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Albin, Cecilia
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Publications (10 of 76) Show all publications
Albin, C. (2019). Negotiating Complex Conflicts. Global Policy, 10, 55-60
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating Complex Conflicts
2019 (English)In: Global Policy, ISSN 1758-5880, E-ISSN 1758-5899, Vol. 10, p. 55-60Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Opposing notions of justice held by parties frequently contribute to the complexity of conflict and its resolution. Yet the implications of this reality remain poorly explored in scholarship and often little recognized in policy approaches. This chapter delineates different causes behind and roots of opposing justice notions in conflicts situations. A range of means available to tackle them are then developed. So called integrative strategies of negotiation and conflict resolution are put forward as most promising if certain preparatory steps, involving a third party and trust building among other matters, are taken.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-390693 (URN)10.1111/1758-5899.12693 (DOI)000475976600008 ()
Available from: 2019-08-13 Created: 2019-08-13 Last updated: 2019-08-13Bibliographically approved
Di Baldassarre, G., Nohrstedt, D., Mård, J., Burchardt, S., Albin, C., Bondesson, S., . . . Parker, C. F. (2018). An Integrative Research Framework to Unravel the Interplay of Natural Hazards and Vulnerabilities. Earth's Future, 6(3), 305-310
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Integrative Research Framework to Unravel the Interplay of Natural Hazards and Vulnerabilities
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2018 (English)In: Earth's Future, ISSN 1384-5160, E-ISSN 2328-4277, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 305-310Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change, globalization, urbanization, social isolation, and increased interconnectedness between physical, human, and technological systems pose major challenges to disaster risk reduction (DRR). Subsequently, economic losses caused by natural hazards are increasing in many regions of the world, despite scientific progress, persistent policy action, and international cooperation. We argue that these dramatic figures call for novel scientific approaches and new types of data collection to integrate the two main approaches that still dominate the science underpinning DRR: the hazard paradigm and the vulnerability paradigm. Building from these two approaches, here we propose a research framework that specifies the scope of enquiry, concepts, and general relations among phenomena. We then discuss the essential steps to advance systematic empirical research and evidence-based DRR policy action. Plain Language Summary The recent deadly earthquake in Iran-Iraq has been yet another reminder of the topicality of natural hazards, and it has come just after an unprecedented series of catastrophic events, including the extensive flooding in South Asia and the string of devastating hurricanes in the Americas. He we identify three main puzzles in the nexus of natural hazards and vulnerabilities, and demonstrate how novel approaches are needed to solve them with reference to a flood risk example. Specifically, we show how a new research framework can guide systematic data collections to advance the fundamental understanding of socionatural interactions, which is an essential step to improve the development of policies for disaster risk reduction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
Keywords
Disaster risk reduction, Natural hazards, Vulnerability, Flood risk, Socio-hydrology
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-350188 (URN)10.1002/2017EF000764 (DOI)000430171600002 ()
Available from: 2018-05-07 Created: 2018-05-07 Last updated: 2018-06-18Bibliographically approved
Albin, C. & Druckman, D. (2017). Negotiating effectively: Justice in international environmental negotiations. Group Decision and Negotiation, 26(1), 93-113
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating effectively: Justice in international environmental negotiations
2017 (English)In: Group Decision and Negotiation, ISSN 0926-2644, E-ISSN 1572-9907, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 93-113Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Are negotiators who rely on justice principles in the process of bargain- ing and drafting agreements more—or rather less—effective than others? This article examines whether adherence to principles of procedural and distributive justice in negotiations contributes to more effective results, with a focus on international envi- ronmental negotiations. Effectiveness is defined in terms of the extent of agreement (among parties and on issues), time to reach agreement, and comprehensiveness of the agreement. A set of hypotheses is evaluated on a selection of bilateral and mul- tilateral cases of environmental negotiations, using statistical methods. The analyses reveal that adherence to principles of procedural justice contributes to more effective results in multilateral environmental negotiations. These principles are found to hin- der effectiveness in the bilateral cases. On the other hand, adherence to principles of distributive justice is only moderately related to effectiveness in both the bilateral and multilateral cases. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keywords
international negotiation, environmental agreements, procedural justice, distributive justice, effectiveness
National Category
Political Science
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308756 (URN)10.1007/s10726-016-9509-3 (DOI)000392417600007 ()
Projects
Justice and international negotiations
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P09-0448:1-E
Available from: 2016-11-30 Created: 2016-11-30 Last updated: 2019-02-27Bibliographically approved
Albin, C. (2016). Negotiating international cooperation. In: Inge Kaul (Ed.), Global Public Goods: . Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating international cooperation
2016 (English)In: Global Public Goods / [ed] Inge Kaul, Edward Elgar Publishing , 2016Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2016
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-292709 (URN)9781783472994 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-05-07 Created: 2016-05-07 Last updated: 2016-05-07
Albin, C. (2015). Explaining conflict transformation:  How Jerusalem became negotiable. In: T. Woodhouse, H. Miall, O. Ramsbotham, C. Mitchell (Ed.), The Contemporary Conflict Resolution Reader: (pp. 276-286). Cambridge: Polity Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Explaining conflict transformation:  How Jerusalem became negotiable
2015 (English)In: The Contemporary Conflict Resolution Reader / [ed] T. Woodhouse, H. Miall, O. Ramsbotham, C. Mitchell, Cambridge: Polity Press , 2015, p. 276-286Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cambridge: Polity Press, 2015
Keywords
international negotiations, conflict transformation, Jerusalem, Israel
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-288325 (URN)978-0-7456-8676-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2016-04-27 Created: 2016-04-27 Last updated: 2016-10-11
Albin, C. (2015). The Many Faces of Justice in International Negotiations. International Negotiation, 20(1), 41-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Many Faces of Justice in International Negotiations
2015 (English)In: International Negotiation, ISSN 1382-340X, E-ISSN 1571-8069, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 41-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are a wide range of roles and effects that justice can have in negotiations at the international level. It can be a source of conflict and trigger for negotiation, a referent guiding negotiations, a subject of negotiation, a tool to reach effective agreements, and a tactical tool. Justice can assume any or several of these roles in any one negotiation. This article looks at justice as a lens through which to understand what drives negotiation processes and explains different results in the international arena.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2015
Keywords
power, conflict, negotiation, agreement, justice, equality
National Category
Political Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-245067 (URN)10.1163/15718069-12341296 (DOI)
Available from: 2015-02-24 Created: 2015-02-24 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Albin, C. & Druckman, D. (2014). Bargaining over Weapons: Justice and Effectiveness in Arms Control Negotiations. International Negotiation, 19(3), 426-458
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bargaining over Weapons: Justice and Effectiveness in Arms Control Negotiations
2014 (English)In: International Negotiation, ISSN 1382-340X, E-ISSN 1571-8069, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 426-458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article explores the relationship between justice and effectiveness in bilateral and multilateral arms control negotiations. A set of hypotheses, derived from earlier research about the impacts of procedural and distributive justice on negotiation outcomes is evaluated. The sample consists of twenty cases, ten bilateral and ten multilateral. The results of statistical analyses show strong effects of procedural justice on the effectiveness of bilateral, but not multilateral, negotiations. Further analyses indicate that the effects are largely accounted for by half of the bilateral cases. Case-by-case analyses reveal some of the conditions that explain the correlation between pj principles and effective outcomes. Distributive justice correlated with more substantial agreements in the multilateral cases. Reasons for the limited effects of procedural justice on multilateral outcomes are discussed. The article concludes with more general implications and suggestions for further research.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Leiden: Brill Nijhoff, 2014
Keywords
effective negotiations, bilateral arms control, multilateral arms control, distributive justice, principle of equality, procedural justice
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235746 (URN)10.1163/15718069-12341286 (DOI)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P09-0448:1-E
Available from: 2014-11-07 Created: 2014-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Albin, C. & Druckman, D. (2014). Procedures matter: Justice and effectiveness in international trade negotiations. European Journal of International Relations, 20(4), 1014-1042
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Procedures matter: Justice and effectiveness in international trade negotiations
2014 (English)In: European Journal of International Relations, ISSN 1354-0661, E-ISSN 1460-3713, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1014-1042Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

International negotiators have faced repeated stalemates in a number of significant areas. Justice issues are at the heart of the matter in many cases, as vividly illustrated by trade negotiations, particularly at the multilateral level. Yet, issues of justice have received limited attention in research on trade negotiation. This article asks: do trade negotiators who take justice principles into account arrive at more effective agreements? Specifically, it explores relationships between two types of justice during the negotiation process — procedural and distributive justice — and the effectiveness of outcomes (agreements) in 22 cases of bilateral and multilateral international trade negotiation. It evaluates the impacts of these types of justice on negotiation effectiveness. The results from analyses clearly demonstrate that procedural justice plays a central role in contributing to effective outcomes in both bilateral and multilateral trade cases. The correlations between procedural justice and effectiveness are very strong, and significantly stronger than between distributive justice and effectiveness. Moreover, distributive justice impacts upon effectiveness only when procedural justice principles are observed. These findings contribute knowledge about factors that enhance effective outcomes in international negotiations. They extend earlier work on justice in peace agreements and fill a gap in the research literature. They also provide advice for negotiators, and add important questions to the future research agenda.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
Distributive justice, effective agreements, international trade negotiations, procedural justice
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-235748 (URN)10.1177/1354066114523654 (DOI)000345231000007 ()
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P09-0448:1-E
Available from: 2014-11-07 Created: 2014-11-07 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Albin, C. (2013). International Relations and the J-Problem: Justice in Negotiations and Agreements. In: : . Paper presented at Peace Research Institute, Frankfurt (PRIF), Annual Conference, "Justice from an Interdisciplinary Perspective", 24 October 2013.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>International Relations and the J-Problem: Justice in Negotiations and Agreements
2013 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212961 (URN)
Conference
Peace Research Institute, Frankfurt (PRIF), Annual Conference, "Justice from an Interdisciplinary Perspective", 24 October 2013
Available from: 2013-12-16 Created: 2013-12-16 Last updated: 2013-12-17Bibliographically approved
Albin, C. (2013). Negotiating effectively: Findings from arms control, trade and environmental negotiations. PINPoints, 39, 7-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negotiating effectively: Findings from arms control, trade and environmental negotiations
2013 (English)In: PINPoints, Vol. 39, p. 7-10Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Hague: Clingendael Netherlands Institute of International Relations, 2013
Keywords
negotiation, justice, arms control, trade, the environment, negotiation effectiveness
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Peace and Conflict Research
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-212953 (URN)
Projects
Are just negotiators needed? Justice and effectiveness in international negotiaitons over trade, the environment and weapons disarmament
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond
Available from: 2013-12-16 Created: 2013-12-16 Last updated: 2013-12-17Bibliographically approved
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