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Tuvemo, Torsten
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 52) Show all publications
Wennergren, G. & Tuvemo, T. (2016). Biographical item: "Tony Foucard (1936-2008), A Man Of Honour" In Acta Paediatrica Volume 105 (12) Pages: 1408-1409. , 105(12)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Biographical item: "Tony Foucard (1936-2008), A Man Of Honour" In Acta Paediatrica Volume 105 (12) Pages: 1408-1409
2016 (English)Other (Refereed)
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313609 (URN)10.1111/apa.13558 (DOI)000387793000022 ()27870207 (PubMedID)
Note

Minnesord (Obituary)

Available from: 2017-01-23 Created: 2017-01-23 Last updated: 2017-01-23Bibliographically approved
Chaplin, J. E., Kristrom, B., Jonsson, B., Tuvemo, T. & Albertsson-Wikland, K. (2015). Growth Hormone Treatment Improves Cognitive Function in Short Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency. Hormone Research in Paediatrics, 83(6), 390-399
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth Hormone Treatment Improves Cognitive Function in Short Children with Growth Hormone Deficiency
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2015 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 83, no 6, p. 390-399Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aims: We investigated the association between cognition and growth hormone (GH) status and GH treatment in short prepubertal children with broadly ranging GH secretion. Methods: A total of 99 children (age 3-11 years), 41 with GH deficiency (GHD) and 58 with idiopathic short stature (ISS), were randomized to a fixed dose (43 mu g/kg/day) or a prediction model-guided individualized dose (17-100 mu g/kg/day) and followed up for 24 months. In a longitudinal and mixed within-and between-subjects study, we examined clinical effect size changes, measured by Cohen's d, in full-scale IQ (FSIQ) and secondary IQ indices. Results: Significant increases giving medium effect size in FSIQ (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.63), performance IQ (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.65) and processing speed (p = 0.005, Cohen's d = 0.71) were found in the GH-deficient group. In contrast, perceptual organization only increased in the ISS group (p = 0.001, Cohen's d = 0.53). Baseline IQ was normally distributed with small but significant differences between the groups: GH-deficient children had lower FSIQ (p = 0.042) and lower performance IQ (p = 0.021). Using multiple regression analysis, 40% of the variance in delta processing speed scores (0-24 months) was explained by GH(max) and IGF-I-SDS at baseline. Conclusion: IQ, specifically fluid intelligence, increased in the GH-deficient children. The pretreatment status of the GH/IGF-I axis was significantly predictive for these changes. 

Keywords
Cognition, IQ, Insulin-like growth factor I, Short stature, Fluid intelligence, Idiopathic short stature
National Category
Pediatrics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-269786 (URN)10.1159/000375529 (DOI)000357834800003 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 7509
Available from: 2015-12-18 Created: 2015-12-18 Last updated: 2017-12-01Bibliographically approved
Hansson, T., Dahlbom, I., Tuvemo, T. & Frisk, G. (2015). Silent coeliac disease is over-represented in children with type 1 diabetes and their siblings. Acta Paediatrica, 104(2), 185-191
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Silent coeliac disease is over-represented in children with type 1 diabetes and their siblings
2015 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 104, no 2, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AimThis study measured autoantibodies against tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) to detect untreated coeliac disease in children with type 1 diabetes and their siblings. MethodsAnti-tTG was measured in prospectively collected sera from 169 children at the onset of diabetes, 88 of their siblings and 96 matched control children. Coeliac disease was confirmed with a small intestinal biopsy. ResultsCoeliac disease was diagnosed in five children before diabetes onset. A further 12 children were diagnosed after diabetes onset, without any gastrointestinal symptoms, and 11 of these had anti-tTG at the onset of diabetes, with the remaining child showing seroconversion within 6months. Hence, all the children with both diseases had anti-tTG at or before diabetes diagnosis, and the prevalence of coeliac disease was 10.1%. Moreover, 6.8% of the siblings and 3.1% of the control children had elevated levels of anti-tTG. None of the siblings reported any coeliac-related symptoms, despite being positive for anti-tTG, and coeliac disease has so far been biopsy confirmed in 4.5%. ConclusionSilent coeliac disease is over-represented in children with type 1 diabetes and their siblings. All diabetes children and their siblings should be tested and followed for the presence of anti-tTG and coeliac disease.

Keywords
Autoantibodies, Coeliac disease, tissue transglutaminase, Type 1 diabetes
National Category
Pediatrics Endocrinology and Diabetes
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-246809 (URN)10.1111/apa.12823 (DOI)000348731000024 ()25283799 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Proos, L. A., Gustafsson, J. & Tuvemo, T. (2014). Catch-up growth following undernutrition - a risk factor for early puberty in internationally adopted children [Letter to the editor]. Pediatrics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Catch-up growth following undernutrition - a risk factor for early puberty in internationally adopted children
2014 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220041 (URN)
Note

Hayes, Peter, International Adoption, “Early” Puberty, and Underrecorded Age, Pediatrics 2013; 131:6 1029-1031; doi:10.1542/peds.2013-0232

Available from: 2014-03-10 Created: 2014-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Albertsson-Wikland, K., Kriström, B., Lundberg, E., Aronson, A. S., Gustafsson, J., Hagenäs, L., . . . Aman, J. (2014). Growth hormone dose-dependent pubertal growth: a randomized trial in short children with low growth hormone secretion. Hormone Research in Paediatrics, 82(3), 158-170
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Growth hormone dose-dependent pubertal growth: a randomized trial in short children with low growth hormone secretion
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2014 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, no 3, p. 158-170Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND/AIMS: Growth hormone (GH) treatment regimens do not account for the pubertal increase in endogenous GH secretion. This study assessed whether increasing the GH dose and/or frequency of administration improves pubertal height gain and adult height (AH) in children with low GH secretion during stimulation tests, i.e. idiopathic isolated GH deficiency.

METHODS: A multicenter, randomized, clinical trial (No. 88-177) followed 111 children (96 boys) at study start from onset of puberty to AH who had received GH 33 µg/kg/day for ≥1 year. They were randomized to receive 67 µg/kg/day (GH(67)) given as one (GH(67×1); n = 35) or two daily injections (GH(33×2); n = 36), or to remain on a single 33 µg/kg/day dose (GH(33×1); n = 40). Growth was assessed as heightSDSgain for prepubertal, pubertal and total periods, as well as AHSDS versus the population and the midparental height.

RESULTS: Pubertal heightSDSgain was greater for patients receiving a high dose (GH(67), 0.73) than a low dose (GH(33×1), 0.41, p < 0.05). AHSDS was greater on GH(67) (GH(67×1), -0.84; GH(33×2), -0.83) than GH(33) (-1.25, p < 0.05), and heightSDSgain was greater on GH(67) than GH(33) (2.04 and 1.56, respectively; p < 0.01). All groups reached their target heightSDS.

CONCLUSION: Pubertal heightSDSgain and AHSDS were dose dependent, with greater growth being observed for the GH(67) than the GH(33) randomization group; however, there were no differences between the once- and twice-daily GH(67) regimens.

National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-238294 (URN)10.1159/000363106 (DOI)000345448500003 ()25170833 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-12-11 Created: 2014-12-11 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Benyi, E., Kieler, H., Linder, M., Ritzen, M., Carlstedt-Duke, J., Tuvemo, T., . . . Savendahl, L. (2014). Risks of Malignant and Non-Malignant Tumours in Tall Women Treated with High-Dose Oestrogen during Adolescence. Hormone Research in Paediatrics, 82(2), 89-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Risks of Malignant and Non-Malignant Tumours in Tall Women Treated with High-Dose Oestrogen during Adolescence
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2014 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, E-ISSN 1663-2826, Vol. 82, no 2, p. 89-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aim: High-dose oestrogen treatment has been used to reduce growth in tall adolescent girls. The long-term safety with regard to cancer has not been clarified. Our aim was to study if this growth reduction therapy affects cancer risk later in life. Methods: A cohort study of 369 (172 treated, 197 untreated) Swedish women who in 1973-1993 were assessed for tall adolescent stature was designed. Data were collected from university hospital records, patient questionnaires, and the Swedish Cancer Register. Results: Risks are presented as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals comparing treated to untreated subjects. In treated subjects, the overall OR for having a tumour (malignant or nonmalignant) was 1.7 (0.8-3.8). The ORs were 2.3 (0.4-12.8) for breast tumours, 0.8 (0.2-2.6) for gynaecological tumours, and 6.1 (1.04-infinity) for melanoma. When limiting to malignant tumours, the crude ORs were of similar magnitude. Conclusion: The OR for any melanoma was higher in treated than in untreated women, suggesting an increased risk of melanoma associated with high-dose oestrogen treatment during adolescence. Although the risk estimates were increased for overall tumours, breast tumours, malignant gynaecological tumours, and malignant melanoma, these associations were not statistically significant. Our results need to be verified in a larger cohort. (C) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel

Keywords
Tall stature, Ethinyloestradiol, Growth reduction, Cancer, Malignant melanoma
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-233618 (URN)10.1159/000360137 (DOI)000341584900003 ()
Available from: 2014-10-08 Created: 2014-10-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Proos, L. A., Gustafsson, J. & Tuvemo, T. (2013). Early Puberty in Internationally Adopted Children - Fact or Artefact? [Letter to the editor]. Pediatrics
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early Puberty in Internationally Adopted Children - Fact or Artefact?
2013 (English)In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275Article in journal, Letter (Other academic) Published
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-220047 (URN)
Note

Hayes, Peter, International Adoption, “Early” Puberty, and Underrecorded Age,  Pediatrics 2013; 131:6 1029-1031; doi:10.1542/peds.2013-0232

Available from: 2014-03-10 Created: 2014-03-10 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Albin, A.-K., Ankarberg-Lindgren, C., Tuvemo, T., Jonsson, B., Albertsson-Wikland, K. & Ritzen, E. M. (2011). Does Growth Hormone Treatment Influence Pubertal Development in Short Children?. Hormone Research in Paediatrics, 76(4), 262-272
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does Growth Hormone Treatment Influence Pubertal Development in Short Children?
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2011 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, Vol. 76, no 4, p. 262-272Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To study the influence of growth hormone (GH) treatment on the initiation and progression of puberty in short children.

Methods: This prospective, randomized, controlled study included 124 short children (33 girls) who received GH treatment (Genotropin (R); Pfizer Inc.) from a mean age of 11 years until near adult height [intent-to-treat (ITT) population]. Children were randomized into three groups: controls (n = 33), GH 33 mu g/kg/day (n = 34) or GH 67 mu g/kg/day (n = 57). Prepubertal children at study start constituted the per-protocol (PP) population (n = 101). Auxological measurements were made and puberty was staged every 3 months. Serum sex-steroid concentrations were assessed every 6 months.

Results: No significant differences were found between the groups, of both PP and ITT populations, in time elapsed from start of treatment until either onset of puberty, age at start of puberty or age at final pubertal maturation in either sex. In the ITT population, pubertal duration was significantly longer in GH-treated girls, and maximum mean testicular volume was significantly greater in GH-treated boys than controls, but there were no differences in testosterone levels between the groups.

Conclusion: GH treatment did not influence age at onset of puberty and did not accelerate pubertal development. In boys, GH treatment appeared to increase testicular volume.

Keywords
Pubertal onset, Testosterone, Testes, Growth hormone treatment
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-161959 (URN)10.1159/000329743 (DOI)000296392700007 ()
Available from: 2011-11-21 Created: 2011-11-21 Last updated: 2011-11-21Bibliographically approved
Chaplin, J. E., Kriström, B., Jonsson, B., Hägglöf, B., Tuvemo, T., Aronson, A. S., . . . Albertsson-Wikland, K. (2011). Improvements in Behaviour and Self-Esteem following Growth Hormone Treatment in Short Prepubertal Children. Hormone Research in Paediatrics, 75(4), 291-303
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Improvements in Behaviour and Self-Esteem following Growth Hormone Treatment in Short Prepubertal Children
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2011 (English)In: Hormone Research in Paediatrics, ISSN 1663-2818, Vol. 75, no 4, p. 291-303Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background/Aims: To evaluate effects of growth hormone (GH) treatment on behaviour and psychosocial characteristics in short-stature children. Methods: 99 referred prepubertal non-familiar short-stature children (32 GH deficiency; 67 idiopathic short stature) aged 3-11 years, randomized to fixed or individual GH doses and their parents completed questionnaires (Child Behaviour Checklist, Birleson Depression Self-Report Scale, Abbreviated Parent-Teacher Questionnaire, I Think I Am, Well-Being Visual-Analogue Scales for Short-Stature Children) at baseline (BL) and after 3, 12, and 24 months. Results: At BL, children showed higher levels of internalizing behaviour (p < 0.001), lower levels of externalizing behaviour (p < 0.006) and self-esteem (p < 0.001) compared to reference values. During GH treatment, behavioural measures (p < 0.001) and depression (p < 0.01) changed towards the mean of the population within the first 3 months and remained improved to 24 months. Self-esteem improved at all time points (p < 0.001), and in all subgroups, as did well-being dimensions stability and mood (p < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that greater improvements were related to lower BL value, height gain, higher maximal GH value, being older, and being male. Conclusion: On GH treatment, prepubertal short children significantly improved on behavioural, depression, and psychosocial evaluations over a 2-year period of GH treatment. Most change occurred within the first 3 months, which highlights this short period as important not only for growth and metabolic changes but also for behaviour and psychosocial improvements following GH treatment.

Keywords
Self-perception, Quality of life, Short-stature children, psychosocial variables, Idiopathic short stature, Growth hormone deficiency
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-152628 (URN)10.1159/000322937 (DOI)000289275000010 ()21304250 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2011-04-29 Created: 2011-04-29 Last updated: 2012-03-15Bibliographically approved
Proos, L. A., Tuvemo, T., Ahlsten, G., Gustafsson, J. & Dahl, M. (2011). Increased perinatal intracranial pressure and brainstem dysfunction predict early puberty in boys with myelomeningocele. Acta Paediatrica, 100(10), 1368-1372
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Increased perinatal intracranial pressure and brainstem dysfunction predict early puberty in boys with myelomeningocele
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2011 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 10, p. 1368-1372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Children with myelomeningocele (MMC) run an increased risk of developing early or precocious puberty (E/PP).

Aim: To identify risk factors for E/PP in boys with MMC.

Methods: Boys born between 1970 and 1992, treated for MMC at the University Children's Hospital, Uppsala, were identified. Thirty-eight boys were eligible to be included. Medical records were examined retrospectively. Early puberty was defined as pubertal signs before the age of 10 years and 2 months. Precocious puberty was defined as the appearance of these signs before 9 years of age. Increased intracranial pressure perinatally was defined as wide sutures, bulging fontanelles and increased/increasing head circumference at birth and/or during the first week after birth. Early brainstem dysfunction was defined as severe and persistent feeding and respiratory problems before the age of 3 months despite proper control of the hydrocephalus.

Results: Of the 38 boys, 8 (21%) had E/PP, which was strongly associated with increased intracranial pressure perinatally and also with early brainstem dysfunction. Multivariate regression analysis showed early brainstem dysfunction to have the highest explanatory value regarding the occurrence of early puberty.

Conclusion: Increased intracranial pressure perinatally and brainstem dysfunction early in life are strong predictors of E/PP in boys with MMC.

Keywords
Brainstem dysfunction, Early puberty, Intracranial pressure, Myelomeningocele, Perinatal
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-159462 (URN)10.1111/j.1651-2227.2011.02335.x (DOI)000294900300030 ()
Available from: 2011-10-04 Created: 2011-10-03 Last updated: 2018-01-17Bibliographically approved
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