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Wang, J., Zhao, Z., Zhang, Y., Li, B., Huang, C., Zhang, X., . . . Norbäck, D. (2019). Asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema among parents of preschool children in relation to climate, and dampness and mold in dwellings in China. Environment International, 130, Article ID 104910.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema among parents of preschool children in relation to climate, and dampness and mold in dwellings in China
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 130, article id 104910Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main aim was to study associations between asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema among adults across China and dampness and mold at home. Young adults (N = 40,279) in eight cities in China answered a questionnaire in 2010-2012 (response rate 75.0%). Data on asthma, allergic rhinitis, eczema and the home environment was assessed by the questionnaire. Climate data was obtained from China Meteorological Administration and the website of Weather Underground. Health associations were analyzed by two-level logistic regression models, adjusting for covariates. Totally 1.6% had asthma, 6.6% allergic rhinitis and 2.2% eczema. Mold odor was associated with asthma (OR = 1.90) and allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.25-1.44). Window pane condensation in winter was associated with asthma (OR = 1.39), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.26-1.58) and eczema (OR = 1.36-1.77). Presence of mold spots or damp stains was related to asthma (OR = 1.58-2.49), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.35-1.76) and eczema (OR = 1.47-1.70). Water damage was related to asthma (OR = 1.69-1.82), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.40-1.45) and eczema (OR = 1.44-1.96). Damp bed clothing was related to asthma (OR = 1.23), allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.23) and eczema (OR = 1.35). A higher dampness score was associated with increased odds ratios for diseases. Those living in older buildings had more asthma (OR = 1.39-1.76) and allergic rhinitis (OR = 1.16-1.21). Those living in suburban or rural areas had less asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema as compared to those living in urban areas (OR values from 0.24 to 0.66). Stronger health associations with dampness and mold were found in southern China and in newer buildings (constructed after 2005). In conclusion, dampness and mold at home can be risk factors for asthma, allergic rhinitis and eczema among adults in China. Living in older buildings can be risk factors for asthma or allergic rhinitis while living in less urbanized areas can be protective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD, 2019
Keywords
Asthma, Allergic rhinitis, Eczema, Dampness, Mold, Climate
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-392122 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2019.104910 (DOI)000477934800019 ()31226554 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05845AFA Insurance, 467801100
Available from: 2019-09-03 Created: 2019-09-03 Last updated: 2019-09-03Bibliographically approved
Zhang, X., Norbäck, D., Fan, Q., Bai, X., Li, T., Zhang, Y., . . . Wang, J. (2019). Dampness and mold in homes across China: Associations with rhinitis, ocular, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue among adults. Indoor Air, 29(1), 30-42
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dampness and mold in homes across China: Associations with rhinitis, ocular, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue among adults
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2019 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We studied dampness and mold in China in relation to rhinitis, ocular, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue. A questionnaire study was performed in six cities including 36 541 randomized parents of young children. Seven self-reported signs of dampness were evaluated. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs). Totally, 3.1% had weekly rhinitis, 2.8% eye, 4.1% throat and 4.8% skin symptoms, 3.0% headache and 13.9% fatigue. Overall, 6.3% of the homes had mold, 11.1% damp stains, 35.3% damp bed clothing, 12.8% water damage, 45.4% window pane condensation, 11.1% mold odor, and 37.5% humid air. All dampness signs were associated with symptoms (ORs from 1.2 to 4.6; P < 0.001), including rhinitis (ORs from 1.4 to 3.2; P < 0.001), and ORs increased by number of dampness signs. The strongest associations were for mold odor (ORs from 2.3 to 4.6) and humid air (ORs from 2.8 to 4.8). Associations were stronger among men and stronger in Beijing as compared to south China. In conclusion, dampness and mold are common in Chinese homes and associated with rhinitis and ocular, throat and dermal symptoms, headache and fatigue. Men can be more sensitive to dampness and health effects of dampness can be stronger in northern China.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
dampness, home environment, mold odor, rhinitis, sick building syndrome, water damage
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372871 (URN)10.1111/ina.12517 (DOI)000453742000004 ()30379348 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 348-2011-7402
Note

De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-01-10 Created: 2019-01-10 Last updated: 2019-01-10Bibliographically approved
Wang, J., Pindus, M., Janson, C., Sigsgaard, T., Kim, J.-L., Holm, M., . . . Norbäck, D. (2019). Dampness, mould, onset and remission of adult respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis. European Respiratory Journal, 53(5), Article ID 1801921.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dampness, mould, onset and remission of adult respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis
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2019 (English)In: European Respiratory Journal, ISSN 0903-1936, E-ISSN 1399-3003, Vol. 53, no 5, article id 1801921Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study question: Is dampness and indoor mould associated with onset and remission of respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis among adults?

Materials and methods: Associations between dampness, mould and mould odour at home and at work and respiratory health were investigated in a cohort of 11 506 adults from Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Denmark and Estonia. They answered a questionnaire at baseline and 10 years later, with questions on respiratory health, home and work environment.

Results: Baseline water damage, floor dampness, mould and mould odour at home were associated with onset of respiratory symptoms and asthma (OR 1.23-2.24). Dampness at home during follow-up was associated with onset of respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis (OR 1.21-1.52). Dampness at work during follow-up was associated with onset of respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis (OR 1.31-1.50). Combined dampness at home and at work increased the risk of onset of respiratory symptoms and rhinitis. Dampness and mould at home and at work decreased remission of respiratory symptoms and rhinitis.

The answer to the question: Dampness and mould at home and at work can increase onset of respiratory symptoms, asthma and rhinitis, and decrease remission.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, 2019
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387961 (URN)10.1183/13993003.01921-2018 (DOI)000470244000010 ()30880288 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Heart Lung FoundationVårdal FoundationThe Research Council of Norway
Available from: 2019-06-27 Created: 2019-06-27 Last updated: 2019-06-27Bibliographically approved
Olivieri, M., Murgia, N., Carsin, A.-E., Heinrich, J., Benke, G., Bono, R., . . . Verlato, G. (2019). Effects of smoking bans on passive smoking exposure at work and at home: The European Community respiratory health survey. Indoor Air, 29(4), 670-679
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of smoking bans on passive smoking exposure at work and at home: The European Community respiratory health survey
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2019 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 670-679Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This longitudinal study investigated whether smoking bans influence passive smoking at work and/or at home in the same subjects. Passive smoking at work and/or at home was investigated in random population samples (European Community Respiratory Health Survey) in 1990-1995, with follow-up interviews in 1998-2003 and 2010-2014. National smoking bans were classified as partial (restricted to public workplaces) or global (extended to private workplaces). Multivariable analysis was accomplished by three-level logistic regression models, where level-1, level-2, and level-3 units were, respectively, questionnaire responses, subjects, and centers. Passive smoking at work was reported by 31.9% in 1990-1995, 17.5% in 1998-2003, and 2.5% in 2010-2014. Concurrently, passive smoking at home decreased from 28.9% to 18.2% and 8.8%. When controlling for sex, age, education, smoking status, and ECHRS wave, the odds of passive smoking at work was markedly reduced after global smoking bans (OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.25-0.81), particularly among non-smokers, while the protective effect of global smoking bans on passive smoking at home was only detected in non-smokers. Smoking bans both in public and private workplaces were effective in reducing passive smoking at work in Europe. However, given the inefficacy of smoking bans in current smokers' dwellings, better strategies are needed to avoid smoking indoors.

Keywords
follow-up study, home environment, secondhand smoke, smoking restriction, social settings, workplace
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388764 (URN)10.1111/ina.12556 (DOI)000471273100013 ()30963644 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Norbäck, D., Zhang, X., Fan, Q., Zhang, Z., Zhang, Y., Li, B., . . . Wang, J. (2019). Home environment and health: Domestic risk factors for rhinitis, throat symptoms and non-respiratory symptoms among adults across China. Science of the Total Environment, 681, 320-330
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Home environment and health: Domestic risk factors for rhinitis, throat symptoms and non-respiratory symptoms among adults across China
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2019 (English)In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 681, p. 320-330Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few studies exist from China on associations between home environment and adult health. We studied associations between home environment factors (other than dampness and mould) and rhinitis, throat and dermal symptoms and headache and fatigue among young parents in six cities across China (N = 36,541). They were recruited as parents from day care centers selected randomly and answered a questionnaire on medical symptoms and the home environment. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated by multilevel logistic regression adjusting for gender, atopy, smoking, home size and dampness/mould. Overall, 4.8% had skin symptoms 3.1% rhinitis, 2.8% eye, 4.1% throat symptoms, 3.0% headache and 13.9% had fatigue (all as weekly symptoms). Redecoration was associated with rhinitis, eye and skin symptoms, headache and fatigue. New furniture was associated with eye, throat and skin symptoms and fatigue. Gas cooking was associated with eye and throat symptoms, headache and fatigue. Biomass cooking was associated with eye and throat symptoms and headache. Burning incense was associated with eye, throat and skin symptoms, headache and fatigue. Presence of cockroaches and mosquitos or flies was associated with all six symptoms. Rats or mice were associated with eye and dermal symptoms. Cat keeping was associated with eye symptoms while dog keepers had less fatigue. Living near major roads was associated with rhinitis, eye, throat and skin symptoms and fatigue. Daily cleaning, a mechanical ventilation system in the kitchen or in the bathroom, living in older buildings and living in less urbanized areas were protective factors. In conclusion, urbanization, traffic exhaust, indoor emissions from redecoration and new furniture, gas cooking and air pollution from burning incense and biomass may cause dermal and mucosal symptoms, headache and fatigue among adults in China. Indoor animals (cats, mice/rats, cockroaches) were other risk factors. Daily cleaning, mechanical ventilation and living in older buildings can be protective. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, 2019
Keywords
Home environment, Sick Building Syndrome (SBS), Air pollution, Redecoration, Incense burning, Cockroaches
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-387712 (URN)10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.05.084 (DOI)000469847200030 ()31121396 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 348-2011-7402Swedish Research Council, 2017-05845
Available from: 2019-06-26 Created: 2019-06-26 Last updated: 2019-06-26Bibliographically approved
Cai, J., Li, B., Yu, W., Wang, H., Du, C., Zhang, Y., . . . Sundell, J. (2019). Household dampness-related exposures in relation to childhood asthma and rhinitis in China: A multicentre observational study. Environment International, 126, 735-746
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household dampness-related exposures in relation to childhood asthma and rhinitis in China: A multicentre observational study
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 126, p. 735-746Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During 2010-2012, we conducted an observational study on household environment and health outcomes among 40,010 preschool children from seven cities of China. Here we examined associations of six dampness-related indicators (visible mold spots, visible damp stains, damp clothing and/or bedding, water damage, condensation on windowpane, moldy odor) in the current residence and three dampness-related indicators (visible mold spots, condensation on windowpane, moldy odor) in the early residence with childhood asthma and rhinitis. In the multi-level logistic regression analyses, visible mold spots and visible damp stains in the current residence were significantly associated with the increased odds of doctor-diagnosed asthma and allergic rhinitis during lifetime-ever (adjusted odd ratios (AORs) range: 1.18-1.35). All dampness-related indicators were significantly associated with increased odds of wheeze and rhinitis during lifetime-ever and in the past 12 months (AORs range: 1.16-2.64). The cumulative numbers of damp indicators had positively dose-response relationships with the increased odds of the studied diseases. These associations for wheeze and rhinitis were similar between northern children and southern children. Similar results were found in the sensitive analyses among children without a family history of allergies and among children without asthma and allergic rhinitis. For 3-6 years-old children in mainland of China in 2011, we speculated that about 90,000 (2.02%) children with asthma and about 59,000 (1.09%) children with allergic rhinitis could be attributable to exposing to visible mold spots in the current residence. Our results suggested that early and lifetime exposures to household dampness indicators are risk factors for childhood asthma and rhinitis.

Keywords
Home, Dampness, Asthma, Rhinitis, Children, China
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382244 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2019.03.013 (DOI)000462597500082 ()30878869 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-15 Created: 2019-05-15 Last updated: 2019-05-15Bibliographically approved
Liu, W., Huang, C., Li, B., Zhao, Z., Yang, X., Deng, Q., . . . Zhang, Y. (2019). Household renovation before and during pregnancy in relation to preterm birth and low birthweight in China. Indoor Air, 29(2), 202-214
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Household renovation before and during pregnancy in relation to preterm birth and low birthweight in China
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2019 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 202-214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

From October 2010 to April 2012, we conducted a cross-sectional study of associations between household environments and childhood health among preschool children in eight Chinese cities. Here, we analyze associations of early household renovation with preterm birth (PTB), low birthweight (LBW), term low birthweight (Term-LBW), and small for gestational age (SGA). Parents responded to questions about household renovation and their children's gestational age and birthweight. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, household renovation in the year before pregnancy was significantly associated with LBW (sample size: N = 25 813; adjusted odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs): 1.23, 1.01-1.50) and Term-LBW (N = 24 823; 1.29, 1.01-1.67). Household renovation during pregnancy was significantly associated with PTB (N = 25 202; 1.28, 1.01-1.69). These significant associations were also found in the two-level (city-child) logistic regression analyses and in the sensitivity analyses among 21 009 children with complete data in all studied variates. Stronger associations were found in certain subgroups. Our findings indicate that household renovation within one year before pregnancy might be a risk factor for LBW and Term-LBW, while household renovation during pregnancy could be a risk factor for PTB.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
China, home renovation, low birthweight, prenatal exposure, preterm birth
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379573 (URN)10.1111/ina.12534 (DOI)000459637200005 ()30597644 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-04-11 Created: 2019-04-11 Last updated: 2019-04-11Bibliographically approved
Lytras, T., Kogevinas, M., Kromhout, H., Carsin, A.-E., Maria Anto, J., Bentouhami, H., . . . Zock, J.-P. (2019). Occupational exposures and incidence of chronic bronchitis and related symptoms over two decades: the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 76(4), 222-229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occupational exposures and incidence of chronic bronchitis and related symptoms over two decades: the European Community Respiratory Health Survey
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2019 (English)In: Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1351-0711, E-ISSN 1470-7926, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 222-229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives Chronic bronchitis (CB) is an important chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)-related phenotype, with distinct clinical features and prognostic implications. Occupational exposures have been previously associated with increased risk of CB but few studies have examined this association prospectively using objective exposure assessment. We examined the effect of occupational exposures on CB incidence in the European Community Respiratory Health Survey. Methods Population samples aged 20-44 were randomly selected in 1991-1993, and followed up twice over 20 years. Participants without chronic cough or phlegm at baseline were analysed. Coded job histories during follow-up were linked to the ALOHA Job Exposure Matrix, generating occupational exposure estimates to 12 categories of chemical agents. Their association with CB incidence over both follow-ups was examined with Poisson models using generalised estimating equations. Results 8794 participants fulfilled the inclusion criteria, contributing 13 185 observations. Only participants exposed to metals had a higher incidence of CB (relative risk (RR) 1.70, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.50) compared with non-exposed to metals. Mineral dust exposure increased the incidence of chronic phlegm (RR 1.72, 95% CI 1.43 to 2.06). Incidence of chronic phlegm was increased in men exposed to gases/fumes and to solvents and in women exposed to pesticides. Conclusions Occupational exposures are associated with chronic phlegm and CB, and the evidence is strongest for metals and mineral dust exposure. The observed differences between men and women warrant further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, 2019
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390048 (URN)10.1136/oemed-2018-105274 (DOI)000471887500005 ()30700596 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationSwedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-08-05 Created: 2019-08-05 Last updated: 2019-08-05Bibliographically approved
Norbäck, D., Lu, C., Zhang, Y., Li, B., Zhao, Z., Huang, C., . . . Deng, Q. (2019). Onset and remission of childhood wheeze and rhinitis across China: Associations with early life indoor and outdoor air pollution. Environment International, 123, 61-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Onset and remission of childhood wheeze and rhinitis across China: Associations with early life indoor and outdoor air pollution
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2019 (English)In: Environment International, ISSN 0160-4120, E-ISSN 1873-6750, Vol. 123, p. 61-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Few longitudinal studies exist on childhood exposure to indoor and outdoor air pollution and respiratory illness in China. We studied associations between indoor and outdoor environment and prevalence, onset and remission of wheeze and rhinitis among children across China.

Methods: Children (3-6 y) were recruited from randomized day care centres in six cities. The main data analysis was restricted to children not moving since birth (N = 17,679). Data on wheeze, rhinitis and the home environment were assessed by a parental questionnaire. Prevalence in the first two years of life (baseline) and the last year (follow-up) was used to calculate onset and remission. Outdoor PM2.5, PM10, and NO2 at the day care centre were modelled from monitoring station data. Associations were calculated by multilevel logistic regression.

Results: Prenatal NO2 was associated with decreased remission of wheeze and increased prevalence and increased onset of rhinitis. Prenatal PM2.5 was associated with increased prevalence of wheeze. Postnatal NO2 and postnatal PM10 were associated with increased prevalence and lower remission of wheeze and rhinitis. Mould, window pane condensation, renovation and cockroaches at home were associated with increased prevalence and increased onset of wheeze and rhinitis. Gas cooking was associated with increased onset of rhinitis. Children of mothers with industrial work had more wheeze.

Conclusions: Outdoor PM2.5, PM10 and NO2 can increase childhood wheeze and rhinitis. Dampness and mould can increase onset and decrease remission. Crowdedness, cockroaches at home and emissions from new building materials and gas cooking can be risk factors for wheeze and rhinitis.

Keywords
Asthma, Rhinitis, Dampness, PM2.5, Traffic-related air pollution (TRAP), Renovation
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375805 (URN)10.1016/j.envint.2018.11.033 (DOI)000455532500008 ()30496983 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-02-13 Created: 2019-02-13 Last updated: 2019-02-13Bibliographically approved
Norbäck, D., Li, T., Bai, X., Li, C., Zhao, Z. & Zhang, X. (2019). Onset and remission of rhinitis among students in relation to the home and school environment: A cohort study from Northern China. Indoor Air, 29(4), 527-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Onset and remission of rhinitis among students in relation to the home and school environment: A cohort study from Northern China
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2019 (English)In: Indoor Air, ISSN 0905-6947, E-ISSN 1600-0668, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 527-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Few prospective studies exist on indoor and outdoor air pollution in relation to adolescent rhinitis. We studied associations between onset and remission of rhinitis among junior high school students in relation to the home and school environment. A 2-year questionnaire cohort study was performed among 1325 students (11-15 years) in eight schools in Taiyuan, Northern China. Climate and air pollution were measured by direct reading instruments and passive samplers inside and outside the schools at baseline. Associations were calculated by multilevel logistic regression. Two-year onset of rhinitis and weekly rhinitis were 26.7% and 13.1%, respectively. RH (P < 0.001), CO2 (P < 0.01) and PM10 (P < 0.01) in the classrooms, PM10 (P < 0.01) and NO2 (P < 0.05) outside the schools, and redecoration (OR = 2.25) and dampness/indoor mold at home (OR = 2.04) were associated with onset of weekly rhinitis. RH (P < 0.05) and CO2 (P < 0.05) in the classroom and dampness/indoor mold (OR = 0.67) and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) at home (OR = 0.63) reduced remission of rhinitis. In conclusion, dampness/mold and chemical emissions from new materials at home can increase onset of rhinitis and ETS and dampness/mold can reduce the remission. PM10, RH, CO2, and NO2 at school can increase the onset, and RH and CO2 can reduce the remission of rhinitis.

Keywords
building ventilation, dampness, indoor environment, PM10, redecoration, rhinitis
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-388763 (URN)10.1111/ina.12559 (DOI)000471273100002 ()30985976 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-05845Swedish Research Council Formas, 348-2011-7402
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5174-6668

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