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Danielsson, K., Jansson-Fröjmark, M., Jan-Erik, B. & Markström, A. (2018). Light therapy with scheduled rise times in young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder: Therapeutic outcomes and possible predictors. Behavioural Sleep Medicine, 16(4), 325-336
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Light therapy with scheduled rise times in young adults with delayed sleep phase disorder: Therapeutic outcomes and possible predictors
2018 (English)In: Behavioural Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1540-2002, E-ISSN 1540-2010, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 325-336Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical trials with light therapy (LT) for delayed sleep phase disorder (DSPD) are sparse and little is known about factors that are favorable for improvements. In this study, LT with scheduled rise times was conducted at home for 14 days by 44 participants with DSPD aged 16–26 years. Primary outcomes were sleep onset and sleep offset. Potential predictors were demographic characteristics, chronotype, dim light melatonin onset, the number of days the LT lamp was used, the daily duration of LT, daytime sleepiness, anxiety, depression, worry, and rumination. Significant advances were observed in sleep onset and sleep offset from baseline to the end of treatment. The number of days of LT predicted earlier sleep onset and sleep offset.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2018
National Category
Neurosciences Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298760 (URN)10.1080/15402002.2016.1210150 (DOI)000431524200002 ()27712107 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-07-07 Created: 2016-07-07 Last updated: 2018-07-04Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2017). Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms. European Journal of Integrative Medicine, 16, 15-21
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Auricular acupuncture versus cognitive behavioural therapy in the discontinuation of hypnotic drug usage and treatment effects of anxiety-, depression and insomnia symptoms
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Integrative Medicine, ISSN 1876-3820, E-ISSN 1876-3839, Vol. 16, p. 15-21Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: The interest in non-pharmacological interventions for insomnia disorder has increased. The aim was to assess the immediate treatment effects of auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-i) regarding discontinuation of hypnotic usage and symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia.

Method: Prospective randomised controlled study. Fifty-seven participants (mean age 61 years (SD 8.6)) with insomnia disorder and long-term use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics received group-treatment with AA or CBT-i. Pre- and post-treatment measures included symptoms of anxiety, depression and insomnia via self-report questionnaires: Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD-A, HAD-D) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI). Other sleep parameters and hypnotic consumption were measured with a sleep diary. Linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time within and between the groups.

Results: Seventy-one percent of the AA participants and 84% of the CBT-i participants managed to discontinue their hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Symptoms of anxiety and depression decreased within the AA group (HAD-A (p < 0.05), HAD-D (p < 0.05)) and insomnia symptoms decreased within the CBT-i group (ISI (p < 0.001)). The only between-group difference occurred in ISI (p < 0.001), in favour of CBT-i. According to the within-group sleep diary results, the CBT-i group went to bed later (p < 0.001), fell asleep quicker (p < 0.05), increased their sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) and self-rated sleep quality (p < 0.05) post-treatment.

Conclusions: Both groups ended/maintained low hypnotic drug consumption post-treatment. Short-term reductions occurred in the AA group in anxiety and depression symptoms and in the CBT-i group regarding insomnia symptoms.

Keywords
Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive behavioural therapy, Hypnotic consumption, Anxiety Insomnia Depression
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Psychiatry
Research subject
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319923 (URN)10.1016/j.eujim.2017.10.002 (DOI)000417392500003 ()
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2018-03-08Bibliographically approved
Höglund, A., Broman, J.-E., Hagell, P., Pålhagen, S. & Fredrikson, S. (2017). Excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: a 10-year longitudinal study. Paper presented at 3rd Congress of the European-Academy-of-Neurology, JUN, 2017, Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS. European Journal of Neurology, 24(S1), 485-485
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Excessive daytime sleepiness in Parkinson's disease: a 10-year longitudinal study
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2017 (English)In: European Journal of Neurology, ISSN 1351-5101, E-ISSN 1468-1331, Vol. 24, no S1, p. 485-485Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2017
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345896 (URN)000405530101067 ()
Conference
3rd Congress of the European-Academy-of-Neurology, JUN, 2017, Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS
Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2018-03-13Bibliographically approved
Rångtell, F. H., Karamchedu, S., Andersson, P., van Egmond, L., Hultgren, T., Broman, J.-E., . . . Benedict, C. (2017). Learning performance is linked to procedural memory consolidation across both sleep and wakefulness. Scientific Reports, 7, Article ID 10234.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Learning performance is linked to procedural memory consolidation across both sleep and wakefulness
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2017 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, article id 10234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated whether learning performance in a procedural finger tapping task before nocturnal sleep would predict performance gains after sleep in 60 young adults. Gains were defined as change in correctly tapped digit sequences between learning (12 trials administered in the evening) and retesting (3 trials administered in the morning after sleep). The same task was also administered to a separate wake group (N = 54 young adults), which learned in the morning and was retested in the evening. Learning performance was determined by either using the average performance on the last three learning trials or the average performance on the best three learning trials. Our results demonstrated an inverse association between learning performance and gains in procedural skill, i.e., good learners exhibited smaller performance gains across both wakefulness and sleep than poor learners. Regardless of learning performance, gains in finger tapping skills were greater after sleep than daytime wakefulness. Importantly, some of our findings were influenced by how learning performance was estimated. Collectively, these results suggest that learning performance and the method through which it is estimated may influence performance gains in finger tapping skills across both sleep and wakefulness.

National Category
Neurosciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334935 (URN)10.1038/s41598-017-09263-5 (DOI)000408781200093 ()28860592 (PubMedID)
Funder
AFA InsuranceLars Hierta Memorial FoundationNovo NordiskSwedish Society for Medical Research (SSMF)Swedish Society of MedicineThe Swedish Brain FoundationSwedish Research CouncilÅke Wiberg Foundation
Available from: 2017-12-01 Created: 2017-12-01 Last updated: 2019-04-23Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2017). Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, 28, 220-226
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sleep patterns in a randomized controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia
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2017 (English)In: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, ISSN 1744-3881, E-ISSN 1873-6947, Vol. 28, p. 220-226Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of the study was to objectively examine how sleep patterns were affected in a short- and long-term perspective after auricular acupuncture (AA) and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-i). Sixty participants with insomnia disorders (men/women 9/51; mean age of 60.5 years, (SD 9.4)), were randomized to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Actigraphy recordings were made at baseline, post-treatment and 6-month follow-up. The CBT-i group reduced their time in bed, their actual sleeping time, their sleep latency and their actual time awake. The AA group slept longer, increased their time in bed and decreased their sleep latency post-treatment. The between-groups results differed in wake-up time, rising, time in bed, actual sleep time and actual wake time. The differences were not maintained six months later. In accordance with previous findings the results support the notion that the objective sleep time does not necessarily affect the subjective perception of insomnia.

Keywords
Actigraphy, Auricular acupuncture, Cognitive-behavioral therapy, Insomnia disorder, Non-pharmacological, Treatment
National Category
Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320044 (URN)10.1016/j.ctcp.2017.06.006 (DOI)000407722900030 ()28779933 (PubMedID)
Funder
Ekhaga Foundation, 2011 59
Available from: 2017-04-12 Created: 2017-04-12 Last updated: 2017-11-21Bibliographically approved
Bergdahl, L., Broman, J.-E., Berman, A. H., Haglund, K., von Knorring, L. & Markström, A. (2016). A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 213-213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A randomised controlled trial of auricular acupuncture and cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia: a short-term self-assessment
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 213-213Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309494 (URN)000383445201008 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved
Hetta, J. & Broman, J.-E. (2016). A screening instrument to evaluate sexsomnia in legal cases. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 273-273
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A screening instrument to evaluate sexsomnia in legal cases
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 273-273Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309497 (URN)000383445201197 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Cedernaes, J., Lampola, L., Axelsson, E. K., Liethof, L., Hassanzadeh, S., Yeganeh, A., . . . Benedict, C. (2016). A single night of partial sleep loss impairs fasting insulin sensitivity but does not affect cephalic phase insulin release in young men. Journal of Sleep Research, 25(1), 5-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A single night of partial sleep loss impairs fasting insulin sensitivity but does not affect cephalic phase insulin release in young men
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 5-10Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The present study sought to investigate whether a single night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would alter fasting insulin sensitivity and cephalic phase insulin release (CPIR) in humans. A rise in circulating insulin in response to food-related sensory stimulation may prepare tissues to break down ingested glucose, e.g. by stimulating rate-limiting glycolytic enzymes. In addition, given insulin's anorexigenic properties once it reaches the brain, the CPIR may serve as an early peripheral satiety signal. Against this background, in the present study 16 men participated in two separate sessions: one night of PSD (4.25 h sleep) versus one night of full sleep (8.5 h sleep). In the morning following each sleep condition, subjects' oral cavities were rinsed with a 1-molar sucrose solution for 45 s, preceded and followed by blood sampling for repeated determination of plasma glucose and serum insulin concentrations (-3, +3, +5, +7, +10 and +20 min). Our main result was that PSD, compared with full sleep, was associated with significantly higher peripheral insulin resistance, as indicated by a higher fasting homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance index (+16%, P = 0.025). In contrast, no CPIR was observed in any of the two sleep conditions. Our findings indicate that a single night of PSD is already sufficient to impair fasting insulin sensitivity in healthy men. In contrast, brief oral cavity rinsing with sucrose solution did not change serum insulin concentrations, suggesting that a blunted CPIR is an unlikely mechanism through which acute sleep loss causes metabolic perturbations during morning hours in humans.

Keywords
HOMA-IR; cephalic phase insulin response; curtailed sleep
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-275287 (URN)10.1111/jsr.12340 (DOI)000367618900002 ()26361380 (PubMedID)
Funder
The Swedish Brain FoundationAFA InsuranceNovo NordiskMagnus Bergvall FoundationSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2016-02-02 Created: 2016-02-02 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Broman, J.-E., Danielsson, K. & Markström, A. (2016). A Swedish version of the Flinders Fatigue Scale: measurement properties in patients with insomnia disorder. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 346-346
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish version of the Flinders Fatigue Scale: measurement properties in patients with insomnia disorder
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 346-346Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309506 (URN)000383445201429 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Broman, J.-E. & Lindberg, E. (2016). An abridged version of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-5): measurement properties in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea. Paper presented at 23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY. Journal of Sleep Research, 25, 345-345
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An abridged version of the Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ-5): measurement properties in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sleep Research, ISSN 0962-1105, E-ISSN 1365-2869, Vol. 25, p. 345-345Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
National Category
Neurology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-309505 (URN)000383445201428 ()
Conference
23rd Congress of the European-Sleep-Research-Society, SEP 13-16, 2016, Bologna, ITALY
Available from: 2016-12-05 Created: 2016-12-05 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-9849-363X

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