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Örberg, Jan
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 22) Show all publications
Lejonklou, M. H., Christiansen, S., Örberg, J., Shen, L., Larsson, S., Boberg, J., . . . Lind, P. M. (2016). Low-dose developmental exposure to bisphenol A alters the femoral bone geometry in wistar rats. Chemosphere, 164, 339-346
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Low-dose developmental exposure to bisphenol A alters the femoral bone geometry in wistar rats
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2016 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 164, p. 339-346Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical produced in large volumes for use in manufacturing of consumer products and industrial applications, and an endocrine disruptor known to affect several hormonal systems. Bone produces hormones and is additionally a sensitive hormone target tissue, and is thus potentially sensitive to low doses of endocrine disruptors such as BPA, especially during development. Methods: 110 pregnant Wistar rats were gavaged with 0; 25 mu g; 250 mu g; 5000 mu g or 50,000 mu g BPA/kg bodyweight (bw)/day from gestational day 7 until weaning at postnatal day 22. The three-month-old offspring were sacrificed and right femurs collected for length measurements, geometrical measurements by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), as well as for analyses of biomechanical properties using the three-point-bending method. Results: The femur was elongated in female offspring of dams exposed to 25 or 5000 mu g BPA/kg bw/day (1.8% and 2.1%, respectively), and increased cortical thickness (4.7%) was observed in male offspring of dams exposed to 25 mu g BPA/kg bw/day, compared to controls (p < 0.005). The biomechanical properties of the bone were not significantly altered. Conclusions: In utero and lactational exposure to the lowest BPA dose used in this study altered femoral geometry in both male and female offspring. This was observed at 25 mu g BPA/kg bw/day, a dose lower than the Human Equivalent Dose (HED) applied by EFSA to set a temporary TDI (609 mu g BPA/kg bw/day), and far lower than the No-Observed-Adverse-Effect-Level (NOAEL) (5000 mu g BPA/kg bw/day) on which the US FDA TDI is based.

Keywords
Bisphenol A (BPA), Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), Low dose effects, Developmental exposure, Bone geometry, Bone biomechanics
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-307506 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.08.114 (DOI)000385318200040 ()27592323 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 216-2009-972; 216-2012-475
Available from: 2016-11-21 Created: 2016-11-17 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Kunce, W., Josefsson, S., Örberg, J. & Johansson, F. (2015). Combination effects of pyrethroids and neonicotinoids on development and survival of Chironomus riparius. Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, 122, 426-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Combination effects of pyrethroids and neonicotinoids on development and survival of Chironomus riparius
2015 (English)In: Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety, ISSN 0147-6513, E-ISSN 1090-2414, Vol. 122, p. 426-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Standard ecotoxicological risk assessments are conducted on individual substances, however monitoring of streams in agricultural areas has shown that pesticides are rarely present alone. In fact, brief but intense pulse events such as storm water runoff and spray drift during application subject freshwater environments to complex mixtures of pesticides at high concentrations. This study investigates the potential risks to non-target aquatic organisms exposed to a brief but intense mixture of the neonicotinoid pesticides imidacloprid and thiacloprid and the pyrethroid pesticides deltamethrin and esfenvalerate, compared to single substance exposure. All four of these pesticides have been detected in surface waters at concentrations higher than benchmark values and both classes of pesticides are known to exert adverse effects on non-target aquatic organisms under single substance exposure scenarios. First instar midge larvae of the non-target aquatic organism, Chironomus riparius, were exposed to combinations of these four pesticides at 50% of their LC50 (96 h) values in a 1 h pulse. They were then reared to adulthood in uncontaminated conditions and assessed for survival, development time and fecundity. Our results show that the risk of disruption to survival and development of non-target aquatic organisms under this scenario is not negligible on account of the significant increases in mortality of C. riparius found in the majority of the pesticide exposures and the delays in development after pyrethroid exposure. While none of the deleterious effects appear to be amplified by combination of the pesticides, there is some evidence for antagonism. No effects on fecundity by any of the pesticide treatments were observed.

Keywords
Brief exposure, Aquatic invertebrate, Mixture toxicity, Pesticide, Midge
National Category
Ecology Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-268704 (URN)10.1016/j.ecoenv.2015.09.008 (DOI)000364263000053 ()26379201 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Rönn, M., Lind, L., Örberg, J., Kullberg, J., Söderberg, S., Larsson, A., . . . Lind, P. M. (2014). Bisphenol A is related to circulating levels of adiponectin, leptin and ghrelin, but not to fat mass or fat distribution in humans. Chemosphere, 112, 42-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bisphenol A is related to circulating levels of adiponectin, leptin and ghrelin, but not to fat mass or fat distribution in humans
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2014 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 112, p. 42-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: Since bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to induce obesity in experimental studies, we explored the associations between BPA and fat mass, fat distribution and circulating levels of adiponectin, leptin and ghrelin in humans.

METHODS: In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS), fat mass and fat distribution were determined in 70-year-old men and women (n=890) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (n=287). Serum levels of BPA were analyzed using isotope liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometer (API4000LC-MS/MS). Hormone levels were analyzed with radioimmunoassays (RIA) or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Imaging was performed approximately two years following collection of other data.

RESULTS: Serum concentrations of BPA were not related to adipose tissue measurements by DXA or MRI. BPA associated positively with adiponectin and leptin, but negatively with ghrelin, following adjustments for sex, height, fat mass, lean mass, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, energy intake, and educational levels (p<0.001, p=0.009, p<0.001, respectively). The relationship between BPA and ghrelin was stronger in women than in men.

CONCLUSION: Although no relationships between BPA levels and measures of fat mass were seen, BPA associated strongly with the adipokines adiponectin and leptin and with the gut-hormone ghrelin suggesting that BPA may interfere with hormonal control of hunger and satiety.

Keywords
BPA; Adiponectin; Leptin; Ghrelin; Adipose tissue
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-229030 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.03.042 (DOI)000340688300006 ()25048886 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Note

Correction in Chemosphere, 2015, vol 139, pp. 1, DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.05.050

Available from: 2014-07-27 Created: 2014-07-27 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Rönn, M., Kullberg, J., Karlsson, H., Berglund, J., Malmberg, F., Örberg, J., . . . Lind, P. M. (2013). Bisphenol A exposure increases liver fat in juvenile fructose-fed Fischer 344 rats. Toxicology, 303(1), 125-132
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bisphenol A exposure increases liver fat in juvenile fructose-fed Fischer 344 rats
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2013 (English)In: Toxicology, ISSN 0300-483X, E-ISSN 1879-3185, Vol. 303, no 1, p. 125-132Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Prenatal exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) has been shown to induce obesity in rodents. To evaluate if exposure also later in life could induce obesity or liver damage we investigated these hypothesises in an experimental rat model.

METHODS:

From five to fifteen weeks of age, female Fischer 344 rats were exposed to BPA via drinking water (0.025, 0.25 or 2.5mgBPA/L) containing 5% fructose. Two control groups were given either water or 5% fructose solution. Individual weight of the rats was determined once a week. At termination magnetic resonance imaging was used to assess adipose tissue amount and distribution, and liver fat content. After sacrifice the left perirenal fat pad and the liver were dissected and weighed. Apolipoprotein A-I in plasma was analyzed by western blot.

RESULTS:

No significant effects on body weight or the weight of the dissected fad pad were seen in rats exposed to BPA, and MRI showed no differences in total or visceral adipose tissue volumes between the groups. However, MRI showed that liver fat content was significantly higher in BPA-exposed rats than in fructose controls (p=0.04). BPA exposure also increased the apolipoprotein A-I levels in plasma (p<0.0001).

CONCLUSION:

We found no evidence that BPA exposure affects fat mass in juvenile fructose-fed rats. However, the finding that BPA in combination with fructose induced fat infiltration in the liver at dosages close to the current tolerable daily intake (TDI) might be of concern given the widespread use of this compound in our environment.

Keywords
MRI, Liver fat, Rat, Bisphenol A, Obesity
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-185549 (URN)10.1016/j.tox.2012.09.013 (DOI)000314856800014 ()23142792 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2012-11-08 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Rönn, M., Lind, M. P., Karlsson, H., Cvek, K., Berglund, J., Malmberg, F., . . . Kullberg, J. (2013). Quantification of total and visceral adipose tissue in fructose-fed rats using water-fat separated single echo MRI. Obesity, 21(9), E388-E395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quantification of total and visceral adipose tissue in fructose-fed rats using water-fat separated single echo MRI
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2013 (English)In: Obesity, ISSN 1930-7381, E-ISSN 1930-739X, Vol. 21, no 9, p. E388-E395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: The aim of this study was to setup a rodent model for modest weight gain and an MRI-based quantification of body composition on a clinical 1.5 T MRI system for studies of obesity and environmental factors and their possible association. Design and Methods: Twenty-four 4-week-old female Fischer rats were divided into two groups: one exposed group (n=12) and one control group (n 12). The exposed group was given drinking water containing fructose (5% for 7 weeks, then 20% for 3 weeks). The control group was given tap water. Before sacrifice, whole body MRI was performed to determine volumes of total and visceral adipose tissue and lean tissue. MRI was performed using a clinical 1.5 T system and a chemical shift based technique for separation of water and fat signal from a rapid single echo acquisition. Fat signal fraction was used to separate adipose and lean tissue. Visceral adipose tissue volume was quantified using semiautomated segmentation. After sacrifice, a perirenal fat pad and the liver were dissected and weighed. Plasma proteins were analyzed by Western blot. Results: The weight gain was 5.2% greater in rats exposed to fructose than in controls (P=0.042). Total and visceral adipose tissue volumes were 5.2 cm(3) (P=0.017) and 3.1 cm(3) (P=0.019) greater, respectively, while lean tissue volumes did not differ. The level of triglycerides and apolipoprotein A-I was higher (P=0.034, P=0.005, respectively) in fructose-exposed rats.

National Category
Medical Image Processing Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-209508 (URN)10.1002/oby.20229 (DOI)000325426600007 ()
Available from: 2013-10-21 Created: 2013-10-21 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Örberg, J. (2007). Behaviour. Reproductive Toxicology in Environmental Research: a report from the ReproSafe-programme, Report 5729
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Behaviour
2007 (English)In: Reproductive Toxicology in Environmental Research: a report from the ReproSafe-programme, ISSN 0282-7298, Vol. Report 5729Article, review/survey (Other (popular scientific, debate etc.)) Published
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-14328 (URN)
Available from: 2008-01-29 Created: 2008-01-29 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Lundberg, R., Jenssen, B. M., Leiva-Presa, A., Rönn, M., Hernhag, C., Wejheden, C., . . . Lind, M. (2007). Effects of short-term exposure to the DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE on bone tissue in male common frog (Rana temporaria). Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, 70(7), 614-619
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of short-term exposure to the DDT metabolite p,p'-DDE on bone tissue in male common frog (Rana temporaria)
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2007 (English)In: Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, ISSN 1528-7394, E-ISSN 1087-2620, Vol. 70, no 7, p. 614-619Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Experimental studies as well as studies in free-ranging animals have shown that endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) impair bone tissue composition and strength. The aim of the present study was to expand our studies on bone tissue in a new group of animals by investigating whether bone tissue in frogs is an additional potential target of EDCs. Adult male European common frogs (Rana temporaria) were divided into 5 groups (n = 20) and injected (sc, single injection) with p,p'-DDE, a total dose of 0.01, 0.1, 1, or 10 mg of p,p'-DDE/kg body weight, respectively. A control group was treated with the vehicle (corn oil). Two weeks after injection the frogs were euthanized and samples taken. The diaphysis of the excised left femur was scanned using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) and cortical variables, such as cortical bone mineral density (BMD), cortical cross-sectional area (CSA), and periosteal circumference, were determined. In addition, biomechanical three-point bending of the bones was conducted, with the load being applied to the same point as where the pQCT measurement was performed. The results from the pQCT measurements show that bone tissue in male frogs exposed to p,p'-DDE is negatively affected. A significant decrease in cortical BMD at the diaphysis was observed in frogs exposed to 1 mg p,p'-DDE. However, the biomechanical testing of the bones showed no significant differences between exposed and control group. Although this is the only study performed to date examining the possible relationships between EDCs and negative effects on frog bones, it supports both previous experimental findings in rodents and findings in free-ranging animals.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-11730 (URN)10.1080/15287390600974486 (DOI)000245097700005 ()17365615 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2008-05-31 Created: 2008-05-31 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Lundstedt-Enkel, K., Lek, P. M., Lundstedt, T. & Örberg, J. (2007). Relationships between physicochemical and structural descriptors and biomagnification of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants. In: BFR2007, The Fourth International Workshop on Brominated Flame Retardants: Amsterdam, the Netherlands from 24 to 27 April 2007.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Relationships between physicochemical and structural descriptors and biomagnification of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants
2007 (English)In: BFR2007, The Fourth International Workshop on Brominated Flame Retardants: Amsterdam, the Netherlands from 24 to 27 April 2007, 2007Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-16336 (URN)
Available from: 2008-05-21 Created: 2008-05-21
Andersson, C., Abrahamson, A., Brandt, I., Jönsson, M., Otte, J., Örberg, J. & Brunström, B. (2006). Gill filament EROD activity in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) as a biomarker for exposure to Ah receptor agonists in the water. In: Organohalogen Compounds (pp. 1259-1261).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gill filament EROD activity in the three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus L.) as a biomarker for exposure to Ah receptor agonists in the water
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2006 (English)In: Organohalogen Compounds, 2006, p. 1259-1261Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-24473 (URN)
Available from: 2007-02-05 Created: 2007-02-05
Lundstedt-Enkel, K., Asplund, L., Nylund, K., Bignert, A., Tysklind, M., Olsson, M. & Örberg, J. (2006). Multivariate data analysis of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in Baltic Sea guillemot (Uria aalge) egg and muscle. Chemosphere, 65(9), 1591-1599
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multivariate data analysis of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in Baltic Sea guillemot (Uria aalge) egg and muscle
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2006 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 65, no 9, p. 1591-1599Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Concentrations of organochlorines (OCs) and brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) were determined in guillemot (Uria aalge) eggs from the island of Stora Karlsö in the Baltic Sea where 10 eggs/year were collected in the years 2000, 2001 and 2002. The dominating contaminant in egg was p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′-DDE) with a geometric mean (GM) concentration of 18 200 ng/g lipid weight (lw). The GM concentration in egg of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) of 140 ng/g lw, was significantly higher than that of polybrominated diphenyl ether (∑PBDE) of 77 ng/g lw.

For the evaluation of the data multivariate data analysis techniques namely principal components analysis (PCA), partial least squares regression (PLS), soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA classification), and PLS discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. We investigated whether the eggs’ biological characteristics co-varied with egg concentrations of OCs and BFRs, and found e.g., significant negative correlations between egg weight and concentrations of HCB and p,p′-DDE. A PLS model with analyzed BFRs as the Y matrix and OCs as the X matrix could, with varying accuracy, calculate the concentrations of BFRs in the individual egg from their concentrations of OCs (e.g., R2Y of 0.89 for BDE47, and of 0.50 for HBCD).

Lastly, we compared the contaminant concentrations in the eggs to those in previously analyzed pectoral muscles from adult guillemots from Stora Karlsö, from the year 2000. A PLS-DA model, showed that some of the contaminants (e.g., HBCD and CB28) had significantly higher concentrations in egg than in muscle, although 7 of the 14 contaminants showed no difference in concentrations between the two matrices.

Keywords
Multivariate modelling, Organohalogens, PCA, PLS, Seabird
National Category
Biological Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-21059 (URN)10.1016/j.chemosphere.2006.03.051 (DOI)000242962900018 ()16674995 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2006-12-14 Created: 2006-12-14 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
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