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Högman, M., Sulku, J., Ställberg, B., Janson, C., Bröms, K., Hedenström, H., . . . Malinovschi, A. (2018). 2017 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease reclassifies half of COPD subjects to lower risk group. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 13(`), 165-173
Open this publication in new window or tab >>2017 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease reclassifies half of COPD subjects to lower risk group
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2018 (English)In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 13, no `, p. 165-173Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Unlike the 2014 guidelines, the 2017 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) guidelines have removed lung function from the risk assessment algorithm of patients with COPD. The aim of this investigation was to analyze the proportion of subjects who would change to a lower risk group when applying GOLD(2017) and determine if they exhibit different characteristics in terms of inflammation, symptoms and comorbidity compared to the subjects who would remain in a high-risk group.

Subjects and methods: A total of 571 subjects with physician-diagnosed and spirometry-verified COPD were included in the present study. The data consisted of measurements of lung function, inflammatory markers, together with questionnaires that covered comorbidities, COPD symptoms and medication.

Results: From group C, 53% of the subjects would be reclassified to the lower risk group A, and from group D, 47% of the subjects would be reclassified to the lower risk group B when using GOLD(2017) instead of GOLD(2014). Compared to the subjects who would remain in group D, those who would change to group B were more often men (56% vs 72%); of an older age, mean (SD), 71 (8) years vs 68 (7) years; had more primary care contact (54% vs 33%); had lower levels of blood neutrophils, geometrical mean (95% CI), 5.3 (5.0, 5.7) vs 4.6 (4.3, 4.9); reported less anxiety/depression (20% vs 34%); experienced less asthma (29% vs 46%) and had fewer symptoms according to the COPD assessment test, 16 (5) vs 21 (7). All p-values were <0.05.

Conclusion: The removal of spirometry from risk assessment in GOLD(2017) would lead to the reclassification of approximately half of the subjects in the risk groups C and D to the lower risk groups A and B. There are differences in age, gender, health care contacts, inflammation, comorbidity and symptom burden among those changing from group D to group B. The effects of reclassification and changes in eventual treatment for disease control and symptom burden need further investigation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2018
Keywords
COPD, lung function test, eosinophils, neutrophils, comorbidity, GOLD
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341327 (URN)10.2147/COPD.S151016 (DOI)000419105400001 ()29379281 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2018-02-07 Created: 2018-02-07 Last updated: 2018-02-07Bibliographically approved
Mindus, S., Malinovschi, A., Ekerljung, L., Forsberg, B., Gislason, T., Jogi, R., . . . Janson, C. (2018). Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is related to a high burden of sleep disturbance and respiratory symptoms: Results from the RHINE and Swedish GA(2)LEN surveys. PLoS ONE, 13(4), Article ID e0195055.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Asthma and COPD overlap (ACO) is related to a high burden of sleep disturbance and respiratory symptoms: Results from the RHINE and Swedish GA(2)LEN surveys
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2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 4, article id e0195055Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The term Asthma and COPD Overlap (ACO) describes a condition where asthma and COPD overlap. We aimed to investigate associations between ACO and insomnia and respiratory symptoms, and to investigate the prevalence of ACO and the characteristics of subjects with ACO in two Northern European population studies.

Methods: The study comprised 25 429 subjects aged >40 years who participated in one of two Northern European general population surveys. Both surveys included questions on asthma, COPD, respiratory and sleep-related symptoms, including difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, early-morning awakening, and excessive daytime sleepiness. ACO was defined as having both self-reported asthma and COPD.

Results: The prevalence of ACO was 1.0%. The group with ACO had a higher prevalence of both insomnia and respiratory symptoms than subjects with only asthma or COPD. Having ACO was independently associated with a 2-3 times higher probability of having sleep-related symptoms as compared with the group without asthma or COPD, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, smoking history and educational level (adjusted odds ratio 2.14-3.36, 95% CI).

Conclusion: Subjects with ACO have a high prevalence of insomnia and respiratory symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the association between sleep-related symptoms and ACO.

National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351632 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0195055 (DOI)000428988800023 ()29608582 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Asthma and Allergy AssociationSwedish Heart Lung FoundationThe Swedish Heart and Lung AssociationForte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-06-07 Created: 2018-06-07 Last updated: 2018-06-07Bibliographically approved
Cai, G.-H., Janson, C., Theorell-Haglöw, J., Benedict, C., Elmståhl, S., Lind, L. & Lindberg, E. (2018). Both Weight at Age 20 and Weight Gain Have an Impact on Sleep Disturbances Later in Life: Results of the EpiHealth Study. Sleep, 41(1), Article ID zsx176.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Both Weight at Age 20 and Weight Gain Have an Impact on Sleep Disturbances Later in Life: Results of the EpiHealth Study
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2018 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 41, no 1, article id zsx176Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives: Obesity is often associated with impaired sleep, whereas the impact of body mass index (BMI) at younger age and previous weight gain on sleep problems remains unknown.

Methods: The present study utilized data from the Swedish EpiHealth cohort study. A total of 15 845 participants (45-75 years) filled out an internet-based questionnaire. BMI was calculated from both measured data at study time and self-reported data at age 20 from the questionnaire.

Results: Sleep-related symptoms were most common among obese individuals (BMI >30 kg/m(2)). An association between weight gain and sleep problems was found and those with a low BMI at age 20 were most vulnerable to weight gain when it came to risk of sleep problems. Among those who were underweight (BMI <18.5 kg/m(2)) at age 20, weight gain (kg/year) was associated with difficulties initiating sleep with an adjusted OR of 2.64 (95% CI: 1.51-4.62) after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, education, and civil status. The corresponding adjusted OR's among those who had been normal weight (BMI 18.5-24.99) and overweight (BMI 25-29.99 kg/m(2)) at age 20 were 1.89 (1.47-2.45) and 1.02 (0.48-2.13), respectively. Also difficulties maintaining sleep and snoring were most strongly related to weight gain among those who were underweight at age 20 with decreasing odds with increasing BMI at that age.

Conclusions: Sleep problems are related to weight gain and obesity. The impact of weight is most pronounced among those who had a low BMI when young.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, 2018
Keywords
epidemiology, insomnia, obesity, aging, weight gain, EpiHealth study, body mass index (BMI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), sleep problems, snoring
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-342460 (URN)10.1093/sleep/zsx176 (DOI)000422879100012 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-02-26 Created: 2018-02-26 Last updated: 2018-02-26Bibliographically approved
Stegberg, M., Hasselgren, M., Montgomery, S., Lisspers, K., Ställberg, B., Janson, C. & Sundh, J. (2018). Changes in smoking prevalence and cessation support, and factors associated with successful smoking cessation in Swedish patients with asthma and COPD. European Clinical Respiratory Journal, 5(1), Article ID 1421389.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes in smoking prevalence and cessation support, and factors associated with successful smoking cessation in Swedish patients with asthma and COPD
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2018 (English)In: European Clinical Respiratory Journal, ISSN 2001-8525, Vol. 5, no 1, article id 1421389Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Our aim was to investigate changes in smoking prevalence, smoking cessation support and factors associated with successful smoking cessation in patients with asthma and COPD.

Methods: Questionnaires about available smoking cessation resources were completed by 54 primary health-care centers and 14 hospitals in central Sweden in 2005 and 2012. Patient data were collected using record reviews and patients questionnaires for two cohorts of randomly selected asthma and COPD patients in 2005 (n = 2306; with a follow up in 2012), and in 2014/ 2015 (n = 2620). Smoking prevalence, available individual and group smoking cessation support, and factors associated with successful smoking cessation were explored.

Results: Smoking prevalence decreased from 11% to 6% (p < 0.0001) in patients with asthma but was almost unchanged in patients with COPD (28 to 26%, p = 0.37). Smoking cessation support increased from 53% to 74% (p = 0.01). A high cardiovascular risk factor level, including diabetes mellitus and hypertension was associated with improved smoking cessation in patients with asthma (OR (95% CI) 3.87 (1.04-14.4), p = 0.04). A higher magnitude success was observed in men with asthma (OR (95% CI) 27.9 (1.73-449), p = 0.02). More highly educated women with asthma had successful greater smoking cessation (4.76 (1.22-18.7), p = 0.04). No significant associations were found in COPD.

Conclusions: The smoking prevalence in patients with asthma but not in COPD has almost halved in Sweden during a 7-year period. The availability of smoking cessation support has increased. Suggested factors related to successful smoking cessation are higher level of education in women with asthma and cardiovascular risk factors in men and women with asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, 2018
Keywords
Smoking prevalence, smoking cessation support, primary care, secondary care, cardiovascular risk factors, high educational level
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341584 (URN)10.1080/20018525.2017.1421389 (DOI)000419510300001 ()29321831 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-14 Created: 2018-02-14 Last updated: 2018-02-14Bibliographically approved
Lisspers, K., Janson, C., Larsson, K., Johansson, G., Telg, G., Thuresson, M. & Ställberg, B. (2018). Comorbidity, disease burden and mortality across age groups in a Swedish primary care asthma population: An epidemiological register study (PACEHR). Respiratory Medicine, 136, 15-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comorbidity, disease burden and mortality across age groups in a Swedish primary care asthma population: An epidemiological register study (PACEHR)
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2018 (English)In: Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 0954-6111, E-ISSN 1532-3064, Vol. 136, p. 15-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Asthma is often associated with other diseases. To identify and manage comorbidities is important, as these conditions may increase the disease burden.

Objective:

To describe the prevalence of comorbidities, disease burden and mortality across age groups in a large Swedish primary care real-life asthma population.

Methods:

Observational cohort study of asthma patients, all ages, identified from electronic medical records by ICD-10-CM code, data from 36 primary care centers. Data were linked to national mandatory Swedish health registers. Comorbidities were identified by ICD-10-CM codes and collected from electronic medical records and the National Patient Registers, mortality data from the Cause of Death Register. Exacerbations were defined as hospitalizations due to asthma, and/or emergency visits at hospital and/or prescription claims of oral steroids.

Results:

In total 33,468 patients ( 58% women) were included. The most prevalent comorbidities were acute upper respiratory tract infection ( 53%), rhinitis ( 25%), acute lower respiratory tract infection ( 25%), hypertension ( 21%), anxiety and depression ( 20%). The comorbidities associated with highest risk for an exacerbation were COPD OR 1.98 ( 95% CI: 1.80-2.19), nasal polyps OR 1.75 ( 95% CI: 1.49-2.05) and rhinitis OR 1.52 ( 95% CI: 1.41-1.63). All-cause mortality was similar to the Swedish population, 1011 deaths per 100,000 person/year compared with 1058 deaths ( standardized risk=0.99 [ 95% CI: 0.95-1.04]). The pulmonary related death rate was greater in the study population versus the Swedish population ( 122 versus 72 per 100,000person/year).

Conclusion:

Comorbid disease was frequent in this large real-life asthma population with an impact on exacerbations. To identify and treat comorbidities with impact on asthma outcomes are essential to improve

Keywords
Asthma, Comorbidity, Mortality, Primary care, Observational
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351269 (URN)10.1016/j.rmed.2018.01.020 (DOI)000426428800003 ()29501242 (PubMedID)
Funder
AstraZeneca
Available from: 2018-06-04 Created: 2018-06-04 Last updated: 2018-06-04Bibliographically approved
Erbas, B., Knudsen, T. M., Janson, C., Nilsen, R. M., Accordini, S., Benediktdottir, B., . . . Svanes, C. (2018). Critical age windows in the impact of lifetime smoking exposure on respiratory symptoms and disease among ever smokers. Environmental Research, 164, 241-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical age windows in the impact of lifetime smoking exposure on respiratory symptoms and disease among ever smokers
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2018 (English)In: Environmental Research, ISSN 0013-9351, E-ISSN 1096-0953, Vol. 164, p. 241-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite extensive knowledge of smoking effects on respiratory disease, there is no study including all age windows of exposure among ever smokers. The objective of this study was to assess the effects from smoking exposure in utero, early childhood, adolescence and adulthood on respiratory health outcomes in adult male and female ever smokers. Methods: Respiratory health outcomes were assessed in 10,610 participants of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS) I who reported a history of ever smoking by questionnaire. The associations of maternal smoking in utero, maternal smoking during childhood, age of smoking debut and pack-years of smoking with respiratory symptoms, obstructive diseases and bronchial hyperreactivity were analysed using generalized linear regression, non-linearity between age of smoking debut and outcomes were assessed by Generalized additive mixed models. Results: Respiratory symptoms and asthma were more frequent in adults if their mother smoked during pregnancy, and, in men, also if mother smoked in childhood. Wheeze and >= 3 respiratory symptoms declined with later smoking debut among women [<= 10 years: OR = 3.51, 95% CI 1.26, 9.73; 11-12 years: 1.57[1.01-2.44]; 13-15 years: 1.11[0.94-1.32] and <= 10 years: 3.74[1.56-8.83]; 11-12 years: 1.76[1.19-2.56]; 13-15 years: 1.12[0.94-1.35], respectively]. Effects of increasing number of packyears were pronounced in women (Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): OR/10 packyears women: 1.33 [1.18, 1.50], men: 1.14 [1.04, 1.26] P-interaction = 0.01). Conclusions: Among ever smokers, smoking exposure in each stage of the lifespan show persistent harmful effects for adult respiratory health, while women appeared to be more vulnerable to an early age of smoking debut and amount of smoking in adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ACADEMIC PRESS INC ELSEVIER SCIENCE, 2018
Keywords
Cigarette smoking, Lung function, Asthma, Respiratory symptoms, ECRHS
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356376 (URN)10.1016/j.envres.2018.02.028 (DOI)000431387100031 ()29522998 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-15Bibliographically approved
Farkhooy, A., Bodegård, J., Erikssen, J.-E., Janson, C., Hedenström, H., Stavem, K. & Malinovschi, A. (2018). Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the association between lung function and exercise capacity in healthy Norwegian men. BMC Pulmonary Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses of the association between lung function and exercise capacity in healthy Norwegian men
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2018 (English)In: BMC Pulmonary Medicine, ISSN 1471-2466, E-ISSN 1471-2466Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

It is widely accepted that exercise capacity in healthy individuals is limited by the cardiac function, while the respiratory system is considered oversized. Although there is physiological, age-related decline in both lung function and physical capacity, the association between decline in lung function and decline in exercise capacity is little studied. Therefore, we examined the longitudinal association between lung function indices and exercise capacity, assessed by the total amount of work performed on a standardized incremental test, in a cohort of middle-aged men.

METHODS:

A total of 745 men between 40 and 59 years were examined using spirometry and standardized bicycle exercise ECG test within "The Oslo Ischemia Study," at two time points: once during 1972-1975, and again, approximately 16 years later, during 1989-1990. The subjects exercise capacity was assessed as physical fitness i.e. the total bicycle work (in Joules) at all workloads divided by bodyweight (in kg).

RESULTS:

Higher FEV1, FVC and PEF values related to higher physical fitness at both baseline and follow-up (all p values < 0.05). Higher explanatory values were found at follow-up than baseline for FEV1 (r2 = 0.16 vs. r2 = 0.03), FVC (r2 = 0.14 vs. r2 = 0.03) and PEF (r2 = 0.13 vs. r2 = 0.02). No significant correlations were found between decline in physical fitness and declines in FEV1, FVC or PEF.

CONCLUSIONS:

A weak association between lung function indices and exercise capacity, assessed through physical fitness, was found in middle-aged, healthy men. This association was strengthened with increasing age, suggesting a larger role for lung function in limiting exercise capacity among elderly subjects. However, decline in physical fitness over time was not related to decline in lung function.

National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Research subject
Clinical Physiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356371 (URN)10.1186/s12890-018-0655-z. (DOI)
Available from: 2018-07-24 Created: 2018-07-24 Last updated: 2018-07-31Bibliographically approved
Garcia-Larsen, V., Thawer, N., Charles, D., Cassidy, A., van Zele, T., Thilsing, T., . . . Burney, P. G. J. (2018). Dietary Intake of Flavonoids and Ventilatory Function in European Adults: A GA(2)LEN Study. Nutrients, 10(1), Article ID 95.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary Intake of Flavonoids and Ventilatory Function in European Adults: A GA(2)LEN Study
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2018 (English)In: Nutrients, ISSN 2072-6643, E-ISSN 2072-6643, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 95Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Flavonoids exert anti-inflammatory properties and modulate oxidative stress in vitro, suggesting a protective effect on lung function, but epidemiological studies examining this association are scarce. Methods: A stratified random sample was drawn from the GA(2)LEN screening survey, in which 55,000 adults aged 15 to 75 answered a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms. Post-bronchodilator spirometry was obtained from 2850 subjects. Forced vital capacity (FVC), the ratio between the forced exhaled volume in 1 second (FEV1) and FVC (FEV1/FVC), FVC below lower limit of normal (FVC < LLN), and FEV1/FVC < LLN were calculated. Intake of the six main subclasses of flavonoids was estimated using the GA(2)LEN Food Frequency Questionnaire. Adjusted associations between outcomes and each subclass of flavonoids were examined with multivariate regressions. Simes' procedure was used to test for multiple comparisons. Results: A total of 2599 subjects had valid lung function and dietary data. A lower prevalence of FVC < LLN (airway restriction) was observed in those with higher total flavonoid (adjusted odds ratio (aOR), higher vs. lowest quintile intake 0.58; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.36, 0.94), and pro-anthocyanidin intakes (aOR 0.47; 95% CI 0.27, 0.81). A higher FEV1/FVC was associated with higher intakes of total flavonoids and pro-anthocyanidins (adjusted correlation coefficient (a -coeff 0.33; 0.10, 0.57 and a -coeff 0.44; 95% CI 0.19, 0.69, respectively). After Simes' procedure, the statistical significance of each of these associations was attenuated but remained below 0.05, with the exception of total flavonoids and airway restriction. Conclusions: This population-based study in European adults provides cross-sectional evidence of a positive association of total flavonoid intake and pro-anthocyanidins and ventilatory function, and a negative association with spirometric restriction in European adults.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI AG, 2018
Keywords
flavonoids, pro-anthocyanidins, lung function, GA(2)LEN
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347659 (URN)10.3390/nu10010095 (DOI)000424088000095 ()
Available from: 2018-04-06 Created: 2018-04-06 Last updated: 2018-04-06Bibliographically approved
Lisspers, K., Larsson, K., Johansson, G., Janson, C., Costa-Scharplatz, M., Gruenberger, J.-B., . . . Ställberg, B. (2018). Economic burden of COPD in a Swedish cohort: the ARCTIC study. The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 13, 275-285
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Economic burden of COPD in a Swedish cohort: the ARCTIC study
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2018 (English)In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 13, p. 275-285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: We assessed direct and indirect costs associated with COPD in Sweden and examined how these costs vary across time, age, and disease stage in a cohort of patients with COPD and matched controls in a real-world, primary care (PC) setting.

Patients and methods: Data from electronic medical records linked to the mandatory national health registers were collected for COPD patients and a matched reference population in 52 PC centers from 2000 to 2014. Direct health care costs (drug, outpatient or inpatient, PC, both COPD related and not COPD related) and indirect health care costs (loss of income, absenteeism, loss of productivity) were assessed.

Results: A total of 17,479 patients with COPD and 84,514 reference controls were analyzed. During 2013, direct costs were considerably higher among the COPD patient population ((sic)13,179) versus the reference population ((sic)2,716), largely due to hospital nights unrelated to COPD. Direct costs increased with increasing disease severity and increasing age and were driven by higher respiratory drug costs and non-COPD-related hospital nights. Indirect costs (similar to(sic)28,000 per patient) were the largest economic burden in COPD patients of working age during 2013.

Conclusion: As non-COPD-related hospital nights represent the largest direct cost, management of comorbidities in COPD would offer clinical benefits and relieve the financial burden of disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
DOVE MEDICAL PRESS LTD, 2018
Keywords
COPD, direct cost, indirect cost, burden, Sweden
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341586 (URN)10.2147/COPD.S149633 (DOI)000422631500001 ()29391785 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
Sundbom, F., Janson, C., Malinovschi, A. & Lindberg, E. (2018). Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), 14(2), 253-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of Coexisting Asthma and Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Sleep Architecture, Oxygen Saturation, and Systemic Inflammation in Women
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: Both asthma and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are strongly associated with poor sleep. Asthma and OSA also have several features in common, including airway obstruction, systemic inflammation, and an association with obesity. The aim was to analyze the effect of asthma, OSA, and the combination of asthma and OSA on objectively measured sleep quality and systemic inflammation.

METHODS: Sleep and health in women is an ongoing community-based study in Uppsala, Sweden. Three hundred eighty-four women ages 20 to 70 years underwent overnight polysomnography and completed questionnaires on airway diseases and sleep complaints. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor α were analyzed.

RESULTS: = .04) than the group with OSA alone. The results were consistent after adjusting for age, body mass index, and smoking status. Asthma was independently associated with lower oxygen saturation, whereas OSA was not.

CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that coexisting asthma and OSA are associated with poorer sleep quality and more profound nocturnal hypoxemia than either of the conditions alone. The results are similar to earlier findings related to OSA and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, but they have not previously been described for asthma.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Academy of Sleep Medicine, 2018
Keywords
OSA, asthma, inflammation, polysomnography
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343517 (URN)10.5664/jcsm.6946 (DOI)000425136900013 ()29394961 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-27 Created: 2018-02-27 Last updated: 2018-04-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5093-6980

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