uu.seUppsala University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
BETA
Eriksson, Stefan
Publications (10 of 26) Show all publications
Carlsson, M., Eriksson, S. & Rooth, D.-O. (2018). Job Search Methods and Wages: Are Natives and Immigrants Different?. Manchester School, 86(2), 219-247
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Job Search Methods and Wages: Are Natives and Immigrants Different?
2018 (English)In: Manchester School, ISSN 1463-6786, E-ISSN 1467-9957, Vol. 86, no 2, p. 219-247Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We conduct a survey of newly hired workers in the Swedish labour market to analyse if there are differences between natives and immigrants in the choice of search intensity/methods and in the search method getting the job. We further investigate if the wage and other characteristics of the new job differ depending on the successful search method. We find that immigrants use all search methods more than natives, but they especially rely on informal search. Immigrants are more likely than natives to find a job using informal search through friends and relatives, and these jobs are associated with lower wages.

Keywords
Job search methods; Wage differentials, Immigrants, Labour market.
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-332038 (URN)10.1111/manc.12202 (DOI)000424941200005 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-10-23 Created: 2017-10-23 Last updated: 2018-04-09Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, M. & Eriksson, S. (2017). Do Attitudes Expressed in Surveys Predict Ethnic Discrimination?. Ethnic and Racial Studies, 40(10), 1739-1757
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Attitudes Expressed in Surveys Predict Ethnic Discrimination?
2017 (English)In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 40, no 10, p. 1739-1757Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Survey data on people’s reported attitudes towards ethnic minorities are sometimes used as a proxy for ethnic discrimination. However, there is weak empirical evidence of a link between reported attitudes and discrimination. In this article, we use survey data on people’s attitudes towards ethnic minorities combined with a direct measure of ethnic discrimination from a field experiment in the Swedish housing market to re-examine this policy-relevant issue. We find clear evidence of a link between reported attitudes towards ethnic minorities and the extent of ethnic discrimination: in regions where attitudes are more negative, there is more discrimination, and vice versa. Thus, in contrast to most prior studies, our results suggest that reported attitudes may be a useful predictor of ethnic discrimination.

Keywords
Attitudes, ethnic discrimination, housing market, field experiments, surveys, racial prejudice
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308481 (URN)10.1080/01419870.2016.1201580 (DOI)000404348500008 ()
Funder
The Jan Wallander and Tom Hedelius Foundation, W2010-0049:1
Available from: 2016-11-27 Created: 2016-11-27 Last updated: 2017-09-27Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S., Johansson, P. & Langenskiöld, S. (2017). What is the right profile for getting a job?: A stated choice experiment of the recruitment process. Empirical Economics, 53(2), 803-826
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the right profile for getting a job?: A stated choice experiment of the recruitment process
2017 (English)In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 53, no 2, p. 803-826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We study the recruitment behaviour of Swedish employers using data from a stated choice experiment. In the experiment, the employers are first asked to describe an employee who recently and voluntarily left the firm and then to choose between two hypothetical applicants to invite to a job interview or to hire as a replacement for their previous employee. The two applicants differ with respect to characteristics such as gender, age, education, work experience, ethnicity, religious beliefs, family situation, weight, and health, but otherwise have similar characteristics as the previous employee. Our results show that employers prefer not to recruit applicants who are old, non-European, Muslim, Jewish, obese, have several children, or have a history of sickness absence. We also calculate the reduction in wage costs needed to make employers indifferent between applicants with and without these characteristics, and find that wage costs would have to be reduced by up to 50 % for applicants with some characteristics.

Keywords
Stated choice experiment, Discrimination, Age, Ethnicity, Obesity, Sickness absence
National Category
Economics and Business Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334923 (URN)10.1007/s00181-016-1133-1 (DOI)000407847400017 ()
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare
Available from: 2017-11-29 Created: 2017-11-29 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S., Johansson, P. & Langenskiöld, S. (2016). What is the Right Profile for Getting a Job? A Stated Choice Experiment of the Recruitment Process. Empirical Economics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>What is the Right Profile for Getting a Job? A Stated Choice Experiment of the Recruitment Process
2016 (English)In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921Article in journal (Refereed) Accepted
National Category
Social Sciences Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298147 (URN)
Available from: 2016-06-30 Created: 2016-06-30 Last updated: 2017-11-28
Carlsson, M. & Eriksson, S. (2015). Ethnic Discrimination in the London Market for Shared Housing. Journal of ethnic and migration studies, 41(8), 1276-1301
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Discrimination in the London Market for Shared Housing
2015 (English)In: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, ISSN 1369-183X, E-ISSN 1469-9451, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1276-1301Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is well documented that there exists ethnic discrimination in the regular housing market in European and US cities. However, the existing literature has so far neglected the informal market for shared housing. We use a field experiment to investigate ethnic discrimination in this market. We sent fictitious enquiries with a randomly assigned name signalling a British, Eastern European, Indian, African or Arabic/Muslim background to more than 5000 room advertisers in the Greater London Area. Our main finding is that ethnic discrimination is widespread. We also find that the degree of discrimination depends on the applicant's occupation and the ethnic residential concentration.

Keywords
Ethnic discrimination, Field experiment, Housing market, Shared housing
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234911 (URN)10.1080/1369183X.2014.965670 (DOI)000354934000005 ()
Note

Correction in: Journal of ethnic and migration studies, vol. 41, issue 8, DOI: 10.1080/1369183X.2014.991571

Available from: 2014-10-26 Created: 2014-10-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, M. & Eriksson, S. (2014). Discrimination in the Rental Market for Apartments. Journal of Housing Economics, 23(1), 41-54
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discrimination in the Rental Market for Apartments
2014 (English)In: Journal of Housing Economics, ISSN 1051-1377, E-ISSN 1096-0791, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 41-54Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Discrimination in the housing market may create large economic inefficiencies and unfair individual outcomes, but is very difficult to measure. To circumvent the problems with unobserved heterogeneity, most recent studies use the correspondence testing approach (i.e. sending fictitious inquiries to landlords). In this study, we generalize the existing methodology in order to facilitate a test of to what extent the measured degree of discrimination depends on applicant, landlord/apartment, and regional characteristics. To show how this more general methodology can be implemented, we investigate the effects of gender, ethnicity, age, and employment status in the Swedish rental market for apartments. Our results confirm the existence of widespread discrimination against some of the groups, but also show that the degree of discrimination varies substantially with landlord, apartment, and regional characteristics. This heterogeneity highlights the importance of using a broad approach when conducting correspondence studies. Our results also allow us to interpret the nature of discrimination and how it relates to segregation and geographical sorting.

Keywords
Discrimination, Field experiment, Correspondence testing, Housing market
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-213971 (URN)10.1016/j.jhe.2013.11.004 (DOI)000332143800004 ()
Available from: 2014-01-06 Created: 2014-01-06 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S. & Rooth, D.-O. (2014). Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment. The American Economic Review, 104(3), 1014-1039
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Employers Use Unemployment as a Sorting Criterion When Hiring? Evidence from a Field Experiment
2014 (English)In: The American Economic Review, ISSN 0002-8282, E-ISSN 1944-7981, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 1014-1039Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The stigma associated with long-term unemployment spells could create large inefficiencies in labor markets. While the existing literature points toward large stigma effects, it has proven difficult to estimate causal relationships. Using data from a field experiment, we find that long-term unemployment spells in the past do not matter for employers' hiring decisions, suggesting that subsequent work experience eliminate this negative signal. Nor do employers treat contemporary short-term unemployment spells differently, suggesting that they understand that worker/firm matching takes time. However, employers attach a negative value to contemporary unemployment spells lasting at least nine months, providing evidence of stigma effects.

National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-219848 (URN)10.1257/aer.104.3.1014 (DOI)000334497800010 ()
Available from: 2014-03-05 Created: 2014-03-05 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Carlsson, M., Eriksson, S. & Gottfries, N. (2013). Product Market Imperfections and Employment Dynamics. Oxford Economic Papers, 65(2), 447-470
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Product Market Imperfections and Employment Dynamics
2013 (English)In: Oxford Economic Papers, ISSN 0030-7653, E-ISSN 1464-3812, Vol. 65, no 2, p. 447-470Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How important is imperfect competition in the product market for employment dynamics? To investigate this, we formulate a model of employment adjustment with search frictions, vacancy costs, hiring costs, and imperfect competition in the product market. From this model, we derive a structural equation for employment that we estimate on firm-level data. We find that product market demand shocks have significant and quantitatively large effects on employment. This supports a model with imperfect competition in the product market. We find no evidence that the level of unemployment in the local labour market has a direct effect on job creation in existing firms. In some specifications, we find evidence of congestion effects, i.e., that hiring is slowed down if there are many vacancies in the local labour market.

National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-185586 (URN)10.1093/oep/gps033 (DOI)000317007800012 ()
Available from: 2012-11-26 Created: 2012-11-26 Last updated: 2017-12-07
Eriksson, S., Johansson, P. & Langenskiöld, S. (2013). Vad är värst - dålig hälsa, utländsk bakgrund eller 55+?. Ekonomisk Debatt, 41(5), 14-26
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Vad är värst - dålig hälsa, utländsk bakgrund eller 55+?
2013 (Swedish)In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 14-26Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.)) Published
National Category
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-206830 (URN)
Available from: 2013-09-04 Created: 2013-09-04 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Eriksson, S. & Lagerström, J. (2012). Detecting discrimination in the hiring process: evidence from an Internet-based search channel. Empirical Economics, 43(2), 537-563
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Detecting discrimination in the hiring process: evidence from an Internet-based search channel
2012 (English)In: Empirical Economics, ISSN 0377-7332, E-ISSN 1435-8921, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 537-563Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article uses data from an Internet-based CV database to study how job searchers’ ethnicity, employment status, age, and gender affect how often they are contacted by firms. Since we know which types of information that are available to the recruiting firms, we can handle some of the problems with unobserved heterogeneity better than many existing discrimination studies. We find that searchers who have non-Nordic names, are unemployed or old get significantly fewer firm contacts. Moreover, this matters for the hiring outcome: searchers who get more contacts have a higher probability of getting hired.

Keywords
Job search, Unobserved heterogeneity, Discrimination, Ethnicity, Employment status, Age
National Category
Economics
Research subject
Economics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-181043 (URN)10.1007/s00181-011-0496-6 (DOI)000308827200005 ()
Available from: 2012-09-16 Created: 2012-09-16 Last updated: 2017-12-07Bibliographically approved
Organisations

Search in DiVA

Show all publications