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Rosenquist, Richard
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Publications (10 of 229) Show all publications
Wasik, A. M., Wu, C., Mansouri, L., Rosenquist, R., Pan-Hammarstrom, Q. & Sander, B. (2018). Clinical and functional impact of recurrent S1PR1 mutations in mantle cell lymphoma. BLOOD ADVANCES, 2(6), 621-625
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical and functional impact of recurrent S1PR1 mutations in mantle cell lymphoma
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2018 (English)In: BLOOD ADVANCES, ISSN 2473-9529, Vol. 2, no 6, p. 621-625Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY, 2018
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-354348 (URN)10.1182/bloodadvances.2017014860 (DOI)000428386900004 ()29549086 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilEU, European Research Council, RNAEDIT-649019Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2018-06-27 Created: 2018-06-27 Last updated: 2018-06-27Bibliographically approved
Agathangelidis, A., Ljungström, V., Scarfo, L., Fazi, C., Gounari, M., Pandzic, T., . . . Ghia, P. (2018). Highly similar genomic landscapes in monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia with low frequency of driver mutations. Haematologica, 103(5), 865-873
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Highly similar genomic landscapes in monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia with low frequency of driver mutations
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2018 (English)In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 5, p. 865-873Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite the recent discovery of recurrent driver mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the genetic factors involved in disease onset remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we per-formed whole-genome sequencing in 11 individuals with monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis, both of the low-count and high-count subtypes, and 5 patients with ultra-stable chronic lymphocytic leukemia (>10 years without progression from initial diagnosis). All three entities were indistinguishable at the genomic level exhibiting low genomic complexity and similar types of somatic mutations. Exonic mutations were not frequently identified in putative chronic lymphocytic leukemia driver genes in all settings, including low-count monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. To corroborate these findings, we also performed deep sequencing in 11 known frequently mutated genes in an extended cohort of 28 monoclonal B-cell lym phocytosis/chronic lymphocytic leukemia cases. Interestingly, shared mutations were detected between clonal B cells and paired polymorphonuclear cells, strengthening the notion that at least a fraction of somatic mutations may occur before disease onset, likely at the hematopoietic stem cell level. Finally, we identified previously unreported non-coding variants targeting pathways relevant to B-cell and chronic lymphocytic leukemia development, likely associated with the acquisition of the characteristic neoplastic phenotype typical of both monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis and chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

National Category
Hematology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356089 (URN)10.3324/haematol.2017.177212 (DOI)000431396200029 ()29449433 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Cancer SocietyEU, European Research Council
Available from: 2018-07-19 Created: 2018-07-19 Last updated: 2018-07-19Bibliographically approved
Baliakas, P., Mattsson, M., Hadzidimitriou, A., Minga, E., Agathangelidis, A., Sutton, L. A., . . . Stamatopoulos, K. (2018). No improvement in long-term survival over time for chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients in stereotyped subsets #1 and #2 treated with chemo(immuno)therapy [Letter to the editor]. Haematologica, 103(4), E158-E161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No improvement in long-term survival over time for chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients in stereotyped subsets #1 and #2 treated with chemo(immuno)therapy
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2018 (English)In: Haematologica, ISSN 0390-6078, E-ISSN 1592-8721, Vol. 103, no 4, p. E158-E161Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
FERRATA STORTI FOUNDATION, 2018
National Category
Hematology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-356894 (URN)10.3324/haematol.2017.182634 (DOI)000428242100006 ()29269523 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-08-09 Created: 2018-08-09 Last updated: 2018-08-09Bibliographically approved
Amarasinghe, H., Wojdacz, T., Rose-Zerilli, M., Beattie, A., Forster, J., Kadalayil, L., . . . Strefford, J. (2018). Patients with a Memory-like DNA Methylation Signature exhibit long-term survival after first-line immuno-chemotherapy: Data from the UK CLL4, ARCTIC and ADMIRE trials. Paper presented at 58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Society-for-Haematology, APR 16-18, 2018, Liverpool, ENGLAND. British Journal of Haematology, 181, 29-29
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with a Memory-like DNA Methylation Signature exhibit long-term survival after first-line immuno-chemotherapy: Data from the UK CLL4, ARCTIC and ADMIRE trials
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2018 (English)In: British Journal of Haematology, ISSN 0007-1048, E-ISSN 1365-2141, Vol. 181, p. 29-29Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
Chemo-immunotherapy, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia, Clinical Trials, DNA methylation
National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-357326 (URN)000430117900026 ()
Conference
58th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Society-for-Haematology, APR 16-18, 2018, Liverpool, ENGLAND
Available from: 2018-08-16 Created: 2018-08-16 Last updated: 2018-08-16Bibliographically approved
Rawstron, A. C., Kreuzer, K.-A., Soosapilla, A., Spacek, M., Stehlikova, O., Gambell, P., . . . Montserrat, E. (2018). Reproducible diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia by flow cytometry: An European Research Initiative on CLL (ERIC) & European Society for Clinical Cell Analysis (ESCCA) Harmonisation project. Cytometry. Part B, Clinical cytometry., 94(1), 121-128
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reproducible diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia by flow cytometry: An European Research Initiative on CLL (ERIC) & European Society for Clinical Cell Analysis (ESCCA) Harmonisation project
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2018 (English)In: Cytometry. Part B, Clinical cytometry., ISSN 1552-4949, E-ISSN 1552-4957, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 121-128Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The diagnostic criteria for CLL rely on morphology and immunophenotype. Current approaches have limitations affecting reproducibility and there is no consensus on the role of new markers. The aim of this project was to identify reproducible criteria and consensus on markers recommended for the diagnosis of CLL. ERIC/ESCCA members classified 14 of 35 potential markers as “required” or “recommended” for CLL diagnosis, consensus being defined as >75% and >50% agreement, respectively. An approach to validate “required” markers using normal peripheral blood was developed. Responses were received from 150 participants with a diagnostic workload >20 CLL cases per week in 23/150 (15%), 5–20 in 82/150 (55%), and <5 cases per week in 45/150 (30%). The consensus for “required” diagnostic markers included: CD19, CD5, CD20, CD23, Kappa, and Lambda. “Recommended” markers potentially useful for differential diagnosis were: CD43, CD79b, CD81, CD200, CD10, and ROR1. Reproducible criteria for component reagents were assessed retrospectively in 14,643 cases from 13 different centers and showed >97% concordance with current approaches. A pilot study to validate staining quality was completed in 11 centers. Markers considered as “required” for the diagnosis of CLL by the participants in this study (CD19, CD5, CD20, CD23, Kappa, and Lambda) are consistent with current diagnostic criteria and practice. Importantly, a reproducible approach to validate and apply these markers in individual laboratories has been identified. Finally, a consensus “recommended” panel of markers to refine diagnosis in borderline cases (CD43, CD79b, CD81, CD200, CD10, and ROR1) has been defined and will be prospectively evaluated.

Keywords
chronic lymphocytic leukemia, flow cytometry, diagnosis
National Category
Clinical Laboratory Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-346369 (URN)10.1002/cyto.b.21595 (DOI)000423805500012 ()29024461 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-03-16 Created: 2018-03-16 Last updated: 2018-03-16Bibliographically approved
Glimelius, B., Melin, B., Enblad, G., Alafuzoff, I., Beskow, A. H., Ahlström, H., . . . Sjöblom, T. (2018). U-CAN: a prospective longitudinal collection of biomaterials and clinical information from adult cancer patients in Sweden.. Acta Oncologica, 57(2), 187-194
Open this publication in new window or tab >>U-CAN: a prospective longitudinal collection of biomaterials and clinical information from adult cancer patients in Sweden.
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2018 (English)In: Acta Oncologica, ISSN 0284-186X, E-ISSN 1651-226X, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 187-194Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Progress in cancer biomarker discovery is dependent on access to high-quality biological materials and high-resolution clinical data from the same cases. To overcome current limitations, a systematic prospective longitudinal sampling of multidisciplinary clinical data, blood and tissue from cancer patients was therefore initiated in 2010 by Uppsala and Umeå Universities and involving their corresponding University Hospitals, which are referral centers for one third of the Swedish population.

Material and Methods: Patients with cancer of selected types who are treated at one of the participating hospitals are eligible for inclusion. The healthcare-integrated sampling scheme encompasses clinical data, questionnaires, blood, fresh frozen and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens, diagnostic slides and radiology bioimaging data.

Results: In this ongoing effort, 12,265 patients with brain tumors, breast cancers, colorectal cancers, gynecological cancers, hematological malignancies, lung cancers, neuroendocrine tumors or prostate cancers have been included until the end of 2016. From the 6914 patients included during the first five years, 98% were sampled for blood at diagnosis, 83% had paraffin-embedded and 58% had fresh frozen tissues collected. For Uppsala County, 55% of all cancer patients were included in the cohort.

Conclusions: Close collaboration between participating hospitals and universities enabled prospective, longitudinal biobanking of blood and tissues and collection of multidisciplinary clinical data from cancer patients in the U-CAN cohort. Here, we summarize the first five years of operations, present U-CAN as a highly valuable cohort that will contribute to enhanced cancer research and describe the procedures to access samples and data.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-325565 (URN)10.1080/0284186X.2017.1337926 (DOI)000423473200003 ()28631533 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer Society
Available from: 2017-06-26 Created: 2017-06-26 Last updated: 2018-03-09Bibliographically approved
Stamatopoulos, K., Agathangelidis, A., Rosenquist, R. & Ghia, P. (2017). Antigen receptor stereotypy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Leukemia, 31(2), 282-291
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Antigen receptor stereotypy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia
2017 (English)In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 282-291Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The discovery of almost identical or 'stereotyped' B-cell receptor immunoglobulins (BcR IG) among unrelated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cemented the idea of antigen selection in disease ontogeny and evolution. The systematic analysis of the stereotypy phenomenon in CLL revealed that around one-third of CLL patients may be grouped into subsets based on shared sequence motifs within the variable heavy complementarity determining region 3. Stereotyped subsets display a strikingly similar biology of the leukemic clones, referring to many different levels, from the immunogenetic and genetic and extending to the epigenetic and functional levels. Even more importantly, the homogeneity of stereotyped subsets has clinical consequences as patients assigned to the same stereotyped subset generally exhibit an overall similar disease course and outcome. In other words, stereotypy-based patient classification of CLL has already provided a more compartmentalized view of this otherwise heterogeneous disease and can assist in refining prognostication models. While this is relevant only for the one-third of cases expressing stereotyped BcR IG; in principle, however, the findings from further analysis of the stereotyped subsets may also contribute towards improved understanding of the remaining non-stereotyped fraction of CLL patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
NATURE PUBLISHING GROUP, 2017
National Category
Hematology Cancer and Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320092 (URN)10.1038/leu.2016.322 (DOI)000394058800003 ()27811850 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-04-27 Created: 2017-04-27 Last updated: 2017-04-27Bibliographically approved
Xochelli, A., Baliakas, P., Kavakiotis, I., Agathangelidis, A., Sutton, L. A., Minga, E., . . . Stamatopoulos, K. (2017). Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with Mutated IGHV4-34 Receptors: Shared and Distinct Immunogenetic Features and Clinical Outcomes. Clinical Cancer Research, 23(17), 5292-5301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with Mutated IGHV4-34 Receptors: Shared and Distinct Immunogenetic Features and Clinical Outcomes
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2017 (English)In: Clinical Cancer Research, ISSN 1078-0432, E-ISSN 1557-3265, Vol. 23, no 17, p. 5292-5301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: We sought to investigate whether B cell receptor immunoglobulin (BcR IG) stereotypy is associated with particular clinicobiological features among chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients expressing mutated BcR IG (M-CLL) encoded by the IGHV4-34 gene, and also ascertain whether these associations could refine prognostication. Experimental Design: In a series of 19,907 CLL cases with available immunogenetic information, we identified 339 IGHV4-34expressing cases assigned to one of the four largest stereotyped M-CLL subsets, namely subsets #4, #16, #29 and #201, and investigated in detail their clinicobiological characteristics and disease outcomes. Results: We identified shared and subset-specific patterns of somatic hypermutation (SHM) among patients assigned to these subsets. The greatest similarity was observed between subsets #4 and #16, both including IgG-switched cases (IgG-CLL). In contrast, the least similarity was detected between subsets #16 and #201, the latter concerning IgM/D-expressing CLL. Significant differences between subsets also involved disease stage at diagnosis and the presence of specific genomic aberrations. IgG subsets #4 and #16 emerged as particularly indolent with a significantly (P < 0.05) longer time-to-first-treatment (TTFT; median TTFT: not yet reached) compared with the IgM/D subsets #29 and #201 (median TTFT: 11 and 12 years, respectively). Conclusions: Our findings support the notion that BcR IG stereotypy further refines prognostication in CLL, superseding the immunogenetic distinction based solely on SHM load. In addition, the observed distinct genetic aberration landscapes and clinical heterogeneity suggest that not all M-CLL cases are equal, prompting further research into the underlying biological background with the ultimate aim of tailored patient management.  

Keywords
B-cell receptors, gene mutational status, antigen receptors, CD38 expression, genomic aberrations, sequence-analysis, I-antigen, immunoglobulin, antibodies, dna
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334402 (URN)10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-16-3100 (DOI)000409037300034 ()28536306 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-12-08 Created: 2017-12-08 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Young, E., Noerenberg, D., Mansouri, L., Ljungström, V., Frick, M., Sutton, L. A., . . . Damm, F. (2017). EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Leukemia, 31(7), 1547-1554
Open this publication in new window or tab >>EGR2 mutations define a new clinically aggressive subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia
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2017 (English)In: Leukemia, ISSN 0887-6924, E-ISSN 1476-5551, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 1547-1554Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recurrent mutations within EGR2 were recently reported in advanced-stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and associated with a worse outcome. To study their prognostic impact, 2403 CLL patients were examined for mutations in the EGR2 hotspot region including a screening (n = 1283) and two validation cohorts (UK CLL4 trial patients, n = 366; CLL Research Consortium (CRC) patients, n = 490). Targeted deep-sequencing of 27 known/postulated CLL driver genes was also performed in 38 EGR2-mutated patients to assess concurrent mutations. EGR2 mutations were detected in 91/2403 (3.8%) investigated cases, and associated with younger age at diagnosis, advanced clinical stage, high CD38 expression and unmutated IGHV genes. EGR2- mutated patients frequently carried ATM lesions (42%), TP53 aberrations (18%) and NOTCH1/FBXW7 mutations (16%). EGR2 mutations independently predicted shorter time-to-first-treatment (TTFT) and overall survival (OS) in the screening cohort; they were confirmed associated with reduced TTFT and OS in the CRC cohort and independently predicted short OS from randomization in the UK CLL4 cohort. A particularly dismal outcome was observed among EGR2-mutated patients who also carried TP53 aberrations. In summary, EGR2 mutations were independently associated with an unfavorable prognosis, comparable to CLL patients carrying TP53 aberrations, suggesting that EGR2-mutated patients represent a new patient subgroup with very poor outcome.

National Category
Cancer and Oncology
Research subject
Oncology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-314928 (URN)10.1038/leu.2016.359 (DOI)000404745300009 ()27890934 (PubMedID)
Note

E.Y. and D.N. contributed equally to this study as joint first authors.

R.R. and F.D. contributed equally as joint senior authors.

Available from: 2017-02-07 Created: 2017-02-07 Last updated: 2017-09-28Bibliographically approved
Löf, L., Arngården, L., Olsson-Strömberg, U., Siart, B., Jansson, M., Dahlin, J. S., . . . Kamali-Moghaddam, M. (2017). Flow Cytometric Measurement of Blood Cells with BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia. Scientific Reports, 7, 1-9, Article ID 623.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Flow Cytometric Measurement of Blood Cells with BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, p. 1-9, article id 623Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is characterized in the majority of cases by a t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation, also called the Philadelphia chromosome, giving rise to the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein. Current treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors is directed against the constitutively active ABL1 domain of the fusion protein, and minimal residual disease (MRD) after therapy is monitored by real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) of the fusion transcript. Here, we describe a novel approach to detect and enumerate cells positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion protein by combining the in situ proximity ligation assay with flow cytometry as readout (PLA-flow). By targeting of the BCR and ABL1 parts of the fusion protein with one antibody each, and creating strong fluorescent signals through rolling circle amplification, PLA-flow allowed sensitive detection of cells positive for the BCR-ABL1 fusion at frequencies as low as one in 10,000. Importantly, the flow cytometric results correlated strongly to those of RQ-PCR, both in diagnostic testing and for MRD measurements over time. In summary, we believe this flow cytometry-based method can serve as an attractive approach for routine measurement of cells harboring BCR-ABL1 fusions, also allowing simultaneously assessment of other cell surface markers as well as sensitive longitudinal follow-up.

National Category
Hematology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319726 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-00755-y (DOI)000398162400034 ()28377570 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 294409Swedish Cancer SocietySwedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-04-07 Created: 2017-04-07 Last updated: 2017-05-15Bibliographically approved
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