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Marklund, M., Wu, J. H. Y., Imamura, F., Del Gobbo, L. C., Fretts, A., de Goede, J., . . . Risérus, U. (2019). Biomarkers of Dietary Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: An Individual-Level Pooled Analysis of 30 Cohort Studies. Circulation, 139(21), 2422-2436
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biomarkers of Dietary Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Incident Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: An Individual-Level Pooled Analysis of 30 Cohort Studies
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2019 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 139, no 21, p. 2422-2436Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Global dietary recommendations for and cardiovascular effects of linoleic acid, the major dietary omega-6 fatty acid, and its major metabolite, arachidonic acid, remain controversial. To address this uncertainty and inform international recommendations, we evaluated how in vivo circulating and tissue levels of linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA) relate to incident cardiovascular disease (CVD) across multiple international studies.

Methods:

We performed harmonized, de novo, individual-level analyses in a global consortium of 30 prospective observational studies from 13 countries. Multivariable-adjusted associations of circulating and adipose tissue LA and AA biomarkers with incident total CVD and subtypes (coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, cardiovascular mortality) were investigated according to a prespecified analytic plan. Levels of LA and AA, measured as the percentage of total fatty acids, were evaluated linearly according to their interquintile range (ie, the range between the midpoint of the first and fifth quintiles), and categorically by quintiles. Study-specific results were pooled using inverse-variance-weighted meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was explored by age, sex, race, diabetes mellitus, statin use, aspirin use, omega-3 levels, and fatty acid desaturase 1 genotype (when available).

Results:

In 30 prospective studies with medians of follow-up ranging 2.5 to 31.9 years, 15198 incident cardiovascular events occurred among 68659 participants. Higher levels of LA were significantly associated with lower risks of total CVD, cardiovascular mortality, and ischemic stroke, with hazard ratios per interquintile range of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.88-0.99), 0.78 (0.70-0.85), and 0.88 (0.79-0.98), respectively, and nonsignificantly with lower coronary heart disease risk (0.94; 0.88-1.00). Relationships were similar for LA evaluated across quintiles. AA levels were not associated with higher risk of cardiovascular outcomes; in a comparison of extreme quintiles, higher levels were associated with lower risk of total CVD (0.92; 0.86-0.99). No consistent heterogeneity by population subgroups was identified in the observed relationships.

Conclusions:

In pooled global analyses, higher in vivo circulating and tissue levels of LA and possibly AA were associated with lower risk of major cardiovascular events. These results support a favorable role for LA in CVD prevention.

Keywords
arachidonic acid, biomarkers, cardiovascular diseases, diet, epidemiology, linoleic acid, primary prevention
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387592 (URN)10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.118.038908 (DOI)000469018300011 ()30971107 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Gulseth, H. L., Gjelstad, I. M. F., Tiereny, A. C., McCarthy, D., Lovegrove, J. A., Defoort, C., . . . Birkeland, K. I. (2019). Effects of dietary fat on insulin secretion in subjects with the metabolic syndrome. European Journal of Endocrinology, 180(5), 321-328
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of dietary fat on insulin secretion in subjects with the metabolic syndrome
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Endocrinology, ISSN 0804-4643, E-ISSN 1479-683X, Vol. 180, no 5, p. 321-328Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Impaired insulin secretion and action contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Dietary fat modification may improve insulin sensitivity, whereas the effect on insulin secretion is unclear. We investigated the effect of dietary fat modification on insulin secretion in subjects with the metabolic syndrome.

Design: In a 12-week pan-European parallel, randomized controlled dietary intervention trial (LIPGENE), 486 subjects were assigned to four isoenergetic diets: high-fat diets rich in saturated fat (HSFA) or monounsaturated fat (HMUFA) or low-fat, high-complex carbohydrate diets with (LFHCC n-3) or without (LFHCC control) 1.2 g/day of n-3 PUFA supplementation. Insulin secretion was estimated as acute insulin response to glucose (AIRg) and disposition index (DI), modeled from an intravenous glucose tolerance test.

Results: There were no overall effect of the dietary intervention on AIRg and DI in the total cohort, in neither the highfat nor LFHCC groups. We observed significant diet*fasting glucose category interactions for AIRg (P = 0.021) and DI (P = 0.001) in the high-fat groups. In subjects with normal fasting glucose and preserved first phase insulin secretion, the HMUFA diet increased, whereas the HSFA diet reduced AIRg (P = 0.015) and DI (P = 0.010).

Conclusions: The effects of dietary fat modification on insulin secretion were minor, and only evident in normoglycemic subjects. In this case, the HMUFA diet improved AIRg and DI, as compared to the HSFA diet.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BIOSCIENTIFICA LTD, 2019
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382818 (URN)10.1530/EJE-19-0022 (DOI)000464997600007 ()30893645 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-05-06Bibliographically approved
Myhrstad, M. C. W., de Mello, V. D., Dahlman, I., Kolehmainen, M., Paananen, J., Rundblad, A., . . . Ulven, S. M. (2019). Healthy Nordic Diet Modulates the Expression of Genes Related to Mitochondrial Function and Immune Response in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome-A SYSDIET Sub-Study. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 63(13), Article ID 1801405.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy Nordic Diet Modulates the Expression of Genes Related to Mitochondrial Function and Immune Response in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Subjects with Metabolic Syndrome-A SYSDIET Sub-Study
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2019 (English)In: Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, ISSN 1613-4125, E-ISSN 1613-4133, Vol. 63, no 13, article id 1801405Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Scope To explore the effect of a healthy Nordic diet on the global transcriptome profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of subjects with metabolic syndrome. Methods and results Subjects with metabolic syndrome undergo a 18/24 week randomized intervention study comparing an isocaloric healthy Nordic diet with an average habitual Nordic diet served as control (SYSDIET study). Altogether, 68 participants are included. PBMCs are obtained before and after intervention and total RNA is subjected to global transcriptome analysis. 1302 probe sets are differentially expressed between the diet groups (p-value < 0.05). Twenty-five of these are significantly regulated (FDR q-value < 0.25) and are mainly involved in mitochondrial function, cell growth, and cell adhesion. The list of 1302 regulated probe sets is subjected to functional analyses. Pathways and processes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, immune response, and cell cycle are downregulated in the healthy Nordic diet group. In addition, gene transcripts with common motifs for 42 transcription factors, including NFR1, NFR2, and NF-kappa B, are downregulated in the healthy Nordic diet group. Conclusion These results suggest that benefits of a healthy diet may be mediated by improved mitochondrial function and reduced inflammation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
gene-expression, healthy Nordic diet, metabolic syndrome, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, transcriptome
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390915 (URN)10.1002/mnfr.201801405 (DOI)000473667000001 ()30964598 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung FoundationNordForsk, 070014Swedish Diabetes Association
Available from: 2019-08-15 Created: 2019-08-15 Last updated: 2019-08-15Bibliographically approved
Diamanti, K., Cavalli, M., Pan, G., Pereira, M. J., Kumar, C., Skrtic, S., . . . Wadelius, C. (2019). Intra- and inter-individual metabolic profiling highlights carnitine and lysophosphatidylcholine pathways as key molecular defects in type 2 diabetes. Scientific Reports, 9, Article ID 9653.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra- and inter-individual metabolic profiling highlights carnitine and lysophosphatidylcholine pathways as key molecular defects in type 2 diabetes
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2019 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, article id 9653Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Type 2 diabetes (T2D) mellitus is a complex metabolic disease commonly caused by insulin resistance in several tissues. We performed a matched two-dimensional metabolic screening in tissue samples from 43 multi-organ donors. The intra-individual analysis was assessed across five key metabolic tissues (serum, visceral adipose tissue, liver, pancreatic islets and skeletal muscle), and the inter-individual across three different groups reflecting T2D progression. We identified 92 metabolites differing significantly between non-diabetes and T2D subjects. In diabetes cases, carnitines were significantly higher in liver, while lysophosphatidylcholines were significantly lower in muscle and serum. We tracked the primary tissue of origin for multiple metabolites whose alterations were reflected in serum. An investigation of three major stages spanning from controls, to pre-diabetes and to overt T2D indicated that a subset of lysophosphatidylcholines was significantly lower in the muscle of pre-diabetes subjects. Moreover, glycodeoxycholic acid was significantly higher in liver of pre-diabetes subjects while additional increase in T2D was insignificant. We confirmed many previously reported findings and substantially expanded on them with altered markers for early and overt T2D. Overall, the analysis of this unique dataset can increase the understanding of the metabolic interplay between organs in the development of T2D.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391017 (URN)10.1038/s41598-019-45906-5 (DOI)000474222900010 ()31273253 (PubMedID)
Funder
AstraZenecaSwedish Research Council FormaseSSENCE - An eScience CollaborationSwedish Diabetes AssociationErnfors Foundation
Available from: 2019-08-21 Created: 2019-08-21 Last updated: 2019-08-21Bibliographically approved
Tan, X., Cedernaes, J., Risérus, U. & Benedict, C. (2019). Lack of association between self-reported insomnia symptoms and clamp-derived insulin sensitivity in elderly men. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 102, 256-260
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lack of association between self-reported insomnia symptoms and clamp-derived insulin sensitivity in elderly men
2019 (English)In: Psychoneuroendocrinology, ISSN 0306-4530, E-ISSN 1873-3360, Vol. 102, p. 256-260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Insomnia-related sleep disruptions, such as short and disturbed sleep, have been tied to systemic insulin resistance in young adult populations. We therefore sought to confirm these findings in a cohort of elderly men. To this aim, we utilized variables from 980 men who participated in the investigation at age 70 of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men. Self-reported insomnia symptoms were assessed by questions about difficulty initiating sleep, early final awakening, and regular use of hypnotics. All participants also underwent the gold standard hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique to assess the insulin sensitivity index (M/I). Finally, fasting blood was collected to measure free fatty acids (FFAs) and adiponectin. Differences in blood parameters between men with and those without insomnia were determined by ANCOVA, and were adjusted for lifestyle and cardio-metabolic risk factors. Our analysis yielded no differences in M/I, FFAs, and adiponectin between men with and those without insomnia symptoms. Analyses in non-diabetic and diabetic subsamples confirmed these negative findings. Our cross-sectional results therefore suggest that insomnia symptoms may have a minimal effect, if any, on measures of insulin sensitivity in elderly men. Given the observational design of our study, future studies are needed to determine whether experimental sleep manipulations influence systemic insulin sensitivity in elderly humans, as has previously been shown in young adult populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2019
Keywords
Male cohort, Insomnia symptoms, Clamp-derived insulin sensitivity, Adiponectin, Free fatty acids
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382522 (URN)10.1016/j.psyneuen.2018.12.227 (DOI)000462800900032 ()30594818 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-03100Novo Nordisk, NNF14OC0009349The Swedish Brain FoundationÅke Wiberg Foundation, M17-0088Fredrik och Ingrid Thurings Stiftelse, 2017-00313
Available from: 2019-04-29 Created: 2019-04-29 Last updated: 2019-04-29Bibliographically approved
Berglund, L., Risérus, U. & Hambraeus, K. (2019). Repeated measures of body mass index and waist circumference in the assessment of mortality risk in patients with myocardial infarction. Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, 124(1), 78-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated measures of body mass index and waist circumference in the assessment of mortality risk in patients with myocardial infarction
2019 (English)In: Upsala Journal of Medical Sciences, ISSN 0300-9734, E-ISSN 2000-1967, Vol. 124, no 1, p. 78-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: Weight loss is recommended for myocardial infarction (MI) patients with overweight or obesity. It has, however, been suggested that obese patients have better prognosis than normal-weight patients have, but also that central obesity is harmful. The aim of this study was to examine associations between repeated measures of body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC), and all-cause mortality.

Methods and results: A total of 14,224 MI patients aged <75 years in Sweden between the years 2004 and 2013 had measurements of risk factors at hospital discharge. The patients' BMI and WC were recorded in secondary prevention clinics two months and one year after hospital discharge. We collected mortality data up to 8.3 years after the last visit. There were 721 deaths. We used anthropometric measures at the two-month visit and the change from the two-month to the one-year visit. With adjustments for risk factors and the other anthropometric measure the hazard ratio (HR) per standard deviation in a Cox proportional hazard regression model for mortality was 0.64 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.56-0.74) for BMI and 1.55 (95% CI 1.34-1.79) for WC, and 1.43 (95% CI 1.17-1.74) for a BMI decrease from month two to one year of more than 0.6 kg/m(2). Low BMI and high WC were associated with the highest mortality.

Conclusion: High WC is harmful regardless of BMI in MI patients. Reduced BMI during the first year after MI is, however, associated with higher mortality, potentially being an indicator of deteriorated health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2019
Keywords
Body mass index, myocardial infarction, obesity paradox, repeated measurements, waist circumference
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-381210 (URN)10.1080/03009734.2018.1494644 (DOI)000461811100016 ()30256695 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-10 Created: 2019-04-10 Last updated: 2019-04-10Bibliographically approved
Hansson, S. O., Åman, P., Becker, W., De Koning, D.-J., Lagerkvist, C. J., Larsson, I., . . . Stymne, S. (2018). Breeding for public health: A strategy. Trends in Food Science & Technology, 80, 131-140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breeding for public health: A strategy
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2018 (English)In: Trends in Food Science & Technology, ISSN 0924-2244, E-ISSN 1879-3053, Vol. 80, p. 131-140Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Plant and animal breeding can contribute to promote human health by providing new and healthier food products that farmers can produce in an economically viable way and consumers will choose to buy and eat. However, this can only be achieved if breeding makes full use of knowledge about nutrition, consumer behaviour, farming and agricultural economics, A strategy is needed for breeding for public health. Scope and Approach: A multidisciplinary group of researchers has developed a strategy for plant and animal breeding for public health. The group includes experts in plant breeding, animal breeding, food science, nutrition science, clinical nutrition, agricultural economics, consumer research, and ethics. Key Findings and Conclusions: An outline is proposed of a strategy for breeding for public health. It aims at improving public health in both low- and high-income countries. To prevent chronic disease, the highest priority should be to develop healthy variants of traditional food items that can be introduced universally, i.e. completely replace the older, less healthy variants. In particular in low-income countries, food products with enhanced micronutrient content are urgently needed. In all countries, crops with improved fatty acid composition can contribute substantially to improved public health. A reasonable second priority is products that may not be suitable for universal introduction but will expectedly be demanded by large groups of consumers. One example could be diminishing the energy density of traditional foodstuffs by reducing their fat, sugar, and starch content and increasing their dietary fibre content, Changes in the current organization of the market for farm products are needed to encourage the production of healthier foodstuffs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE LONDON, 2018
Keywords
Animal breeding, Consumers, Energy density, Fat composition, Food choice, Genetic modification, Micronutrients, Nutrition, Obesity, Plant breeding, Public health
National Category
Food Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369057 (URN)10.1016/j.tifs.2018.07.023 (DOI)000447080600012 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, K2015-54X-22081-04-3Mistra - The Swedish Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2018-12-14Bibliographically approved
Ruge, T., Carlsson, A. C., Ingelsson, E., Risérus, U., Sundström, J., Larsson, A., . . . Ärnlöv, J. (2018). Circulating endostatin and the incidence of heart failure.. Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, 52(5), 244-249
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating endostatin and the incidence of heart failure.
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2018 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 52, no 5, p. 244-249Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Circulating levels of endostatin are elevated in many underlying conditions leading to heart failure such as hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease and ischemic heart disease. Yet, the association between endostatin and the incidence of heart failure has not been reported previously in the community.

Design: We investigated the longitudinal association between serum endostatin levels and incident heart failure in two community-based cohorts of elderly: Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS, n = 966; mean age 70 years, 51% women, 81 events, mean follow-up 10 years) and Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM, n = 747 men; mean age 78 years, 98 heart failure events, mean follow-up 8 years). We also investigated the cross-sectional association between endostatin and echocardiographic left ventricular systolic function and diastolic function (ejection fraction and E/A-ratio, respectively).

Results: Higher serum endostatin was associated with an increased risk for heart failure in both cohorts after adjustment for established heart failure risk factors, glomerular filtration rate and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) (PIVUS: multivariable hazard ratio (HR) per 1-standard deviation (SD) increase, HR 1.46 (95%CI, 1.17-1.82, p < .001); ULSAM: HR 1.29 (95%CI, 1.00-1.68, p < .05). In cross-sectional analyses at baseline, higher endostatin was significantly associated with both worsened left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in both cohorts.

Conclusion: Higher serum endostatin was associated with left ventricular dysfunction and an increased heart failure risk in two community-based cohorts of elderly. Our findings encourage further experimental studies that investigate the role of endostatin in the development of heart failure.

Keywords
Heart failure, angiogenesis, anti-angiogenesis, epidemiology, left ventricular systolic function, population based studies, remodelling of extracellular matrix
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363655 (URN)10.1080/14017431.2018.1483080 (DOI)000460703000003 ()29893146 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Heart Lung FoundationEU, Horizon 2020, 634869Marianne and Marcus Wallenberg Foundation, 634869Thuréus stiftelse för främjande av geriatrisk forskning
Available from: 2018-10-18 Created: 2018-10-18 Last updated: 2019-04-01Bibliographically approved
Laguzzi, F., Risérus, U., Marklund, M., Vikström, M., Sjögren, P., Gigante, B., . . . Leander, K. (2018). Circulating fatty acids in relation to alcohol consumption: Cross-sectional results from a cohort of 60-year-old men and women. Clinical Nutrition, 37(6, Part A), 2001-2010
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating fatty acids in relation to alcohol consumption: Cross-sectional results from a cohort of 60-year-old men and women
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2018 (English)In: Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0261-5614, E-ISSN 1532-1983, Vol. 37, no 6, Part A, p. 2001-2010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background & aims: Alcohol consumption is considered to affect circulating fatty acids (FAs) but knowledge about specific associations is limited. We aimed to assess the relation between alcohol consumption and serum FAs in 60-year-old Swedish men and women.

Methods: In a random sample of 1917 men and 2058 women residing in Stockholm county, cross-sectional associations between different categories of alcohol consumption and FAs were assessed using linear regression; beta(1) coefficients with 95% confidence interval (Cl) were calculated. Self-reported alcohol consumption was categorized as none, low (<= 9.9 g/day) (reference), moderate (10-29.9 g/day) and high (>= 30 g/day). Moderate alcohol consumption was further subdivided into consumption of beer, wine, liquor and their combinations. Thirteen serum cholesterol ester FM were measured by gas chromatography and individual FM were expressed as percentage of total FAs.

Results: Increasing alcohol consumption was associated to linear increase of saturated myristic acid, monounsaturated FAs and n-6 polyunsaturated (PUFA) arachidonic acid, whereas linear decrease was noted for saturated pentadecanoic acid and for n-6 PUFA linoleic acid. With non-linear associations, increasing alcohol consumption also associated to decreased saturated stearic acid, n-6 PUFA dihomogamma-linolenic acid, and n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid and increased saturated palmitic acid, n-6 PUFA gamma-linolenic acid and n-3 PUFA eicosapentaenoic acid. Among types of beverages, wine consumption was associated with n-6 PUFA arachidonic acid (beta(1) 0.59; 95% CI: 030;0.88) and the n-3 PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (beta(1) 0.54; 95% CI: 0.30;0.78), and docosahexaenoic acid (beta(1) 0.06; 95% CI: 0.00;0.12).

Conclusions: These findings may give important basis for further investigations to better understand biological mechanisms behind the dose-dependent associations between alcohol consumption and health outcomes observed in many previous studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CHURCHILL LIVINGSTONE, 2018
Keywords
Ethanol, Alcohol drinking, Alcoholic beverages, Wine, Beer, Fatty acids
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375579 (URN)10.1016/j.clnu.2017.09.007 (DOI)000455069400023 ()29032841 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 52120133894Swedish Research Council, 09533Stockholm County Council, 20150163Swedish Heart Lung Foundation, 20150581
Available from: 2019-01-31 Created: 2019-01-31 Last updated: 2019-01-31Bibliographically approved
Lampa, E., Arnlöv, J., Sundström, J., Risérus, U. & Lind, L. (2018). Diabetes increases the mortality in myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke: results from a longitudinal study over 40 years. Paper presented at 54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY. Diabetologia, 61, S178-S178
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Diabetes increases the mortality in myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke: results from a longitudinal study over 40 years
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2018 (English)In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 61, p. S178-S178Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2018
National Category
Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367128 (URN)000443556002149 ()
Conference
54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), OCT 01-05, 2018, Berlin, GERMANY
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-11-30Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8620-4586

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