uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Gyllensten, Ulf B.
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 179) Show all publications
Sakornsakolpat, P., Prokopenko, D., Lamontagne, M., Reeve, N. F., Guyatt, A. L., Jackson, V. E., . . . Zeigler-Heitbrock, L. (2019). Genetic landscape of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease identifies heterogeneous cell-type and phenotype associations. Nature Genetics, 51(3), 494-505
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic landscape of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease identifies heterogeneous cell-type and phenotype associations
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 494-505Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of respiratory mortality worldwide. Genetic risk loci provide new insights into disease pathogenesis. We performed a genome-wide association study in 35,735 cases and 222,076 controls from the UK Biobank and additional studies from the International COPD Genetics Consortium. We identified 82 loci associated with P < 5 x 10-8; 47 of these were previously described in association with either COPD or population-based measures of lung function. Of the remaining 35 new loci, 13 were associated with lung function in 79,055 individuals from the SpiroMeta consortium. Using gene expression and regulation data, we identified functional enrichment of COPD risk loci in lung tissue, smooth muscle, and several lung cell types. We found 14 COPD loci shared with either asthma or pulmonary fibrosis. COPD genetic risk loci clustered into groups based on associations with quantitative imaging features and comorbidities. Our analyses provide further support for the genetic susceptibility and heterogeneity of COPD.

National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379346 (URN)10.1038/s41588-018-0342-2 (DOI)000459947200017 ()30804561 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Shrine, N., Guyatt, A. L., Erzurumluoglu, A. M., Jackson, V. E., Hobbs, B. D., Melbourne, C. A., . . . Wain, L. V. (2019). New genetic signals for lung function highlight pathways and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associations across multiple ancestries. Nature Genetics, 51(3), 481-493
Open this publication in new window or tab >>New genetic signals for lung function highlight pathways and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associations across multiple ancestries
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 481-493Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Reduced lung function predicts mortality and is key to the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a genome-wide association study in 400,102 individuals of European ancestry, we define 279 lung function signals, 139 of which are new. In combination, these variants strongly predict COPD in independent populations. Furthermore, the combined effect of these variants showed generalizability across smokers and never smokers, and across ancestral groups. We highlight biological pathways, known and potential drug targets for COPD and, in phenome-wide association studies, autoimmune-related and other pleiotropic effects of lung function-associated variants. This new genetic evidence has potential to improve future preventive and therapeutic strategies for COPD.

National Category
Medical Genetics Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-379345 (URN)10.1038/s41588-018-0321-7 (DOI)000459947200016 ()30804560 (PubMedID)
Funder
Wellcome trust, WT202849/Z/16/Z
Available from: 2019-03-15 Created: 2019-03-15 Last updated: 2019-03-15Bibliographically approved
Gustavsson, I. M., Aarnio, R., Berggrund, M., Lindberg, J. H., Sanner, K., Wikström, I., . . . Gyllensten, U. B. (2019). Randomised study of HPV prevalence and detection of CIN2+ in vaginal self-sampling compared to cervical specimens collected by medical personnel.. International Journal of Cancer, 144(1), 89-97
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Randomised study of HPV prevalence and detection of CIN2+ in vaginal self-sampling compared to cervical specimens collected by medical personnel.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Cancer, ISSN 0020-7136, E-ISSN 1097-0215, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 89-97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conducted a randomised study to compare vaginal self-sampling with assisted sampling by medical personnel on the cervix for HPV testing in primary screening. The first aim was to determine if the HPV prevalence is independent of sampling location (vagina versus cervix) and the person performing the sampling. The second aim was to evaluate if the two sampling strategies differed in the detection rate of CIN2+. In total, 19,523 women were randomised into two groups, with 9926 invited to perform self-sampling (SS arm) using the Rover VIBA-brush and 9597 offered assisted sampling using the cytobrush (AS arm). All samples were applied to the indicating FTA elute card and analysed for high-risk HPV using the hpVIR real-time PCR assay. The outcome for the first aim was HPV prevalence and for the second aim the number of CIN2+ based on histology. In the SS arm, 52.7% of invited women participated in the study, as compared to 34.2% in the AS arm. All samples contained sufficient amount of nuclear DNA for a valid HPV result, with vaginal samples having a higher DNA amount than cervical samples (p < 4.62 × 10-11 ). HPV prevalence was 4.6% in the SS arm and 4.1% in the AS arm (p = 5.5 × 10-2 ), and the distribution of HPV types similar between arms. There was no difference in the prevalence of CIN2+ per 1000 women screened between arms (p = 0.86). The results show that vaginal self-sampling is an equivalent alternative to sampling by medical personnel for HPV typing and identification of CIN2+.

Keywords
HPV test, cervical cancer, randomised study, screening, self-sampling
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367086 (URN)10.1002/ijc.31637 (DOI)000451479900009 ()29943822 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2019-01-28Bibliographically approved
Jiang, J., Thalamuthu, A., Ho, J. E., Mahajan, A., Ek, W. E., Brown, D. A., . . . Mather, K. A. (2018). A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Growth Differentiation Factor-15 Concentration in Blood. Frontiers in Genetics, 9, Article ID 97.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Growth Differentiation Factor-15 Concentration in Blood
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Genetics, ISSN 1664-8021, E-ISSN 1664-8021, Vol. 9, article id 97Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Blood levels of growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), also known as macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 (MIC-1), have been associated with various pathological processes and diseases, including cardiovascular disease and cancer. Prior studies suggest genetic factors play a role in regulating blood MIC-1/GDF-15 concentration. In the current study, we conducted the largest genome-wide association study (GWAS) to date using a sample of similar to 5,400 community-based Caucasian participants, to determine the genetic variants associated with MIC-1/GDF-15 blood concentration. Conditional and joint (COJO), gene-based association, and gene-set enrichment analyses were also carried out to identify novel loci, genes, and pathways. Consistent with prior results, a locus on chromosome 19, which includes nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (top SNP, rs888663, p = 1.690 x 10(-35)), was significantly associated with blood MIC-1/GDF-15 concentration, and explained 21.47% of its variance. COJO analysis showed evidence for two independent signals within this locus. Gene-based analysis confirmed the chromosome 19 locus association and in addition, a putative locus on chromosome 1. Gene-set enrichment analyses showed that the "COPI-mediated anterograde transport" gene-set was associated with MIC-1/GDF15 blood concentration with marginal significance after FDR correction (p = 0.067). In conclusion, a locus on chromosome 19 was associated with MIC-1/GDF-15 blood concentration with genome-wide significance, with evidence for a new locus (chromosome 1). Future studies using independent cohorts are needed to confirm the observed associations especially for the chromosomes 1 locus, and to further investigate and identify the causal SNPs that contribute to MIC-1/GDF-15 levels.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2018
Keywords
genome-wide association study, growth differentiation factor-15, macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1, community-based individuals, chromosome 19
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354354 (URN)10.3389/fgene.2018.00097 (DOI)000428198300001 ()
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research CouncilSwedish Research Council, 2012-1397Swedish Research Council, 2012-1727Swedish Research Council, 2012-2215Swedish Research Council, 80576801Swedish Research Council, 70374401Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Australian Research Council, DP0774213Australian Research Council, DP0773584Australian Research Council, LP0669645
Available from: 2018-08-08 Created: 2018-08-08 Last updated: 2018-08-08Bibliographically approved
Enroth, S., Berggrund, M., Lycke, M., Lundberg, M., Assarsson, E., Olovsson, M., . . . Gyllensten, U. B. (2018). A two-step strategy for identification of plasma protein biomarkers for endometrial and ovarian cancer. Clinical Proteomics, 15, Article ID 38.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A two-step strategy for identification of plasma protein biomarkers for endometrial and ovarian cancer
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Clinical Proteomics, ISSN 1542-6416, E-ISSN 1559-0275, Vol. 15, article id 38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Over 500,000 women worldwide are diagnosed with ovarian or endometrial cancer each year. We have used a two-step strategy to identify plasma proteins that could be used to improve the diagnosis of women with an indication of gynecologic tumor and in population screening.

Methods: In the discovery step we screened 441 proteins in plasma using the proximity extension assay (PEA) and five Olink Multiplex assays (CVD II, CVD III, INF I, ONC II, NEU I) in women with ovarian cancer (n=106), endometrial cancer (n=74), benign ovarian tumors (n=150) and healthy population controls (n=399). Based on the discovery analyses a set of 27 proteins were selected and two focused multiplex PEA assays were developed. In a replication step the focused assays were used to study an independent set of cases with ovarian cancer (n=280), endometrial cancer (n=228), women with benign ovarian tumors (n=76) and healthy controls (n=57).

Results: In the discovery step, 27 proteins that showed an association to cancer status were identified. In the replication analyses, the focused assays distinguished benign tumors from ovarian cancer stage III-IV with a sensitivity of 0.88 and specificity of 0.92 (AUC=0.92). The assays had a significantly higher AUC for distinguishing benign tumors from late stage ovarian cancer than using CA125 and HE4 (p=9.56e-22). Also, population controls could be distinguished from ovarian cancer stage III-IV with a sensitivity of 0.85 and a specificity of 0.92 (AUC=0.89).

Conclusion: The PEA assays represent useful tools for identification of new biomarkers for gynecologic cancers. The selected protein assays could be used to distinguish benign tumors from ovarian and endometrial cancer in women diagnosed with an unknown suspicious pelvic mass. The panels could also be used in population screening, for identification of women in need of specialized gynecologic transvaginal ultrasound examination.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2018
Keywords
Ovarian cancer, Endometrial cancer, Proximity extension assay (PEA), Sensitivity, Specificity, Diagnostics
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372376 (URN)10.1186/s12014-018-9216-y (DOI)000451777900001 ()30519148 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Swedish Research CouncilVINNOVASwedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-01-08Bibliographically approved
Lindström, A., Sanchez Hermansson, R., Gustavsson, I. M., Lindberg, J. H., Gyllensten, U. B. & Olovsson, M. (2018). Cervical dysplasia in elderly women performing repeated self-sampling for HPV testing. PLoS ONE, 13(12), Article ID e0207714.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cervical dysplasia in elderly women performing repeated self-sampling for HPV testing
Show others...
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0207714Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background About 30% of the cervical cancer cases in Sweden occur in women older than 60. The primary aim was to evaluate the acceptability of repeated self-sampling at home for HPV-testing in elderly women. The prevalence of HPV and HPV related dysplasia as well as the sensitivity of cytology was evaluated. Methods Repeated self-sampling at home for HPV testing was offered 375 women in each of the four age groups 60, 65, 70 and 75 years. Women with two consecutive positive HPV tests were examined with sampling for histology and cytology. Findings A self-sample was provided by 59.5% (893/1500) of the invited women. The overall prevalence of HPV was 4.4% (95% CI 3.2-6.0, n = 39) in the first test, and 2.5% were persistent positive in the second test (95% C 1.6-3.8, n = 22) collected on average 5.5 months later. Dysplasia, was found in 1.8% (16/893) (95% CI 1.1-3.0) and CIN 2+ in 1.0% (9/893) (95% CI 0.5-2.0) of the women. Of the 16 women with dysplasia in histology, 13 (81.2%) had a normal cytology. Interpretation Repeated self-sampling at home combined with HPV testing was well accepted among elderly women. A high prevalence of CIN was diagnosed by histology. Cytology showed extremely low sensitivity and should not be recommended for this age group.

National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372761 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0207714 (DOI)000452212400061 ()30517176 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Ameur, A., Che, H., Martin, M., Bunikis, I., Dahlberg, J., Höijer, I., . . . Gyllensten, U. B. (2018). De Novo Assembly of Two Swedish Genomes Reveals Missing Segments from the Human GRCh38 Reference and Improves Variant Calling of Population-Scale Sequencing Data. Genes, 9(10), Article ID 486.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>De Novo Assembly of Two Swedish Genomes Reveals Missing Segments from the Human GRCh38 Reference and Improves Variant Calling of Population-Scale Sequencing Data
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Genes, ISSN 2073-4425, E-ISSN 2073-4425, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 486Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The current human reference sequence (GRCh38) is a foundation for large-scale sequencing projects. However, recent studies have suggested that GRCh38 may be incomplete and give a suboptimal representation of specific population groups. Here, we performed a de novo assembly of two Swedish genomes that revealed over 10 Mb of sequences absent from the human GRCh38 reference in each individual. Around 6 Mb of these novel sequences (NS) are shared with a Chinese personal genome. The NS are highly repetitive, have an elevated GC-content, and are primarily located in centromeric or telomeric regions. Up to 1 Mb of NS can be assigned to chromosome Y, and large segments are also missing from GRCh38 at chromosomes 14, 17, and 21. Inclusion of NS into the GRCh38 reference radically improves the alignment and variant calling from short-read whole-genome sequencing data at several genomic loci. A re-analysis of a Swedish population-scale sequencing project yields > 75,000 putative novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and removes > 10,000 false positive SNV calls per individual, some of which are located in protein coding regions. Our results highlight that the GRCh38 reference is not yet complete and demonstrate that personal genome assemblies from local populations can improve the analysis of short-read whole-genome sequencing data.

Keywords
de novo assembly, SMRT sequencing, GRCh38, human reference genome, human whole-genome sequencing, population sequencing, Swedish population
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369762 (URN)10.3390/genes9100486 (DOI)000448656700024 ()30304863 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, 2014.0272Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-12-17 Created: 2018-12-17 Last updated: 2018-12-17Bibliographically approved
Höijer, I., Tsai, Y.-C., Clark, T. A., Kotturi, P., Dahl, N., Stattin, E., . . . Ameur, A. (2018). Detailed analysis of HTT repeat elements in human blood using targeted amplification-free long-read sequencing. Human Mutation, 39(9), 1262-1272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detailed analysis of HTT repeat elements in human blood using targeted amplification-free long-read sequencing
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Human Mutation, ISSN 1059-7794, E-ISSN 1098-1004, Vol. 39, no 9, p. 1262-1272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Amplification of DNA is required as a mandatory step during library preparation in most targeted sequencing protocols. This can be a critical limitation when targeting regions that are highly repetitive or with extreme guanine-cytosine (GC) content, including repeat expansions associated with human disease. Here, we used an amplification-free protocol for targeted enrichment utilizing the CRISPR/Cas9 system (No-Amp Targeted sequencing) in combination with single molecule, real-time (SMRT) sequencing for studying repeat elements in the huntingtin (HTT) gene, where an expanded CAG repeat is causative for Huntington disease. We also developed a robust data analysis pipeline for repeat element analysis that is independent of alignment of reads to a reference genome. The method was applied to 11 diagnostic blood samples, and for all 22 alleles the resulting CAG repeat count agreed with previous results based on fragment analysis. The amplification-free protocol also allowed for studying somatic variability of repeat elements in our samples, without the interference of PCR stutter. In summary, with No-Amp Targeted sequencing in combination with our analysis pipeline, we could accurately study repeat elements that are difficult to investigate using PCR-based methods.

Keywords
amplification-free sequencing, HTT, Huntington disease, No-Amp Targeted sequencing, repeat expansion, SMRT sequencing, somatic mosaicism, targeted enrichment, targeted sequencing
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364189 (URN)10.1002/humu.23580 (DOI)000443229000010 ()29932473 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-11-07 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Evangelou, E., Warren, H. R., Mosen-Ansorena, D., Mifsud, B., Pazoki, R., Gao, H., . . . Caulfield, M. J. (2018). Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.. Nature Genetics, 50(10), 1412-1425
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic analysis of over 1 million people identifies 535 new loci associated with blood pressure traits.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Nature Genetics, ISSN 1061-4036, E-ISSN 1546-1718, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 1412-1425Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High blood pressure is a highly heritable and modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We report the largest genetic association study of blood pressure traits (systolic, diastolic and pulse pressure) to date in over 1 million people of European ancestry. We identify 535 novel blood pressure loci that not only offer new biological insights into blood pressure regulation but also highlight shared genetic architecture between blood pressure and lifestyle exposures. Our findings identify new biological pathways for blood pressure regulation with potential for improved cardiovascular disease prevention in the future.

National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367084 (URN)10.1038/s41588-018-0205-x (DOI)000446047000013 ()30224653 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilNovo Nordisk, NNF15CC0018486EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, HEALTH-F2-2013-601456Wellcome trust, RE/13/1/30181Wellcome trust, WT098051
Available from: 2018-11-28 Created: 2018-11-28 Last updated: 2018-12-05Bibliographically approved
Ek, W. E., Rask-Andersen, M., Karlsson, T., Enroth, S., Gyllensten, U. B. & Johansson, Å. (2018). Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity. Human Molecular Genetics, 27(5), 799-810
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Human Molecular Genetics, ISSN 0964-6906, E-ISSN 1460-2083, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 799-810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Most genetic studies identify genetic variants associated with disease risk or with the mean value of a quantitative trait. More rarely, genetic variants associated with variance heterogeneity are considered. In this study, we have identified such variance single-nucleotide polymorphisms (vSNPs) and examined if these represent biological gene x gene or gene x environment interactions or statistical artifacts caused by multiple linked genetic variants influencing the same phenotype. We have performed a genome-wide study, to identify vSNPs associated with variance heterogeneity in DNA methylation levels. Genotype data from over 10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation levels at over 430 000 CpG sites, were analyzed in 729 individuals. We identified vSNPs for 7195 CpG sites (P < 9.4 x 10(-11)). This is a relatively low number compared to 52 335 CpG sites for which SNPs were associated with mean DNA methylation levels. We further showed that variance heterogeneity between genotypes mainly represents additional, often rare, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the respective vSNP and for some vSNPs, multiple low frequency variants co-segregating with one of the vSNP alleles. Therefore, our results suggest that variance heterogeneity of DNA methylation mainly represents phenotypic effects by multiple SNPs, rather than biological interactions. Such effects may also be important for interpreting variance heterogeneity of more complex clinical phenotypes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OXFORD UNIV PRESS, 2018
National Category
Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350890 (URN)10.1093/hmg/ddx441 (DOI)000426838200003 ()29325024 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-2354, 2015-03327Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and MedicineSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Åke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-05-28 Created: 2018-05-28 Last updated: 2018-07-06Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications