chronic opioid treatment similar to the exposure seen in human pain patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2018
Keywords
Morphine, Morris water maze (MWM), Mini-osmotic pumps, Memory, Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), Rats
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Pharmaceutical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-352711 (URN)10.1016/j.pbb.2018.01.007 (DOI)000430033600001 ()29421366 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 9459Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2019-05-28
Kakko, J., Gedeon, C., Sandell, M., Grelz, H., Birkemose, I., Clausen, T., . . . Nyberg, F. (2018). Principles for managing OUD related to chronic pain in the Nordic countries based on a structured assessment of current practice. Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, 13, Article ID 22.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Principles for managing OUD related to chronic pain in the Nordic countries based on a structured assessment of current practice
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2018 (English)In: Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy, ISSN 1747-597X, E-ISSN 1747-597X, Vol. 13, article id 22Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Long-term use of opioid analgesics (OA) for chronic pain may result in opioid use disorder (OUD). This is associated with adverse outcomes for individuals, families and society. Treatment needs of people with OUD related to chronic pain are different compared to dependence related to use, and also injection, of illicit opioids. In Nordic countries, day-to-day practical advice to assist clinical decision-making is insufficient.

Aim: To develop principles based on expert clinical insights for treatment of OUD related to the long-term use of OA in the context of chronic pain.

Methods: Current status including an assessment of barriers to effective treatment in Finland, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden was defined using a patient pathway model. Evidence to describe best practice was identified from published literature, clinical guidelines and expert recommendations from practice experience.

Results: Availability of national treatment guidelines for OUD related to chronic pain is limited across the Nordics. Important barriers to effective care identified: patients unlikely to present for help, healthcare system set up limits success, diagnosis tools not used, referral pathways unclear and treatment choices not elucidated. Principles include the development of a specific treatment pathway, awareness/ education programs for teams in primary care, guidance on use of diagnostic tools and a flexible treatment plan to encourage best practice in referral, treatment assessment, choice and ongoing management via an integrated care pathway. Healthcare systems and registries in Nordic countries offer an opportunity to further research and identify population risks and solutions.

Conclusions: There is an opportunity to improve outcomes for patients with OUD related to chronic pain by developing and introducing care pathways tailored to specific needs of the population.

Keywords
Opioid use disorder, Chronic pain, Nordics countries
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362654 (URN)10.1186/s13011-018-0160-7 (DOI)000433980900001 ()29859110 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-16 Created: 2018-10-16 Last updated: 2018-10-16Bibliographically approved
Hamalainen, M. D., Zetterstrom, A., Winkvist, M., Soderquist, M., Karlberg, E., Ohagen, P., . . . Nyberg, F. (2018). Real-time Monitoring Using a Breathalyzer-Based eHealth System Can Identify Lapse/Relapse Patterns in Alcohol Use Disorder Patients. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 53(4), 368-375
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Real-time Monitoring Using a Breathalyzer-Based eHealth System Can Identify Lapse/Relapse Patterns in Alcohol Use Disorder Patients
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2018 (English)In: Alcohol and Alcoholism, ISSN 0735-0414, E-ISSN 1464-3502, Vol. 53, no 4, p. 368-375Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: We introduce a new remote real-time breathalyzer-based method for monitoring and early identification of lapse/relapse patterns for alcohol use disorder (AUD) patients using a composite measure of sobriety, the Addiction Monitoring Index (AMI). Methods: We constructed AMI from (a) obtained test results and (b) the pattern of ignored tests using data from the first 30 patients starting in the treatment arms of two on-going clinical trials. The patients performed 2-4 scheduled breath alcohol content (BrAC)-tests per day presented as blood alcohol content (BAC) data. In total, 10,973 tests were scheduled, 7743 were performed and 3230 were ignored during 3982 patient days. Results: AMI-time profiles could be used to monitor the daily trends of alcohol consumption and detect early signs of lapse and relapses. The pattern of ignored tests correlates with the onset of drinking. AMI correlated with phosphatidyl ethanol (n = 61, F-ratio = 34.6, P < 0.0001, R = -0.61). The recognition of secret drinking could further be improved using a low alcohol detection threshold (BrAC = 0.025 mg/l, BAC(Swe) = 0.05% or US = 0.0053 g/dl), in addition to the legal Swedish traffic limit (BrAC = 0.1 mg/l, BAC(Swe) = 0.2% or US = 0.021 g/dl). Nine out of 10 patients who dropped out from the study showed early risk signs as reflected in the level and pattern in AMI before the actual dropout. Conclusions: AMI-time profiles from an eHealth system are useful for monitoring the recovery process and for early identification of lapse/relapse patterns. High-resolution monitoring of sobriety enables new measurement-based treatment methods for proactive personalized long-term relapse prevention and treatment of AUD patients. Clinical Trial Registration: The data used for construction of AMI was from two clinical trials approved by the Regional Ethics Committee of Uppsala, Sweden and performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Written informed consent was obtained from all participating subjects. The study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT03195894).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362169 (URN)10.1093/alcalc/agy011 (DOI)000439653000004 ()29590325 (PubMedID)
Funder
VINNOVA, 2014-03659
Note

Correction: A correction has been published: Alcohol and Alcoholism, Volume 53, Issue 4, 1 July 2018, Pages 499, https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agy028

Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Nylander, E., Zelleroth, S., Nyberg, F., Grönbladh, A. & Hallberg, M. (2018). The Protective and Restorative Effects of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 on Methadone-Induced Toxicity In Vitro. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 19(11), 1-16, Article ID ijms-387278.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Protective and Restorative Effects of Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 on Methadone-Induced Toxicity In Vitro
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2018 (English)In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, ISSN 1422-0067, E-ISSN 1422-0067, Vol. 19, no 11, p. 1-16, article id ijms-387278Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence to date suggests that opioids such as methadone may be associated with cognitive impairment. Growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) are suggested to be neuroprotective and procognitive in the brain and may therefore counteract these effects. This study aims to explore the protective and restorative effects of GH and IGF-1 in methadone-treated cell cultures. Primary cortical cell cultures were harvested from rat fetuses and grown for seven days in vitro. To examine the protective effects, methadone was co-treated with or without GH or IGF-1 for three consecutive days. To examine the restorative effects, methadone was added for the first 24 h, washed, and later treated with GH or IGF-1 for 48 h. At the end of each experiment, mitochondrial function and membrane integrity were evaluated. The results revealed that GH had protective effects in the membrane integrity assay and that both GH and IGF-1 effectively recovered mitochondrial function and membrane integrity in cells pretreated with methadone. The overall conclusion of the present study is that GH, but not IGF-1, protects primary cortical cells against methadone-induced toxicity, and that both GH and IGF-1 have a restorative effect on cells pretreated with methadone.

Keywords
growth hormone; insulin-like growth factor-1; neuroprotection; neurorecovery; cognition; primary cell cultures; methadone; opioids
National Category
Basic Medicine Cell and Molecular Biology
Research subject
Pharmaceutical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369995 (URN)10.3390/ijms19113627 (DOI)000451528500343 ()30453639 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 9459The Swedish Brain Foundation
Note

Även finansierat av Kjell och Märta Beijer stiftelsen.

Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-10-04Bibliographically approved
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