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Caron, J.-B., Webster, M., Briggs, D. E. G., Pari, G., Santucci, G., Mangano, M. G., . . . Gaines, R. R. (2024). The lower Cambrian Cranbrook Lagerstätte of British Columbia. Journal of the Geological Society, 181(1), Article ID jgs2023-106.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The lower Cambrian Cranbrook Lagerstätte of British Columbia
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2024 (English)In: Journal of the Geological Society, ISSN 0016-7649, E-ISSN 2041-479X, Vol. 181, no 1, article id jgs2023-106Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Discovered over a century ago, the lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 4) Cranbrook Lagerstatte of southeastern British Columbia's Eager Formation is one of the oldest Burgess Shale-type deposits in North America. This Konservat-Lagerstatte is rich in olenelloid trilobites, but also yields a very low-diversity soft-bodied fossil assemblage including Tuzoia and Anomalocaris, and a low-diversity ichnofauna. Its scientific study, however, remains limited. A 2015 field-based investigation by the Royal Ontario Museum has revealed new information about the site's biota, depositional environment and taphonomic conditions. Not only is the Cranbrook Lagerstatte significant for early Cambrian biostratigraphy and comparisons with other Burgess Shale-type deposits, it also reveals some of the little-known diversity of life in a distal outer shelf environment during the Cambrian period.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geological Society of London, 2024
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-520721 (URN)10.1144/jgs2023-106 (DOI)001125595400002 ()
Available from: 2024-01-15 Created: 2024-01-15 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Elbrächter, M., Gottschling, M., Hoppenrath, M., Keupp, H., Kusber, W.-H., Streng, M., . . . Zonneveld, K. A. F. (2023). (258-260) Proposals to eliminate contradiction between Articles 11.7 and 11.8 and to equate non-fossil with fossil names of dinophytes for purposes of priority. Taxon, 72(3), 684-686
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(258-260) Proposals to eliminate contradiction between Articles 11.7 and 11.8 and to equate non-fossil with fossil names of dinophytes for purposes of priority
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2023 (English)In: Taxon, ISSN 0040-0262, E-ISSN 1996-8175, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 684-686Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2023
National Category
Biological Systematics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510511 (URN)10.1002/tax.12947 (DOI)001016157800035 ()
Available from: 2023-08-30 Created: 2023-08-30 Last updated: 2023-08-30Bibliographically approved
Streng, M., Høyberget, M. & Ebbestad, J. O. (2022). Bradoriids from the late early Cambrian of Norway and Sweden. In: Jeanette Bergman Weihed; Åke Johansson; Emma Rehnström (Ed.), Geological Society of Sweden, 150 year anniversary meeting: Uppsala, August 17–19, 2022: Abstract volume. Paper presented at Geological Society of Sweden, 150 year anniversary meeting, Uppsala, August 17–19, 2022 (pp. 342-343). Geologiska föreningen
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bradoriids from the late early Cambrian of Norway and Sweden
2022 (English)In: Geological Society of Sweden, 150 year anniversary meeting: Uppsala, August 17–19, 2022: Abstract volume / [ed] Jeanette Bergman Weihed; Åke Johansson; Emma Rehnström, Geologiska föreningen , 2022, p. 342-343Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A new bradoriid fauna comprising seven taxa is introduced from the early Cambrian Skyberg Member of the Ringstrand Formation of the Mjøsa area in Norway. The fauna is compared to coeval specimens described from Sweden (Wiman 1903), which have been restudied for this study. Both faunas comprise the same, or similar, genera of the families Bradoriidae, Beyrichonidae, Hipponicharionidae, and Svealutidae. Reevaluation of Wiman’s specimens revealed the presence of five distinct taxa rather than nine. The faunas from Norway and Sweden are similar to contemporaneous faunas of Avalonia and West Gondwana.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Geologiska föreningen, 2022
Series
Geologiska Föreningen Specialpublikation ; 1
Keywords
Cambrian, Skyberg, bradoriids, Sweden, Norway, Taxonomy
National Category
Geology Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-505776 (URN)978-91-987833-0-8 (ISBN)
Conference
Geological Society of Sweden, 150 year anniversary meeting, Uppsala, August 17–19, 2022
Available from: 2023-06-21 Created: 2023-06-21 Last updated: 2023-06-21Bibliographically approved
Streng, M., Rasmussen, J. A., Ebbestad, J. O. & Weidner, T. (2022). First record of an Early Ordovician brachiopod and conodont fauna from Lapland, Sweden. GFF, 144(1), 24-40
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First record of an Early Ordovician brachiopod and conodont fauna from Lapland, Sweden
2022 (English)In: GFF, ISSN 1103-5897, E-ISSN 2000-0863, Vol. 144, no 1, p. 24-40Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An Early Ordovician fauna of linguliform brachiopods and euconodonts is described from the Alum Shale Formation in northernmost Vasterbotten County, northern Sweden. The fauna was recovered from a single carbonate concretion collected at an exposure near the northern shore of Lake Storvindeln. Despite of the fragmentary and tectonized preservation of the obtained fossils, at least eight different taxa of linguliform brachiopods and four species of euconodonts could be identified. Among the brachiopods, the ephippelasmatid Pomeraniotreta biernatae Bednarczyk, 1986 is most common; it is associated among others with the acrotretids Eurytreta cf. sabrinae (Callaway, 1877) and Ottenbyella sp., and a spinose specimen potentially representing the zhanatellid Thysanotos. Two of the brachiopod taxa appear to present new species, Pomeraniotreta n. sp. and Mytoella? n. sp., but additional material would be needed for a formal description. Euconodont specimens are rare and comprise coniform elements of Drepanodus arcuatus Pander, 1856, Drepanoistodus aff. amoenus (Lindstrom, 1955) sensu Lofgren (1994), Paroistodus numarcuatus (Lindstrom, 1955) and Rossodus aff. manitouensis Repetski & Ethington, 1983. Evaluation of the stratigraphic distribution of the different taxa of brachiopods and euconodonts under consideration of the local geology, suggests that the investigated sample represents a level in the upper part of the Tremadocian (Tr2) part of the Alum Shale Formation. The fauna represents the northernmost occurrence of age diagnostic Early Ordovician (Tremadocian) fossils in Sweden.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Informa UK Limited, 2022
Keywords
Ordovician, Tremadocian, linguliform brachiopods, euconodonts, Lapland
National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-478573 (URN)10.1080/11035897.2022.2032822 (DOI)000808346000003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4961
Available from: 2022-06-28 Created: 2022-06-28 Last updated: 2022-06-28Bibliographically approved
Streng, M. (2022). Geology and palaeontology of the Codos anticline, eastern Iberian Chains, NE Spain: age constraints for the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary in the Iberian Chains. Geological Magazine, 159(7), 1240-1250, Article ID PII S0016756821000595.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Geology and palaeontology of the Codos anticline, eastern Iberian Chains, NE Spain: age constraints for the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary in the Iberian Chains
2022 (English)In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 159, no 7, p. 1240-1250, article id PII S0016756821000595Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The two major structural elements of the Iberian Chains, the Datos and Jarque thrust faults, have been described as occurring in proximity in the area around the village of Codos. The purported Jarque fault corresponds to the axial plane of an anticline known as the Codos anticline, which exposes the oldest stratigraphic unit in this area, i.e. the Codos Bed, a limestone bed bearing skeletal fossils of putative Ediacaran or earliest Cambrian age. Details of the geology of the area and the age of the known fossils are poorly understood or not universally agreed upon. New investigations in the anticline revealed the presence of a normal fault, introduced as the Codos fault, which cross-cuts the course of the alleged Jarque fault. The vertical displacement along the axial plane of the anticline appears to be insignificant, challenging the traditional interpretation of the plane as an equivalent of the Jarque thrust fault. Reinvestigation of the Codos Bed revealed previously unknown skeletal fossils of early Cambrian age, confirming notions that the bed is younger than traditionally assumed. In particular, two helcionelloid molluscs, Anabarella cf. plana and Igorella? sp., allow correlations with Terreneuvian strata of central Spain (Pusa and Fuentepizzara formations) and support previously suggested connections with the Heraultia Limestone of southern France. Former identification of the terminal Ediacaran index-fossil Cloudina in the bed is erroneous. Consequently, the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary in the Iberian Chains, which has been placed at the top of the formation overlying the Codos Bed, is stratigraphically distinctly lower.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge University Press, 2022
Keywords
Paracuellos Group, Aluenda Formation, Codos Bed, Cloudina, helcionelloids, Terreneuvian, Heraultia Limestone
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-483944 (URN)10.1017/S0016756821000595 (DOI)000767142300001 ()
Available from: 2022-09-14 Created: 2022-09-14 Last updated: 2022-09-14Bibliographically approved
Johnston, P. & Streng, M. (2021). Morphology and relationships of the enigmatic stenothecoid pan-brachiopod Stenothecoides-new data from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Formation. Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 66(4), 723-751
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Morphology and relationships of the enigmatic stenothecoid pan-brachiopod Stenothecoides-new data from the middle Cambrian Burgess Shale Formation
2021 (English)In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421, Vol. 66, no 4, p. 723-751Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bulk sampling of middle Cambrian carbonate units in the lower Burgess Shale Formation (Wuliuan) and the upper Wheeler Formation (Drumian) in Utah have yielded abundant silicified stenothecoids. Previously unreported from the Burgess Shale, stenothecoids discovered include at least two species: Stenothecoides cf. elongata and Stenothecoides rasettii sp. nov. The Utah material is assigned to Stenothecoides elongata. The new stenothecoid material confirms some earlier observations including a set of interior grooves and ridges forming nested chevrons across the midline and a finer set disposed around the interior shell margin. The chevroned grooves are interpreted here as mantle canals and the peripheral furrows as setal grooves. A prominent boss occurs at the valve apex in both valves. An apparent socket receiving the boss in the opposite valve described in earlier studies we show to be an artefact of preservation. Consequently, the bosses were juxtaposed when the valves were conjoined and so must have had some function other than valve articulation. Most extraordinary in Stenothecoides is an embayment at the shell apex, which likely represents a rudimentary pedicle foramen. This and other features including apparent articulate brachiopod-like calcitic fibrous shell microstructure replicated in silica, indicate phylogenetic propinquity of the Stenothecoida is with the Brachiopoda, not the Mollusca. However, phylogenetic proximity of the Stenothecoida relative to any of the brachiopod crown groups is unclear. Stenothecoids may represent a pan-brachiopod stem group derived from organocalcitic, multisclerite, eccentrothecimorph tommotiids via sclerite reduction to two opposing mitral sclerites. Discovery of stenothecoids in carbonate debris aprons in the Burgess Shale suggests transport of shelly biota downslope from the adjacent platform. However, their absence in siliciclastic units of the Burgess Shale preserving both shelly and soft-bodied biota indicates these units lack significant input of transported elements from the adjacent platform.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INST PALEOBIOLOGII PAN, 2021
Keywords
Stenothecoida, Brachiopoda, Mollusca, Cambrian, Burgess Shale Formation
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-463591 (URN)10.4202/app.00928.2021 (DOI)000735377100002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4961
Available from: 2022-01-12 Created: 2022-01-12 Last updated: 2022-01-12Bibliographically approved
Streng, M. & Geyer, G. (2019). Middle Cambrian Bradoriida (Arthropoda) from the Franconian Forest, Germany, with a review of the bradoriids described from West Gondwana and a revision of material from Baltica. Palaeontologische Zeitschrift, 93(4), 567-591
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Middle Cambrian Bradoriida (Arthropoda) from the Franconian Forest, Germany, with a review of the bradoriids described from West Gondwana and a revision of material from Baltica
2019 (English)In: Palaeontologische Zeitschrift, ISSN 0031-0220, E-ISSN 1867-6812, Vol. 93, no 4, p. 567-591Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Bradoriid arthropods (class Bradoriida) are described for the first time from the lower-middle Cambrian boundary interval (regional Agdzian Stage) of the Franconian Forest in eastern Bavaria, Germany. The specimens originate from the Tannenknock and Triebenreuth formations, which are part of a shallow marine succession deposited at the margin of West Gondwana. Five different forms have been distinguished, Indiana aff. dermatoides (Walcott), Indiana sp., Indota? sp., Pseudobeyrichona monile sp. nov., and an undetermined svealutid, all of which belong to families that have previously been reported from and are typical of West Gondwana. However, at the generic level, all taxa are new for the region. Indiana is typical of shallow marine environments. So far it has been reported from Laurentia, Avalonia, and Baltica, and is considered to characterize the paleogeographic vicinity of Cambrian continents. Pseudobeyrichona has previously only been recorded from South China, and its new occurrence corroborates previous documentation of taxa from South China in northern West Gondwana. The presence of Indiana as a typical "western" taxon and Pseudobeyrichona among other typical "eastern taxa" confirms the unique biogeographical position of West Gondwana. The poorly known Indiana anderssoni (Wiman) and Indiana minima Wiman from the late early Cambrian of Scandinavia have been restudied in order to re-evaluate the two species and to refine the definition of Indiana. Indiana anderssoni represents a distinct species of Indiana, whereas I. minima is a pseudo-fossil.

Keywords
Cambrian, West Gondwana, Baltica, Bradoriida, Franconian Forest, Indiana, Pseudobeyrichona
National Category
Geology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-398131 (URN)10.1007/s12542-019-00448-z (DOI)000496332000002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2015-04726German Research Foundation (DFG), GE 549/22-1
Available from: 2019-12-04 Created: 2019-12-04 Last updated: 2019-12-04Bibliographically approved
Streng, M., Ebbestad, J. O. & Berg-Madsen, V. (2017). Cambrian palaeoscolecids (Cycloneuralia) of southern Scandinavia. Papers in Palaeontology, 3(1), 21-48
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cambrian palaeoscolecids (Cycloneuralia) of southern Scandinavia
2017 (English)In: Papers in Palaeontology, ISSN 2056-2799, E-ISSN 2056-2802, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 21-48Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A previously undocumented diversity of Cambrian palaeoscolecids is described from localities in Sweden, Norway and Denmark. The material described here includes isolated sclerites as well as the first macroscopic specimens reported from the palaeocontinent Baltica. The sclerites are all of early middle Cambrian age (Ptychagnostus gibbus Biozone) and are assigned to at least four new species of Hadimopanella, two of which are formally introduced: H. incubo sp. nov. and H. oelandiana sp. nov. The two macroscopic specimens are of late early Cambrian (Ellipsocephalus lunatus Biozone) and early middle Cambrian age (Acadoparadoxides oelandicus Biozone), respectively. The early Cambrian specimen is described as Maotianshania? sp. and comprises an incomplete annulated trunk fragment which is uniformly covered with circular sclerites, indicative of the palaeoscolecid family Maotianshaniidae. This is the first record of this family outside China. The middle Cambrian specimen is almost complete and introduced as Wronascolex? johanssoni sp. nov. It is characterized by a previously undocumented distribution of its Hadimopanella-like sclerites which increase in size and change ornamentation from the anterior to the posterior end of the distinctly annulated trunk. The observed distribution pattern can explain the high variability of species of the sclerite-based genus Hadimopanella as well as the occurrence of rare morphotypes of Hadimopanella in otherwise rich samples. Available data on the ontogeny of palaeoscolecids regarding the relationship between body and sclerite size of a taxon are evaluated. It is concluded that sclerite size might be species specific and should be considered when comparing taxa with morphological similar sclerites.

National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Earth Science with specialization in Historical Geology and Palaeontology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311368 (URN)10.1002/spp2.1067 (DOI)000397149200002 ()
Available from: 2016-12-26 Created: 2016-12-26 Last updated: 2020-12-15Bibliographically approved
Troll, V. R., Carracedo, J. C., Jägerup, B., Streng, M., Barker, A., Deegan, F., . . . Geiger, H. (2017). Volcanic particles in agriculture and gardening. Geology Today, 33(4), 148-154
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Volcanic particles in agriculture and gardening
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2017 (English)In: Geology Today, ISSN 0266-6979, E-ISSN 1365-2451, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 148-154Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Volcanic pyroclasts of small size, such as lapilli and small pumice stones, are widely used in agriculture, gardening, and for pot plants as natural inorganic mulch. The technique of using pyroclasts to enhance topsoil stems from the eighteenth century, and specifically from the ad 1730–1736 eruption on Lanzarote. Critical observations on plant development during and after the eruption showed that the vegetation died when buried under a thick layer of lapilli, but grew vigorously when covered thinly. While the agriculture of Lanzarote was restricted to cereals before the eruption, it diversified to many kinds of fruit and vegetables afterwards, including the production of the famous Malvasía wines in the Canaries. The population of Lanzarote doubled in the years after the eruption, from about 5000 in 1730 to near 10 000 in 1768, predominantly as a result of the higher agricultural productivity. This outcome led to widespread use of lapilli and pumice fragments throughout the islands and eventually the rest of the globe. Lapilli and pumice provide vesicle space for moisture to be retained longer within the planting soil, which can create an environment for micro-bacteria to thrive in. Through this route, nutrients from volcanic matter are transported into the surrounding soil where they become available to plant life. The detailed processes that operate within the pyroclasts are less well understood, such as the breakdown of nutrients from the rock matrix and transport into the soil by biological action. Further studies promise significant potential to optimize future agricultural efforts, particularly in otherwise arid areas of the globe.

National Category
Geosciences, Multidisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383079 (URN)10.1111/gto.12193 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-05-09 Created: 2019-05-09 Last updated: 2019-09-03Bibliographically approved
Streng, M., Butler, A. D., Peel, J. S., Garwood, R. J. & Caron, J.-B. (2016). A new family of Cambrian rhynchonelliformean brachiopods (Order Naukatida) with an aberrant coral-like morphology. Palaeontology, 59(2), 269-293
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new family of Cambrian rhynchonelliformean brachiopods (Order Naukatida) with an aberrant coral-like morphology
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2016 (English)In: Palaeontology, ISSN 0031-0239, E-ISSN 1475-4983, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 269-293Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Tomteluva perturbata gen. et sp. nov. and Nasakia thulensis gen. et sp. nov., two new rhynchonelliformean brachiopod taxa, are described from carbonate beds from the lower middle Cambrian (Series 3, Stage 5) basinal Stephen Formation, Canada, and the upper lower Cambrian (Series 2, Stage 4) Henson Gletscher Formation, North Greenland, respectively. The two taxa are characterized by an unusual coral-like morphology typified by a high conical ventral valve with an anteriorly curved umbo and a tube-like structure inside the ventral valve, interpreted as pedicle tube. Both resemble the problematic late middle Cambrian (Drumian) species Anomalocalyx cawoodi Brock from Australia, whose systematic affiliation is controversial. Together, the three genera are interpreted as representatives of a new family of rhynchonelliformean brachiopods, the Tomteluvidae fam. nov., which is interpreted as an aberrant or derived taxon within the Order Naukatida. Convergence between the Tomteluvidae and the coralla of small solitary Cambrian coralimorphs, as well as the late Palaeozoic reef-building richthofenioid brachiopods, might indicate adaptation to a similar life habits and environments. However, their small size (length 4 mm), well-developed pedicle and perfect morphological symmetry make it more likely that tomteluvids lived attached to frondose algae or sponges, above the seafloor, in a similar fashion to the acrotretoid brachiopods with which they show a high degree of morphological convergence. Morphological features of the pedicle tube of N. thulensis suggest that the tomteluvid pedicle is homologous to that in modern rhynchonelliformean brachiopods. This is the first evidence of the pedicle type within the Naukatida and represents the oldest confirmation of a rhynchonellate pedicle.

National Category
Other Earth and Related Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-261904 (URN)10.1111/pala.12226 (DOI)000370607400007 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2011-4961
Available from: 2015-09-05 Created: 2015-09-05 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Projects
Phylogeny and diversification of Cambrian linguliform brachiopods and their use in biostratigraphy and paleobiogeography [2008-03768_VR]; Uppsala UniversityPhylogeny and diversification of Cambrian linguliform brachiopods and their use in biostratigraphy and paleobiogeography [2011-04961_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7790-0478

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