uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Jonsson, Lars
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 23) Show all publications
Bengtsson, C., Jonsson, L., Holmstrom, M., Hellgren, J., Franklin, K., Gislason, T., . . . Lindberg, E. (2019). Incident Chronic Rhinosinusitis Is Associated With Impaired Sleep Quality: Results of the RHINE Study. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), 15(6), 899-905, Article ID PII jc-18-00575.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Incident Chronic Rhinosinusitis Is Associated With Impaired Sleep Quality: Results of the RHINE Study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine (JCSM), ISSN 1550-9389, E-ISSN 1550-9397, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 899-905, article id PII jc-18-00575Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Study Objectives: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a common inflammatory disease of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses. Associations between CRS and poor sleep quality have been reported. This 10-year follow-up study investigates possible associations between incident CRS and sleep quality. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to 16,500 individuals in Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland and Estonia in 2000. It included questions on airway diseases, age, sex, body mass index, smoking habits, comorbidities, education and sleep quality. In 2010, a second questionnaire was sent to the same individuals, with a response rate of 53%. A subgroup of 5,145 individuals without nasal symptoms in 2000 was studied. Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine associations between CRS (defined according to the European position paper on rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps epidemiological criteria) at follow-up and sleep quality, with adjustment for potential confounders. Individuals with the respective sleep problem at baseline were excluded. Results: Over 10 years, 141 (2.7%) of the individuals without nasal symptoms in 2000 had developed CRS. CRS was associated with difficulties inducing sleep (adjusted odds ratio 2.81 [95% CI 1.67-4.70]), difficulties maintaining sleep (2.07 [1.35-3.18]), early morning awakening (3.03 [1.91-4.81]), insomnia (2.21 [1.46-3.35]), excessive daytime sleepiness (2.85 [1.79-4.55]), and snoring (3.31 [2.07-5.31]). Three insomnia symptoms at baseline increased the risk of CRS at follow-up by 5.00 (1.93-12.99). Conclusions: Incident CRS is associated with impaired sleep quality and excessive daytime sleepiness. Insomnia symptoms may be a risk factor for the development of CRS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER ACAD SLEEP MEDICINE, 2019
Keywords
chronic rhinosinusitis, CRS, epidemiology, insomnia, sleep quality
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-389988 (URN)10.5664/jcsm.7846 (DOI)000471747600013 ()31138385 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and WelfareSwedish Heart Lung FoundationSwedish Asthma and Allergy Association
Available from: 2019-08-02 Created: 2019-08-02 Last updated: 2019-12-19Bibliographically approved
Jensson, D., Weninger, W. J., Schmid, M., Meng, S., Jonsson, L., Tzou, C.-H. J. & Rodriguez-Lorenzo, A. (2019). Oculo-zygomatic nerve transfer for facial synkinesis: An anatomical feasibility study. Microsurgery, 37(7), 629-633
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Oculo-zygomatic nerve transfer for facial synkinesis: An anatomical feasibility study
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Microsurgery, ISSN 0738-1085, E-ISSN 1098-2752, Vol. 37, no 7, p. 629-633Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Patients with severe oro-ocular synkinesis often present with concomitant inefficient smile excursion on the affected site. In theory, oculo-zygomatic nerve transfer may decrease synkinesis and improve smile by redirecting nerve fibers to their target muscle. The aim of this study was to explore the feasibility of nerve transfer in human cadavers between a caudal branch innervating the orbicularis oculi to a cephalad branch innervating the zygomaticus major muscles.

METHODS: Eighteen hemi-faces were dissected. Reach for direct coaptation of a caudal nerve branch innervating the orbicularis oculi muscle to a cephalad nerve branch innervating the zygomaticus major muscle was assessed. Measurements included total number of nerve branches as well as maximum dissection length. Nerve samples were taken from both branches at the site of coaptation and histomorphometric analysis for axonal count was performed.

RESULTS: The number of sub-branches to the orbicularis oculi muscle was 3.1 ± 1.0 and to the zygomaticus major muscle 4.7 ± 1.2. The maximal length of dissection of the caudal nerve branch to the orbicularis oculi muscle was 28.3 ± 7.3 mm and for the cranial nerve branch to the zygomaticus major muscle 23.8 ± 6.5 mm. Transection and tension-free coaptation was possible in all cases but one. The average myelinated fiber counts per mm2 was of 5,173 ± 2,293 for the caudal orbicularis oculi branch and 5,256 ± 1,774 for the cephalad zygomaticus major branch.

CONCLUSION: Oculo-zygomatic nerve transfer is an anatomically feasible procedure. The clinical value of this procedure, however, remains to be proven.

National Category
Surgery
Research subject
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394138 (URN)10.1002/micr.30457 (DOI)000490018500007 ()30957287 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Jensson, D., Enghag, S., Bylund, N., Jonsson, L., Wikström, J., Grindlund, M. E., . . . Rodriguez-Lorenzo, A. (2018). Cranial Nerve Coactivation and Implication for Nerve Transfers to the Facial Nerve.. Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), 141(4), 582e-585e
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cranial Nerve Coactivation and Implication for Nerve Transfers to the Facial Nerve.
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Plastic and reconstructive surgery (1963), ISSN 0032-1052, E-ISSN 1529-4242, Vol. 141, no 4, p. 582e-585eArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In reanimation surgery, effortless smile can be achieved by a nonfacial donor nerve. The underlying mechanisms for this smile development, and which is the best nonfacial neurotizer, need further clarification. The aim of the present study was therefore to further explore the natural coactivation between facial mimic muscles and muscles innervated by the most common donor nerves used in smile reanimation. The study was conducted in 10 healthy adults. Correlation between voluntary facial muscle movements and simultaneous electromyographic activity in muscles innervated by the masseter, hypoglossal, and spinal accessory nerves was assessed. The association between voluntary movements in the latter muscles and simultaneous electromyographic activity in facial muscles was also studied. Smile coactivated the masseter and tongue muscles equally. During the seven mimic movements, the masseter muscle had fewer electromyographically measured coactivations compared with the tongue (two of seven versus five of seven). The trapezius muscle demonstrated no coactivation during mimic movements. Movements of the masseter, tongue, and trapezius muscles induced electromyographically recorded coactivation in the facial muscles. Bite resulted in the strongest coactivation of the zygomaticus major muscle. The authors demonstrated coactivation between voluntary smile and the masseter and tongue muscles. During voluntary bite, strong coactivation of the zygomaticus major muscle was noted. The narrower coactivation pattern in the masseter muscle may be advantageous for central relearning and the development of a spontaneous smile. The strong coactivation between the masseter muscle and the zygomaticus major indicates that the masseter nerve may be preferred in smile reanimation.

National Category
Surgery
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347468 (URN)10.1097/PRS.0000000000004235 (DOI)000428668900014 ()29595736 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-04-03 Created: 2018-04-03 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, C., Lindberg, E., Jonsson, L., Holmström, M., Sundbom, F., Hedner, J., . . . Janson, C. (2017). Chronic rhinosinusitis impairs sleep quality: Results of the GA(2)LEN study. Sleep, 40(1), Article ID zsw021.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic rhinosinusitis impairs sleep quality: Results of the GA(2)LEN study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Sleep, ISSN 0161-8105, E-ISSN 1550-9109, Vol. 40, no 1, article id zsw021Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STUDY OBJECTIVES: To analyse the prevalence of sleep problems in subjects with CRS and to determine whether the disease severity of CRS affects sleep quality.

METHODS: Questionnaires were sent to a random sample of 45 000 adults in four Swedish cities. Questions on CRS, asthma, allergic rhinitis, co-morbidities, tobacco use, educational level and physical activity were included. CRS was defined according to the European Position Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EPOS) epidemiological criteria. The disease severity of CRS was defined by the number of reported CRS symptoms. Sleep quality was assessed using the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire.

RESULTS: Of the 26 647 subjects, 2249 (8.4%) had CRS. Reported sleep problems were 50-90% more common among subjects with CRS compared with those without or the total population. The prevalence of reported sleep problems increased in conjunction with the severity of CRS. After adjusting for gender, BMI, age, tobacco use, asthma, somatic diseases, physical activity level and educational level, participants with four symptoms of CRS (compared with subjects without CRS symptoms) displayed a higher risk of snoring (adj. OR (95% CI): 3.13 (2.22-4.41)), difficulties inducing sleep (3.98 (2.94-5.40)), difficulties maintaining sleep (3.44 (2.55-4.64)), early morning awakening (4.71 (3.47-6.38)) and excessive daytime sleepiness (4.56 (3.36-6.18)). The addition of persistent allergic rhinitis to CRS further increased the risk of sleep problems.

CONCLUSIONS: Sleep problems are highly prevalent among subjects with CRS. The disease severity of CRS negatively affects sleep quality.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311304 (URN)10.1093/sleep/zsw021 (DOI)000394125700021 ()27692055 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Heart Lung Foundation
Available from: 2016-12-22 Created: 2016-12-22 Last updated: 2019-10-12Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, C., Janson, C., Jonsson, L., Holmström, M., Theorell-Haglöw, J. & Lindberg, E. (2017). Chronic rhinosinusitis is an independent risk factor for sleeping problems – a 10-year-follow-up study. Paper presented at The 2017 joint congress of World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) and World Sleep Federation (WSF), October 7-11, 2017, Prague, Czech Republic.. Sleep Medicine, 40(Supplement 1), E30-E30
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic rhinosinusitis is an independent risk factor for sleeping problems – a 10-year-follow-up study
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 40, no Supplement 1, p. E30-E30Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Respiratory Medicine and Allergy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369232 (URN)10.1016/j.sleep.2017.11.082 (DOI)000444558902082 ()
Conference
The 2017 joint congress of World Association of Sleep Medicine (WASM) and World Sleep Federation (WSF), October 7-11, 2017, Prague, Czech Republic.
Available from: 2019-01-07 Created: 2019-01-07 Last updated: 2019-01-07Bibliographically approved
Bylund, N., Jensson, D., Enghag, S., Berg, T., Marsk, E., Hultcrantz, M., . . . Jonsson, L. (2017). Synkinesis in Bell's palsy in a randomised controlled trial. Clinical Otolaryngology, 42(3), 673-680
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Synkinesis in Bell's palsy in a randomised controlled trial
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Clinical Otolaryngology, ISSN 1749-4478, E-ISSN 1365-2273, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 673-680Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: To study the development of synkinesis in Bell's palsy. Frequency, severity, gender aspects and predictors were analysed.

DESIGN: Data from the randomised controlled Scandinavian Bell's palsy trial including 829 patients.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Frequency and severity of synkinesis at 12 months were the main outcome measures. Mean Sunnybrook synkinesis scores, voluntary movement scores and composite scores between 6 and 12 months were compared.

RESULTS: In 743 patients with a 12-month follow-up, synkinesis frequency was 21.3%. There was no gender difference. Synkinesis was moderate to severe in 6.6% of patients. Those with synkinesis at 6 months had a synkinesis score of 4.1 (±2.8 sd), which increased to 4.7 (±3.2) (P = 0.047) at 12 months (n = 93). Sunnybrook composite score at 1 month was the best predictor for synkinesis development with receiver operating characteristics and area under the curve (AUC) 0.87. Risk for synkinesis increased with a lower Sunnybrook composite score. Furthermore, at 1 month, symmetry of voluntary movement had higher predictive value for synkinesis than resting symmetry with AUC 0.87 and 0.77, respectively. Gentle eye closure and open-mouth smile were the only independent significant predictive items (AUC 0.86).

CONCLUSIONS: Moderate-to-severe synkinesis was present in 6.6% of patients. The mean synkinesis score increased between 6 and 12 months, and outcome should therefore be evaluated after at least 12 months. Sunnybrook composite score and symmetry of voluntary movement at 1 month were good predictors for synkinesis.

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-315889 (URN)10.1111/coa.12799 (DOI)000399941300024 ()27882653 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-02-22 Created: 2017-02-22 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Berg, T. & Jonsson, L. (2015). Are patients with Bell's palsy receiving the right treatment?. Tidsskrift for Den norske lægeforening, 135(11), 1026-1027
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are patients with Bell's palsy receiving the right treatment?
2015 (Norwegian)In: Tidsskrift for Den norske lægeforening, ISSN 0029-2001, E-ISSN 0807-7096, Vol. 135, no 11, p. 1026-1027Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275137 (URN)10.4045/tidsskr.15.0249 (DOI)000371235500017 ()26080776 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-01-30 Created: 2016-01-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Berg, T., Stjernquist-Desatnik, A., Kanerva, M., Hultcrantz, M., Engström, M. & Jonsson, L. (2015). Bells pares ger resttillstånd hos 30 procent av vuxna patienter: Tidig behandling med kortison ökar utläkningen. Läkartidningen, 112, 1-5, Article ID C6RD.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bells pares ger resttillstånd hos 30 procent av vuxna patienter: Tidig behandling med kortison ökar utläkningen
Show others...
2015 (Swedish)In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 112, p. 1-5, article id C6RDArticle in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275139 (URN)
Note

[Residual states in 30 percent of patients with Bell's palsy. Early treatment with cortisone improves the healing process]

Available from: 2016-01-30 Created: 2016-01-30 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Bengtsson, C., Jonsson, L., Holmström, M., Svensson, M., Theorell-Haglöw, J. & Lindberg, E. (2015). Impact of nasal obstruction on sleep quality: a community-based study of women. European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, 272(1), 97-103
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Impact of nasal obstruction on sleep quality: a community-based study of women
Show others...
2015 (English)In: European Archives of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, ISSN 0937-4477, E-ISSN 1434-4726, Vol. 272, no 1, p. 97-103Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to analyse the impact of self-reported nasal obstruction on sleep quality in women. A community-based sample of 400 women underwent a full night of polysomnography. Airway diseases, allergies and sleep-related symptoms were assessed by questionnaires. Women with subjective nasal obstruction were subdivided into three groups: persistent nasal obstruction (PNO, n = 46), hay fever (n = 88) and nasal obstruction at night (NON, n = 30). Sleep problems and related daytime symptoms were most prevalent among women with NON. After adjusting for age, BMI, smoking and asthma, NON was an independent predictor of 'Difficulties inducing sleep due to nasal obstruction' [adjusted odds ratio (95 % CI): 89.5 (27.0-296.7)], 'Snoring' [4.2 (1.7-10.2)], 'Sweating at night' [2.6 (1.1-6.1)], 'Difficulties maintaining sleep' [2.7 (1.2-6.2)], and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath' [32.2 (8.7-119.1)]. 'Dry mouth on awakening' [7.7 (3.2-18.4)], 'Waking up unrefreshed' [2.7 (1.2-6.0)], 'Excessive daytime sleepiness' [2.6 (1.1-6.0)], and 'Daytime nasal obstruction' [12.2 (4.8-31.2)] were also associated with NON. Persistent nasal obstruction and hay fever were both associated with some reported sleep problems due to an overlap with NON. When women with NON were excluded, only 'Daytime nasal obstruction' was still significantly associated with PNO, while hay fever was associated with 'Daytime nasal obstruction' and 'Waking up hastily gasping for breath'. There were no significant differences in objectively measured sleep variables between any of the three subgroups and the study cohort. Self-reported nasal obstruction at night in women has a significant effect on several subjective day- and nighttime symptoms, but it does not appear to affect objectively measured sleep quality.

National Category
Otorhinolaryngology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-231393 (URN)10.1007/s00405-014-3067-6 (DOI)000347292000014 ()24792065 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-09-08 Created: 2014-09-08 Last updated: 2019-10-12Bibliographically approved
Jonsson, L., Baraldi, E., Larsson, L.-E., Forsberg, P. & Severinsson, K. (2015). Targeting Academic Engagement in Open Innovation: Tools, Effects and Challenges for University Management. Journal of the Knowledge Economy, 6(3), 522-550
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Targeting Academic Engagement in Open Innovation: Tools, Effects and Challenges for University Management
Show others...
2015 (English)In: Journal of the Knowledge Economy, ISSN 1868-7865, E-ISSN 1868-7873, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 522-550Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-267406 (URN)10.1007/s13132-015-0254-7 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-11-23 Created: 2015-11-23 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications