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Gustafson, Per
Publications (10 of 45) Show all publications
Gustafson, P. (2018). The Gendered Economics of Synchronized Retirement. Research on Aging, 40(7), 623-644
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Gendered Economics of Synchronized Retirement
2018 (English)In: Research on Aging, ISSN 0164-0275, E-ISSN 1552-7573, Vol. 40, no 7, p. 623-644Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Women generally receive lower pensions than men, and research on gender and pensions has identified a number of factors underlying this pattern. The present article examines one factor that has largely gone unnoticedsynchronized retirement. In most married couples, the husband is older than his wife, yet many couples prefer to retire together. At the same time, pension systems are increasingly designed to discourage early retirement and reward late retirement. If younger wives and older husbands tend to synchronize their retirement, this may reinforce gendered income inequalities among older persons. Analyses of register data on Swedish married couples provide empirical support for this argument. Comparisons of their pre- and postretirement incomes show that women who synchronized retirement with their husbands had, in relative terms, lower postretirement incomes than other women, whereas men who synchronized had higher postretirement incomes than other men.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, 2018
Keywords
income inequality, joint retirement, pensions, Sweden
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-361679 (URN)10.1177/0164027517724491 (DOI)000438610500002 ()28782420 (PubMedID)
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2010-0070
Available from: 2018-10-08 Created: 2018-10-08 Last updated: 2018-10-08Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, P. & Laksfoss Cardozo, A. E. (2017). Language use and social inclusion in internationalretirement migration. Social Inclusion, 5(4), 69-77
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Language use and social inclusion in internationalretirement migration
2017 (English)In: Social Inclusion, ISSN 2183-2803, E-ISSN 2183-2803, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 69-77Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The migration of older people in search for improved quality of life has become an important form of human mobility, andpopular retirement destinations are often highly multilingual settings. This article explores language use and social inclu-sion in international retirement migration through a case study of Scandinavian retirees in the Alicante province in Spain.It examines the linguistic landscape they meet, their language use and their inclusion in their new home country. Inter-views with retired migrants and key local individuals show that many migrants try to learn the host country language, butthat these attempts are often not very successful. As a result, they frequently use either their native language or Englishfor everyday communication. This article elaborates on three theoretical and political notions of inclusion—assimilation,multiculturalism and civic integration—and discusses how retired migrants’ language use can be interpreted in the light ofthese notions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
COGITATIO PRESS, 2017
Keywords
international retirement migration; language; multilingualism; social inclusion; Spain
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338921 (URN)10.17645/si.v5i4.1133 (DOI)000422676500008 ()
Available from: 2018-01-15 Created: 2018-01-15 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, P. (2017). Spousal age differences and synchronised retirement. Ageing & Society, 37(4), 777-803
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Spousal age differences and synchronised retirement
2017 (English)In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 777-803Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many couples want to retire together even if spouses differ in age. Drawing on theories of leisure complementarity, gender roles and social status, this article uses comprehensive Swedish register data from 2002 to 2010 to explore synchronised retirement and its association with spousal age differences and other socio-demographic factors. Synchronisation rates in dual-earner couples (N = 83,986) were 10 per cent for retirement the same calendar year and 25 per cent for retirement the same or the following year. Contrary to theoretical expectations, synchronisation was more common in women-older couples than in men-older couples, although this was largely a consequence of the skewed distribution of age differences. Moreover, spouses' education, incomes, assets, employment and health were differently associated with synchronisation in same-age, men-older and women-older couples. In the total population, average retirement age differed very little between synchronising couples and other couples. Yet women who synchronised retired at an earlier age than other women, whereas men who synchronised retired later than other men. This was partly an effect of the predominance of men-older couples, but men in men-older couples were also more likely than women in women-older couples to delay retirement in order to synchronise.

Keywords
age differences, joint retirement, synchronisation, gender
National Category
Gerontology, specialising in Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-321325 (URN)10.1017/S0144686X15001452 (DOI)000398500200006 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2017-05-31 Created: 2017-05-31 Last updated: 2018-01-13Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, P. & Hertting, N. (2017). Understanding Participatory Governance: An Analysis of Participants' Motives. American Review of Public Administration, 47(5), 538-549
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Understanding Participatory Governance: An Analysis of Participants' Motives
2017 (English)In: American Review of Public Administration, ISSN 0275-0740, E-ISSN 1552-3357, Vol. 47, no 5, p. 538-549Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the growing body of literature on participatory and collaborative governance, little is known about citizens' motives for participation in such new governance arrangements. The present article argues that knowledge about these motives is essential for understanding the quality and nature of participatory governance and its potential contribution to the overall political and administrative system. Survey data were used to explore participants' motives for participating in a large-scale urban renewal program in Stockholm, Sweden. The program was neighborhood-based, characterized by self-selected and repeated participation, and designed to influence local decisions on the use of public resources. Three types of motives were identified among the participants: (a) Common good motives concerned improving the neighborhood in general and contributing knowledge and competence. (b) Self-interest motives reflected a desire to improve one's own political efficacy and to promote the interest of one's own group or family. (c) Professional competence motives represented a largely apolitical type of motive, often based on a professional role. Different motives were expressed by different categories of participants and were also associated with different perceptions concerning program outcomes. Further analysis suggested that participatory governance may represent both an opportunity for marginalized groups to empower themselves and an opportunity for more privileged groups to act as local citizen representatives and articulate the interests of their neighborhoods. These findings call for a more complex understanding of the role and potential benefits of participatory governance.

National Category
Public Administration Studies
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292947 (URN)10.1177/0275074015626298 (DOI)000403590800003 ()
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare, 2009-0052Swedish Research Council Formas, 250-210-105
Available from: 2016-05-10 Created: 2016-05-10 Last updated: 2019-09-20Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, P. & Fransson, U. (2015). Age differences between spouses: Sociodemographic variation and selection. Marriage and Family Review, 51(7), 610-632
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Age differences between spouses: Sociodemographic variation and selection
2015 (English)In: Marriage and Family Review, ISSN 0149-4929, E-ISSN 1540-9635, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 610-632Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Throughout the world, marriages in which the husband is older than his wife are more common than same-age and women-older marriages. Yet there is surprisingly little systematic knowledge about within-country variation in spousal age differences. This study used comprehensive Swedish register data to investigate how age differences in newly married couples were associated with spouses' age, gender, education, income, and birthplace. Among both women and men, small age differences were most common among the highly educated, high-income earners, and native Swedes, whereas persons with low education, low income, and non-Swedish origin more often entered marriages with large age differences, particularly men-older marriages. Findings are discussed in relation to theoretical attempts to explain spousal age differences and sociodemographic selection into couples with different age relationships.

Keywords
gender, marriage, mate selection, socioeconomic status, spousal age differences
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-265183 (URN)10.1080/01494929.2015.1060289 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-10-23 Created: 2015-10-23 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Danielsson, M., Gustafson, P. & Hertting, N. (2015). Vem vinner på medborgardialog?: Deltagande och politisk integration i den segregerade staden (1ed.). In: Bo Bengtsson, Gunnar Myrberg och Roger Andersson (Ed.), Mångfaldens dilemman: Medborgarskap och integrationspolitik (pp. 143-165). Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vem vinner på medborgardialog?: Deltagande och politisk integration i den segregerade staden
2015 (Swedish)In: Mångfaldens dilemman: Medborgarskap och integrationspolitik / [ed] Bo Bengtsson, Gunnar Myrberg och Roger Andersson, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015, 1, p. 143-165Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2015 Edition: 1
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269887 (URN)9789140692122 (ISBN)
Projects
Mångfaldens dilemman: Etnisk integration och segregation i staden
Funder
Forte, Swedish Research Council for Health, Working Life and Welfare
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2015-12-18
Gustafson, P. (2014). Business Travel from the Traveller's Perspective: Stress, Stimulation and Normalization. Mobilities, 9(1), 63-83
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Business Travel from the Traveller's Perspective: Stress, Stimulation and Normalization
2014 (English)In: Mobilities, ISSN 1745-0101, E-ISSN 1745-011X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 63-83Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For growing numbers of businesspeople, managers and public officials, work involves travel. This study investigates what business travel means to travellers. What are their experiences of travel and what are the consequences of travel for their professional and personal lives? Qualitative interviews with frequent business travellers and corporate travel managers show that travel may be both stressful and stimulating. It may be associated with physical and psychological strain, increased workloads and difficulties in balancing work and private life, but also with enriching experiences, social and professional status and a cosmopolitan identity. It may also promote travellers' professional careers. However, in some respects, an ongoing normalization of travel seems to have moderating effects on both stress and stimulation among travellers. This normalization occurs on three different levels: the societal, organizational and individual.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-217656 (URN)10.1080/17450101.2013.784539 (DOI)000329424700004 ()
Available from: 2014-02-12 Created: 2014-02-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, P. (2014). Place attachment in an age of mobility. In: L. Manzo & P. Devine-Wright (Ed.), Place Attachment: Advances in Theory, Methods and Applications (pp. 37-48). London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Place attachment in an age of mobility
2014 (English)In: Place Attachment: Advances in Theory, Methods and Applications / [ed] L. Manzo & P. Devine-Wright, London: Routledge, 2014, p. 37-48Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Place attachments are emotional bonds that form between people and their physical surroundings. These connections are a powerful aspect of human life that inform our sense of identity, create meaning in our lives, facilitate community and influence action. Place attachments have bearing on such diverse issues as rootedness and belonging, placemaking and displacement, mobility and migration, intergroup conflict, civic engagement, social housing and urban redevelopment, natural resource management and global climate change.       In this multidisciplinary book, Manzo and Devine-Wright draw together the latest thinking by leading scholars from around the globe, capturing important advancements in three areas: theory, methods and application. In a wide range of conceptual and applied ways, the authors critically review and challenge contemporary knowledge, identify significant advances and point to areas for future research.   This volume offers the most current understandings about place attachment, a critical concept for the environmental social sciences and placemaking professions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2014
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-207439 (URN)9780415538213 (ISBN)
Available from: 2013-09-13 Created: 2013-09-13 Last updated: 2013-10-02Bibliographically approved
Gustafson, P. (2013). Control and commitment in corporate travel management. Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), 9(December), 21-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Control and commitment in corporate travel management
2013 (English)In: Research in Transportation Business and Management (RTBM), ISSN 2210-5395, E-ISSN 2210-5409, Vol. 9, no December, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the practice of corporate travel management, using an analytical distinction between managerial strategies based on control versus commitment. Control-oriented strategies use formal rules, surveillance and sanctions, whereas commitment-oriented strategies encourage employee involvement, responsibility and self-control. The study draws on interviews with travel managers and analysis of travel policy documents. Elements of both control- and commitment-based management were identified at all stages of the business travel process – when a decision to travel was taken, when travel and accommodation were booked, and after the trip – but to varying extents in different organizations. The balance between control and commitment was influenced by both internal and external factors. With regard to internal factors, organizational hierarchies and the professional status of both travel managers and travelers played an important role. Senior management support and corporate culture also had an impact. External factors were mainly related to the business travel market. The ‘hybrid’ character of this market, the pricing and marketing strategies of important suppliers, and the services provided by major business travel agencies often promoted control-oriented travel management. The study may inspire travel managers to reflect on and refine their concrete managerial practices as well as their broader management strategies.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213321 (URN)
Available from: 2013-12-20 Created: 2013-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-06
Gustafson, P. (2013). Retirement migration. In: I. Ness (Ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration: . Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retirement migration
2013 (English)In: Encyclopedia of Global Human Migration / [ed] I. Ness, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Retired persons migrate for several different reasons, even though the migration rate in general is lower for retirees than among younger persons (Bradley & Longino 2009). One common form of retiree migration is the return migration of former labor migrants to their previous home countries or home regions. Another form can be described as family-oriented migration, as retired parents move in order to be close to their children (Warnes 2009). However, in academic discourse, the term retirement migration, or sometimes international retirement migration (IRM), primarily refers to amenity-oriented migration among retired persons from the Western world who move, permanently or temporarily, to new home places in search for an improved quality of life (King et al. 2000; Migration Policy Institute 2006).

Keywords: Central America; globalization; immigration; postcolonialism; social change

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-200394 (URN)10.1002/9781444351071.wbeghm452 (DOI)
Available from: 2013-05-27 Created: 2013-05-27 Last updated: 2013-05-27
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