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Ebbestad, Jan Ove R.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8769-3572
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Publications (10 of 140) Show all publications
Ebbestad, J. O. & Weidner, T. (2017). Extreme Protomeric Development In A Burlingiid Trilobite From Cambrian Glacial Erratics Of Denmark. Palaeontology, 60(2), 233-253
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Extreme Protomeric Development In A Burlingiid Trilobite From Cambrian Glacial Erratics Of Denmark
2017 (English)In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 60, no 2, p. 233-253Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pengia Geyer & Corbacho is a Cambrian burlingiid trilobite with fused trunk segments devoid of any articulation in the anamorphic and epimorphic phases of development. The type species is Pengia fusilis (Peng etal.) from the Wanshania wanshanensis Zone of China. Here we describe a second species, Pengia palsgaardia sp. nov., from the Lejopyge laevigata Zone of the Paradoxides forchhammeri Superzone. It comes from a glacial erratic in Denmark which probably originated in the Alum Shale Formation of Vastergotland, Sweden. Pengia palsgaardia is a large burlingiid (similar to 10mm in length), with 14 fused segments in the trunk whose boundaries are marked by ridges. The axis is narrow, with the axial furrows faintly indicated or effaced across the median. Laterally along the axis and the tapering glabella, symmetrical globular lobes are developed that are pinched at their base. During ontogeny the glabellar furrows are pit-like adaxially but shallow towards the axial furrow as the globular lobes develop. Their pit-like appearance in Pengia palsgaardia and some other burlingiid species is not considered similar to the condition seen in oryctocephalid trilobites. A median preglabellar ridge resembling that of Schmalenseeia Moberg develops late in ontogeny but in early ontogeny the preglabellar field resembles that of Burlingia Walcott, Alumenella Geyer & Corbacho and Niordilobites Geyer & Corbacho. This gives Pengia a more basal position in the schmalenseeid lineage, outside the derived Schmalenseeia. In mature specimens the facial sutures in P.palsgaardia are fused, but an ocular suture may have been present. During ontogeny Pengia would have gone through the anamorphic and protomeric protaspid segmental conditions, but articulation between either the cephalon and pygidium, or pygidium and thoracic segments of the trunk never developed so it did not progress beyond the protaspid phase. This extreme protomeric development is considered to be a derived feature in Pengia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
Keywords
Pengia, Burlingia, Schmalenseeia, morphology, Cambrian, protomeric development
National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320396 (URN)10.1111/pala.12279 (DOI)000394993300008 ()
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2017-04-20Bibliographically approved
Ebbestad, J. O. & Carlos Gutierrez-Marco, J. (2017). First occurrence of Pterotheca (Gastropoda) from the Silurian (Aeronian) of Spain. Geobios, 50(2), 97-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First occurrence of Pterotheca (Gastropoda) from the Silurian (Aeronian) of Spain
2017 (English)In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 97-104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pterotheca hispanica nov. sp. is described from the basal beds (Stimulograptus sedgwickii graptolite Zone) of the Formigoso Fm., in the Cantabrian Zone of the Iberian Massif, north-western Spain. This specialized bellerophontoid gastropod is for the first time recorded in the Silurian of peri-Gondwana; it is the only Aeronian species known so far. Its most closely allied relatives are from higher beds placed in the Telychian of Scotland. Pterotheca is considered a highly derived genus within the Pterothecinae of the Carinaropsidae, with the strongly reduced to absent coiling and the growth of the septum being synapomorphies. In the present work it is shown that not only the apical angle of the septum can be used to distinguish species, but also the relative length and width of the septum. In some cases, the slit may extend as far back as the anterior part of the internal septum. Silurian species were hitherto only found in marginal Laurentian and Eastern Avalonian settings. Pterotheca is absent from central Laurentia and Baltica, where it could be expected to be present based on its wide Ordovician distribution. In the light of this, the occurrence of the genus in the Aeronian of Spain seems difficult to explain, albeit the genus was present in peri-Gondwana prior to the end-Ordovician extinction. The extreme scarcity of described taxa recorded from Avalonia, Baltica and Iberia during the Early Silurian may explain this patchy distribution.

Keywords
Bellerophontoidea, Carinaropsidae, Pterothecinae, Silurian, Palaeobiogeography, Iberian Peninsula
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329142 (URN)10.1016/j.geobios.2017.02.003 (DOI)000403386300002 ()
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2017-10-09Bibliographically approved
Ebbestad, J. O., Rhebergen, F. & Gubanov, A. P. (2017). Late Ordovician rostroconchs (Mollusca) from fluvial erratics in northwestern Europe. Bulletin of Geosciences, 92(4), 405-438
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Late Ordovician rostroconchs (Mollusca) from fluvial erratics in northwestern Europe
2017 (English)In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 405-438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes 3 species of ribeirioid and 2 species of conocardiid rostroconchs from fluvially transported erratics in the Dutch-German border area. The material probably stems from Ordovician deposits of the North Estonian Confacies Belt. The ribeirioid specimens from the flaljala group of erratics (Sandhian 2) are represented by Tolmachovia subliratu sp. nov., Beukeria plicata gen. nov. sp. nov. and Ischyrinia viator sp. nov. The single specimen of Tohnachovia is hitherto the youngest occurrence of this genus and the first in Baltica. The presence of subordinate radial ornamentation is added to the emended diagnosis of the genus. The new genus Beukeria is an ischyriniid rostroconch with an elongated conch, two thick pegmas and a plicate shell posterior to vertical axis. Ischyrinia viator is similar to the coeval. I. notTegica Soot-Ryon, 1960 but this has a ventrolateral sinus that is subparallel to the dorsal axis. Conocardild specimens from the Pirgu Ojlemyr chert (Katian 4) are represented by Bitrigonocardia lindstroemi (Isberg) and Pojetaconcha costulata sp. nov. The identification of Bitrigonocardia lindstroemi is circumstantial as the type specimens are missing, but as understood here new details of morphology and ornamentation are given. Pojetaconcha is for the first time recognized outside Laurentia and Australia. Pojetaconcha costulata sp. nov. is distinguished by 14 or 15 broad and flat-topped radial ribs on the body and snout and compares closely with the Chazyan P. alabamensis (Pojeta & Runnegar, 1976), USA. Ischyriniids occur mainly in Baltica with Ischyrinia migrating into Laurentia. A general exchange of Bitrigonocardia and Pojetaconcha is seen between Laurentia and Baltica.

Keywords
ribeirioid rostroconch, conocardiid rostroconch, ischyriniid rostroconch, Ordovician, fluvially transported erratics
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-339999 (URN)10.3140/bull.geosci.1675 (DOI)000419438500001 ()
Available from: 2018-01-29 Created: 2018-01-29 Last updated: 2018-01-29Bibliographically approved
Lu, X., Kendall, B., Stein, H. J., Li, C., Hannah, J. L., Gordon, G. W. & Ebbestad, J. O. (2017). Marine redox conditions during deposition of Late Ordovician and Early Silurian organic-rich mudrocks in the Siljan ring district, central Sweden. Chemical Geology, 457, 75-94
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Marine redox conditions during deposition of Late Ordovician and Early Silurian organic-rich mudrocks in the Siljan ring district, central Sweden
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2017 (English)In: Chemical Geology, ISSN 0009-2541, E-ISSN 1872-6836, Vol. 457, p. 75-94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The Late Ordovician Period witnessed the second largest mass extinction in the Phanerozoic Eon and the Hirnantian glaciation. To infer ocean redox conditions across the Ordovician-Silurian transition, we measured the U (as δ238U relative to standard CRM145 = 0‰) and Mo (as δ98Mo relative to standard NIST SRM 3134 = +0.25‰) isotope compositions of 26 organic-rich mudrock samples from the Late Ordovician (Katian) Fjacka Shale and the Early Silurian (Aeronian-Telychian) Kallholn Formation (Siljan ring district, Sweden). The magnitude of Re, Mo, and U enrichments, ReEF/MoEF and UEF/MoEF ratios, and sedimentary Fe speciation point to locally euxinic bottom water conditions during deposition of the Fjacka Shale. The same proxies suggest that black shales of the Kallholn Formation were deposited under transiently euxinic conditions with the chemocline situated near the sediment-water interface, whereas gray shales stratigraphically equivalent to the upper Kallholn Formation were deposited from oxygenated bottom waters. These observations are consistent with higher δ98Mo and δ238U in the Fjacka Shale compared with the Kallholn Formation.

Because the Fjacka Shale was deposited from persistently euxinic bottom waters, the Mo and U isotope compositions from these rocks can be used to estimate the extent of global ocean euxinia and ocean anoxia (euxinic plus ferruginous conditions), respectively. Elevated MoEF and Mo/TOC ratios in the euxinic Fjacka Shale suggest no more than moderate basin restriction from the open ocean as well as non-quantitative removal of Mo from the euxinic bottom waters, thus pointing to Mo isotope fractionation between seawater and the euxinic sediments. Hence, we infer that even the highest δ98Mo (+1.28‰) preserved in the Fjacka Shale is only a minimum estimate for the Mo isotope composition of coeval global seawater. Correcting for seawater-sediment Mo isotope fractionation, the δ98Mo of late Katian seawater may have been +1.4-2.1%0, which corresponds to similar to 10-70% Mo removal into the euxinic sink. The average authigenic δ238U of the Fjacka Shale is 0.05‰ to +0.02‰ after correcting for a range of possible detrital δ238U values, thus yielding an overall average of-0‰. Taking into account isotope fractionation during U removal to euxinic sediments, we infer that late Katian seawater δ238U was about 0.85‰ to 0.60‰. A steady-state U isotope mass balance model reveals that 46-63% of riverine U input was removed in anoxic settings. Based on the Mo and U isotope data, we infer that euxinic and anoxic waters may have covered <1% and at least 5% (potentially tens of percent) of the total seafloor area during the late Katian, respectively, based on previously published models that relate the magnitude of Mo and U burial fluxes to the areal extent of euxinic and anoxic seafloor. By comparison, only 021-035% and <1% of the total seafloor area was covered by anoxic waters today and during the Cenozoic, respectively. The difference between the estimated extent of ocean anoxia (euxinic plus ferruginous) and ocean euxinia points to an appreciable extent of ferruginous water masses during the late Katian. Integration of our data with previous studies thus supports the hypothesis that ocean oxygenation intensified during the subsequent Hirnantian glaciation (when seawater δ98Mo temporarily reached values similar to today). Hence, environmental stresses related to glaciation, not an expansion of ocean anoxia, may have triggered the first phase of the Hirnantian mass extinction.

Keywords
Uranium isotopes, Molybdenum isotopes, Katian, Himantian glaciation, Euxinic, Ferruginous
National Category
Geochemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329735 (URN)10.1016/j.chemgeo.2017.03.015 (DOI)000403516900008 ()
Available from: 2017-09-20 Created: 2017-09-20 Last updated: 2017-09-20Bibliographically approved
Gubanov, A. P., Ebbestad, J. O. & Männik, P. (2017). The problematic mollusc Jinonicella from the Silurian of North America. GFF, 139(3), 216-218
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The problematic mollusc Jinonicella from the Silurian of North America
2017 (English)In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 139, no 3, p. 216-218Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The small problematic mollusc Jinonicella kolebabai Pokorný, 1978 is described from the lower Silurian Laketown Dolostone at Barn Hills in Utah, USA. The associated conodonts suggest a late Telychian age for the assemblage, which makes this the oldest occurrence of this species. Previous Silurian records of Jinonicellawere known from the Sheinwoodian to Ludfordian of Bohemia, the Czech Republic, Gotland, Sweden and the Carnic Alps of Austria.

Keywords
Mollusca, Jinonicella, Silurian, USA
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Historical Geology and Paleontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-337476 (URN)10.1080/11035897.2017.1291539 (DOI)000413398600005 ()
Funder
Swedish Institute
Available from: 2017-12-29 Created: 2017-12-29 Last updated: 2018-01-26Bibliographically approved
Kroger, B., Ebbestad, J. O. & Lehnert, O. (2016). Accretionary Mechanisms And Temporal Sequence Of Formation Of The Boda Limestone Mud-Mounds (Upper Ordovician), Siljan District, Sweden. Journal of Sedimentary Research, 86(4), 363-379
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accretionary Mechanisms And Temporal Sequence Of Formation Of The Boda Limestone Mud-Mounds (Upper Ordovician), Siljan District, Sweden
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sedimentary Research, ISSN 1527-1404, E-ISSN 1938-3681, Vol. 86, no 4, p. 363-379Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Late Ordovician mud-mounds in the Boda Limestone, Siljan area, central Sweden, consist mainly of massive spiculitic stromatactis limestone similar to other well-known Paleozoic mud-mounds. The mound cores are predominantly formed by spiculite and ostracod-rich mudstone and/or wackestone, and networks of spar-filled syndepositional cavities. The mounds of the Boda Limestone are specific in two ways: (1) large parts of the lower mound cores are formed by a Palaeoporella framestone and/or bafflestone with signs of early recrystallization and cementation; and (2) the stromatactis facies is accompanied by masses of limestone with non-stromatactis cryptocrystalline patches. Cryptocrystalline patches are filled with massive, fibrous low-Mg calcite, have cloudy, transitional margins, contain randomly spaced skeletal grains and dolomitic micro-inclusions, and are interpreted as recrystallized patches of the original host lime mud. Models of formation of Paleozoic mud-mounds generally hypothesize accretionary processes that are based on sponge biomass degradation and associated diagenetic processes. In the Boda Limestone Palaeoporella skeleton disintegration, early recrystallization, and additionally, cementation were essential for the mound formation. The Boda mounds exemplify that formation of Paleozoic mud-mounds reflects a spectrum of different essentially diagenetic accretionary mechanisms. This diversity should be taken into account in future discussions about Paleozoic mud-mound formation. The new name Osmundsberget Formation is given for a Hirnantian succession of brachiopod-rich limestone above the Boda Limestone. The Osmundsberget Formation occurs only in direct geographical vicinity to the mud-mounds.

National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300095 (URN)10.2110/jsr.2016.12 (DOI)000379519200006 ()
Funder
German Research Foundation (DFG), LE 867/8-1 LE 867/8-2 ICDP-SPP 1006 KR 2095/7-1 IGCP 591
Available from: 2016-08-02 Created: 2016-08-02 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Ebbestad, J. O. (2016). Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden. In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories: (pp. 15-29). Geological Society
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carl Wiman and the foundation of Mesozoic vertebrate palaeontology in Sweden
2016 (English)In: Mesozoic Biotas Of Scandinavia And Its Arctic Territories, Geological Society, 2016, p. 15-29Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In 1908, Carl Wiman of Uppsala University, Sweden, discovered rich horizons with Triassic vertebrate remains in Spitsbergen on Svalbard, Norway. This marked the beginning of vertebrate palaeontology as a science in Sweden, subsequently developed mainly through the collection and study of non-Swedish fossil remains. Wiman's accomplishments, resolute personality and a tight network of influential friends and supporters enabled him to become the first person in Sweden to hold a university chair in Palaeontology and Historical Geology. He also managed to amass large numbers of unique fossil vertebrate specimens culminating in an extensive Chinese collection of both world famous dinosaurs and Neogene mammals deposited at Uppsala University. Joint scientific Sino-Swedish collaboration and a deliberate Swedish scientific agenda ensured this unprecedented situation in an opportune moment. Governmental support and initiative allowed Uppsala University and Carl Wiman's Palaeontological Institute to erect a museum building dedicated foremost to the Chinese material, now known as the Lagrelius Collection in recognition of the patron behind Wiman's ambitious endeavours. In addition, the museum served as a permanent repository for seminal collections of Mesozoic fossils from Svalbard and North America. Collectively, these represent a landmark research and teaching resource that remains of intense scientific interest even today.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geological Society, 2016
Series
Geological Society Special Publication, ISSN 0305-8719 ; 434
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-299528 (URN)10.1144/SP434.15 (DOI)000377671000002 ()2-s2.0-84970007069 (Scopus ID)9781862397484 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-07-22 Created: 2016-07-22 Last updated: 2017-01-03Bibliographically approved
Meinhold, G., Perschl, M., Schröpfer, M., Steichert, A., Ebbestad, J. O., Högström, A., . . . Ou, Z. (2016). Changes of sediment composition at the dawn of animal life: Insights from the Ediacaran‒Cambrian boundary section of the Digermulen Peninsula (Finnmark, Arctic Norway). In: Ortner, H. (Ed.), Abstract Volume of GeoTirol2016 - Annual Meeting of DGGV and PANGEO Austria, 25-28. September 2016, Innsbruck.: . Paper presented at Annual Meeting of DGGV and PANGEO Austria, 25-28. September 2016, Innsbruck. (pp. 205).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changes of sediment composition at the dawn of animal life: Insights from the Ediacaran‒Cambrian boundary section of the Digermulen Peninsula (Finnmark, Arctic Norway)
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2016 (English)In: Abstract Volume of GeoTirol2016 - Annual Meeting of DGGV and PANGEO Austria, 25-28. September 2016, Innsbruck. / [ed] Ortner, H., 2016, p. 205-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The Digermulen Peninsula in northern Norway is the only fossiliferous site in Scandinavia with sedimentationacross the Ediacaran–Cambrian transition without a significant hiatus. Furthermore, it is the only locality inScandinavia where Ediacara-type fossils have been found. The site is located at the edge of Baltica during theEdiacaran–Cambrian transition, where potentially the dramatic climatic turnover from icehouse to greenhouseconditions can be deduced and tied to large-scale plate tectonics. Since 2011, studies by the Digermulen EarlyLife Research Group have recorded significant new finds, promising to establish the site as a significant Ediacaranbiota locality. The Ediacaran succession is about 1000 m thick. Ediacara-type fossils occur in the InnerelvaMember of the Stáhpogiedde Formation. Discoidal fossils dominate the Ediacaran assemblage, although apotentially much greater diversity is suggested because of the recent discovery of a frond-shaped fossil. TheEdiacaran–Cambrian boundary is located within the Manndraperelva Member of the Stáhpogiedde Formation,based on biostratigraphic age control, followed by the Lower Cambrian Breidvika Formation. The successionconsists mainly of quartz-rich sandstones and mudrocks. Deposition took place in various environments, includingfluvial, shallow marine and deeper marine settings. As shown by previous studies using palaeocurrent data,sediment supply was from the Baltic Shield toward the passive margin of Baltica in pre-Ediacaran time. At onepoint within the Ediacaran succession, it shifted by 180 degrees due to the newly formed Timanian orogen. Thisorogen formed in north-eastern Baltica during the late Neoproterozoic and caused a shift in sediment transportdirection and change in source area due to the formation of the Timanian foreland basin to the east of DigermulenPeninsula. In order to track sediment supply and to test current palaeotectonic models a multi-disciplinaryapproach on late Neoproterozoic and Cambrian sediments of the Digermulen Peninsula has been applied. Themethods include, amongst other things, thin section petrography, bulk rock geochemistry (XRF, ICP-MS, ICPOES),bulk rock mineralogy (XRD), heavy mineral analysis, single grain chemistry (EMP, LA-ICP-MS) and zirconU-Pb geochronology.

Keywords
Digermulen Peninsula, Ediacara, provenance, Norway
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Mineral Chemistry, Petrology and Tectonics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311371 (URN)
Conference
Annual Meeting of DGGV and PANGEO Austria, 25-28. September 2016, Innsbruck.
Available from: 2016-12-26 Created: 2016-12-26 Last updated: 2016-12-27Bibliographically approved
Rushton, A. A. ., Weidner, T. & Ebbestad, J. O. (2016). Paradoxidid trilobites from a mid-Cambrian (Series 3, stage 5) limestone concretion from Jämtland, central Sweden. Bulletin of Geosciences, 91(3), 515-552
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Paradoxidid trilobites from a mid-Cambrian (Series 3, stage 5) limestone concretion from Jämtland, central Sweden
2016 (English)In: Bulletin of Geosciences, ISSN 1214-1119, E-ISSN 1802-8225, Vol. 91, no 3, p. 515-552Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper describes the morphology and discusses the taxonomy of the paradoxidid trilobites present in the moult ensemble described by Ebbestad et al. (2013) from a huge limestone concretion of the Alum Shale Formation collected at Östnår, Jämtland. Two species, both represented by numerous but small complete holaspid specimens are described as new: Eccaparadoxides? thorslundi sp. nov. is distinctive, but its generic position is considered doubtful; Hydrocephalus spinulosus is similar to H. vikensis Rushton & Weidner, 2007 (also present as a rarity in the moult ensemble) and is partly distinguished from it by characters of the thorax. Also illustrated are a few specimens that have been collected at various localities between Hackås and Brunflo. They appear to represent individuals of some of the species in the moult ensemble and are about twice the size of their type specimens.

National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311367 (URN)10.3140/bull.geosci.1606 (DOI)000392741400004 ()
Available from: 2016-12-26 Created: 2016-12-26 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Ebbestad, J. O. & Lefebvre, B. (2015). An unusual onychochilid mollusc from the Ordovician (Tremadocian) Fezouata Formation, Morocco. Geobios, 48(6), 427-438
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An unusual onychochilid mollusc from the Ordovician (Tremadocian) Fezouata Formation, Morocco
2015 (English)In: Geobios, ISSN 0016-6995, E-ISSN 1777-5728, Vol. 48, no 6, p. 427-438Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Pelecyogyra fezouataensis nov. gen., nov. sp. is described from the Lower Ordovician (Tremadocian, A. murrayi Biozone) Fezouata Formation at Oued Beni Zoli (locality Z-F5), in the central Anti-Atlas, Morocco. This is the first Onychochilidae Koken in Koken and Perner, 1925 reported from the Ordovician of Morocco. Its stratigraphical position bridges the gap between the late Cambrian and Middle to Upper Ordovician records. This new taxon draws together large specimens, reaching 27 mm in the greatest diameter, with 3 rapidly expanding whorls. All specimens are invariably preserved as dorsoventrally compressed moulds although preservation suggests that the degree of compaction was not great and that the species was generally low spired. A characteristic axe-shaped apertural lip and an ornamentation consisting of fine and dense lirae serve to distinguish the new genus from other onychochilids. The species appears to have been gregarious. In some specimens, small scalloped injuries are preserved along the apertural margins but these are not considered to reflect failed predation. Up to now, twenty-two species and eight genera of Ordovician onychochilids have been documented, being distributed in eight different terranes. The composition of the Onychochilidae is briefly reviewed and updated from the literature, to include Helicotis? Koken in Koken and Perner, 1925, Hyperstrophema Horný, 1964, Invertospira Horný, 1964, Kobayashiella Endo, 1937, Laeogyra Perner, 1903, Matherella Walcott, 1912, Matherellina Kobayashi, 1937, Onychochilus Lindström, 1884, Pelecyogyra nov. gen., Pervertina Horný, 1964, Scaevogyra Whitfield, 1878, Sinistracirsa Cossmann, 1908, Versispira Perner, 1903, and Voskopiella Frýda, 1992. Onychochilidae and Clisospiridae are placed in Mimospirida Dzik, 1983, regarding Hyperstrophina Linsley and Kier, 1984 as a junior synonym.

Keywords
New genus and species, Onychochilidae, Mimospirida, Paragastropoda, Mollusca, Lower Ordovician, Fezouata biota
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-270311 (URN)10.1016/j.geobios.2015.09.004 (DOI)000368211500001 ()
Available from: 2015-12-27 Created: 2015-12-27 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8769-3572

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