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Publications (10 of 74) Show all publications
Bondjers, K., Willebrand, M. & Arnberg, F. (2020). Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5): Sensitivity, Specificity, Diagnostic Accuracy and Structural Validity in a Mixed Trauma Sample.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Psychometric Properties of the Swedish Version of the PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5): Sensitivity, Specificity, Diagnostic Accuracy and Structural Validity in a Mixed Trauma Sample
2020 (English)In: Article in journal (Refereed) Submitted
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-403113 (URN)
Available from: 2020-01-23 Created: 2020-01-23 Last updated: 2020-01-31Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, A., Orwelius, L., Sveen, J., Willebrand, M., Ekselius, L., Gerdin, B. & Sjoberg, F. (2019). Anxiety and depression after burn, not as bad as we think-A nationwide study. Burns, 45(6), 1367-1374
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Anxiety and depression after burn, not as bad as we think-A nationwide study
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2019 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1367-1374Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: A history of psychiatric disorders is more common among patients who have had burns than in the general population. To try and find out the scale of the problem we have assessed self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression after a burn. Methods: Consecutive patients with burns measuring more than 10% total body surface area or duration of stay in hospital of seven days or more were included. Personal and clinical details about the patients were extracted from the database at each center. Data were collected from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, as well as Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL; Short Form-36, SF-36) and questionnaires about socioeconomic factors. All results were obtained 12 and 24 months after the burn, and compared with those from a reference group. Results: A total of 156 patients responded to the questionnaires. Mean (SD) age and TBSA (%) were 46 (16.4) years and 23.6 (19.2) %, respectively. There were no differences in incidence between the burn and reference groups in anxiety or depression either 12 or 24 months after the burn. Those who reported higher anxiety and depression scores also had consistently poorer HRQoL as assessed by the SF-36. Conclusion: Seen as a group, people who have had burns report anxiety and depression the same range as a reference group. Some patients, however, express more anxiety and depression, and concomitantly poorer HRQoL. These patients should be identified, and offered additional support. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2019
Keywords
Burns, Quality of life, Anxiety, Depression, Follow-up studies
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-394054 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2019.03.014 (DOI)000483339500013 ()31378623 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-10-03 Created: 2019-10-03 Last updated: 2019-10-03Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, J., Willebrand, M. & Öster, C. (2019). Identifying the Needs of Family Members in Burn Care: Nurses' Different Approaches. Journal of Burn Care & Research, 40(3), 336-340
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identifying the Needs of Family Members in Burn Care: Nurses' Different Approaches
2019 (English)In: Journal of Burn Care & Research, ISSN 1559-047X, E-ISSN 1559-0488, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 336-340Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to explore how nurses in burn care identify family members' needs of support and what support the nurses offer. Family members are an important source of short- and long-term support for burn survivors. Being a family member in burn specific as well as general care can be challenging in several ways. Nurses are recognized as well as positioned in the team for assessing and providing such support; however, little is known about how this is done. This is an explorative study with a qualitative descriptive design. Fourteen semistructured interviews with registered nurses working in national burn centers were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using Systematic text condensation. The analysis resulted in four themes reflecting different approaches to assess the needs of family members: Active, Emotional, Passive, and Rejective Approach. Nurses in this study demonstrated different approaches to assessing needs in family members; it is possible that these differences may affect what support family members receive. Therefore, the importance of theoretical education, professional views, and local ward culture should be highlighted in ongoing work in improving care within burn care as well as similar health care contexts.

National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-396560 (URN)10.1093/jbcr/irz018 (DOI)000490449100011 ()30957150 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-11-06 Created: 2019-11-06 Last updated: 2019-11-06Bibliographically approved
Bondjers, K., Roberts, N., Bisson, J., Hyland, P., Willebrand, M. & Arnberg, F. (2019). Reliability and validity of the Swedish international trauma interview for posttraumatic stress disorders in the ICD-11. In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology: Trauma in Transition: Building Bridges. Paper presented at The 16th ESTSS Conference, 14-16 June 2019, Rotterdam, Netherlands. , 10, Article ID 1613836.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reliability and validity of the Swedish international trauma interview for posttraumatic stress disorders in the ICD-11
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology: Trauma in Transition: Building Bridges, 2019, Vol. 10, article id 1613836Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-391173 (URN)10.1080/20008198.2019.1613836 (DOI)
Conference
The 16th ESTSS Conference, 14-16 June 2019, Rotterdam, Netherlands
Available from: 2019-08-20 Created: 2019-08-20 Last updated: 2019-08-20
Bondjers, K., Hyland, P., Roberts, N. P., Bisson, J. I., Willebrand, M. & Arnberg, F. (2019). Validation of a clinician-administered diagnostic measure of ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD: the International Trauma Interview in a Swedish sample. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 10(1), Article ID 1665617.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of a clinician-administered diagnostic measure of ICD-11 PTSD and Complex PTSD: the International Trauma Interview in a Swedish sample
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2019 (English)In: European Journal of Psychotraumatology, ISSN 2000-8066, E-ISSN 2000-8066, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1665617Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The recently published ICD-11 includes substantial changes to the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and introduces the diagnosis of Complex PTSD (CPTSD). The International Trauma Interview (ITI) has been developed for clinicians to assess these new diagnoses but has not yet been evaluated.

Objectives: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Swedish translation of the ITI by examining the interrater agreement, latent structure, internal consistency, and convergent and discriminant validity.

Methods: In a prospective study, 186 adults who had experienced a potentially traumatic event were assessed with the ITI and answered questionnaires for symptoms of posttraumatic stress, other psychiatric disorders, functional disability, and quality of life (QoL).

Results: The diagnostic rate was 16% for PTSD and 6% for CPTSD. Interrater agreement was satisfactory (α = .76), and confirmatory factor analysis indicated that a two-factor second-20 order model consistent with the ICD-11 model of CPTSD provided acceptable fit to the data. Composite reliability analysis demonstrated that the ITI possessed acceptable internal reliability, and associations with measures of other psychiatric disorders, insomnia, functional disability, and QoL supported the concurrent validity of the ITI.

Conclusion: Swedish ITI shows promise as a clinician-administered instrument to assess and diagnose ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD.

National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-395492 (URN)10.1080/20008198.2019.1665617 (DOI)000488883400001 ()31632616 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
Available from: 2019-10-20 Created: 2019-10-20 Last updated: 2020-01-23Bibliographically approved
Bondjers, K., Willebrand, M. & Arnberg, F. (2018). A Prospective Study of ICD-11 and DSM-5 PTSD, Functional Disability and Quality of Life. In: : . Paper presented at The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 34th Annual Meeting, Promoting Societal Change: Integrating Traumatic Stress Research, Practice and Policy for Vulnerable Populations, Washington D.C., USA, November 8-10.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Prospective Study of ICD-11 and DSM-5 PTSD, Functional Disability and Quality of Life
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: It is unclear if there are differences between the ICD-11 and DSM-5 diagnoses for PTSD related to type of potential traumatic event (PTE) and patient-reported outcomes.Method: In an ongoing prospective study, 250 participants were assessed with structured clinical interviews for ICD-11 and DSM-5 PTSD, functional disability (FD) and quality of life (QoL) at the first assessment point (T1). Participants were followed up after six months (T2) with self-rated symptom levels, functional disability (FD), and quality of life (QoL).

Results: Interim results (N=184) from T1 indicate that 68% did not fulfil criteria for any PTSD diagnosis. Of those with PTSD, 58% fulfilled criteria for both systems, 13% for ICD-11 only and 31% for DSM-5 only. Fulfilling criteria for both disorders was associated with higher FD and lower QoL at T1. Loss was more common among those fulfilling criteria for DSM-5 only.Conclusions: The concordance between the systems were low, and there were differences regarding event type and outcome. This presentation will discuss these results and present outcomes assessed at T2.Relevance: Knowledge about the differences between the ICD-11 and DSM-5 PTSD specifications are necessary to better understand how these differences influence prevalence rates, diagnostic status, as well as to understand the advantages and disadvantages of each system.

National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-382954 (URN)
Conference
The International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 34th Annual Meeting, Promoting Societal Change: Integrating Traumatic Stress Research, Practice and Policy for Vulnerable Populations, Washington D.C., USA, November 8-10
Available from: 2019-05-07 Created: 2019-05-07 Last updated: 2019-10-24
Bäckström, J., Willebrand, M., Sjöberg, F. & Haglund, K. (2018). Being a family member of a burn survivor –: Experiences and needs. Paper presented at 2018/11/29. Burns Open, 2(4), 193-198
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Being a family member of a burn survivor –: Experiences and needs
2018 (English)In: Burns Open, ISSN 2468-9122, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 193-198Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Family members are important in the recovery process of persons with severe burns; however, few previous studies have focused on how this group experiences care and rehabilitation.

Objective

To explore family members’ experiences and needs, during the time in hospital and after discharge.

Methodology

Explorative study with a qualitative descriptive design. Ten semi-structured interviews with family members of injured persons treated at the national burn centres were recorded digitally, transcribed verbatim, and analysed using content analysis.

Findings

Five categories were related to experiences during care: Experiencing excellent treatment and support, Experiencing mistrust and a rejecting attitude, Feelings of chaos and shock, Being the hub of the family network, Feeling hope and thankfulness. Three categories were related to experiences during rehabilitation: Ambiguous feelings, Multifaceted support and Handling the situation.

Conclusion

The experiences of the time in hospital and during rehabilitation are individual and comprise a mixture of positive and negative experiences and a diversity of needs. The results suggest that healthcare professionals should be proactive and identify specific needs for support as well as provide individualized treatment of family members.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Burns, Critical care, Family centred care, Family members, Needs, Experiences
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-367302 (URN)10.1016/j.burnso.2018.07.001 (DOI)
Conference
2018/11/29
Available from: 2018-11-29 Created: 2018-11-29 Last updated: 2019-01-23Bibliographically approved
Löfving-Gupta, S., Willebrand, M., Koposov, R., Blatny, M., Hrdlicka, M., Schwab-Stone, M. & Ruchkin, V. (2018). Community violence exposure and substance use: cross-cultural and gender perspectives. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 27(4), 493-500
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Community violence exposure and substance use: cross-cultural and gender perspectives
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2018 (English)In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, ISSN 1018-8827, E-ISSN 1435-165X, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 493-500Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The negative effects of community violence exposure on child and adolescent mental health are well documented and exposure to community violence has been linked both to a number of internalizing and externalizing symptoms. Our aim was, therefore, to investigate cross-cultural and gender differences in the relationship between community violence exposure and substance abuse. A self-report survey was conducted among 10,575, 12-18 year old adolescents in three different countries, Czech Republic (N = 4537), Russia (N = 2377) and US (N = 3661). We found that in all three countries both substance use and problem behavior associated with it increased similarly along with severity of violence exposure and this association was not gender-specific. It was concluded that in spite of the differences in the levels of violence exposure and substance use cross-culturally and by gender, the pattern of their association is neither culturally nor gender bound.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2018
Keywords
Community violence exposure, Substance use, Gender, Adolescents
National Category
Psychiatry Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-358568 (URN)10.1007/s00787-017-1097-5 (DOI)000429661700010 ()29264649 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-09-17 Created: 2018-09-17 Last updated: 2018-09-17Bibliographically approved
Sveen, J. & Willebrand, M. (2018). Feelings of guilt and embitterment in parents of children with burns and its associations with depression. Burns, 44(5), 1135-1140
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Feelings of guilt and embitterment in parents of children with burns and its associations with depression
2018 (English)In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 1135-1140Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim was to examine guilt and embitterment in mothers and fathers of children with burns and its associations with depression and burn severity. Methods: Parents (N=61, mothers n=41, fathers n=20) completed self-report questionnaires on guilt and embitterment, 0.8-5.6 years after their child's burn. Burn severity and sociodemographic variables were obtained from medical records and symptoms of depression were assessed with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Results: The parents reported low levels of guilt, embitterment and depression. Burn-specific and general guilt were higher in mothers than fathers, but there were no differences in embitterment or symptoms of depression. General guilt was associated with depression, whereas burn-specific guilt and embitterment were not. Conclusions: Parents with general guilt may suffer from symptoms of depression. An implication is that clinicians should address guilt feelings among parents in order to alleviate distress and to identify any need for further counseling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2018
Keywords
Guilt, Embitterment, Depression, Pediatric burns, Mothers, Fathers
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-359870 (URN)10.1016/j.burns.2018.02.005 (DOI)000436791900011 ()29929898 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-3033
Available from: 2018-09-07 Created: 2018-09-07 Last updated: 2018-09-07Bibliographically approved
Willebrand, M., Sjöberg, F., Huss, F. & Sveen, J. (2018). Parents' perceived quality of pediatric burn care.. Journal of critical care, 43, 256-259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents' perceived quality of pediatric burn care.
2018 (English)In: Journal of critical care, ISSN 0883-9441, E-ISSN 1557-8615, Vol. 43, p. 256-259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To describe parents' perceived quality of pediatric burn care and evaluate factors associated with differences in perceived quality among parents.

METHODS: 62 parents of children with burns were recruited on a Swedish national basis 0.8 to 5.6years after the child's injury. Measures were an adaptation of the Quality of Care Indices - Parent questionnaire consisting of 8 subscales and one overall question, the Impact of Event Scale -Revised, Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale, and Injury-specific fear-avoidance.

RESULTS: Ratings of quality of care were high, especially regarding Staff Attitudes, Medical Treatment, and Caring Processes. Overall satisfaction rated from 1 to 10 was on average 9.1 (SD=1.2). Overall satisfaction and specific indices of Quality of care were not associated with burn severity, parent gender, or parent age. However, Quality of care was associated with current symptoms of posttraumatic stress and depression, and parents of girls expressed being less satisfied with Participation.

CONCLUSIONS: Parents' perceived quality of care is associated with psychological health, but not with characteristics of the child's injury or age. The results suggest that burn care can improve by involving parents of girls more and by being more attentive towards parents who themselves appear stressed or worried.

Keywords
Burns, Care, Child, Pediatric, Quality
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334009 (URN)10.1016/j.jcrc.2017.08.037 (DOI)000418522800042 ()28946104 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2010-3033
Available from: 2017-11-20 Created: 2017-11-20 Last updated: 2018-01-25Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2506-6527

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