uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 59) Show all publications
Bergfelt, A., Hernández, G., Mogensen, R., Lacey, M. J., Mindemark, J., Brandell, D. & Bowden, T. M. (2020). A Mechanical Robust yet highly Conductive Diblock Copolymer-based Solid Polymer Electrolyte for Room Temperature Structural Battery Applications. ACS Applied Polymer Materials, 2(2), 939-948
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Mechanical Robust yet highly Conductive Diblock Copolymer-based Solid Polymer Electrolyte for Room Temperature Structural Battery Applications
Show others...
2020 (English)In: ACS Applied Polymer Materials, ISSN 2637-6105, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 939-948Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper we present a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) that uniquely combines ionic conductivity and mechanical robustness. This is achieved with a diblock copolymer poly(benzyl methacrylate)-poly(ε-caprolactone-r-trimethylene carbonate). The SPE with 16.7 wt% lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) showed the highest ionic conductivity (9.1×10−6 S cm−1 at 30 °C) and apparent transference number (T+) of 0.64 ± 0.04. Due to the employment of the benzyl methacrylate hard-block, this SPE is mechanically robust with a storage modulus (E') of 0.2 GPa below 40 °C, similar to polystyrene, thus making it a suitable material also for load-bearing constructions. The cell Li|SPE|LiFePO4 is able to cycle reliably at 30 °C for over 300 cycles. The promising mechanical properties, desired for compatibility with Li-metal, together with the fact that BCT is a highly reliable electrolyte material makes this SPE an excellent candidate for next-generation all-solid-state batteries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Chemical Society (ACS), 2020
Keywords
block copolymer, solid polymer electrolyte, lithium-ion battery, structural battery, solid-state battery
National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340855 (URN)10.1021/acsapm.9b01142 (DOI)000514258700088 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 40466-1EU, European Research Council, 771777 FUN POLYSTORE
Available from: 2018-02-04 Created: 2018-02-04 Last updated: 2020-04-02Bibliographically approved
Zhou, B., Gao, M., Feng, X., Huang, L., Huang, Q., Kootala, S., . . . Bowden, T. (2020). Carbazate modified dextrans as scavengers for carbonylated proteins. Carbohydrate Polymers, 232, Article ID 115802.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Carbazate modified dextrans as scavengers for carbonylated proteins
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 232, article id 115802Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A series of biocompatible and non- toxic polysaccharide molecules have been successfully fabricated and explored their potential application for scavenging the carbonyl species in vitro. These macromolecules were dextrans with different hydrazide substitution ratios determined by TNBS assay, NMR and FTIR characterization. The colorimetric assay had demonstrated that these macromolecules could effectively scavenge acrolein, oxidized bovine serum albumin (BSA) in buffer solutions as well as carbonyl proteins from serum. The scavengers could achieve twice more scavenging effects for modified dextrans with high molecular weight (Mw=100,000) than those of low ones (Mw=40,000) with the same substitution ratio. Protein gel electrophoresis confirmed that the formation of the complex between carbonyls and modified dextrans resulted in appearance of slower bands. It also revealed that such macromolecules could protect cultured cells against the toxicity of acrolein or its derivatives. The proposed macromolecules indicated a very promising capability as scavengers for oxidative stress plus its derivatives without side effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER SCI LTD, 2020
Keywords
Oxidative stress, Protein carbonyl groups, Human blood serum, Hydrazide-carbonyl click chemistry, Protein gel electrophoresis, Carbonyl scavengers
National Category
Organic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-405335 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2019.115802 (DOI)000507231800005 ()31952601 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-03-04 Created: 2020-03-04 Last updated: 2020-03-04Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, E., Bowden, T. & Rennie, A. R. (2020). Interactions of amphiphiles with plasticisers used in polymers: Understanding the basis of health and environmental challenges. Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, 277, Article ID 102109.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interactions of amphiphiles with plasticisers used in polymers: Understanding the basis of health and environmental challenges
2020 (English)In: Advances in Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0001-8686, E-ISSN 1873-3727, Vol. 277, article id 102109Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Plasticisers are widely used to provide desirable mechanical properties of many polymeric materials. These small molecule additives are also known to leach from the finished products, and this not only may modify the physical properties but the distribution of these materials in the environment and in the human body can cause long-term health concerns and environmental challenges. Many of these plasticisers are esters of polyvalent acids and phthalic acid has previously been predominant but various alternatives are now being more widely explored. The eventual distribution of these compounds depends not just on solubility in aqueous media and on vapour pressure but also on their interaction with other materials, particularly lipids and amphiphiles. This review provides an overview of both the basic physical data (solubility, partition coefficients, surface tension, vapour pressure) that is available in the literature and summarises what has been learnt about the molecular interactions of various plasticisers with surfactants and lipids.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER, 2020
Keywords
Polyvinyl chloride, Plasticiser, Surfactant, Phthalate esters, Solubility
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-408920 (URN)10.1016/j.cis.2020.102109 (DOI)000521512600004 ()32028074 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research , GSn15-0008
Available from: 2020-04-17 Created: 2020-04-17 Last updated: 2020-04-17Bibliographically approved
Gao, M., Yang, Y., Bergfelt, A., Huang, L., Zheng, L. & Melander Bowden, T. (2020). Self-assembly of cholesterol end-capped polymer micelles for controlled drug delivery. Journal of Nanobiotechnology, 18, Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-assembly of cholesterol end-capped polymer micelles for controlled drug delivery
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Journal of Nanobiotechnology, ISSN 1477-3155, E-ISSN 1477-3155, Vol. 18, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: During the past few decades, drug delivery system (DDS) has attracted many interests because it could enhance the therapeutic effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. The advent of nanotechnology has promoted the development of nanosized DDSs, which could promote drug cellular uptake as well as prolong the half-life in blood circulation. Novel polymer micelles formed by self-assembly of amphiphilic polymers in aqueous solution have emerged as meaningful nanosystems for controlled drug release due to the reversible destabilization of hydrophobic domains under different conditions.

Results: The amphiphilic polymers presented here were composed of cholesterol groups end capped and poly (poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (poly (OEGMA)) as tailed segments by the synthesis of cholesterol-based initiator, followed by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with OEGMA monomer. FT-IR and NMR confirmed the successfully synthesis of products including initiator and polymers as well as the Mw of the polymers were from 33,233 to 89,088 g/mol and their corresponding PDI were from 1.25 to 1.55 by GPC. The average diameter of assembled polymer micelles was in hundreds nanometers demonstrated by DLS, AFM and SEM. The behavior of the amphiphilic polymers as micelles was investigated using pyrene probing to explore their critical micelle concentration (CMC) ranging from 2.53 x 10(-4) to 4.33 x 10(-4) mg/ml, decided by the balance between cholesterol and poly (OEGMA). Besides, the CMC of amphiphilic polymers, the quercetin (QC) feeding ratio and polarity of solvents determined the QC loading ratio maximized reaching 29.2% certified by UV spectrum, together with the corresponding size and stability changes by DLS and Zeta potential, and thermodynamic changes by TGA and DSC. More significantly, cholesterol end-capped polymer micelles were used as nanosized systems for controlled drug release, not only alleviated the cytotoxicity of QC from 8.6 to 49.9% live cells and also achieved the QC release in control under different conditions, such as the presence of cyclodextrin (CD) and change of pH in aqueous solution.

Conclusions: The results observed in this study offered a strong foundation for the design of favorable polymer micelles as nanosized systems for controlled drug release, and the molecular weight adjustable amphiphilic polymer micelles held potential for use as controlled drug release system in practical application.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2020
Keywords
Atom transfer radical polymerization, Supermolecular self-assembly, Amphiphilic polymer micelles, Critical micelle concentration, Controlled drug delivery system
National Category
Physical Chemistry Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-409660 (URN)10.1186/s12951-020-0575-y (DOI)000521249500001 ()31941501 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-04-29 Created: 2020-04-29 Last updated: 2020-04-29Bibliographically approved
Yang, Y., Gao, M., Zhou, B., Cai, P., Larsson, T. E., Zhao, J. & Melander Bowden, T. (2020). Weak acidic stable carbazate modified cellulose membranes target for scavenging carbonylated proteins in hemodialysis. Carbohydrate Polymers, 231, Article ID 115727.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Weak acidic stable carbazate modified cellulose membranes target for scavenging carbonylated proteins in hemodialysis
Show others...
2020 (English)In: Carbohydrate Polymers, ISSN 0144-8617, E-ISSN 1879-1344, Vol. 231, article id 115727Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbazate groups were grafted on the commercial cellulose membrane (CM) to specifically scavenge the carbonylated proteins for hemodialysis. It confirmed that carbazate groups were successfully covalently attached on the CMs by XPS and EDS, and the modified CMs still saved their original morphology and crystalline structures by SEM and XRD. Furthermore, the modified CMs presented favorable physicochemical stability at wide pH range from 2.5 to 7.4. It was also found that the carbazate modified CMs could selectively remove carbonylated proteins from acrolein treated bovine serum albumin (BSA) or ESRD patient's blood serum in PBS buffer. The modified CMs showed the potential to be utilized as the substitute of dialysis membranes in hemodialysis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Cellulose membrane, TNBS assay, Carbazate stability, Carbonylated protein, Carbazate- aldehyde/ ketone coupling, Hemodialysis
National Category
Urology and Nephrology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402393 (URN)10.1016/j.carbpol.2019.115727 (DOI)000504650500059 ()31888849 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2020-01-24 Created: 2020-01-24 Last updated: 2020-01-24Bibliographically approved
Mindemark, J., Lacey, M. J., Bowden, T. & Brandell, D. (2018). Beyond PEO-Alternative host materials for Li+-conducting solid polymer electrolytes. Progress in polymer science, 81, 114-143
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Beyond PEO-Alternative host materials for Li+-conducting solid polymer electrolytes
2018 (English)In: Progress in polymer science, ISSN 0079-6700, E-ISSN 1873-1619, Vol. 81, p. 114-143Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The bulk of the scientific literature on Li-conducting solid (solvent-free) polymer electrolytes (SPEs) for applications such as Li-based batteries is focused on polyether-based materials, not least the archetypal poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO). A significant number of alternative polymer hosts have, however, been explored over the years, encompassing materials such as polycarbonates, polyesters, polynitriles, polyalcohols and polyamines. These display fundamentally different properties to those of polyethers, and might therefore be able to resolve the key issues restricting SPEs from realizing their full potential, for example in terms of ionic conductivity, chemical or electrochemical stability and temperature sensitivity. It is further interesting that many of these polymer materials complex Li-ions less strongly than PEO and facilitate ion transport through different mechanisms than polyethers, which is likely critical for true advancement in the area. In this review, >30 years of research on these 'alternative' Li-ion-conducting SPE host materials are summarized and discussed in the perspective of their potential application in electrochemical devices, with a clear focus on Li batteries. Key challenges and strategies forward and beyond the current PEO-based paradigm are highlighted.

Keywords
Polymer electrolyte, Solid electrolyte, Li battery, Ionic conductivity, Ion transport
National Category
Materials Chemistry Polymer Technologies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-365125 (URN)10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2017.12.004 (DOI)000433643500004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-3837
Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-12 Last updated: 2018-11-12Bibliographically approved
Li, Z., Mogensen, R., Mindemark, J., Bowden, T., Brandell, D. & Tominaga, Y. (2018). Ion-Conductive and Thermal Properties of a Synergistic Poly(ethylene carbonate)/Poly(trimethylene carbonate) Blend Electrolyte. Macromolecular rapid communications, 39(14), Article ID 1800146.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ion-Conductive and Thermal Properties of a Synergistic Poly(ethylene carbonate)/Poly(trimethylene carbonate) Blend Electrolyte
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Macromolecular rapid communications, ISSN 1022-1336, E-ISSN 1521-3927, Vol. 39, no 14, article id 1800146Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Electrolytes comprising poly(ethylene carbonate) (PEC)/poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTM C) with lithium bis(trifluoromethane sulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) are prepared by a simple solvent casting method. Although PEC and PTMC have similar chemical structures, they are immiscible and two glass transitions are present in the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements. Interestingly, these two polymers change to miscible blends with the addition of LiTFSI, and the ionic conductivity increases with increasing lithium salt concentration. The optimum composition of the blend electrolyte is achieved at PEC6PTMC4, with a conductivity as high as 10(-6) S cm(-1) at 50 degrees C. This value is greater than that for single PEC- and PTMC-based electrolytes. Moreover, the thermal stability of the blend-based electrolytes is improved as compared to PEC-based electrolytes. It is clear that the interaction between C=O groups and Li+ gives rise to a compatible amorphous phase of PEC and PTMC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2018
Keywords
lithium batteries, poly(ethylene carbonate), poly(trimethylene carbonate), polymer blends, solid polymer electrolytes
National Category
Inorganic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-362173 (URN)10.1002/marc.201800146 (DOI)000439816900026 ()29748986 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-05 Created: 2018-10-05 Last updated: 2018-10-05Bibliographically approved
Bergfelt, A., Mogensen, R., Lacey, M., Guiomar, H., Brandell, D. & Bowden, T. (2018). Mechanically Robust and Highly Conductive Di-Block Copolymers as Solid Polymer Electrolytes for Room Temperature Li-ion Batteries. In: : . Paper presented at 16th International Symposium on Polymer Electrolytes (ISPE-16).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mechanically Robust and Highly Conductive Di-Block Copolymers as Solid Polymer Electrolytes for Room Temperature Li-ion Batteries
Show others...
2018 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Alternative solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) hosts to the archetype poly(ethylene oxide) are gaining attention thanks to their appealing properties, such as higher cation transport number, thermal stability and electrochemical stability [1]. In addition, high mechanical stability is required in order to integrate easy-to-use materials into flexible or ‘structural’ batteries [2, 3].

 In this work, a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) featuring high ionic conductivity and mechanical robustness at room temperature is presented. The SPE consists of a di-block copolymer, poly(benzyl methacrylate)-poly(ε-caprolactone-r-trimethylene carbonate) (BCT), mixed with different loadings of lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI). The highest ionic conductivity achieved for these SPEs was found with 16.7 wt% LiTFSI loading (BCT17), reaching 9.1 x 10-6 S cm-1 at 30 °C. The limited current fraction (F+) for the BCT17 electrolyte was calculated to be 0.64 with the Bruce-Vincent method. Furthermore, dynamic mechanical analysis showed a storage modulus (E’) of 0.2 GPa below 40 °C and 1 MPa above 50 °C. These results indicate that BCT with LiTFSI is a competitive electrolyte, combining high ionic conductivity and modulus at ambient temperatures.

 LiFePO4|BCT17|Li half-cells showed good cycling performance at 60 °C. At 30 °C, where the SPE possessed significantly higher modulus, decent cell performance could still be achieved after several optimization steps. These included incorporating a SPE as binder, and infiltration cast the SPE on the electrode to maximize the contact between both components, thereby improving the interfacial contact and decreasing the cell resistance and overpotential when cycling the battery device.

 References

[1] J. Mindemark, M.J. Lacey, T. Bowden, D. Brandell. Prog Polym Sci, (2018). DOI: 10.1016/j.progpolymsci.2017.12.004.

[2] J.F. Snyder, R.H. Carter, E.D. Wetzel. Chem Mater, 19 (2007) 3793-801.

[3] W.S. Young, W.F. Kuan, Thomas H. Epps. J Polym Sci, Part B: Polym Phys, 52 (2014) 1-16.

National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-374680 (URN)
Conference
16th International Symposium on Polymer Electrolytes (ISPE-16)
Available from: 2019-01-22 Created: 2019-01-22 Last updated: 2019-01-22
Bergfelt, A., Rubatat, L., Brandell, D. & Bowden, T. (2018). Poly(benzyl methacrylate)-Poly[(oligo ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] Triblock-Copolymers as Solid Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries. Solid State Ionics, 321, 55-61
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Poly(benzyl methacrylate)-Poly[(oligo ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] Triblock-Copolymers as Solid Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries
2018 (English)In: Solid State Ionics, ISSN 0167-2738, E-ISSN 1872-7689, Vol. 321, p. 55-61Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A triblock copolymer of benzyl methacrylate and oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate was polymerized to form the general structure PBnMA-POEGMA-PBnMA, using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). The block copolymer (BCP) was blended with lithium bis(trifluoro methylsulfonate) (LiTFSI) to form solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs). AC impedance spectroscopy was used to study the ionic conductivity of the SPE series in the temperature interval 30 °C to 90 °C. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was used to study the morphology of the electrolytes in the temperature interval 30 °C to 150 °C. By using benzyl methacrylate as a mechanical block it was possible to tune the microphase separation by the addition of LiTFSI, as proven by SAXS. By doing so the ionic conductivity increased to values higher than ones measured on a methyl methacrylate triblock copolymer-based electrolyte in the mixed state, which was investigated in an earlier paper by our group. A Li|SPE|LiFePO4 half-cell was constructed and cycled at 60 °C. The cell produced a discharge capacity of about 100 mAh g−1 of LiFePO4 at C/10, and the half-cell cycled for more than 140 cycles.

National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Research subject
Chemistry with specialization in Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340851 (URN)10.1016/j.ssi.2018.04.006 (DOI)000437372200009 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy AgencyStandUp
Available from: 2018-02-04 Created: 2018-02-04 Last updated: 2018-10-11Bibliographically approved
Bergfelt, A., Lacey, M. J., Hedman, J., Sångeland, C., Brandell, D. & Bowden, T. (2018). ε-Caprolactone-based solid polymer electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries: synthesis, electrochemical characterization and mechanical stabilization by block copolymerization. RSC Advances, 8(30), 16716-16725
Open this publication in new window or tab >>ε-Caprolactone-based solid polymer electrolytes for lithium-ion batteries: synthesis, electrochemical characterization and mechanical stabilization by block copolymerization
Show others...
2018 (English)In: RSC Advances, ISSN 2046-2069, E-ISSN 2046-2069, Vol. 8, no 30, p. 16716-16725Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this work, three types of polymers based on epsilon-caprolactone have been synthesized: poly(epsilon-caprolactone), polystyrene-poly(epsilon-caprolactone), and polystyrene-poly(epsilon-caprolactone-r-trimethylene carbonate) (SCT), where the polystyrene block was introduced to improve the electrochemical and mechanical performance of the material. Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) were produced by blending the polymers with 10-40 wt% lithium bis(trifluoromethane) sulfonimide (LiTFSI). Battery devices were thereafter constructed to evaluate the cycling performance. The best performing battery half-cell utilized an SPE consisting of SCT and 17 wt% LiTFSI as both binder and electrolyte; a Li vertical bar SPE vertical bar LiFePO4 cell that cycled at 40 degrees C gave a discharge capacity of about 140 mA h g(-1) at C/5 for 100 cycles, which was superior to the other investigated electrolytes. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) showed that the storage modulus E' was about 5 MPa for this electrolyte.

National Category
Polymer Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-340854 (URN)10.1039/c8ra00377g (DOI)000431814500034 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 42031-1EU, Horizon 2020, 685716
Available from: 2018-02-04 Created: 2018-02-04 Last updated: 2018-08-27Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0851-4316

Search in DiVA

Show all publications