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Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
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Publications (10 of 36) Show all publications
Noren, J., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Rubertsson, C. & Blomqvist, Y. T. (2018). Becoming a mother: Mothers' experience of Kangaroo Mother Care. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 16, 181-185
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Becoming a mother: Mothers' experience of Kangaroo Mother Care
2018 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 181-185Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To describe mothers' experiences of providing their preterm infants with Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC).

Study design: A qualitative descriptive design.

Setting: Two level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Sweden.

Participants: Thirteen mothers of preterm infants.

Methods: The mothers were interviewed when their infant had reached a corrected age of 4 months +/- 2 weeks. The interviews were recorded and transcribed and data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

Results: The mothers described the skin-to-skin contact with, and closeness to, the preterm infant as something they valued, and involuntary physical separation as something they had to accept and adapt to. Providing the infant with breast milk by expressing and tube feeding was experienced as time-consuming and as impinging on the skin-to-skin contact.

Conclusion: Mothers want to stay close to their preterm infant. The NICU environment and staff can facilitate KMC by providing a private space for parents and infants, and enable mothers to breastfeed and express breast milk by giving them support based on science and proven experience.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER IRELAND LTD, 2018
National Category
Pediatrics Nursing Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-363075 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2018.04.005 (DOI)000440877700028 ()29804764 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-10-12 Created: 2018-10-12 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Rosenblad, A., Volgsten, H., Funkquist, E.-L. & Mattsson, E. (2017). Early skin-to-skin contact between healthy late preterm infants and their parents: an observational cohort study. PeerJ, 5, Article ID e3949.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Early skin-to-skin contact between healthy late preterm infants and their parents: an observational cohort study
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2017 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 5, article id e3949Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Skin-to-skin contact (SSC) is an important factor to consider in the care of late preterm infants (born between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 completed weeks of gestation). The literature suggests that SSC between preterm infants and their mothers facilitates breastfeeding. However, more studies are needed to explore potential dose-response effects between SSC and breastfeeding as well as studies that explicitly investigate SSC by fathers among late preterm infants. The aim was to investigate the duration of healthy late preterm infants’ SSC with the mother and father, respectively, during the first 48 h after birth and the associations with breastfeeding (exclusive/partial at discharged), clinical and demographic variables.

Methods

This was an observational cohort study in which parents to healthy late preterm infants, born between 34 5/7 and 36 6/7 completed weeks of gestation, recorded duration of SSC provided by mother and father, respectively. Demographic and clinical variables were retrieved from the medical records and were used as predictors. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between the predictors and the outcome, SSC (hours), separately for mothers and fathers.

Results

The mean (standard deviation [SD]) time per day spent with SSC with mothers (n = 64) and fathers (n = 64), was 14.7 (5.6) and 4.4 (3.3) hours during the first day (24 h) after birth and 9.2 (7.1) and 3.1 (3.3) hours during the second day (24 h), respectively. Regarding SSC with mothers, no variable was significantly associated with SSC during the first day, while the mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) time of SSC during the second day was 6.9 (1.4–12.4) hours shorter for each additional kg of birthweight (p = 0.014). Concerning SSC with fathers, the mean (95% CI) time of SSC during the first day was 2.1 (0.4–3.7) hours longer for infants born at night (p = 0.015), 1.7 (0.1–3.2) hours longer for boys (p = 0.033), 3.2 (1.2–5.2) hours longer for infants born by caesarean section (p = 0.003), and 1.6 (0.1–3.1) hours longer for infants exclusively breastfed at discharge (p = 0.040). During the second day, the mean (95% CI) time of SSC with fathers was 3.0 (0.6–5.4) hours shorter for each additional kg of birthweight (p = 0.014), 2.0 (0.5–3.6) hours longer for infants born during night-time (p = 0.011), 2.9 (1.4–4.4) hours longer if the mother was primipara (p < 0.001), and 1.9 (0.3–3.5) hours shorter if supplementary artificial milk feeds were given. None of the other predictors, i.e., mother’s age, gestational age, or induction of labor were significantly associated with infants’ SSC with mothers or fathers during any of the first two days after birth.

Conclusion

Future studies are warranted that investigate duration of SSC between late preterm infants and their parents separately and the associations with breastfeeding and other variables of clinical importance.

Keywords
Preterminfants, Skin-to-skincontact, Breastfeeding, Latepreterminfants, Mothers, Fathers
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-333035 (URN)10.7717/peerj.3949 (DOI)000413966900002 ()29104822 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-11-06 Created: 2017-11-06 Last updated: 2018-02-08Bibliographically approved
Blomqvist, Y. T., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Rubertsson, C. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2017). Parents need support to find ways to optimise their own sleep without seeing their preterm infant's sleeping patterns as a problem. Acta Paediatrica, 106(2), 223-228
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Parents need support to find ways to optimise their own sleep without seeing their preterm infant's sleeping patterns as a problem
2017 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 106, no 2, p. 223-228Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: This study described how parents perceived their own sleep, and their infants', during neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission and after discharge. It also explored the infants' sleeping location at home.

METHODS: The study was conducted in the NICUs of two Swedish university hospitals. The parents of 86 infants - 86 mothers and 84 fathers - answered questionnaires during their infants' hospital stay, at discharge and at the infants' corrected ages of two, six and 12 months. The parents' own sleep was explored with the Insomnia Severity Index.

RESULTS: Mothers reported more severe insomnia than fathers during their infants' hospitalisation, and these higher insomnia severity scores were associated with more severe infant sleep problems at discharge (p = 0.027) and at two months (p = 0.006) and 12 months (p = 0.002) of corrected age. During the study period, 4%-10% of the parents reported severe or very severe infant sleeping problems. The bed-sharing rate was 75% after discharge and about 60% at the corrected age of 12 months.

CONCLUSION: Maternal insomnia during an infant's hospital stay was associated with later perceptions of sleep problems in their children. Parents need support to find solutions for optimal sleep without seeing their child's sleeping patterns as a problem.

Keywords
Bed-sharing, Insomnia, Neonatal intensive care unit, Preterm infants, Sleep problems
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-311797 (URN)10.1111/apa.13660 (DOI)000397337100008 ()27925691 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-01-03 Created: 2017-01-02 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Namnabati, M., Zamanzadeh, V., Valizadeh, L., Tazakori, Z. & Nyqvist, K. H. (2017). Theory of Infants' Transition Management from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study. International Journal Of Pediatrics-Mashhad, 5(1), 4151-4162
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Theory of Infants' Transition Management from the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit to Home: A Qualitative Study
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2017 (English)In: International Journal Of Pediatrics-Mashhad, ISSN 2345-5047, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 4151-4162Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Infant's transition is a challenge for parents and the health system that requires ongoing assessment and management to improve each newborn's growth and development. The purpose of this study was to explore the management of infant' transition from neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to home. Materials and Methods: We used a grounded theory study to explore and describe the management of infants' transition from the NICU to the home. Interviews were conducted with 31 professionals and 20 family members, and participant observations were made in hospitals, clinics, and one physician office. MAXQDA was utilized for coding and categorizing data. Results: The theory illustrated six phenomena: An unexpected separation; A crisis situation; Mother-infant rebonding; Protection of the infant's health; Promotion of growth and development; and Inadequate management causing disability. Together, these formed a three-phase process consisting of: A threat to the infant's life, Efforts to save the infant's life, and Continuation of life. Conclusion: Development of the theory of infants transition provides a three phases process (A threat to the infant's life, Efforts to save the infant's life, and Continuation of life), that can yield guidelines to manage the infant' transition in prevent mother-infant separation, support parents in their role as primary caregivers, and follow up with individual home visits by nurses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MASHHAD UNIV MED SCIENCES, 2017
Keywords
Discharge, Grounded Theory, NICU, Newborn, Qualitative study, Transition
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319814 (URN)10.22038/ijp.2016.7887 (DOI)000396613600004 ()
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-04-10Bibliographically approved
Nyqvist, K. H. (2016). Given the benefits of Kangaroo mother care, why has its routine uptake been so slow?. Acta Paediatrica, 105(4), 341-342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Given the benefits of Kangaroo mother care, why has its routine uptake been so slow?
2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 4, p. 341-342Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-298948 (URN)10.1111/apa.13236 (DOI)000371892200011 ()26946234 (PubMedID)
Note

Comment on: Newly born low birthweight infants stabilise better in skin-to-skin contact than when separated from their mothers: a randomised controlled trial. [Acta Paediatr. 2016]

Available from: 2016-07-13 Created: 2016-07-12 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Oras, P., Thernström Blomqvist, Y., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Gradin, M., Rubertsson, C., Hellström-Westas, L. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2016). Skin-to-skin contact is associated with earlier breastfeeding attainment in preterm infants. Acta Paediatrica, 105(7), 783-789
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Skin-to-skin contact is associated with earlier breastfeeding attainment in preterm infants
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2016 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 7, p. 783-789Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

This study investigated the effects of skin-to-skin contact on breastfeeding attainment, duration and infant growth in preterm infants, as this has not been sufficiently explored.

METHODS:

A prospective longitudinal study on Kangaroo mother care was carried out, comprising 104 infants with a gestational age of 28+0 to 33+6 and followed up to one year of corrected age. Parents and staff recorded the duration of skin-to skin contact during the stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Medical data were collected through patient records and follow-up questionnaires were filled in by parents.

RESULTS:

The 53 infants who attained full breastfeeding in the NICU did so at a median (range) of 35+0 (32+1 to 37+5) weeks of postmenstrual age and skin-to-skin contact was the only factor that influenced earlier attainment in the regression analysis (R(2) 0.215 p<0.001). The daily duration of skin-to-skin contact during the stay in the NICU did not affect the duration of breastfeeding or infant growth after discharge. Furthermore, infant growth was not affected by the feeding strategy of exclusive, partial breastfeeding or no breastfeeding.

CONCLUSION:

A longer daily duration of skin-to-skin contact in the NICU was associated with earlier attainment of exclusive breastfeeding.

Keywords
Breastfeeding duration; family-centred care; human milk; infant growth; Kangaroo mother care
National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-289173 (URN)10.1111/apa.13431 (DOI)000378565100018 ()27100380 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-29 Created: 2016-04-29 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Oras, P., Thernström Blomqvist, Y., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Gradin, M., Rubertsson, C., Hellström-Westas, L. & Funkquist, E.-L. (2015). Breastfeeding Patterns in Preterm Infants Born at 28-33 Gestational Weeks. Journal of Human Lactation, 31(3), 377-385
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breastfeeding Patterns in Preterm Infants Born at 28-33 Gestational Weeks
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Human Lactation, ISSN 0890-3344, E-ISSN 1552-5732, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 377-385Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND:

Studies of breastfeeding patterns during preterm infants' first year of life are scarce but are important for providing breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants with optimal support.

OBJECTIVE:

This study aimed to describe breastfeeding patterns in preterm infants up to 1 year of corrected age.

METHODS:

As part of a larger study on kangaroo mother care in Sweden, a 24-hour breastfeeding diary was sent home after discharge from hospital, and at 2, 6, and 12 months of the infant's corrected age. Eighty-three mothers responded to the follow-up questionnaires, and the number of respondents to the breastfeeding diary was 48 at discharge, 43 at 2 months, 22 at 6 months, and 8 at 12 months. Infants were born at a median (range) gestational age of 32 (28-33) weeks. Breastfeeding patterns were analyzed according to durations, frequencies per 24 hours, and intervals between sessions.

RESULTS:

In exclusively breastfed infants, the median (range) breastfeeding session frequency was 14 (8-26) times per 24 hours including 4 (1-9) times per night after discharge (n = 24) and 10 (6-25) times per 24 hours including 2 (0-5) times per night at 2 months (n = 23). In partially breastfed infants, the median (range) frequency was 5 (1-14) times per 24 hours including 2 (0-4) times per night at 6 months (n = 20) and 5.5 (1-12) times per 24 hours including 2 (0-3) times per night at 12 months (n = 8).

CONCLUSION:

Mothers reported large variations in breastfeeding patterns, with higher median breastfeeding session frequencies than previously described in term infants in affluent settings.

National Category
Clinical Medicine Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-254708 (URN)10.1177/0890334415586406 (DOI)000358070300010 ()25956792 (PubMedID)
Note

This study was supported by grants from the Regional Research Council in the Uppsala-Orebro region, Uppsala County Council, and Uppsala University Funds.

Available from: 2015-06-10 Created: 2015-06-10 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Mattsson, E., Funkquist, E.-L., Wickström, M., Nyqvist, K. H. & Volgsten, H. (2015). Healthy late preterm infants and supplementary artificial milk feeds: Effects on breast feeding and associated clinical parameters. Midwifery, 31(4), 426-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Healthy late preterm infants and supplementary artificial milk feeds: Effects on breast feeding and associated clinical parameters
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2015 (English)In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 426-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: to compare the influence of supplementary artificial milk feeds on breast feeding and certain clinical parameters among healthy late preterm infants given regular supplementary artificial milk feeds versus being exclusively breast fed from birth.

DESIGN: a comparative study using quantitative methods. Data were collected via a parental diary and medical records.

METHODS: parents of 77 late preterm infants (34 5/7-36 6/7 weeks), whose mothers intended to breast feed, completed a diary during the infants׳ hospital stay.

FINDINGS: infants who received regular supplementary artificial milk feeds experienced a longer delay before initiation of breast feeding, were breast fed less frequently and had longer hospital stays than infants exclusively breast fed from birth. Exclusively breast-fed infants had a greater weight loss than infants with regular artificial milk supplementation. A majority of the mothers (65%) with an infant prescribed artificial milk never expressed their milk and among the mothers who used a breast-pump, milk expression commenced late (10-84 hours after birth). At discharge, all infants were breast fed to some extent, 43% were exclusively breast fed.

KEY CONCLUSIONS: clinical practice and routines influence the initiation of breast feeding among late preterm infants and may act as barriers to the mothers׳ establishment of exclusive breast feeding.

National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Caring Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-242501 (URN)10.1016/j.midw.2014.12.004 (DOI)000353526100004 ()25596897 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2015-01-26 Created: 2015-01-26 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Mode, R. I., Mard, E., Nyqvist, K. H. & Blomqvist, Y. T. (2014). Fathers' perception of information received during their infants' stay at a neonatal intensive care unit. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 5(3), 131-136
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fathers' perception of information received during their infants' stay at a neonatal intensive care unit
2014 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 131-136Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: To explore fathers' perception of information received during their infants' care at a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: An inductive, qualitative and descriptive study. Eight fathers in two units were interviewed. The infants' gestational age at birth ranged between 23 and 36 weeks. Data were collected through semi-structured, individual interviews and were analyzed by qualitative content analysis. Results: Three categories were identified: perception of information, perception of the source of information, and circumstances influencing the perception of information. Information had an important impact; comprehensible and adequate information increased the fathers' knowledge, which generated a sense of control. Early information about the infant's care was particularly important and positively affected father and infant bonding. Conclusion and practical implications: Ensuring a high quality of information is an important task for NICU staff. Fathers' perception of the quality of information depended on the contents of the information and how it was conveyed. Comprehensible information at the onset of the infant's hospital stay increased the fathers' sense of security, and made them feel in control. It is important that the staff strive to identify what information the father requires, and prevent situations when fathers feel uncertainty about what the staff expect from them.

Keywords
Father, Information, Infant preterm, Neonatal intensive care unit, Staff
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-236072 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2014.05.001 (DOI)000342889200008 ()25200974 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-11-12 Created: 2014-11-12 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
Baylis, R., Ewald, U., Gradin, M., Hedberg Nyqvist, K., Rubertsson, C. & Thernström Blomqvist, Y. (2014). First-time events between parents and preterm infants are affected by the designs and routines of neonatal intensive care units. Acta Paediatrica, 103(10), 1045-1052
Open this publication in new window or tab >>First-time events between parents and preterm infants are affected by the designs and routines of neonatal intensive care units
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2014 (English)In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 103, no 10, p. 1045-1052Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM:

Early parental bonding with preterm babies is particularly important, and the aim of our study was to explore when parents experienced what they regarded as important events for the first time while their infant was in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU).

METHODS:

The study was part of a longitudinal project on Kangaroo Mother Care at two Swedish university hospitals. The parents of 81 infants completed questionnaires during their infants' hospital stay.

RESULTS:

Most parents saw and touched their infants immediately after birth, but only a few could hold them skin to skin or swaddle them. Other important events identified by parents included the first time they performed care giving activities and did so independently, interaction and closeness with the infant, signs of the infant's recovery and integration into the family. The timing of the events depended on the physical design of the NICU, whether parents' could stay with their infant round-the-clock and when they were allowed to provide care under supervision and on their own.

CONCLUSION:

The design and routines of the NICU dictated when parents first interacted with their infants. Clinical guidelines that facilitate early contact with preterm babies can help parents to make the transition to their parental role.

National Category
Pediatrics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-234679 (URN)10.1111/apa.12719 (DOI)000342753400017 ()24923236 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2014-10-22 Created: 2014-10-22 Last updated: 2019-06-28Bibliographically approved
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