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Malmberg, Anders
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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Malmberg, A., Kettis, Å. & Maandi, C. (Eds.). (2017). Quality and Renewal 2017 (Kvalitet och förnyelse 2017): Research Environment Evaluation at Uppsala University. Uppsala: Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Quality and Renewal 2017 (Kvalitet och förnyelse 2017): Research Environment Evaluation at Uppsala University
2017 (English)Collection (editor) (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Abstract [en]

This is the final report of the enhancement-led research evaluation Quality and Renewal 2017, Q&R17 (in Swedish, Kvalitet och förnyelse, KoF17), carried out at Uppsala University between February 2016 and October 2017. The project has been a major undertaking, aiming to strengthen research at Uppsala University through a broad analysis of the functioning of its various research environments, with particular focus on the preconditions and processes that underpin research quality and renewal. 

To this end, an internet-based survey was carried out, in which around 3,700 active researchers at Uppsala University shared their perceptions of and opinions on their local research environments at the University. Together with some bibliometric analyses, the survey results served as background material for departmental self-evaluations, which in turn were subjected to external peer review. In this process, almost 130 ‘critical friends’, most of them from outside Sweden, evaluated 54 evaluation units to assess strengths and weaknesses and make recommendations.

Q&R17 is the third major research evaluation at Uppsala University. The two previous evaluations, Q&R07 and Q&R11, primarily aimed to identify strong research activities and research initiatives with potential to develop into strong future areas of research, thereby aiding the university management in its continuous strategic decision-making process. In contrast to those two evaluations, Q&R17 has not resulted in any sort of grading of the research carried out at Uppsala University, either in its totality or in its parts. Nevertheless, the panel reports include numerous testimonies of the perceived strength and excellence of research at Uppsala University. 

More importantly, given the purpose of Q&R17, a number of areas have been identified where action is needed if Uppsala University is to take steps towards reaching its full potential. These relate to: leadership and strategic renewal; talent attraction and retention; quality culture and control; inter-national milieu; external collaboration and outreach; and research-teaching linkages. The conclusions and recommendations coming out of Q&R17 will form the basis for a number of actions throughout the University aiming to further strengthen the international standing of Uppsala University.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala University, 2017. p. 703
Keywords
Q&R17, research, research evaluation, evaluation, Uppsala University, KoF17, Uppsala universitet, forskning, utvärdering, forskningsutvärdering
National Category
Other Social Sciences not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332718 (URN)978-91-506-2667-4 (ISBN)
Projects
Kvalitet coh förnyelse 2017 (KoF17)
Available from: 2017-11-08 Created: 2017-10-31 Last updated: 2017-11-16Bibliographically approved
Malmberg, A. & Maskell, P. (2010). An evolutionary approach to localized learning and spatial clustering (1ed.). In: Ron Boschma and Ron Martin (Ed.), The handbook of evolutionary economic geography (pp. 391-405). Cheltenhamn, UK & Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An evolutionary approach to localized learning and spatial clustering
2010 (English)In: The handbook of evolutionary economic geography / [ed] Ron Boschma and Ron Martin, Cheltenhamn, UK & Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar , 2010, 1, p. 391-405Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenhamn, UK & Northampton, MA, USA: Edward Elgar, 2010 Edition: 1
National Category
Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-140891 (URN)978 1 84720 2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2011-01-10 Created: 2011-01-10 Last updated: 2011-02-04Bibliographically approved
Malmberg, A. & Lagerholm, M. (2009). Path dependence in economic geography (1ed.). In: The evolution of path dependence (pp. 87-107). Cheltenham: Edward Elgar
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Path dependence in economic geography
2009 (English)In: The evolution of path dependence, Cheltenham: Edward Elgar , 2009, 1, p. 87-107Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cheltenham: Edward Elgar, 2009 Edition: 1
Series
New horizons in institutional and evolutionary economics
National Category
Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-108875 (URN)978-1-84376-137-2 (ISBN)
Available from: 2009-10-01 Created: 2009-10-01 Last updated: 2010-06-09Bibliographically approved
Hauge, A., Power, D. & Malmberg, A. (2009). The Spaces and Places of Swedish Fashion. European Planning Studies, 17(4), 529-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Spaces and Places of Swedish Fashion
2009 (English)In: European Planning Studies, ISSN 0965-4313, E-ISSN 1469-5944, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 529-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Fashion companies are involved not only in producing material commodities (clothes), but also in the parallel production of ideas (fashion). The consistent use of outsourcing in the fashion industry means that material production is constantly on the move to low-cost locations. Still high-cost countries have managed to retain a sizable presence in the world of fashion. For firms in such countries, the creation of value and profitability commonly rests on the ability to produce innovative design, brand value, efficient marketing channels, logistics and distribution. Sweden, for instance, plays host to a range of fashion firms: from the multinational giant Hennes & Mauritz to small innovative designers. This creates an interesting strategic problem for firms: why root knowledge intensive functions in Sweden when customers are mainly found in distant export markets? What localized knowledge processes, networks and other factors make these firms keep their home base in Sweden? The article suggests that both spatial proximity and the role of place are important to answering these questions. In conclusion, three main findings are discussed: that the Swedish fashion cluster is not based on high-tech but it is nevertheless knowledge intensive; that fashion has a multifaceted relationship with space and is produced under conditions simultaneously characterized by both localization and globalization; that place does play a distinct role in processes of fashion branding and more generally in the creation of immaterial value.

National Category
Economic Geography
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-110838 (URN)10.1080/09654310802682073 (DOI)000264223400003 ()
Available from: 2009-11-26 Created: 2009-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-12Bibliographically approved
Power, D. & Malmberg, A. (2008). The contribution of universities to innovation and economic development: in what sense a regional problem?. Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, 1(2), 233-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The contribution of universities to innovation and economic development: in what sense a regional problem?
2008 (English)In: Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, ISSN 1752-1378, E-ISSN 1752-1386, ISSN 1752-1378, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 233-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

To explore the contradictions and problems apparent in contemporary policy towards universities, this article reviews two parallel but related debates: the debate about competitive and prosperous regions and the debate about excellent institutions of research and higher education. It questions whether it is necessary, or always healthy, to conflate the processes behind excellence in regional innovation and economic development with excellence in university research, education and collaboration. In other words, while we agree that universities contribute to innovation, it is less clear how they contribute to regional innovation and still less clear how they contribute to regional innovation systems.

Keywords
economic geography, regional innovation systems, university, science and technology policy, regional economic development
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-17776 (URN)10.1093/cjres/rsn006 (DOI)000207962700005 ()
Available from: 2008-08-28 Created: 2008-08-28 Last updated: 2017-12-08Bibliographically approved
Waxell, A. & Malmberg, A. (2007). What is global and what is local in knowledge-generating interaction?: The case of the biotech cluster in Uppsala, Sweden. Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, 19(2), 137-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is global and what is local in knowledge-generating interaction?: The case of the biotech cluster in Uppsala, Sweden
2007 (English)In: Entrepreneurship and Regional Development, ISSN 0898-5626, E-ISSN 1464-5114, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 137-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this paper is to describe the structure of the biotech cluster in Uppsala, Sweden, and to analyse how cluster knowledge dynamics result from processes and interactions unfolding at different spatial scales. The empirical basis for the analyses are derived from various sources: business registers, an internet- based survey of 106 firms, 23 in-depth interviews with key individuals, and a longitudinal database give data on the degree to which collaborations, rivalry, business transactions, capital sourcing and labour mobility take place in the local cluster. In addition to asking questions about which interactions are most localized and globalized, respectively, the paper also sets out to give an account of the 'clusterness' of the case in point. The paper shows that while the business relations of the biotech companies in Uppsala are strongly globalized, the sourcing of capital, the informal social networking and the labour market dynamics are much more regionalized/ localized.

Keywords
clusters, biotechnology, knowledge, labour mobility
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-12441 (URN)10.1080/089856206011061184 (DOI)000246479300002 ()
Available from: 2007-12-20 Created: 2007-12-20 Last updated: 2017-12-11Bibliographically approved
Maskell, P., Bathelt, H. & Malmberg, A. (2006). Building global knowledge pipelines: The role of temporary clusters. European Planning Studies, 14(8), 997-1013
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Building global knowledge pipelines: The role of temporary clusters
2006 (English)In: European Planning Studies, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 997-1013Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Business people and professionals come together regularly at trade fairs, exhibitions, conventions, congresses, and conferences. Here, their latest and most advanced findings, inventions and products are on display to be evaluated by customers and suppliers, as well as by peers and competitors. Participation in events like these helps firms to identify the current market frontier, take stock of relative competitive positions and form future plans. Such events exhibit many of the characteristics ascribed to permanent spatial clusters, albeit in a temporary and intensified form. These short-lived hotspots of intense knowledge exchange, network building and idea generation can thus be seen as temporary clusters. This paper compares temporary clusters with permanent clusters and other types of inter-firm interactions. If regular participation in temporary clusters can satisfy a firm's need to learn through interaction with suppliers, customers, peers and rivals, why is the phenomenon of permanent spatial clustering of similar and related economic activity so pervasive? The answer, it is claimed, lies in the restrictions imposed upon economic activity when knowledge and ideas are transformed into valuable products and services. The paper sheds new light on how interaction among firms in current clusters coincides with knowledge-intensive pipelines between firms in different regions or clusters. In doing so, it offers a novel way of understanding how inter-firm knowledge relationships are organized spatially and temporally.

Keywords
INNOVATION NETWORKS, INDUSTRIAL, ORGANIZATION, ENTERPRISE, PROXIMITY, GEOGRAPHY, CULTURE, CONTEXT, SYSTEMS, MEDIA
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-84036 (URN)
Available from: 2006-11-12 Created: 2006-11-12 Last updated: 2011-01-11
Malmberg, A. & Maskell, P. (2006). Localized learning revisited. Growth and Change, 37(1), 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Localized learning revisited
2006 (English)In: Growth and Change, ISSN 0017-4815, E-ISSN 1468-2257, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The concept of localized learning outlines how local conditions and spatial proximity between actors enable the formation of distinctive cognitive repertoires and influence the generation and selection of skills, processes, and products within a field of knowledge or activity. The localized learning argument consists of two distinct yet related elements. One has to do with localized capabilities that enhance learning, while the other concerns the possible benefits that firms with similar or related activities may accrue by locating in spatial proximity to one another. This article disentangles these two inherent elements of the concept, reviews some of the critiques that have been raised against it, and sorts out some misunderstandings that are often attached to its present use.

Keywords
ABSORPTIVE-CAPACITY, UNIVERSITY-RESEARCH, TACIT KNOWLEDGE, INNOVATION, CLUSTERS, TECHNOLOGY, SPILLOVERS, SYSTEMS, COMPETITIVENESS, COLLABORATION
National Category
Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-84038 (URN)10.1111/j.1468-2257.2006.00302.x (DOI)
Available from: 2008-02-14 Created: 2008-02-14 Last updated: 2017-12-14
Malmberg, A. & Power, D. (2006). True Clusters / A Severe Case of Conceptual Headache. In: Clusters in Regional Development. London: Routledge
Open this publication in new window or tab >>True Clusters / A Severe Case of Conceptual Headache
2006 (English)In: Clusters in Regional Development, London: Routledge , 2006Chapter in book (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2006
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-82110 (URN)0415349141 (ISBN)
Available from: 2006-12-22 Created: 2006-12-22 Last updated: 2011-11-14Bibliographically approved
Malmberg, A. & Power, D. (2005). (How) Do (Firms in) Clusters Create Knowledge?. Industry and Innovation, 12(4), 409-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>(How) Do (Firms in) Clusters Create Knowledge?
2005 (English)In: Industry and Innovation, ISSN 1366-2716, E-ISSN 1469-8390, ISSN 1469-8390, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 409-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The literature on clusters and cluster building has been rapidly growing both in academic and policy‐making circles. Central to this interest and body of work has been the assumption that location in clusters helps firms to exchange, acquire and generate new knowledge. Since knowledge is increasingly believed to be the basis of firm competitiveness clustered firms and industries will outperform others. This paper sets out to examine the evidence for propositions regarding the knowledge‐enhancing qualities of clusters by reviewing the literature with the expressed intention of examining whether such claims in fact rest upon rigorous and verifiable empirical findings. In order to do this we extract from the theoretical literature on clusters three hypothetical arguments for the knowledge creating and competitiveness generating power of clusters: knowledge in clusters is created through various forms of local inter‐organizational collaborative interaction; knowledge in clusters is created through increased competition and intensified rivalry; knowledge in clusters is created through spillover following from the local mobility and sociability of individuals. The paper goes on to assess and evaluate the number and rigour of empirical cases supporting these types of argument.

Keywords
Cluster, knowledge, empirical review
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Social and Economic Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-74985 (URN)10.1080/13662710500381583 (DOI)
Available from: 2005-12-22 Created: 2005-12-22 Last updated: 2017-12-14Bibliographically approved
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