uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 27) Show all publications
Karunasekera, H., Pettersson, J., Mi, J., Bergquist, J. & Daniel, G. (2019). Copper tolerance of the soft-rot fungus Phialophora malorum grown in-vitro revealed by microscopy and global protein expression. International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, 137, 147-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Copper tolerance of the soft-rot fungus Phialophora malorum grown in-vitro revealed by microscopy and global protein expression
Show others...
2019 (English)In: International Biodeterioration & Biodegradation, ISSN 0964-8305, E-ISSN 1879-0208, Vol. 137, p. 147-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we used proteomics in conjunction with microscopy to study differences in the proteome and hyphal morphology of the copper tolerant soft rot fungus Phialophora malorum grown in media containing 0.064, 0.64% Cu as CuSO4. Unique proteins were found in the control and the copper-treated (0.064% CuSO4) samples. Of five unique proteins found in the 0.064% CuSO4 treated cultures, ATP synthase subunit alpha is considered to play an important role in copper tolerance as it is involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids and steroids and may relate to morphological changes associated with hyphal cell walls of the fungus when grown in the presence of copper. ICP-AES analyses showed total mycelial Cu to increase with media Cu with 5246- and 16535 mu g Cu/g dry wt mycelia respectively found in 0.064 and 0.64% Cu-cultures after 6 weeks growth. Rubeanic acid staining of 0.064% mycelia showed Cu bound in intracellular bodies while most Cu was found as extracellular precipitates on the surfaces of hyphae in 0.64% Cu. SEM showed hyphal surfaces enrobed in fibrillar polysaccharides to which Cu was bound.

Keywords
Copper tolerance, ICP-AES, LC-MS/MS, Phialophora malorum, Proteomics, Soft rot fungi
National Category
Wood Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-378196 (URN)10.1016/j.ibiod.2018.12.001 (DOI)000458470800017 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-416Swedish Research Council Formas, 2011-6383-19675Swedish Research Council Formas, 621-2015-4870
Available from: 2019-03-07 Created: 2019-03-07 Last updated: 2019-03-07Bibliographically approved
Xu, X., Makaraviciute, A., Pettersson, J., Zhang, S.-L., Nyholm, L. & Zhang, Z. (2019). Revisiting the factors influencing gold electrodes prepared using cyclic voltammetry. Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, 283, 146-153
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Revisiting the factors influencing gold electrodes prepared using cyclic voltammetry
Show others...
2019 (English)In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 283, p. 146-153Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Gold is widely used as the electrode material in different chemi- and biosensing applications while cyclic voltammetry (CV) in sulfuric acid solutions is a commonly employed method for gold surface preparation and characterization. However, as shown herein, chloride leakage from the Ag/AgCl/sat. KCl reference electrode and platinum dissolution from the platinum counter electrode can severely compromise the reproducibility and hence the reliability of the prepared gold electrodes. The aim of this work is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the separate and interdependent effects of the aforementioned factors on the voltammetric behavior of microfabricated polycrystalline gold electrodes. It is shown that the leakage of chloride gives rise to etching of both the gold working and the platinum counter electrodes and that the chloride concentration has a strong influence on the ratio between the obtained gold and platinum concentrations in the electrolyte. The dissolved gold and platinum are then re-deposited on the gold electrode on the cathodic voltammetric scan, changing the structure and properties of the electrode. It is also demonstrated that the changes in the properties of the gold electrode are determined by the ratio between the co-deposited platinum and gold rather than the absolute amount of platinum deposited on the gold electrode. In addition, the chloride and sulfate adsorption behavior on the gold electrode is carefully investigated. It is proposed that redox peaks due to the formation ofthe corresponding Au(I) complexes can be seen in the double layer region of the voltammogram. The results show that the chloride leakage from the reference electrode needs to be carefully controlled and that platinum counter electrodes should be avoided when developing gold sensing electrodes. The present comprehensive understanding of the electrochemical performance of gold electrodes prepared using CV should be of significant importance in conjunction with both fundamental investigations and practical applications.

Keywords
gold electrode, cyclic voltammetry, platinum, electrde etching, chloride leakage, Au(I) complexes
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Research subject
Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry; Engineering Science with specialization in Solid State Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372135 (URN)10.1016/j.snb.2018.12.008 (DOI)000455854000018 ()
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , ICA 12-0047Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , FFL15-0174Swedish Research Council, 2014-5588Wallenberg Foundations, Academy Fellow
Available from: 2019-01-06 Created: 2019-01-06 Last updated: 2019-02-18Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Pettersson, J., Johansson, A. & Molin Thorén, M. (2019). Titanium release in peri-implantitis. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 46(2), 179-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Titanium release in peri-implantitis
2019 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182X, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 179-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the titanium (Ti) content of biopsies from patients with severe peri-implantitis or controls without Ti exposure.

Background: Peri-implantitis is considered to be an infectious disease, but recent studies have shown that Ti can aggravate inflammation in combination with bacterial products. The Ti content of peri-implantitis and periodontitis (controls) tissue is unknown.

Methods: Thirteen patients referred for peri-implantitis and eleven for periodontitis treatment were included in the study. Disease severity was obtained from dental records. Biopsies were taken from both groups and chemically analysed with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for Ti content. Additionally, two patients with peri-implantitis and two with periodontitis were recruited and their biopsies were analysed microscopically with light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with element analysis to investigate the presence of particulate Ti.

Results: All patients lost one or more implants despite undergoing peri-implant or treatment. Peri-implantitis tissue contained significantly higher concentrations of Ti than control samples with a mean +/- SD of 98.7 +/- 85.6 and 1.2 +/- 0.9 mu g/g, respectively. Particulate metal was identified in peri-implantitis and control biopsies, but element analyses could confirm only the presence of Ti in peri-implantitis tissue.

Conclusion: We showed that high contents of particulate and submicron Ti were present in peri-implantitis tissue. These high Ti contents in peri-implant mucosa can potentially aggravate inflammation, which might reduce the prognosis of treatment interventions.

Keywords
energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, light microscopy, peri-implantitis, scanning electron microscopy, titanium
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375808 (URN)10.1111/joor.12735 (DOI)000455483300010 ()30325523 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, VLL 1147-2014
Available from: 2019-02-12 Created: 2019-02-12 Last updated: 2019-02-12Bibliographically approved
Xu, X., Makaraviciute, A., Pettersson, J., Zhang, S.-L. & Zhang, Z. (2018). Considerations for the Cyclic Voltammetry of Gold in Sulfuric Acid Solutions. In: : . Paper presented at 69th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Electrochemistry in Bologna.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Considerations for the Cyclic Voltammetry of Gold in Sulfuric Acid Solutions
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

A comprehensive understanding of the cyclic voltammetry (CV) for gold surfaces is essential for advanced applications. In the present study, a series of experiments were designed to investigate CV for gold under different experimental conditions when using a conventional configuration of a Ag/AgCl/sat. KCl reference electrode and a platinum wire counter electrode. The interferences introduced by the configuration were reflected in the three fingerprint regions of the voltammograms. It was found that the shape of the voltammograms was less reproducible at a lower sample volume when the cycle number was increased. This observation could be explained by different concentrations of Cl- leaking from the reference electrode and platinum dissolved from the counter electrode. The reproducibility of the gold oxidation and reduction (Ox/Re) region in the voltammograms was improved when gold dissolution and re-deposition caused by Cl- leakage was eliminated by using a bridge. In the hydrogen evolution and oxidation reactions (HER/HOR) region the catalytic performance of the gold electrode could be minimized by replacing the platinum counter electrode with a graphite rod. Alternatively, it could be enhanced by increasing the surface ratio of the co-deposited platinum to gold. In the electric double layer (EDL) region, peaks dependent on the concentrations of Cl- and SO42- were observed. To account for the occurrence of these peaks, a new mechanism based on the formation of neutral gold (I) complexes at very low Au+ concentrations, was proposed. 

National Category
Physical Chemistry Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363362 (URN)
Conference
69th Annual Meeting of the International Society of Electrochemistry in Bologna
Available from: 2018-10-17 Created: 2018-10-17 Last updated: 2018-10-18Bibliographically approved
Pettersson, M., Pettersson, J., Thoren, M. M. & Johansson, A. (2018). Effect of cobalt ions on the interaction between macrophages and titanium. Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, 106(9), 2518-2530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of cobalt ions on the interaction between macrophages and titanium
2018 (English)In: Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. Part A, ISSN 1549-3296, E-ISSN 1552-4965, Vol. 106, no 9, p. 2518-2530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Inflammation and bone reduction around dental implants are described as peri-implantitis and can be caused by an inflammatory response against bacterial products and toxins. Titanium (Ti) forms aggregates with serum proteins, which activate and cause release of the cytokine interleukin (IL-1) from human macrophages. It was hypothesized that cobalt (Co) ions can interact in the formation of pro-inflammatory aggregates, formed by titanium. To test this hypothesis, we differentiated THP-1 cells into macrophages and exposed them to Ti ions alone or in combination with Co ions to investigate if IL-1 release and cytotoxicity were affected. We also investigated aggregate formation, cell uptake and human biopsies with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Co at a concentration of 100 mu M neutralized the IL-1 release from human macrophages and affected the aggregate formation. The aggregates formed by Ti could be detected in the cytosol of macrophages. In the presence of Co, the Ti-induced aggregates were located in the cytosol of the cultured macrophages, but outside the lysosomal structures. It is concluded that Co can neutralize the Ti-induced activation and release of active IL-1 from human macrophages in vitro. Also, serum proteins are needed for the formation of metal-protein aggregates in cell medium. Furthermore, the structures of the aggregates as well as the localisation after cellular uptake differ if Co is present in a Ti solution. Phagocytized aggregates with a similar appearance seen in vitro with Ti present, were also visible in a sample from human peri-implant tissue.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
titanium, cobalt, interleukin-1, peri-implantitis, aggregate formation
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363623 (URN)10.1002/jbm.a.36447 (DOI)000445615600016 ()29708655 (PubMedID)
Funder
Västerbotten County Council, VLL 1147-2014
Available from: 2018-10-25 Created: 2018-10-25 Last updated: 2018-10-25Bibliographically approved
Korvela, M., Andersson, M. & Pettersson, J. (2018). Internal standards in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using kinetic energy discrimination and dynamic reaction cells. Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, 33(10), 1770-1776
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Internal standards in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry using kinetic energy discrimination and dynamic reaction cells
2018 (English)In: Journal of Analytical Atomic Spectrometry, ISSN 0267-9477, E-ISSN 1364-5544, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1770-1776Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ICP-MS is a sensitive element analysis technique used for analyzing several different sample types. This can result in difficult matrixes which can affect both physical parameters and create overlaps of analyte elements. Some of the possible overlaps can be reduced by the use of reaction and/or collision cells, while the use of internal standards can help with reducing the physical interferences caused by a matrix. While both internal standardization and the use of cells have been studied separately, their effects on each other have not been investigated earlier. In this study ICP-MS was used to analyze Mg-24, Al-27, Ti-47, Ti-49, V-51, Cr-52, Cr-53, Mn-55, Fe-57, Co-59, Ni-60, Ni-61, Ni-62, Cu-63, Cu-65, Zn-66, Zn-67, As-75, Se-78, Se-82, Cd-111, and Pb-208 with Be-9, Y-89, Ga-69, Rh-103, In-115, Ir-193, and Tl-205 as internal standards with high concentrations of either HNO3, PBS-buffer, or Triton X-100 as the matrix, in reaction-, collision- and standard-cell modes. This was done to investigate which internal standards would compensate matrix effects in different cell modes. All internal standards, except Be, compensated fairly well (relative sensitivity RSD < 10%) even for severe matrix effects for most elements regardless of similarity in mass in the different cell modes. For Zn, As and Se no proper internal standard could be found, of the ones investigated.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC CHEMISTRY, 2018
National Category
Analytical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369509 (URN)10.1039/c8ja00171e (DOI)000448340200019 ()
Available from: 2018-12-14 Created: 2018-12-14 Last updated: 2019-10-10Bibliographically approved
Rehnlund, D., Lindgren, F., Pettersson, J., Edström, K. & Nyholm, L. (2018). Lithium Trapping in Alloy forming Electrodes and Current Collectors for Lithium based Batteries. In: : . Paper presented at The 233rd ECS Meeting, Seattle, USA, May 13-17 2018.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lithium Trapping in Alloy forming Electrodes and Current Collectors for Lithium based Batteries
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The next generation of lithium based batteries can be expected to be based on lithium alloy forming anode materials which can store up to ten times more charge than the currently used graphite anodes. This increase in the charge storage capability has motivated significant research towards the commercialization of anode materials such as Si, Sn and Al. These alloy forming anode materials are, however, known to exhibit significant capacity losses during cycling. This is typically ascribed to the volume expansion associated with the formation of the lithium alloys (the volume expansion is e.g. about 280 % for Li3.75Si) resulting in electrode pulverization as well as continuous solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formation [1-3]. While significant progress has been made to decrease the volume expansion problems by the use of e.g. nanoparticles, nanorods and thin films, and/or capacity limitations [1-3], capacity losses are still generally seen [4,5]. This and previously published data suggest that the phenomenon may be due to another effect and that this in fact could stem from lithium trapping in the electrodes [6-8].

In the present work it is demonstrated (based on e.g. elemental analyses of cycled Sn, Al and Si electrodes) that lithium trapping can account for the capacity losses seen when alloy forming anode materials are cycled versus lithium electrodes, see Figure 1. It is shown that small amounts of elemental lithium are trapped within the electrode material during the cycling as a result of a two-way diffusion process [8] causing the lithium to move into the bulk material even during the delithiation step. This phenomenon, which can be explained by the lithium concentration profiles in the electrodes, makes a complete delithiation process very time consuming. As a result of the lithium trapping effect, the lithium concentration in the electrode increases continuously during the cycling. The experimental results also show that a similar effect can be seen also for commonly used current collector metals such as Cu, Ni and Ti. The latter means that these metals are unsuitable as current collector materials for lithium alloy forming materials in the absence of a thin layer of boron doped diamond serving as a lithium diffusion barrier layer [8].

References

1    M. N. Obrovac and V. L. Chevrier, Chem. Rev., 2014, 114, 11444.

2    X. Su, Q. Wu, J. Li, X. Xiao, A. Lott, W. Lu, B. W. Sheldon and J. Wu, Adv. Energy Mater., 2014, 4, 1300882.

3    J. R. Szczech and S. Jin, Energy Environ. Sci., 2011, 4, 56.

4    G. Zheng, S. W. Lee, Z. Liang, H-W. Lee, K. Yan, H. Yao, H. Wang, W. Li, S. Chu and Y. Cui, Nat. Nanotechnol., 2014, 9, 618.

5    K. Yan, H-W. Lee, T. Gao, G. Zheng, H. Yao, H. Wang, Z. Lu, Y. Zhou, Z. Liang, Z. Liu, S. Chu and Y. Cui, Nano Letters, 2014, 14, 6016.

6    G. Oltean, C-W. Tai, K. Edström and L. Nyholm, J. Power Sources, 2014, 269, 266.

7    A. L. Michan, G. Divitini, A. J. Pell, M. Leskes, C. Ducati and C. P. Grey, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2016, 138, 7918.

8    D. Rehnlund, F. Lindgren, S. Böhme, T. Nordh, Y. Zou, J. Pettersson, U. Bexell, M. Boman, K. Edström and L. Nyholm, Energy Environ. Sci., 10 (2017) 1350.

 

Keywords
Lithium, trapping, diffusion, alloy formation, silicon, tin, aluminium
National Category
Inorganic Chemistry
Research subject
Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry; Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry; Chemistry with specialization in Organic Chemistry; Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-355546 (URN)
Conference
The 233rd ECS Meeting, Seattle, USA, May 13-17 2018
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-04421
Available from: 2018-07-01 Created: 2018-07-01 Last updated: 2018-10-31Bibliographically approved
Rehnlund, D., Pettersson, J., Edström, K. & Nyholm, L. (2018). Lithium trapping in microbatteries based on lithium- and Cu2O-coated copper nanorods. ChemistrySelect, 3(8), 2311-2314
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lithium trapping in microbatteries based on lithium- and Cu2O-coated copper nanorods
2018 (English)In: ChemistrySelect, E-ISSN 2365-6549, Vol. 3, no 8, p. 2311-2314Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Microbatteries based on three-dimensional (3D) electrodes composed of thin films of Li and Cu2O coated on Cu nanorod current collectors by electrodeposition and spontaneous oxidation, respectively, are described and characterised electrochemically. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) data indicate that the Li electrodeposition resulted in a homogenous coverage of the Cu nanorods and elemental analyses were also used to determine the amount of lithium in the Li-coated electrodes. The results show that 3D Cu2O/Cu electrodes can be cycled versus 3D Li/Cu electrodes but that the capacity decreased during the cycling due to Li trapping in the Cu current collector of the 3D Li/Cu electrode. These findings highlight the problem of using copper current collectors together with metallic lithium as the formation of a solid solution yields considerable losses of electroactive lithium and hence capacity.

Keywords
lithium trapping, microbatteries, nanorods, Cu2O, copper
National Category
Inorganic Chemistry
Research subject
Chemistry with specialization in Inorganic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-343590 (URN)10.1002/slct.201800281 (DOI)000426495600015 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-4681, 2015-04421StandUpSwedish Energy Agency
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-05-31Bibliographically approved
Ablikim, M., Achasov, M. N., Ahmed, S., Ai, X. C., Albayrak, O., Albrecht, M., . . . Zou, J. H. (2017). Amplitude analysis of D0 -> K -π+π+π-. Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, 95(7), Article ID 072010.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Amplitude analysis of D0 -> K -π+π+π-
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Physical Review D: covering particles, fields, gravitation, and cosmology, ISSN 2470-0010, E-ISSN 2470-0029, Vol. 95, no 7, article id 072010Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present an amplitude analysis of the decay D-0 -> K- pi(+)pi(+)pi(-) based on a data sample of 2.93 fb(-1) acquired by the BESIII detector at the psi(3770) resonance. With a nearly background free sample of about 16000 events, we investigate the substructure of the decay and determine the relative fractions and the phases among the different intermediate processes. Our amplitude model includes the two-body decays D-0 -> (K) over bar*(0)rho(0), D-0 -> K- a(1)(+) (1260) and D-0 -> K-1(-)(1270)pi(+), the three-body decays D-0 -> K-1(-)*(0)pi(+)pi(-) and D-0 -> K- pi(+)rho(0), as well as the four-body nonresonant decay D-0 -> K- pi(+)pi(+)pi(-). The dominant intermediate process is D-0 -> K(-)a(1)(+)(1260)accounting for a fit fraction of 54.6%.

Keywords
Helicity-coupling amplitudes, Tensor formalism, Mesons, Decays
National Category
Subatomic Physics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322816 (URN)10.1103/PhysRevD.95.072010 (DOI)000399946100003 ()
Note

title in WoS: Amplitude analysis of D-0 -> K- pi(+) pi(+) pi(-)

Available from: 2017-09-13 Created: 2017-09-13 Last updated: 2018-01-11
Zanni, G., Michno, W., Di Martino, E., Tjärnlund-Wolf, A., Pettersson, J., Mason, C. E., . . . Hanrieder, J. (2017). Lithium Accumulates in Neurogenic Brain Regions as Revealed by High Resolution Ion Imaging. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 40726.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Lithium Accumulates in Neurogenic Brain Regions as Revealed by High Resolution Ion Imaging
Show others...
2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 40726Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lithium (Li) is a potent mood stabilizer and displays neuroprotective and neurogenic properties. Despite extensive investigations, the mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, especially in the juvenile, developing brain. Here we characterized lithium distribution in the juvenile mouse brain during 28 days of continuous treatment that result in clinically relevant serum concentrations. By using Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry-(ToF-SIMS) based imaging we were able to delineate temporospatial lithium profile throughout the brain and concurrent distribution of endogenous lipids with high chemical specificity and spatial resolution. We found that Li accumulated in neurogenic regions and investigated the effects on hippocampal neurogenesis. Lithium increased proliferation, as judged by Ki67-immunoreactivity, but did not alter the number of doublecortin-positive neuroblasts at the end of the treatment period. Moreover, ToF-SIMS revealed a steady depletion of sphingomyelin in white matter regions during 28d Li-treatment, particularly in the olfactory bulb. In contrast, cortical levels of cholesterol and choline increased over time in Li-treated mice. This is the first study describing ToF-SIMS imaging for probing the brain-wide accumulation of supplemented Li in situ. The findings demonstrate that this technique is a powerful approach for investigating the distribution and effects of neuroprotective agents in the brain.

National Category
Analytical Chemistry Cancer and Oncology Neurology Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316029 (URN)10.1038/srep40726 (DOI)000392273300001 ()28098178 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Childhood Cancer FoundationSwedish Cancer SocietySwedish Radiation Safety AuthorityThe Dementia Association - The National Association for the Rights of the Demented
Available from: 2017-02-24 Created: 2017-02-24 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4764-1246

Search in DiVA

Show all publications