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Publications (10 of 39) Show all publications
Weber, J., Gustafsson, C., Malmgren, K., Strandberg, M., Can, U., Strandberg, M. C. & Kumlien, E. (2019). Evaluation for epilepsy surgery - Why do patients not proceed to operation?. Seizure, 69, 241-244
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Evaluation for epilepsy surgery - Why do patients not proceed to operation?
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2019 (English)In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 69, p. 241-244Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To investigate the reasons for not proceeding to surgery in patients undergoing presurgical evaluation for epilepsy. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 401 consecutive patients who were evaluated for but did not proceed to surgery for epilepsy between 1990 and 2016 at three Swedish epilepsy surgery centers was performed. Reasons for not proceeding to surgery were categorized as inconclusive investigation, seizure onset within eloquent cortex, evidence of multiple seizure foci, infrequent seizures, risk of postoperative severe cognitive decline, patient or caregiver declining surgery or invasive investigation, severe psychiatric or somatic comorbidity, patient death during evaluation and complications during the evaluation. Chi-square tests were performed to compare ordered categorical variables. Results: During the entire time period the main reasons for rejection were inconclusive investigation (34,4%) and multifocal seizure onset (20,0%). The risk for severe cognitive decline postoperatively was more often a cause for rejection in more recent years. Patients declining invasive EEG or surgery accounted for a minor but not insignificant proportion (14,2%) of rejections. Conclusions: Inconclusive results from the presurgical evaluation and multifocal epilepsy were the main causes for not proceeding to surgery. The proportion of patients opting to abstain from surgery was low compared to other recent studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Saunders Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Epilepsy surgery, Presurgical, Nonoperated
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390899 (URN)10.1016/j.seizure.2019.05.004 (DOI)000474500800042 ()31121548 (PubMedID)
Funder
Erik, Karin och Gösta Selanders Foundation
Available from: 2019-08-22 Created: 2019-08-22 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Finnsson, J., Lubberink, M., Savitcheva, I., Fällmar, D., Melberg, A., Kumlien, E. & Raininko, R. (2019). Glucose metabolism in the brain in LMNB1-related autosomal dominant leukodystrophy.. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 139(2), 135-142
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucose metabolism in the brain in LMNB1-related autosomal dominant leukodystrophy.
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2019 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 139, no 2, p. 135-142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: LMNB1-related autosomal dominant leukodystrophy is caused by an overexpression of the protein lamin B1, usually due to a duplication of the LMNB1 gene. Symptoms start in 5th to 6th decade. This slowly progressive disease terminates with death. We studied brain glucose metabolism in this disease using 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET).

METHODS: We examined 8 patients, aged 48-64 years, in varying stages of clinical symptomatology. Two patients were investigated with quantitative PET on clinical indications after which six more patients were recruited. Absolute glucose metabolism was analyzed with the PVElab software in 6 patients and 18 healthy controls. A semiquantitative analysis using the CortexID software was performed in seven investigations, relating local metabolism levels to global glucose metabolism.

RESULTS: The clinical quantitative PET revealed low global glucose metabolism, with the most marked reduction in the cerebellum. In the PVElab analysis, patients presented low mean glucose metabolism in the cerebellum, brainstem and global grey matter. In the semiquantitative analysis, 2 patients showed a decreased metabolism in the cerebellum and 4 patients a relatively higher metabolism in parts of the temporal lobes. Since none of the patients showed an increased metabolism in the quantitative analysis, we interpret these increases as "pseudo-increases" related to a globally reduced metabolism.

CONCLUSIONS: Global reduction of grey matter glucose metabolism in this white matter disease most likely depends on a combination of cortical afferent dysfunction and, in later stages, neuronal loss. The lowest metabolism in the cerebellum is consistent with histopathological findings and prominent cerebellar symptoms.

Keywords
18F-fluorodeoxyglucose, adult-onset leukodystrophy, autosomal dominant leukodystrophy, glucose metabolism, positron emission tomography
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362200 (URN)10.1111/ane.13024 (DOI)000454813600005 ()30192380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-02 Created: 2018-10-02 Last updated: 2019-01-30Bibliographically approved
Larsson, D., Åsberg, S., Kumlien, E. & Zelano, J. (2019). Retention rate of first antiepileptic drug in poststroke epilepsy: A nationwide study. Seizure, 64, 29-33
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Retention rate of first antiepileptic drug in poststroke epilepsy: A nationwide study
2019 (English)In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 64, p. 29-33Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To describe the retention rates of first antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in patients with poststroke epilepsy on a nationwide scale.

Methods: The Swedish Stroke Register, which has 94% coverage and high-resolution data on stroke, comorbidities, and disability, was cross-referenced to the National Patient Register, Drug Register, and Cause-of-Death Register. Patients with onset of AED-treated epilepsy after stroke in 2005–2010 were included. An algorithm based on prescription renewal intervals was used to analyze treatment data until the end of 2014.

Results: A total of 4991 patients were included. First AEDs analyzed were carbamazepine (n = 2373), valproic acid (n = 943), levetiracetam (n = 555), lamotrigine (n = 519), phenytoin (n = 176), and oxcarbazepine (n = 89). The five-year retention rate was highest for lamotrigine (75%, 95%CI:70.4–79.4), followed by levetiracetam (69%, 95%CI:62.9–74.3), oxcarbazepine (68%, 95%CI:55.2–79.8), valproic acid (62%, 95%CI:57.8–66.4), carbamazepine (60%, 95%CI:57.6–62.4), and phenytoin (55%, 95%CI:45.2–64.0). There were minor differences in baseline characteristics with low levels of disability being slightly more common in patients treated with lamotrigine and levetiracetam. Atrial fibrillation and hypertension were more common in patients treated with levetiracetam, and atrial fibrillation was less common in patients treated with carbamazepine. In a Cox model adjusted for baseline characteristics, the risk of discontinuation was lower for lamotrigine (HR 0.53, 95%CI:0.43-0.67) and levetiracetam (HR 0.75, 95%CI:0.60-0.94) when compared to carbamazepine.

Conclusions: Lamotrigine and levetiracetam have higher retention rates than carbamazepine in poststroke epilepsy. This is in agreement with existing small RCTs in this patient group.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
W B SAUNDERS CO LTD, 2019
Keywords
Treatment, Lamotrigine, Levetiracetam, Carbamazepine, Cohort study
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377717 (URN)10.1016/j.seizure.2018.11.013 (DOI)000457657600007 ()30529757 (PubMedID)
Funder
Magnus Bergvall FoundationSwedish Society of Medicine
Available from: 2019-03-08 Created: 2019-03-08 Last updated: 2019-03-08Bibliographically approved
Tomson, T., Battino, D., Bonizzoni, E., Craig, J., Lindhout, D., Perucca, E., . . . Vajda, F. (2018). Comparative risk of major congenital malformations with eight different antiepileptic drugs: a prospective cohort study of the EURAP registry. Lancet Neurology, 17(6), 530-538
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparative risk of major congenital malformations with eight different antiepileptic drugs: a prospective cohort study of the EURAP registry
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2018 (English)In: Lancet Neurology, ISSN 1474-4422, E-ISSN 1474-4465, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 530-538Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Evidence for the comparative teratogenic risk of antiepileptic drugs is insufficient, particularly in relation to the dosage used. Therefore, we aimed to compare the occurrence of major congenital malformations following prenatal exposure to the eight most commonly used antiepileptic drugs in monotherapy. Methods We did a longitudinal, prospective cohort study based on the EURAP international registry. We included data from pregnancies in women who were exposed to antiepileptic drug monotherapy at conception, prospectively identified from 42 countries contributing to EURAP. Follow-up data were obtained after each trimester, at birth, and 1 year after birth. The primary objective was to compare the risk of major congenital malformations assessed at 1 year after birth in offspring exposed prenatally to one of eight commonly used antiepileptic drugs (carbamazepine, lamotrigine, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, topiramate, and valproate) and, whenever a dose dependency was identified, to compare the risks at different dose ranges. Logistic regression was used to make direct comparisons between treatments after adjustment for potential confounders and prognostic factors. Findings Between June 20, 1999, and May 20, 2016, 7555 prospective pregnancies met the eligibility criteria. Of those eligible, 7355 pregnancies were exposed to one of the eight antiepileptic drugs for which the prevalence of major congenital malformations was 142 (10.3%) of 1381 pregnancies for valproate, 19 (6.5%) of 294 for phenobarbital, eight (6.4%) of 125 for phenytoin, 107 (5 .5%) of 1957 for carbamazepine, six (3.9%) of 152 for topiramate, ten (3.0%) of 333 for oxcarbazepine, 74 (2.9%) of 2514 for lamotrigine, and 17 (2.8%) of 599 for levetiracetam. The prevalence of major congenital malformations increased with the dose at time of conception for carbamazepine (p=0.0140), lamotrigine (p=0.0145), phenobarbital (13=0.0390), and valproate (p<0.0001). After adjustment, multivariable analysis showed that the prevalence of major congenital malformations was significantly higher for all doses of carbamazepine and valproate as well as for phenobarbital at doses of more than 80 mg/day than for lamotrigine at doses of 325 mg/day or less. Valproate at doses of 650 mg/day or less was also associated with increased risk of major congenital malformations compared with levetiracetam at doses of 250-4000 mg/day (odds ratio [OR] 2.43, 95% CI 1.30-4.55; p=0.0069). Carbamazepine at doses of more than 700 mg/day was associated with increased risk of major congenital malformations compared with levetiracetam at doses of 250-4000 mg/day (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.33-4.38; p=0.0055) and oxcarbazepine at doses of 75-4500 mg/day (2.37, 1.17-4.80; 13=0.0169). Interpretation Different antiepileptic drugs and dosages have different teratogenic risks. Risks of major congenital malformation associated with lamotrigine, levetiracetam, and oxcarbazepine were within the range reported in the literature for offspring unexposed to antiepileptic drugs. These findings facilitate rational selection of these drugs, taking into account comparative risks associated with treatment alternatives. Data for topiramate and phenytoin should be interpreted cautiously because of the small number of exposures in this study. Copyright (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, 2018
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374774 (URN)10.1016/S1474-4422(18)30107-8 (DOI)000432463400023 ()29680205 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-24 Created: 2019-01-24 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Ferlisi, M., Hocker, S., Trinka, E. & Shorvon, S. (2018). Etiologies and characteristics of refractory status epilepticus cases in different areas of the world: Results from a global audit. Epilepsia, 59 Suppl 2, 100-107
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Etiologies and characteristics of refractory status epilepticus cases in different areas of the world: Results from a global audit
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2018 (English)In: Epilepsia, ISSN 0013-9580, E-ISSN 1528-1167, Vol. 59 Suppl 2, p. 100-107Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To describe the demographics, etiologies, types of status epilepticus (SE), and outcomes in people with refractory and super-refractory SE from around the world, we prospectively collected cases of refractory SE (RSE) treated with continuous intravenous anesthetic drugs in an intensive care unit setting through online questionnaires using "active surveillance." We collected information about 776 cases of RSE in 50 countries over 4 years. Control of SE was achieved in 74% of the cases. Neurologic outcomes were poor in 41% of patients, and 24% died. Good outcome was associated with younger age and a history of epilepsy. Etiology strongly influenced the outcome. Patients from Asia were younger, more frequently presented with convulsive SE, and were more frequently affected by infectious etiologies when compared with patients from Europe and the Americas. Despite these differences, outcomes were similar in all countries. Demographics of patients with RSE in a global audit are similar to those in prior single center series, providing evidence of generalizability of those studies. Important differences exist among patients with RSE from different regions of the world, but these do not seem to significantly influence patient outcomes.

Keywords
etiology, global audit, refractory, registry, status epilepticus, super-refractory
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-375479 (URN)10.1111/epi.14496 (DOI)000446321100007 ()30159876 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-01-30 Created: 2019-01-30 Last updated: 2019-01-30Bibliographically approved
Halawa, I., Vlachogiannis, P., Amandusson, Å., Elf, K., Ronne-Engström, E., Zetterberg, H. & Kumlien, E. (2018). Seizures, CSF neurofilament light and tau in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 137(2), 199-203
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Seizures, CSF neurofilament light and tau in patients with subarachnoid haemorrhage
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2018 (English)In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 137, no 2, p. 199-203Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives

Patients with severe subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) often suffer from complications with delayed cerebral ischaemia (DCI) due to vasospasm that is difficult to identify by clinical examination. The purpose of this study was to monitor seizures and to measure cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of neurofilament light (NFL) and tau, and to see whether they could be used for predicting preclinical DCI.

Methods

We prospectively studied 19 patients with aneurysmal SAH who underwent treatment with endovascular coiling. The patients were monitored with continuous EEG (cEEG) and received external ventricular drainage (EVD). CSF samples of neurofilament light (NLF) and total tau (T-tau) protein were collected at day 4 and day 10. Cox regression analysis was applied to evaluate whether seizures and protein biomarkers were associated with DCI and poor outcome.

Results

Seven patients developed DCI (37%), and 4 patients (21%) died within the first 2months. Six patients (32%) had clinical seizures, and electrographic seizures were noted in one additional patient (4.5%). Increased tau ratio (proportion tau10/tau4) was significantly associated with DCI and hazard ratio [HR=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.055-1.680. P=.016].

Conclusion

Acute symptomatic seizures are common in SAH, but their presence is not predictive of DCI. High values of the tau ratio in the CSF may be associated with development of DCI.

Keywords
acute symptomatic seizures, cerebrospinal biomarkers, continuous EEG monitoring, NFL and tau, non-convulsive seizures, subarachnoid haemorrhage
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341480 (URN)10.1111/ane.12873 (DOI)000419583500007 ()29164612 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-02-28 Created: 2018-02-28 Last updated: 2018-02-28Bibliographically approved
Dagiasi, L., Vall, V., Kumlien, E., Burman, J. & Zelano, J. (2018). Treatment of epilepsy in multiple sclerosis. Seizure, 58, 47-51
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Treatment of epilepsy in multiple sclerosis
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2018 (English)In: Seizure, ISSN 1059-1311, E-ISSN 1532-2688, Vol. 58, p. 47-51Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The prevalence of epilepsy is increased in multiple sclerosis (MS), but information on AED treatment and seizure outcome is scarce. We describe epilepsy characteristics including the use of AEDs and proportion of seizure-free patients at two tertiary hospitals in Sweden. Method: We retrospectively studied electronic medical records of all patients with a diagnosis of MS and seizures at Sahlgrenska university hospital and Uppsala university hospital. Clinical data were reviewed until 2017. Results: We identified a total of 62 MS patients with at least one seizure. Median age at the first seizure (before or after MS) was 41 years (range 0-80). The most common MS disease course at the first seizure was secondary progressive MS, the neurological disability was considerable, and most patients had several MRI lesions at their first seizure. The first EEG demonstrated epileptiform discharges in 38% and unspecific pathology in 40%. Current seizure status could be determined for 37 patients. Out of these, 46% had been seizure free for more than one year at last follow-up. The majority of patients (65%) were on monotherapy at last follow-up. Carbamazepine was the most commonly used first AED, with a retention rate of 52%. No individual AED was associated with a particularly high rate of seizure freedom. The most common reason for discontinuation of the first AED was side-effects. Conclusion: Seizure freedom rates were low, perhaps indicating a need for higher ambitions in management. Side effects of AEDs may be a particular concern when treating epilepsy in patients with MS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
W B SAUNDERS CO LTD, 2018
Keywords
Epilepsy, Multiple sclerosis, Seizures
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-360997 (URN)10.1016/j.seizure.2018.04.001 (DOI)000436884500010 ()29656097 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Society of MedicineMagnus Bergvall Foundation
Available from: 2018-09-26 Created: 2018-09-26 Last updated: 2018-09-26Bibliographically approved
Hansen, J., Åsberg, S., Kumlien, E. & Zelano, J. (2017). Cause of death in patients with poststroke epilepsy: Results from a nationwide cohort study. PLoS ONE, 12(4), Article ID e0174659.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cause of death in patients with poststroke epilepsy: Results from a nationwide cohort study
2017 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 4, article id e0174659Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The risk of death is increased for persons with epilepsy. The literature on causes of death in epilepsy is based mainly on cohorts with epilepsy of mixed aetiologies. For clinical purposes and improved understanding of mortality in different epilepsies, more information is needed on mortality in epilepsies of specific causes. In poststroke epilepsy (PSE), seizures occur in a setting of vascular disease and high mortality rates. The extent to which epilepsy contributes to mortality in this patient group is poorly understood. We therefore aimed to describe causes of death (COD) in PSE on a national scale. A previously identified cohort of 7740 patients with epilepsy or seizures after a stroke in 2005-2010 was investigated. A total of 4167 deaths occurred before the end of 2014. The standardized mortality ratio for the study cohort was 3.56 (95% CI: 3.45-3.67). The main underlying causes of death were disorders of the circulatory system (60%) followed by neoplasms (12%). Diseases of the nervous system were the sixth leading underlying COD (3%), and epilepsy or status epilepticus was considered the underlying COD in approximately a similar proportion of cases as neurodegenerative disorders (0.9% and 1.1%, respectively). Epilepsy was considered a contributing COD in 14% of cases. Our findings highlight the importance of optimal management of vascular morbidity in patients with PSE. The large proportion of patients with epilepsy as a contributing COD indicate the need of high ambitions also regarding the management of seizures in patients with PSE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PUBLIC LIBRARY SCIENCE, 2017
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-322192 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0174659 (DOI)000399353500056 ()28380003 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-05-17 Created: 2017-05-17 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Fahlström, M., Lindskog, K., Appel, L., Engström, M., Antoni, G., Kumlien, E., . . . Lubberink, M. (2017). Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow based on simultaneously acquired arterial spin labelling MRI and 15O-water-PET using zero-echo-time-based attenuation correction. Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the Society-of-Nuclear-Medicine-and-Molecular-Imaging (SNMMI), JUN 10-14, 2017, Denver, CO. Journal of Nuclear Medicine, 58(S1), Article ID 362.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow based on simultaneously acquired arterial spin labelling MRI and 15O-water-PET using zero-echo-time-based attenuation correction
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Nuclear Medicine, ISSN 0161-5505, E-ISSN 1535-5667, Vol. 58, no S1, article id 362Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: Arterial spin labelling (ASL) MRI promises clinical value in several common neurological disorders. Its quantitative accuracy and reproducibility, however, need to be further validated, ideally using simultaneously acquired measurements with 15O-water-PET on an integrated PET-MR scanner. However, so far, few studies have attempted this and the inclusion of bone in MR-based attenuation correction for PET has thus far been a challenge, compromising the quantitative accuracy of PET-MR based 15O-water PET data. The aim of the present work was to assess the correlation of ASL- and 15O-water-PET based regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) values based on simultaneously acquired data, using zero-echo-time (ZTE)-based attenuation correction, as well as to assess the reproducibility of ASL-based rCBF.

Methods: Six subjects underwent 10 min PET scans after automated bolus injection of 400 MBq 15O-water (1 mL/s during 5 s followed by 35 mL saline at 2 mL/s) on a time-of-flight integrated PET-MR scanner (Signa PET-MR, GE Healthcare). Arterial blood radioactivity concentrations were monitored using continuous sampling from the radial artery (Swisstrace Twilite Two). Simultaneously, a 3D FSE pseudo-continuous ASL (3D pCASL) with a spiral read-out as supplied by the scanner manufacturer in the commercial software were acquired using an 8 channel head coil (Invivo Hi-Res Head Coil). In addition, 3D T1-w, ZTE and Dixon fat-water MRI were acquired. The ASL procedure was repeated after 2 h (patients remained in the scanner). Quantifiable ASL-based CBF maps were generated. PET images were reconstructed into 26 frames of increasing durations using time-of-flight OSEM (2 iterations, 28 subsets) and a 5 mm post-filter, with ZTE-based attenuation correction. Blood sampler data were corrected for delay and dispersion and 15O-water-based CBF maps were calculated using a basis function implementation of the single tissue compartment model including a fitted blood volume parameter. CBF maps were co-registered to each patient's T1-w image. 3D T1-w images were segmented and normalised to MNI space using SPM12, and anterior, middle and posterior flow territory volumes of interest (VOIs) were created from a standard template in MNI space and inversely transformed for each patient. In addition, a 45-VOI probabilistic template was applied using PVElab software. Correlations between PET- and ASL-based rCBF values were assessed using regression analysis, and reproducibility of ASL using a paired t-test.

Results: Mean (CI) total brain grey matter CBF values were 67.2 (48.0-86.5) mL/min/100 g for 15O-water-PET and 65.5 (55.7-75.5) mL/min/100 g for ASL. Although correlation and agreement between 15O-water and ASL-based rCBF for individual VOIs in the 45-VOI template were generally poor, significant correlations were found on a grey matter flow territory basis, with R2 ranging from 0.70 in the anterior flow territory to 0.86 in the middle flow territory. rCBF values were significantly reduced between second and first ASL for all flow territories (p<0.01), with a mean decrease of 10%.

Conclusion: A good correlation between regional flow territory CBF values based on ASL and 15O-water-PET was found, using ZTE-based attenuation correction for PET data which takes bone tissue into account. ASL values for regional flow territories may have potential applications in patients with dementia or cerebrovascular diseases affecting blood flow such as moya moya. The decrease of ASL-based rCBF values in the reproducibility study needs to be investigated further to assess whether this is a methodological issue or reflects a true decrease in rCBF. Research Support: Uppsala County Council

National Category
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Medical Imaging
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333332 (URN)000404949901169 ()
Conference
Annual Meeting of the Society-of-Nuclear-Medicine-and-Molecular-Imaging (SNMMI), JUN 10-14, 2017, Denver, CO
Note

Title in WoS: Correlation between regional cerebral blood flow based on simultaneously acquired arterial spin labelling MRI and O-15-water-PET using zero-echo-time-based attenuation correction

Available from: 2017-11-15 Created: 2017-11-15 Last updated: 2017-11-15Bibliographically approved
Knight, A., Pauksen, K., Nordmark, G. & Eva, K. (2017). Fatal outcome of tick-borne encephalitis in two patients with rheumatic disease treated with rituximab. Rheumatology, 56(5), 855-856
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fatal outcome of tick-borne encephalitis in two patients with rheumatic disease treated with rituximab
2017 (English)In: Rheumatology, ISSN 1462-0324, E-ISSN 1462-0332, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 855-856Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2017
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Research subject
Medical Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-318795 (URN)10.1093/rheumatology/kew495 (DOI)000402143000027 ()28130421 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-03-28 Created: 2017-03-28 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1952-8791

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