uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 265) Show all publications
Warensjö Lemming, E., Liisa, B., Wolk, A. & Michaëlsson, K. (2018). A comparison between two healthy diet scores, the modified Mediterranean diet score and the Healthy Nordic Food Index, in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality. British Journal of Nutrition, 119(7), 836-846
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A comparison between two healthy diet scores, the modified Mediterranean diet score and the Healthy Nordic Food Index, in relation to all-cause and cause-specific mortality
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0007-1145, E-ISSN 1475-2662, Vol. 119, no 7, p. 836-846Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High adherence to healthy diets has the potential to prevent disease and prolong life span, and healthy dietary pattern scores have each been associated with disease and mortality. We studied two commonly promoted healthy diet scores (modified Mediterranean diet score (mMED) and the Healthy Nordic Food Index (HNFI)) and the combined effect of the two scores in association with all-cause and cause-specific mortality (cancer, CVD and ischaemic heart disease). The study included 38 428 women (median age of 61 years) from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Diet and covariate data were collected in a questionnaire. mMED and HNFI were generated and categorised into low-, medium- and high-adherence groups, and in nine combinations of these. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of register-ascertained mortality and 95 % CI were calculated in Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. During follow-up (median: 17 years), 10 478 women died. In the high-adherence categories compared with low-adherence categories, the HR for all-cause mortality was 0·76 (95 % CI 0·70, 0·81) for mMED and 0·89 (95 % CI 0·83, 0·96) for HNFI. Higher adherence to mMED was associated with lower mortality in each stratum of HNFI in the combined analysis. In general, mMED, compared with HNFI, was more strongly associated with a lower cause-specific mortality. In Swedish women, both mMED and HNFI were inversely associated with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. The combined analysis, however, indicated an advantage to be adherent to the mMED. The present version of HNFI did not associate with mortality independent of mMED score.

Keywords
Modified Mediterranean diet score, Healthy Nordic Food Index, Mortality, CVD, Cohort studies
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355682 (URN)10.1017/S0007114518000387 (DOI)000431134300011 ()29569544 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-02302Swedish Research Council, 2015-03527
Available from: 2018-07-03 Created: 2018-07-03 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Stilling, F., Wolk, A., Religa, D., Leppert, J., Bergkvist, L., Michaëlsson, K. & Larsson, S. C. (2018). Adipose tissue fatty acid composition and cognitive impairment. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 54, 153-157
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adipose tissue fatty acid composition and cognitive impairment
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), ISSN 0899-9007, E-ISSN 1873-1244, Vol. 54, p. 153-157Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the association among adipose tissue eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), arachidonic acid (AA), and the ratios of EPA to AA and DHA to AA with impaired cognitive function.

Methods: This cross-sectional analysis comprised 481 men participating in the Cohort of Swedish Men Clinical and for whom adipose tissue fatty acid composition and results from a telephone-based cognitive test were available. Impaired cognitive function was defined using a predefined cutoff on the cognitive test. Binomial log-linear regression models were used to estimate prevalence ratios. In secondary analyses, Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risk for incident dementia ascertained by linkage with population-based registers.

Results: We observed a graded reduction in the prevalence of impaired cognitive function across tertiles of adipose tissue EPA/AA- ratio (P-trend = 0.01); compared with the lowest tertile, the multivariable-adjusted prevalence ratios were, respectively, 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.67-1.17) and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.45-0.91) for the second and third tertiles. EPA, DHA, and the DHA/AA ratio showed similar patterns of association; however, the CIs included the null. AA alone was not associated with impaired cognitive function. Although with lower precision, estimates obtained from the prospective analysis were broadly consistent with the main analysis.

Conclusions: Findings from this study suggest that a high ratio of EPA to AA in adipose tissue may be associated with better cognitive function. A similar association was observed with EPA, DHA, and the ratio of DHA to AA, but the results did not exclude a null association.

Keywords
Cognitive impairment, omega-3 Fatty acids, Biomarker, Adipose tissue, Aging
National Category
Nutrition and Dietetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-366941 (URN)10.1016/j.nut.2018.04.006 (DOI)000445322100022 ()29982142 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 633589Swedish Research Council, 2015-05997Swedish Research Council, 2012-2291
Available from: 2018-11-27 Created: 2018-11-27 Last updated: 2018-11-27Bibliographically approved
Trajanoska, K., Morris, J. A., Oei, L., Zheng, H.-F., Evans, D. M., Kiel, D. P., . . . Michaëlsson, K. (2018). Assessment of the genetic and clinical determinants of fracture risk: genome wide association and mendelian randomisation study.. BMJ. British Medical Journal, 362, Article ID k3225.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment of the genetic and clinical determinants of fracture risk: genome wide association and mendelian randomisation study.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: BMJ. British Medical Journal, E-ISSN 1756-1833, Vol. 362, article id k3225Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To identify the genetic determinants of fracture risk and assess the role of 15 clinical risk factors on osteoporotic fracture risk.

DESIGN: Meta-analysis of genome wide association studies (GWAS) and a two-sample mendelian randomisation approach.

SETTING: 25 cohorts from Europe, United States, east Asia, and Australia with genome wide genotyping and fracture data.

PARTICIPANTS: A discovery set of 37 857 fracture cases and 227 116 controls; with replication in up to 147 200 fracture cases and 150 085 controls. Fracture cases were defined as individuals (>18 years old) who had fractures at any skeletal site confirmed by medical, radiological, or questionnaire reports. Instrumental variable analyses were performed to estimate effects of 15 selected clinical risk factors for fracture in a two-sample mendelian randomisation framework, using the largest previously published GWAS meta-analysis of each risk factor.

RESULTS: ). Hand grip strength was inversely associated with fracture risk, but this result was not significant after multiple testing correction. The remaining clinical risk factors (including vitamin D levels) showed no evidence for an effect on fracture.

CONCLUSIONS: This large scale GWAS meta-analysis for fracture identified 15 genetic determinants of fracture, all of which also influenced bone mineral density. Among the clinical risk factors for fracture assessed, only bone mineral density showed a major causal effect on fracture. Genetic predisposition to lower levels of vitamin D and estimated calcium intake from dairy sources were not associated with fracture risk.

National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367526 (URN)10.1136/bmj.k3225 (DOI)30158200 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-11-30
Larsson, S. C., Melhus, H. & Michaëlsson, K. (2018). Circulating Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Bone Mineral Density: Mendelian Randomization Study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 33(5), 840-844
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Circulating Serum 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels and Bone Mineral Density: Mendelian Randomization Study
2018 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 840-844Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is considerable discussion of the importance for increased serum 25‐hydroxyvitamin D (S‐25OHD) concentration associated with adequacy for bone health. Accordingly, whether long‐term high S‐25OHD concentration in general positively affects bone mineral density (BMD) is uncertain. We used a Mendelian randomization design to determine the association between genetically increased S‐25OHD concentrations and BMD. Five single‐nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near genes encoding enzymes and carrier proteins involved in vitamin D synthesis or metabolism were used as instrumental variables to genetically predict 1 standard deviation increase in S‐25OHD concentration. Summary statistics data for the associations of the S‐25OHD‐associated SNPs with dual‐energy X‐ray absorptiometry (DXA)‐derived femoral neck and lumbar spine BMD were obtained from the Genetic Factors for Osteoporosis (GEFOS) Consortium (32,965 individuals) and ultrasound‐derived heel estimated BMD from the UK Biobank (142,487 individuals). None of the SNPs were associated with BMD at Bonferroni‐corrected significance level, but there was a suggestive association between rs6013897 near CYP24A1 and femoral neck BMD (p = 0.01). In Mendelian randomization analysis, genetically predicted 1 standard deviation increment of S‐25OHD was not associated with higher femoral neck BMD (SD change in BMD 0.02; 95% confidence interval [CI] –0.03 to 0.07; p = 0.37), lumbar spine BMD (SD change in BMD 0.02; 95% CI –0.04 to 0.08; p = 0.49), or estimated BMD (g/cm2 change in BMD –0.03; 95% CI –0.05 to –0.01; p = 0.02). This study does not support a causal association between long‐term elevated S‐25OHD concentrations and higher BMD in generally healthy populations. These results suggest that more emphasis should be placed on the development of evidence‐based cut‐off points for vitamin D inadequacy rather than a general recommendation to increase S‐25OHD.

Keywords
Bone Mineral Density, Mendelian Randomization, Osteoporosis, Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms, Vitamin D
National Category
Orthopaedics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-344294 (URN)10.1002/jbmr.3389 (DOI)000432006800010 ()29338102 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2018-03-06 Created: 2018-03-06 Last updated: 2018-08-10Bibliographically approved
Stattin, K., Hållmarker, U., Ärnlöv, J., James, S., Michaëlsson, K. & Byberg, L. (2018). Decreased Hip, Lower Leg, and Humeral Fractures but Increased Forearm Fractures in Highly Active Individuals.. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 33(10), 1842-1850
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Decreased Hip, Lower Leg, and Humeral Fractures but Increased Forearm Fractures in Highly Active Individuals.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1842-1850Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is not known how physical exercise affects the risk of different types of fractures, especially in highly active individuals. To investigate this association, we studied a cohort of 118,204 men and 71,757 women who from 1991 to 2009 participated in Vasaloppet, a long-distance cross-country skiing race in Sweden, and 505,194 nonparticipants frequency-matched on sex, age, and county of residence from the Swedish population. Participants ranged from recreational exercisers to world-class skiers. Race participation, distance of race run, number of races participated in, and finishing time were used as proxies for physical exercise. Incident fractures from 1991 to 2010 were obtained from national Swedish registers. Over a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 53,175 fractures of any type, 2929 hip, 3107 proximal humerus, 11,875 lower leg, 11,733 forearm, and 2391 vertebral fractures occurred. In a Cox proportional hazard regression analysis using time-updated exposure and covariate information, participation in the race was associated with an increased risk of any type of fracture (hazard ratio [HR], 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.05); forearm fractures had an HR, 1.11 with a 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.15. There was a lower risk of hip (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.67 to 0.83), proximal humerus (HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.82 to 0.98), and lower leg fractures (HR, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89 to 0.97), whereas the HR of vertebral fracture was 0.97 with a 95% CI, 0.88 to 1.07. Among participants, the risk of fracture was similar irrespective of race distance and number of races run. Participants close to the median finishing time had a lower risk of fracture compared with faster and slower participants. In summary, high levels of physical exercise were associated with a slightly higher risk of fractures of any type, including forearm fractures, but a lower risk of hip, proximal humerus, and lower leg fractures. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

Keywords
EPIDEMIOLOGY, EXERCISE, FRACTURE PREVENTION, ORTHOPEDICS, OSTEOPOROSIS
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367531 (URN)10.1002/jbmr.3476 (DOI)29933501 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-11-30
Wu, H., Mhd Omar, N. A., Håkansson, N., Wolk, A., Michaëlsson, K. & Landberg, R. (2018). Evaluation of alkylresorcinols in adipose tissue biopsies as a long-term biomarker of whole-grain wheat and rye intake in free-living Swedish men and women.. Public Health Nutrition, 21(10), 1933-1942
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation of alkylresorcinols in adipose tissue biopsies as a long-term biomarker of whole-grain wheat and rye intake in free-living Swedish men and women.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1933-1942Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Wheat and rye, the most consumed whole grains (WG) in the Nordic countries, contain alkylresorcinols (AR) in their bran. AR concentrations in human adipose tissue might reflect long-term WG rye and wheat intake. We aimed to evaluate AR concentrations in adipose tissue biopsies as a long-term biomarker of WG wheat and rye intake in free-living Swedish men and women.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. AR concentrations in adipose tissue biopsies were analysed and compared with long-term WG intake assessed by three FFQ (repeated over a period of 14 years in men, 17 years in women) and with plasma AR concentrations.

SETTING: The Cohort of Swedish Men between 1997 and 2010 and the Swedish Mammography Cohort between 1987 and 2003, Sweden.

SUBJECTS: Men (n 149) and women (n 109).

RESULTS: Long-term WG rye intake estimated with repeated FFQ correlated (r=0·31-0·41, P<0·01) with adipose-tissue AR concentrations, while WG wheat intake correlated only weakly (r=0·17-0·33, P<0·05). Total AR concentration in adipose tissue was 61 % lower in women than in men at similar energy-adjusted WG wheat and rye intakes, but plasma concentrations were similar. AR concentrations in adipose tissue correlated well with plasma concentrations (r=0·49-0·81, P<0·001).

CONCLUSIONS: AR in adipose tissue reflected long-term WG rye but not WG wheat intake, probably due to poor precision in estimating WG wheat intake by FFQ. AR in adipose tissue appears promising as a biomarker of long-term WG rye intake but should be adjusted for sex.

Keywords
Adipose tissue, Alkylresorcinol, Dietary biomarker, Plasma, Whole grain
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367537 (URN)10.1017/S1368980018000484 (DOI)29547368 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-12-04
Jiang, X., O'Reilly, P. F., Aschard, H., Hsu, Y.-H., Richards, J. B., Dupuis, J., . . . Kiel, D. P. (2018). Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. Nature Communications, 9, Article ID 260.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genome-wide association study in 79,366 European-ancestry individuals informs the genetic architecture of 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 9, article id 260Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Vitamin D is a steroid hormone precursor that is associated with a range of human traits and diseases. Previous GWAS of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations have identified four genome-wide significant loci (GC, NADSYN1/DHCR7, CYP2R1, CYP24A1). In this study, we expand the previous SUNLIGHT Consortium GWAS discovery sample size from 16,125 to 79,366 (all European descent). This larger GWAS yields two additional loci harboring genome-wide significant variants (P = 4.7×10−9 at rs8018720 in SEC23A, and P = 1.9×10−14 at rs10745742 in AMDHD1). The overall estimate of heritability of 25-hydroxyvitamin D serum concentrations attributable to GWAS common SNPs is 7.5%, with statistically significant loci explaining 38% of this total. Further investigation identifies signal enrichment in immune and hematopoietic tissues, and clustering with autoimmune diseases in cell-type-specific analysis. Larger studies are required to identify additional common SNPs, and to explore the role of rare or structural variants and gene–gene interactions in the heritability of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343676 (URN)10.1038/s41467-017-02662-2 (DOI)000422650500011 ()29343764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-05 Created: 2018-03-05 Last updated: 2018-03-05Bibliographically approved
Zhou, A., Taylor, A. E., Karhunen, V., Zhan, Y., Rovio, S. P., Lahti, J., . . . Hypponen, E. (2018). Habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in up to 415,530 participants. Scientific Reports, 8, Article ID 7526.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function: a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis in up to 415,530 participants
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 8, article id 7526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coffee's long-term effect on cognitive function remains unclear with studies suggesting both benefits and adverse effects. We used Mendelian randomization to investigate the causal relationship between habitual coffee consumption and cognitive function in mid-to later life. This included up to 415,530 participants and 300,760 coffee drinkers from 10 meta-analysed European ancestry cohorts. In each cohort, composite cognitive scores that capture global cognition and memory were computed using available tests. A genetic score derived using CYP1A1/2 (rs2472297) and AHR (rs6968865) was chosen as a proxy for habitual coffee consumption. Null associations were observed when examining the associations of the genetic score with global and memory cognition (beta = -0.0007, 95% C.I. -0.009 to 0.008, P = 0.87; beta = -0.001, 95% C.I. -0.005 to 0.002, P = 0.51, respectively), with high consistency between studies (P-heterogeneity > 0.4 for both). Domain specific analyses using available cognitive measures in the UK Biobank also did not support effects by habitual coffee intake for reaction time, pairs matching, reasoning or prospective memory (P >= 0.05 for all). Despite the power to detect very small effects, our meta-analysis provided no evidence for causal long-term effects of habitual coffee consumption on global cognition or memory.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356867 (URN)10.1038/s41598-018-25919-2 (DOI)000431958000003 ()29760501 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-15 Created: 2018-08-15 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Kaluza, J., Håkansson, N., Harris, H. R., Orsini, N., Michaëlsson, K. & Wolk, A. (2018). Influence of anti-inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies.. Journal of Internal Medicine
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of anti-inflammatory diet and smoking on mortality and survival in men and women: two prospective cohort studies.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: The associations between an anti-inflammatory diet and both all-cause and cause-specific mortality have been studied previously; however, the influence of an anti-inflammatory diet on survival time has not been investigated. Moreover, the potential modification of these associations by smoking status remains unclear.

OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to examine the associations between an anti-inflammatory diet index (AIDI) and all-cause and cause-specific mortality, to determine the association between the AIDI and differences in survival time and to assess effect modification by smoking status.

METHODS: The study population included 68 273 Swedish men and women (aged 45-83 years) at baseline. The anti-inflammatory potential of the diet was estimated using the validated AIDI, which includes 11 potential anti-inflammatory and five potential pro-inflammatory foods. Cox proportional hazards and Laplace regression were used to estimate hazard ratios and differences in survival time.

RESULTS: During 16 years of follow-up (1 057 959 person-years), 16 088 deaths [5980 due to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and 5252 due to cancer] were recorded. Participants in the highest versus lowest quartile of the AIDI had lower risks of all-cause (18% reduction, 95% CI: 14-22%), CVD (20%, 95% CI: 14-26%) and cancer (13%, 95% CI: 5-20%) mortality. The strongest inverse associations between the highest and lowest quartiles of AIDI and risk of mortality were observed in current smokers: 31%, 36% and 22% lower risks of all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality, respectively. The difference in survival time between current smokers in the lowest AIDI quartile and never smokers in the highest quartile was 4.6 years.

CONCLUSION: Adherence to a diet with high anti-inflammatory potential may reduce all-cause, CVD and cancer mortality and prolong survival time especially amongst smokers.

Keywords
anti-inflammatory index, diet, inflammation, mortality, prospective study, survival time
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367524 (URN)10.1111/joim.12823 (DOI)30209831 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-30 Created: 2018-11-30 Last updated: 2018-11-30
Michaëlsson, K., Wolk, A., Warensjö, E., Melhus, H. & Byberg, L. (2018). Intake of milk or fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hip fracture rates: A cohort study of Swedish women.. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 33(3), 449-457
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intake of milk or fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption in relation to hip fracture rates: A cohort study of Swedish women.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, ISSN 0884-0431, E-ISSN 1523-4681, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 449-457Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Milk products may differ in pro-oxidant properties and their effects on fracture risk could potentially be modified by the intake of foods with antioxidant activity. In the population-based Swedish Mammography Cohort study, we aimed to determine how milk and fermented milk combined with fruit and vegetable consumption are associated with hip fracture. Women born 1914-1948 (n=61 240) answered food frequency and lifestyle questionnaires in 1987-1990 and 38 071 women contributed with updated information in 1997. During a mean follow-up of 22 years, 5827 women had a hip fracture (ascertained via official register data). Compared with a low intake of milk (<1 glass/day) and a high intake of fruits and vegetables (≥5 servings/day), a high intake of milk (≥3 glasses/day) with a concomitant low intake of fruits and vegetables (<2 servings/day) resulted in a HR of 2.49 (95% CI, 2.03-3.05). This higher hip fracture rate among high consumers of milk was only modestly attenuated with a concomitant high consumption of fruit and vegetables (HR 2.14; 95% CI 1.69-2.71). The combination of fruits and vegetables with fermented milk (yogurt or soured milk) yielded a different pattern with lowest rates of hip fracture in high consumers: HR 0.81 (95% CI, 0.68-0.97) for ≥2 servings/day of fermented milk and ≥5 servings/day of fruits and vegetables compared with low consumption of both fruit and vegetables and fermented milk. We conclude that the amount and type of dairy products as well as fruit and vegetable intake are differentially associated with hip fracture rates in women.

Keywords
dairy, fruit, hip fracture, milk, vegetables
National Category
Orthopaedics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334436 (URN)10.1002/jbmr.3324 (DOI)000426731100011 ()29083056 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-2427
Available from: 2017-11-23 Created: 2017-11-23 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2815-1217

Search in DiVA

Show all publications