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Brimdyr, K., Stevens, J., Svensson, K., Blair, A., Turner-Maffei, C., Grady, J., . . . Cadwell, K. (2023). Skin-to-skin contact after birth: Developing a research and practice guideline. Acta Paediatrica, 112(8), 1633-1643
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skin-to-skin contact after birth: Developing a research and practice guideline
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2023 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 112, no 8, p. 1633-1643Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimSkin-to-skin contact immediately after birth is recognised as an evidence-based best practice and an acknowledged contributor to improved short- and long-term health outcomes including decreased infant mortality. However, the implementation and definition of skin-to-skin contact is inconsistent in both practice and research studies. This project utilised the World Health Organization guideline process to clarify best practice and improve the consistency of application. MethodsThe rigorous guideline development process combines a systematic review with acumen and judgement of experts with a wide range of credentials and experience. ResultsThe developed guideline received a strong recommendation from the Expert Panel. The result concluded that there was a high level of confidence in the evidence and that the practice is not resource intensive. Research gaps were identified and areas for continued work were delineated. ConclusionThe World Health Organization guideline development process reached the conclusion immediate, continuous, uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact should be the standard of care for all mothers and all babies (from 1000 g with experienced staff if assistance is needed), after all modes of birth. Delaying non-essential routine care in favour of uninterrupted skin-to-skin contact after birth has been shown to be safe and allows for the progression of newborns through their instinctive behaviours.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
best practice, breastfeeding, guideline development, implementation, skin-to-skin
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-513073 (URN)10.1111/apa.16842 (DOI)000992074300001 ()37166443 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2023-10-04 Created: 2023-10-04 Last updated: 2023-10-04Bibliographically approved
Sunny, A. K., Paudel, P., Tiwari, J., Bagale, B. B., Kukka, A., Hong, Z., . . . KC, A. (2021). A multicenter study of incidence, risk factors and outcomes of babies with birth asphyxia in Nepal. BMC Pediatrics, 21, Article ID 394.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A multicenter study of incidence, risk factors and outcomes of babies with birth asphyxia in Nepal
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2021 (English)In: BMC Pediatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 21, article id 394Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Perinatal events which result in compromised oxygen delivery to the fetus can lead to Birth Asphyxia (BA). While the incidence, risk factors and outcomes of BA have been characterized, less is known in low resource settings.

Aim: To determine the incidence of Birth Asphyxia (BA) in Nepal and to evaluate associated risk factors and outcomes of this condition.

Methods: A nested observational study was conducted in 12 hospitals of Nepal for a period of 14 months. Babies diagnosed as BA at >= 37 weeks of gestation were identified and demographics were reviewed. Data were analyzed using binary logistic regression followed by multiple logistic regression analysis.

Results: The incidence of BA in this study was 6 per 1000 term livebirths and was higher among women 35 years and above. Predictors for BA were instrumented vaginal delivery (aOR:4.4, 95% CI, 3.1-6.1), fetal distress in labour (aOR:1.9, 95% CI, 1.0-3.6), malposition (aOR:1.8, 95% CI, 1.0-3.0), birth weight less than 2500 g (aOR:2.0, 95% CI, 1.3-2.9), gestational age >= 42 weeks (aOR:2.0, 95% CI, 1.3-3.3) and male gender (aOR:1.6, 95% CI, 1.2-2.0). The risk of pre-discharge mortality was 43 times higher in babies with BA (aOR:42.6, 95% CI, 32.2-56.3).

Conclusion: The incidence of Birth asphyxia in Nepal higher than in more resourced setting. A range of obstetric and neonatal risk factors are associated with BA with an associated high risk of pre-discharge mortality. Interventions to improve management and decrease rates of BA could have marked impact on outcomes in low resource settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC)BMC, 2021
Keywords
Newborn, Birth asphyxia, Risk factor, Neonatal mortality, Nepal
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-456499 (URN)10.1186/s12887-021-02858-y (DOI)000694894800001 ()34507527 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilEinhorn Foundation
Available from: 2021-10-25 Created: 2021-10-25 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
Flacking, R., Tandberg, B. S., Niela-Vilen, H., Jonsdottir, R. B., Jonas, W., Ewald, U. & Thomson, G. (2021). Positive breastfeeding experiences and facilitators in mothers of preterm and low birthweight infants: a meta-ethnographic review. International Breastfeeding Journal, 16(1), Article ID 88.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Positive breastfeeding experiences and facilitators in mothers of preterm and low birthweight infants: a meta-ethnographic review
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2021 (English)In: International Breastfeeding Journal, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 88Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Most qualitative research on breastfeeding the preterm or low-birthweight (LBW) infant has focused on negative insights; there are no comprehensive insights into how, when and why mothers experience positive breastfeeding experiences. We aimed to address this knowledge gap by exploring what characterizes and facilitates a positive breastfeeding experience in mothers of preterm and/or LBW infants.

Methods

A systematic review using meta-ethnographic methods was conducted. Search strategies involved a comprehensive search strategy on six bibliographic databases, citation tracking and reference checking. The analysis involved a reciprocal level of translation and a line of argument synthesis.

Results

Searches identified 1774 hits and 17 articles from 14 studies were included, representing the views of 697 mothers. A positive breastfeeding experience was identified as being 'attuned'. Three themes and eight sub-themes were developed to describe what characterizes attuned breastfeeding. 'Trusting the body and what it can do', concerned how attuned breastfeeding was facilitated through understanding the bodily responses and capacity and feeling comfortable with holding the infant and to breastfeed. 'Being emotionally present - in the here and now' described the importance of feeling relaxed and reassured. 'Experiencing mutual positive responses', illuminated how attunement was related to feelings of mutuality - when the mother recognises the infant's cues, responds to these signals and receives a positive response from the infant. The key factors to facilitate attuned breastfeeding were opportunities for prolonged close physical contact with the infant, positive relationships with and support from staff and peers, and being facilitated to breastfeed when the infant showed feeding cues.

Conclusions

This study provides new insights into what characterizes a positive breastfeeding experience and how staff can facilitate and enable mothers to achieve attuned breastfeeding. Improvements in units' design, such as for rooming-in and having prolonged skin-to-skin contact, and care provided by knowledgeable, supportive and encouraging staff and peers, are crucial. The mother's physical and emotional states and the infant's behavioural responses and physiological signals should guide the process towards positive breastfeeding practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC)Springer Nature, 2021
Keywords
Attunement, Breastfeeding, Breast milk, Feeding, Low-birthweight, Mother, Neonatal, NICU, Parent, Preterm
National Category
Pediatrics Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-461560 (URN)10.1186/s13006-021-00435-8 (DOI)000722982100002 ()34838104 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2021-12-17 Created: 2021-12-17 Last updated: 2024-07-04Bibliographically approved
K. C., A., Lawn, J. E., Zhou, H., Ewald, U., Gurung, R., Gurung, A., . . . Singhal, N. (2020). Not Crying After Birth as a Predictor of Not Breathing. Pediatrics, 145(6), Article ID e20192719.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Not Crying After Birth as a Predictor of Not Breathing
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2020 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 145, no 6, article id e20192719Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Worldwide, every year, 6 to 10 million infants require resuscitation at birth according to estimates based on limited data regarding "nonbreathing" infants. In this article, we aim to describe the incidence of "noncrying" and nonbreathing infants after birth, the need for basic resuscitation with bag-and-mask ventilation, and death before discharge.

METHODS: We conducted an observational study of 19 977 infants in 4 hospitals in Nepal. We analyzed the incidence of noncrying or nonbreathing infants after birth. The sensitivity of noncrying infants with nonbreathing after birth was analyzed, and the risk of predischarge mortality between the 2 groups was calculated.

RESULTS: The incidence of noncrying infants immediately after birth was 11.1%, and the incidence of noncrying and nonbreathing infants was 5.2%. Noncrying after birth had 100% sensitivity for nonbreathing infants after birth. Among the "noncrying but breathing" infants, 9.5% of infants did not breathe at 1 minute and 2% did not to breathe at 5 minutes. Noncrying but breathing infants after birth had almost 12-fold odds of predischarge mortality (adjusted odds ratio 12.3; 95% confidence interval, 5.8-26.1).

CONCLUSIONS: All nonbreathing infants after birth do not cry at birth. A proportion of noncrying but breathing infants at birth are not breathing by 1 and 5 minutes and have a risk for predischarge mortality. With this study, we provide evidence of an association between noncrying and nonbreathing. This study revealed that noncrying but breathing infants require additional care. We suggest noncrying as a clinical sign for initiating resuscitation and a possible denominator for measuring coverage of resuscitation.

National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-416128 (URN)10.1542/peds.2019-2719 (DOI)000562973000014 ()32398327 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

De två första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet

Available from: 2020-07-10 Created: 2020-07-10 Last updated: 2021-08-03Bibliographically approved
Budhathoki, S. S., Gurung, R., Ewald, U., Thapa, J. & Ashish, K. C. (2019). Does the Helping Babies Breathe Programme impact on neonatal resuscitation care practices?: Results from systematic review and meta-analysis. Acta Paediatrica, 108(5), 806-813
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does the Helping Babies Breathe Programme impact on neonatal resuscitation care practices?: Results from systematic review and meta-analysis
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2019 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 5, p. 806-813Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This paper examines the change in neonatal resuscitation practices after the implementation of the Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) programme.

Methods: A systematic review was carried out on studies reporting the impact of HBB programmes among the literature found in Medline, POPLINE, LILACS, African Index Medicus, Cochrane, Web of Science and Index Medicus for the Eastern Mediterranean Region database. We selected clinical trials with randomised control, quasi-experimental and cross-sectional designs. We used a data extraction tool to extract information on intervention and outcome reporting. We carried out a meta-analysis of the extracted data on the neonatal resuscitation practices following HBB programme using Review Manager.

Results: Four studies that reported on neonatal resuscitation practices before and after the implementation of the HBB programme were identified. The pooled results showed no changes in the use of stimulation (RR-0.54; 95% CI, 0.21-1.42), suctioning (RR-0.48; 95% CI, 0.18-1.27) and bag-and-mask ventilation (RR-0.93; 95% CI, 0.47-1.83) after HBB training. The proportion of babies receiving bag-and-mask ventilation within the Golden Minute of birth increased by more than 2.5 times (RR-2.67; 95% CI, 2.17-3.28).

Conclusion: The bag-and-mask ventilation within Golden minute has improved following the HBB programme. Implementation of HBB training improves timely initiation of bag-and-mask ventilation within one minute of birth.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2019
Keywords
Helping Babies Breathe, Low-and middle-income countries, Neonatal resuscitation, Ventilation within one minute of birth
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383281 (URN)10.1111/apa.14706 (DOI)000465091200005 ()30582888 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-14 Created: 2019-05-14 Last updated: 2021-12-09Bibliographically approved
KC, A., Ewald, U., Basnet, O., Gurung, A., Pyakuryal, S. N., Jha, B. K., . . . Målqvist, M. (2019). Effect of a scaled-up neonatal resuscitation quality improvement package on intrapartum-related mortality in Nepal: A stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial. PLoS Medicine, 16(9), Article ID e1002900.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of a scaled-up neonatal resuscitation quality improvement package on intrapartum-related mortality in Nepal: A stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial
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2019 (English)In: PLoS Medicine, ISSN 1549-1277, E-ISSN 1549-1676, Vol. 16, no 9, article id e1002900Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Improving quality of intrapartum care will reduce intrapartum stillbirth and neonatal mortality, especially in resource-poor settings. Basic neonatal resuscitation can reduce intrapartum stillbirth and early neonatal mortality, if delivered in a high-quality health system, but there is a dearth of evidence on how to scale up such evidence-based interventions. We evaluated the scaling up of a quality improvement (QI) package for neonatal resuscitation on intrapartum-related mortality (intrapartum stillbirth and first day mortality) at hospitals in Nepal. Methods and findings We conducted a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial in 12 hospitals over a period of 18 months from April 14, 2017, to October 17, 2018. The hospitals were assigned to one of four wedges through random allocation. The QI package was implemented in a stepped-wedge manner with a delay of three months for each step. The QI package included improving hospital leadership on intrapartum care, building health workers' competency on neonatal resuscitation, and continuous facilitated QI processes in clinical units. An independent data collection system was set up at each hospital to gather data on mortality through patient case note review and demographic characteristics of women using semi-structured exit interviews. The generalized linear mixed model (GLMM) and multivariate logistic regression were used for analyses. During this study period, a total of 89,014 women-infant pairs were enrolled. The mean age of the mother in the study period was 24.0 +/- 4.3 years, with 54.9% from disadvantaged ethnic groups and 4.0% of them illiterate. Of the total birth cohort, 54.4% were boys, 16.7% had gestational age less than 37 weeks, and 17.1% had birth weight less than 2,500 grams. The incidence of intrapartum-related mortality was 11.0 per 1,000 births during the control period and 8.0 per 1,000 births during the intervention period (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 0.79; 95% CI, 0.69-0.92; p = 0.002; intra-cluster correlation coefficient [ICC], 0.0286). The incidence of early neonatal mortality was 12.7 per 1,000 live births during the control period and 10.1 per 1,000 live births during the intervention period (aOR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.78-1.02; p = 0.09; ICC, 0.1538). The use of bag-and-mask ventilation for babies with low Apgar score (<7 at 1 minute) increased from 3.2% in the control period to 4.0% in the intervention period (aOR, 1.52; 95% CI, 1.32-1.77, p = 0.003). There were two major limitations to the study; although a large sample of women-infant pairs were enrolled in the study, the clustering reduced the power of the study. Secondly, the study was not sufficiently powered to detect reduction in early neonatal mortality with the number of clusters provided. Conclusion These results suggest scaled-up implementation of a QI package for neonatal resuscitation can reduce intrapartum-related mortality and improve clinical care. The QI intervention package is likely to be effective in similar settings. More implementation research is required to assess the sustainability of QI interventions and quality of care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2019
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396627 (URN)10.1371/journal.pmed.1002900 (DOI)000489902400012 ()31498784 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-11-08 Created: 2019-11-08 Last updated: 2020-04-17Bibliographically approved
Gurung, R., Gurung, A., Rajbhandari, P., Ewald, U., Basnet, O. & KC, A. (2019). Effectiveness and Acceptability of Bag-and-mask Ventilation with Visual Monitor for Improving Neonatal Resuscitation in Simulated Setting in Six Hospitals of Nepal. Journal of Nepal Health Research Council, 17(2), 222-227
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effectiveness and Acceptability of Bag-and-mask Ventilation with Visual Monitor for Improving Neonatal Resuscitation in Simulated Setting in Six Hospitals of Nepal
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Nepal Health Research Council, ISSN 1727-5482, E-ISSN 1999-6217, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 222-227Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Improving the performance of health workers on neonatal resuscitation will be critical to ensure that the babies are effectively ventilated. We conducted a study to evaluate whether a bag-and-mask ventilation with monitor is effective in improving neonatal resuscitation practice in a simulated setting.

METHODS: This is a cross-over design conducted in 6 public hospitals with 82 health workers of Nepal nested over a large scale stepped wedged quality improvement project. A one-day training on neonatal resuscitation was conducted. At the end of the training, participants were evaluated on the bag-and-mask ventilation performance in a manikinbased on the tidal volume, positive end expiratory pressure and air leakage from the maskin two sessions (monitor displayed versus hidden). The comparison of the neonatal resuscitation performance with and without monitor displayed is calculated. We also conducted assessment of confidence with or without monitor of the health workers.

RESULTS: Adequacy of ventilation using bag-and-mask was better when the health workers were displayed monitor (90%) vs without monitor (76%) (p<0.01). The air leakage from the mask reduced when the monitor was displayed (12%) vs without (30%). The PEEP improved when the health workers used monitor as guide to conduct neonatal resuscitation in the manikin then without monitor displayed. The participants felt more confident performing ventilations during the visible sessions.

CONCLUSIONS: The ventilation function monitor helped participants to improve their ventilation skills through realtime feedback of important ventilation parameters. Clinical evaluation of needs to be done to assess the effectiveness of the device.

Keywords
Clinical performance; monivent neo; neonatal resuscitation; Nepal; ventilation monitor.
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397992 (URN)10.33314/jnhrc.v0i0.1730 (DOI)31455938 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2021-12-09Bibliographically approved
Andersson, O., Rana, N., Ewald, U., Målqvist, M., Stripple, G., Basnet, O., . . . KC, A. (2019). Intact cord resuscitation versus early cord clamping in the treatment of depressed newborn infants during the first 10 minutes of birth (Nepcord III) -: a randomized clinical trial. Maternal health, neonatology and perinatology, 5(15)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intact cord resuscitation versus early cord clamping in the treatment of depressed newborn infants during the first 10 minutes of birth (Nepcord III) -: a randomized clinical trial
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2019 (English)In: Maternal health, neonatology and perinatology, ISSN 2054-958X, Vol. 5, no 15Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Experiments have shown improved cardiovascular stability in lambs if umbilical cord clamping is postponed until positive pressure ventilation is started. Studies on intact cord resuscitation on human term infants are sparse. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in clinical outcomes in non-breathing infants between groups, one where resuscitation is initiated with an intact umbilical cord (intervention group) and one group where cord clamping occurred prior to resuscitation (control group).

Methods: Randomized controlled trial, inclusion period April to August 2016 performed at a tertiary hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal. Late preterm and term infants born vaginally, non-breathing and in need of resuscitation according to the 'Helping Babies Breathe' algorithm were randomized to intact cord resuscitation or early cord clamping before resuscitation. Main outcome measures were saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO2), heart rate and Apgar at 1, 5 and 10 minutes after birth.

Results: At 10 minutes after birth, SpO2 (SD) was significantly higher in the intact cord group compared to the early cord clamping group, 90.4 (8.1) vs 85.4 (2.7) %, P < .001). In the intact cord group, 57 (44%) had SpO2 < 90% after 10 minutes, compared to 93 (100%) in the early cord clamping group, P < 0.001. SpO2 was also significantly higher in the intervention (intact cord) group at one and five minutes after birth. Heart rate was lower in the intervention (intact cord) group at one and five minutes and slightly higher at ten minutes, all significant findings. Apgar score was significantly higher at one, five and ten minutes. At 5 minutes, 23 (17%) had Apgar score < 7 in the intervention (intact cord) group compared to 26 (27%) in the early cord clamping group, P < .07. Newborn infants in the intervention (intact cord) group started to breathe and establish regular breathing earlier than in the early cord clamping group.

Conclusions: This study provides new and important information on the effects of resuscitation with an intact umbilical cord. The findings of improved SpO2 and higher Apgar score, and the absence of negative consequences encourages further studies with longer follow-up.

Trial registration: Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02727517, 2016/4/4.

Keywords
Apgar score, Cord clamping, Pulse oximetry, Resuscitation, Term newborn, Umbilical cord
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397521 (URN)10.1186/s40748-019-0110-z (DOI)31485335 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-11-21 Created: 2019-11-21 Last updated: 2021-12-09Bibliographically approved
Gurung, R., Jha, A. K., Pyakurel, S., Gurung, A., Litorp, H., Wrammert, J., . . . KC, A. (2019). Scaling Up Safer Birth Bundle Through Quality Improvement in Nepal (SUSTAIN) - a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial in public hospitals. Implementation Science, 14, Article ID 65.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Scaling Up Safer Birth Bundle Through Quality Improvement in Nepal (SUSTAIN) - a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial in public hospitals
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2019 (English)In: Implementation Science, E-ISSN 1748-5908, Vol. 14, article id 65Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Each year, 2.2 million intrapartum-related deaths (intrapartum stillbirths and first day neonatal deaths) occur worldwide with 99% of them taking place in low- and middle-income countries. Despite the accelerated increase in the proportion of deliveries taking place in health facilities in these settings, the stillborn and neonatal mortality rates have not reduced proportionately. Poor quality of care in health facilities is attributed to two-thirds of these deaths. Improving quality of care during the intrapartum period needs investments in evidence-based interventions. We aim to evaluate the quality improvement packageScaling Up Safer Bundle Through Quality Improvement in Nepal (SUSTAIN)on intrapartum care and intrapartum-related mortality in public hospitals of Nepal.

Methods: We will conduct a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial in eight public hospitals with each having least 3000 deliveries a year. Each hospital will represent a cluster with an intervention transition period of 2months in each. With a level of significance of 95%, the statistical power of 90% and an intra-cluster correlation of 0.00015, a study period of 19months should detect at least a 15% change in intrapartum-related mortality. Quality improvement training, mentoring, systematic feedback, and a continuous improvement cycle will be instituted based on bottleneck analyses in each hospital. All concerned health workers will be trained on standard basic neonatal resuscitation and essential newborn care. Portable fetal heart monitors (Moyo (R)) and neonatal heart rate monitors (Neobeat (R)) will be introduced in the hospitals to identify fetal distress during labor and to improve neonatal resuscitation. Independent research teams will collect data in each hospital on intervention inputs, processes, and outcomes by reviewing records and carrying out observations and interviews. The dose-response effect will be evaluated through process evaluations.

Discussion: With the global momentum to improve quality of intrapartum care, better understanding of QI package within a health facility context is important. The proposed package is based on experiences from a similar previous scale-up trial carried out in Nepal. The proposed evaluation will provide evidence on QI package and technology for implementation and scale up in similar settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2019
Keywords
Quality improvement interventions, Basic neonatal resuscitation, Fetal heart rate monitoring, Stepped wedge cluster randomized control trial, Nepal
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390196 (URN)10.1186/s13012-019-0917-z (DOI)000472202100001 ()31217028 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-08-07 Created: 2019-08-07 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, L., Nga, N. T., Hoa, D. T., Duc, D. M., Bergström, A., Wallin, L., . . . Ekholm Selling, K. (2018). Secular trend, seasonality and effects of a community-based intervention on neonatal mortality: follow-up of a cluster-randomised trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 72(9), 776-782
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Secular trend, seasonality and effects of a community-based intervention on neonatal mortality: follow-up of a cluster-randomised trial in Quang Ninh province, Vietnam
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, ISSN 0143-005X, E-ISSN 1470-2738, Vol. 72, no 9, p. 776-782Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Little is know about whether the effects of community engagement interventions for child survival in low-income and middle-income settings are sustained. Seasonal variation and secular trend may blur the data. Neonatal mortality was reduced in a cluster-randomised trial in Vietnam where laywomen facilitated groups composed of local stakeholders employing a problem-solving approach for 3 years. In this analysis, we aim at disentangling the secular trend, the seasonal variation and the effect of the intervention on neonatal mortality during and after the trial.

Methods: In Quang Ninh province, 44 communes were allocated to intervention and 46 to control. Births and neonatal deaths were assessed in a baseline survey in 2005, monitored during the trial in 2008–2011 and followed up by a survey in 2014. Time series analyses were performed on monthly neonatal mortality data.

Results: There were 30 187 live births and 480 neonatal deaths. The intervention reduced the neonatal mortality from 19.1 to 11.6 per 1000 live births. The reduction was sustained 3 years after the trial. The control areas reached a similar level at the time of follow-up. Time series decomposition analysis revealed a downward trend in the intervention areas during the trial that was not found in the control areas. Neonatal mortality peaked in the hot and wet summers.

Conclusions: A community engagement intervention resulted in a lower neonatal mortality rate that was sustained but not further reduced after the end of the trial. When decomposing time series of neonatal mortality, a clear downward trend was demonstrated in intervention but not in control areas.

Trial registration number: ISRCTN44599712, Post-results.

National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
International Health; Epidemiology; Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365036 (URN)10.1136/jech-2017-209252 (DOI)000445084200004 ()29764902 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 348-20136546
Available from: 2018-11-08 Created: 2018-11-08 Last updated: 2018-11-28Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6785-0494

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