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Publications (10 of 90) Show all publications
Elfversson, E., Höglund, K., Mutahi, P. & Okasi, B. (2024). Insecurity and Conflict Management in Urban Slums: Findings from a Household Survey in Kawangware and Korogocho, Nairobi. Nairobi
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Insecurity and Conflict Management in Urban Slums: Findings from a Household Survey in Kawangware and Korogocho, Nairobi
2024 (English)Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nairobi: , 2024
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-523021 (URN)
Available from: 2024-02-13 Created: 2024-02-13 Last updated: 2024-02-13
Höglund, K. & Elfversson, E. (2024). Urban Kenyans mistrust police even more than rural residents do: study sets out why it matters.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban Kenyans mistrust police even more than rural residents do: study sets out why it matters
2024 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
police, trust, urban, rural, police reform
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-520848 (URN)
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-01-16
Elfversson, E., Höglund, K., Muvumba Sellström, A. & Pellerin, C. (2023). Contesting the growing city?: Forms of urban growth and consequences for communal violence. Political Geography, 100, Article ID 102810.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Contesting the growing city?: Forms of urban growth and consequences for communal violence
2023 (English)In: Political Geography, ISSN 0962-6298, E-ISSN 1873-5096, Vol. 100, article id 102810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

How does rapid urban growth affect risks of communal violence in cities? In rapidly growing cities, poor planning and weak institutions combined with an unregulated influx of migrants can create a potent recipe for violent mobilization. In addition, politicized identity groups often compete for resources and interact in close proximity in urban areas. Despite a growing research agenda on the relationship between rapid urban growth and urban violent unrest, findings remain inconclusive. One explanation for the disparate conclusions is that the theoretical pathways connecting urban growth and unrest largely fail to consider both the violence-generating and violence-stemming effects of urban growth. With a focus on conflict-ridden societies, we theorize processes through which urban growth influences different aspects of group relations in the city, and thereby contribute to prevent, suppress or generate communal violence. To illustrate the framework, we draw on insights from Nairobi, Kampala and Addis Ababa. By paying attention to processes, we are able to identify a range of developments associated with city growth which in turn have different implications for communal violence. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
urban, city, conflict, violence, Africa, Nairobi, Kampala, Addis Ababa, ethnocommunal relations
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-491397 (URN)10.1016/j.polgeo.2022.102810 (DOI)000903918200004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-0394Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-00269
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-03-02Bibliographically approved
Elfversson, E. & Höglund, K. (2023). Urban growth, resilience, and violence. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, 64, Article ID 101356.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Urban growth, resilience, and violence
2023 (English)In: Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, ISSN 1877-3435, E-ISSN 1877-3443, Vol. 64, article id 101356Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Cities undergoing rapid growth are at risk of outbreaks of violence as competition over scarce resources and space intensifies. In this context, it is critical to identify conditions that make cities and their inhabitants resilient to violence. We review research findings about the general relationship between urban growth and the violence-proneness of cities, as well as insights about the factors that underpin violence–resilience in three different areas: 1) urban governance and planning, 2) security institutions, and 3) the everyday practices of urban dwellers. We argue that in order to understand cities’ resilience to violence, we need to account for both the mechanisms linking urban growth to violence, and the possible conflict resolution and mitigation mechanisms present in cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
National Category
Political Science (excluding Public Administration Studies and Globalisation Studies)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510864 (URN)10.1016/j.cosust.2023.101356 (DOI)001070683900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2018-03924Swedish Research Council Formas, 2019-00269
Available from: 2023-09-05 Created: 2023-09-05 Last updated: 2023-10-16Bibliographically approved
Höglund, K., Mutahi, P. & Elfversson, E. (2023). Why Kenya wants to send police to Haiti and prospects for success.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Kenya wants to send police to Haiti and prospects for success
2023 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
Kenya, police, Haiti, trust, police reform
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-520850 (URN)
Available from: 2024-01-16 Created: 2024-01-16 Last updated: 2024-01-16
Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2022). Introducing the Deadly Electoral Conflict Dataset (DECO). Journal of Conflict Resolution, 66(1), 162-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Introducing the Deadly Electoral Conflict Dataset (DECO)
2022 (English)In: Journal of Conflict Resolution, ISSN 0022-0027, E-ISSN 1552-8766, Vol. 66, no 1, p. 162-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article introduces the Deadly Electoral Conflict dataset (DECO): a global, georeferenced event dataset on electoral violence with lethal outcomes from 1989 to 2017. DECO allows for empirical evaluation of theories relating to the timing, location, and dynamics of deadly electoral violence. By clearly distinguishing electoral violence from related (and sometimes concurrent) instances of organized violence, DECO is particularly suitable for investigating how election-related violence is connected to other forms of violent political contention. In the article, we present the theoretical and methodological underpinnings of the data collection and discuss empirical patterns that emerge in DECO. We also demonstrate one potential use of DECO by examining the association between United Nations peacekeeping forces and the prevalence of deadly electoral violence in conflict-affected countries.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
elections, violence, conflict data, electoral violence, civil war, event data
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-446018 (URN)10.1177/00220027211021620 (DOI)000664145800001 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P16-0124:1The Research Council of Norway, 217995/V10
Available from: 2021-06-16 Created: 2021-06-16 Last updated: 2023-08-23Bibliographically approved
Ahmed, A., Elfversson, E. & Höglund, K. (2022). The struggle for gender-equal representation: The 2022 election in Kenya.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The struggle for gender-equal representation: The 2022 election in Kenya
2022 (English)Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
Keywords
election, politics, Kenya, women
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-491398 (URN)
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2022-12-21
Höglund, K. & Nilsson, D. (2022). Violence and Peace Processes (3rded.). In: Roger Mac Ginty & Anthony Wanis-St. John (Ed.), Contemporary Peacemaking: Peace Processes, Peacebuilding and Conflict (pp. 289-306). Palgrave Macmillan
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Violence and Peace Processes
2022 (English)In: Contemporary Peacemaking: Peace Processes, Peacebuilding and Conflict / [ed] Roger Mac Ginty & Anthony Wanis-St. John, Palgrave Macmillan, 2022, 3rd, p. 289-306Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Car bombings, kidnappings, political assassinations, conventional battles and street protests. These are all types of violence that can occur conjointly with efforts to negotiate and implement peace. This chapter addresses the role of violence as an influence on peace negotiations. We look at its main characteristics in terms of the actors involved, targets and motives, as well as chart the main modes by which domestic and international actors seek to prevent and stop violence that threaten to undermine peace efforts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Palgrave Macmillan, 2022 Edition: 3rd
Keywords
peace, violence, negotiations, conflict resolution
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-465647 (URN)978-3-030-82961-2 (ISBN)978-3-030-82962-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-01-18 Created: 2022-01-18 Last updated: 2023-08-23Bibliographically approved
Elfversson, E. & Höglund, K. (2021). Are armed conflicts becoming more urban?. Cities, 119, 1-10, Article ID 103356.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are armed conflicts becoming more urban?
2021 (English)In: Cities, ISSN 0264-2751, E-ISSN 1873-6084, Vol. 119, p. 1-10, article id 103356Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, cities in countries such as Syria, Ukraine, and Somalia have been sites of major incidents of armed conflict. Such violence has led observers to note that armed conflict is becoming more urbanized in nature and increasingly affecting cities. However, existing research has not been able to ascertain whether armed conflict is gradually more concentrated in cities, for two reasons. First, most studies employ a grid-based design which does not theoretically or operationally correspond to cities. Second, some studies take the city as the unit of analysis, but look only at a few major cities in certain regions of the world, or include a broader range of political violence. To assess whether armed conflict is indeed becoming more urban in character, we analyze global patterns of armed conflict 1989–2017. We match the UCDP Georeferenced Events Dataset to cities with at least 100,000 inhabitants, and analyze over time the share of fatalities incurred by armed conflict. We include violence be-tween organized armed actors (inter- and intrastate), but also conflict-related violence against civilians which captures acts of terrorism. With this novel approach, we identify an overall reduction over time in the share of armed conflict violence taking place in cities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2021
Keywords
urban warfare, armed conflict, cities, urban violence, terrorism
National Category
Social Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-450663 (URN)10.1016/j.cities.2021.103356 (DOI)000705333600016 ()
Available from: 2021-08-17 Created: 2021-08-17 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Söderberg Kovacs, M., Höglund, K. & Jiménez, M. (2021). Autonomous Peace?: The Bangsamoro Region in the Philippines Beyond the 2014 Agreement. Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, 16(1), 55-69
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Autonomous Peace?: The Bangsamoro Region in the Philippines Beyond the 2014 Agreement
2021 (English)In: Journal of Peacebuilding and Development, ISSN 1542-3166, E-ISSN 2165-7440, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 55-69Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

What kind of peace has emerged in the Bangsamoro region in the Philippines after the 2014 peace agreement? And how does it matter for the prospects of sustainable peace and development? The peace deal between the government of Philippines and the armed group Moro Islamic Liberation Front builds on the establishment of a new autonomous region. The new autonomy has the potential to end a prolonged cycle of armed rebellions. But if it fails to deliver the expected peace dividends, it could also lead to escalating violence. This article uses the Peace Triangle as a conceptual tool to analyse the current status of peace in Bangsamoro. As such, it advances a theoretical understanding of peace that focuses on how autonomy solutions impact on conflict issues, violent behaviour, and conflict attitudes and aid an assessment of the longer term prospects of peace in the wake of autonomy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage PublicationsSAGE Publications, 2021
Keywords
peace agreement, peace process, autonomy, Peace Triangle, conflict resolution, Bangsamoro, Mindanao, Philippines
National Category
Other Social Sciences Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-433190 (URN)10.1177/1542316620987556 (DOI)2-s2.0-85100033155 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-26 Created: 2021-01-26 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
​From Intra-State War to Durable Peace. Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Africa, 1989-2004; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Ohlson, T. (2008). Understanding causes of war and peace. European Journal of International Relations, 14(1), 133-160Ohlson, T. & Söderberg, M. (2005). From Intra-State War to Democratic Peace in Africa. In: Africa: A Future Beyond the Crises and Conflicts: . Nordic Africa Institute: UppsalaSöderberg, M. & Ohlson, T. (2003). Democratisation and Armed Conflicts in Weak States. Stockholm: SidaOhlson, T. & Söderberg Kovacs, M. (2002). From Intra-State War to Democratic Peace in Weak States. Universitetsförlaget, Uppsala
Conflict and Democracy Program; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict ResearchInternational Responses to Crisis in Kosovo: Crisis Management in a War-Shattered Society; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Höglund, K. (2007). Managing Violent Crisis: Swedish Peacekeeping and the 2004 Ethnic Violence in Kosovo. International Peacekeeping, 14(3), 403-417Jarstad, A. (2007). To Share or to Divide?: Negotiating the Future of Kosovo. Civil Wars, 9(3)
Programme on Governance, Conflict and Peacebuilding; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Nilsson, D. (2012). Anchoring the Peace: Civil Society Actors in Peace Accords and Durable Peace. International Interactions, 38(2), 243-266Ohlson, T. (Ed.). (2012). From Intra-State War to Durable Peace: Conflict and Its Resolution in Africa after the Cold War. Dordrecht: Republic of Letters PublishingNilsson, D. & Söderberg Kovacs, M. (2011). Revisiting an Elusive Concept: A Review of the Debate on Spoilers in Peace Processes. International Studies Review, 13(4), 606-626Lindgren, M. (2011). Sexual Violence Beyond Conflict Termination: Impunity for Past Violations as a Recipe for New Ones?. Durban, South Africa: ACCORD (15)Höglund, K. & Jarstad, A. K. (2011). Toward Electoral Security: Experiences from KwaZulu-Natal. Africa Spectrum, 46(1), 33-59Themnér, A. (2011). Violence in Post-Conflict Societies: Remarginalization, Remobilizers and Relationships. Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon: RoutledgeNilsson, D. (2010). Agreements and Sustainability. In: Nigel J. Young (Ed.), The Oxford International Encyclopedia of Peace: Volume I (pp. 30-32). New York: Oxford University PressHöglund, K. & Söderberg Kovacs, M. (2010). Beyond the Absence of War: The Diversity of Peace in Post-Settlement Societies. Review of International Studies, 36(2), 367-390Höglund, K. & Jarstad, A. K. (2010). Strategies to Prevent and Manage Electoral Violence: Considerations for Policy. Durban: ACCORDNilsson, D. (2010). Turning Weakness into Strength: Military Capabilities, Multiple Rebel Groups and Negotiated Settlements. Conflict Management and Peace Science, 27(3), 253-271
Partnership Project; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict ResearchFrom Wars of the Weak to Strong Peace [P2008-0732:1-E]; Uppsala UniversityFrom Wars of the Weak to Strong Peace. On the Conditions for High-Quality Peace in Sub-Saharan Africa [P2008-0732:1-E_RJ]; Uppsala UniversityElecting Violence? The Causes of Electoral Violence in Africa [2010-01515]; Uppsala University, Disciplinary Domain of Humanities and Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Peace and Conflict Research; Publications
Brosché, J. & Höglund, K. (2016). Crisis of governance in South Sudan: electoral politics and violence in the world's newest nation. Journal of Modern African Studies, 54(1), 67-90Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2016). Electoral Institutions and Electoral Violence in Sub-Saharan Africa. British Journal of Political Science, 46(2), 297-320Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2016). Electoral Violence: The Emergence of a Research Field. APSA Comparative Democratization Newsletter, 14(2)Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2016). Here's One Way to Prevent Electoral Violence. Monkey Cage; The Washington PostFjelde, H. (2016). När val leder till konflikt. In: Jenny Björkman & Arne Jarrick (Ed.), Krig Fred: RJ:s årsbok 2016/2017 (pp. 59-66). Göteborg/Stockholm: Makadam FörlagFjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2016). Våld vid valurnorna - vad beror det på?. Mänsklig säkerhetJarstad, A. K. & Höglund, K. (2015). Local violence and politics in KwaZulu-Natal: perceptions of agency in a post-conflict society. Third World Quarterly, 36(5), 967-984Höglund, K. & Fjelde, H. (2013). Fredslobotomi eller hållbar demokrati?: Kenyas framtid osäker trots fredliga val. Internationella Studier (2), 10-12Opitz, C., Fjelde, H. & Höglund, K. (2013). Including Peace: The Influence of Electoral Management Bodies on Electoral Violence. Journal of Eastern African Studies, 7(4), 713-731Höglund, K. (2011). Priset för demokrati får inte bli våldsamma val. Tvärsnitt: Humanistisk och samhällsvetenskaplig forskning (3-4), 32-35
Electing Violence? The Causes of Electoral Violence in Africa [2010-01515_VR]; Uppsala UniversityKristine Höglund & Hanne Fjelde [2012-06440_VR]; Uppsala UniversityCauses of Peace - The Botswana, Zambia and Malawi ´Zone of Peace´ [2013-06408_VR]; Uppsala UniversityThe Institutional Roots of Electoral Violence [P16-0124:1_RJ]; Uppsala UniversityCommunity-based Responses to Violent Conflict [2019-03934_VR]; Uppsala UniversityAlliances of Anarchy: Actor Constellations and Patterns of Electoral Violence [2020-00914_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-7167-609X

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