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BETA
Edström, Kristina, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4440-2952
Publications (10 of 238) Show all publications
Björklund, E., Wikner, E., Younesi, R., Brandell, D. & Edström, K. (2018). Influence of state-of-charge in commercial LiNi0.33Mn0.33Co0.33O2/LiMn2O4-graphite cells analyzed by synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy. Journal of Energy Storage, 15, 172-180.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of state-of-charge in commercial LiNi0.33Mn0.33Co0.33O2/LiMn2O4-graphite cells analyzed by synchrotron-based photoelectron spectroscopy
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Energy Storage, ISSN 2352-152X, Vol. 15, 172-180 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Degradation mechanisms in 26 Ah commercial Li-ion battery cells comprising graphite as the negative electrode and mixed metal oxide of LiMn2O4 (LMO) and LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC) as the positive electrode are here investigated utilising extensive cycling at two different state-of-charge (SOC) ranges, 10–20% and 60–70%, as well as post-mortem analysis. To better analyze these mechanisms electrochemically, the cells were after long-term cycling reassembled into laboratory scale “half-cells” using lithium metal as the negative electrode, and thereafter cycled at different rates corresponding to 0.025 mA/cm2 and 0.754 mA/cm2. The electrodes were also analyzed by synchrotron-based hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) using two different excitation energies to determine the chemical composition of the interfacial layers formed at different depth on the respective electrodes. It was found from the extensive cycling that the cycle life was shorter for the cell cycled in the higher SOC range, 60–70%, which is correlated to findings of an increased cell resistance and thickness of the SEI layer in the graphite electrode as well as manganese dissolution from the positive electrode.

Keyword
Li-ion battery, Commercial cells, Battery ageing, Photoelectron spectroscopy
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338184 (URN)10.1016/j.est.2017.11.010 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-18Bibliographically approved
Farhat, D., Ghamouss, F., Maibach, J., Edström, K. & Lemordant, D. (2017). Adiponitrile-Lithium Bis(trimethylsulfonyl)imide Solutions as Alkyl Carbonate-free Electrolytes for Li4Ti5O12 (LTO)/LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) Li-Ion Batteries. ChemPhysChem, 18(10), 1333-1344.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Adiponitrile-Lithium Bis(trimethylsulfonyl)imide Solutions as Alkyl Carbonate-free Electrolytes for Li4Ti5O12 (LTO)/LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) Li-Ion Batteries
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2017 (English)In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 18, no 10, 1333-1344 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Recently, dinitriles (NC(CH2)(n)CN) and especially adiponitrile (ADN, n = 4) have attracted attention as safe electrolyte solvents owing to their chemical stability, high boiling points, high flash points, and low vapor pressure. The good solvation properties of ADN toward lithium salts and its high electrochemical stability (approximate to 6 V vs. Li/Li+) make it suitable for safer Li-ions cells without performance loss. In this study, ADN is used as a single electrolyte solvent with lithium bis(trimethylsulfonyl) imide (LiTFSI). This electrolyte allows the use of aluminium collectors as almost no corrosion occurs at voltages up to 4.2 V. The physicochemical properties of the ADN-LiTFSI electrolyte, such as salt dissolution, conductivity, and viscosity, were determined. The cycling performances of batteries using Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as the anode and LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) as the cathode were determined. The results indicate that LTO/NMC batteries exhibit excellent rate capabilities with a columbic efficiency close to 100 %. As an example, cells were able to reach a capacity of 165 mAhg(-1) at 0.1C and a capacity retention of more than 98% after 200 cycles at 0.5 C. In addition, electrodes analyses by SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy after cycling confirming minimal surface changes of the electrodes in the studied battery system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-V C H VERLAG GMBH, 2017
Keyword
adiponitrile, Li-ion batteries, lithium bis(trimethylsulfonyl)imide, Li4Ti5O12 (LTO), LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC)
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327150 (URN)10.1002/cphc.201700058 (DOI)000402713200016 ()28231422 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, Hi-C
Available from: 2017-08-25 Created: 2017-08-25 Last updated: 2017-12-30
Kotronia, A., Asfaw, H. D., Brandell, D. & Edström, K. (2017). CaS- and MgS-assisted graphitization of porous carbons for energy storage applications. In: : . Paper presented at Oorgandagarna 2017. .
Open this publication in new window or tab >>CaS- and MgS-assisted graphitization of porous carbons for energy storage applications
2017 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Chemical Sciences
Research subject
Chemistry with specialization in Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338141 (URN)
Conference
Oorgandagarna 2017
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-08Bibliographically approved
Renault, S., Oltean, V. A., Ebadi, M., Edström, K. & Brandell, D. (2017). Dilithium 2-aminoterephthalate as a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries. Solid State Ionics, 307, 1-5.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dilithium 2-aminoterephthalate as a negative electrode material for lithium-ion batteries
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2017 (English)In: Solid State Ionics, ISSN 0167-2738, E-ISSN 1872-7689, Vol. 307, 1-5 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This work presents the synthesis and characterization of a novel organic Li-battery anode material: dilithium 2-aminoterephthalate (C8H5Li2NO4). When investigated in Li half-cells, the resulting electrodes show stable capacities around ca. 180 mAh g− 1 and promising rate capabilities, with battery performance at 500 mA g− 1 and good capacity recovery, despite being an asymmetric compound. DFT calculations indicate a preferential lithiation on carboxylates close to the amino group.

National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-336695 (URN)10.1016/j.ssi.2017.05.005 (DOI)
Available from: 2017-12-15 Created: 2017-12-15 Last updated: 2018-01-03Bibliographically approved
Böhme, S., Kerner, M., Scheers, J., Johansson, P., Edström, K. & Nyholm, L. (2017). Elevated Temperature Lithium-Ion Batteries Containing SnO2 Electrodes and LiTFSI-Pip14TFSI Ionic Liquid Electrolyte. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 164(4), A701-A708.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Elevated Temperature Lithium-Ion Batteries Containing SnO2 Electrodes and LiTFSI-Pip14TFSI Ionic Liquid Electrolyte
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2017 (English)In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 4, A701-A708 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The performance of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) comprising SnO2 electrodes and an ionic liquid (IL) based electrolyte, i.e., 0.5 MLiTFSI in Pip14TFSI, has been studied at room temperature (i.e., 22◦C) and 80◦C. While the high viscosity and low conductivity ofthe electrolyte resulted in high overpotentials and low capacities at room temperature, the SnO2 performance at 80◦C was found to beanalogous to that seen at room temperature using a standard LP40 electrolyte (i.e., 1MLiPF6 dissolved in 1:1 ethylene carbonate anddiethyl carbonate). Significant reduction of the IL was, however, found at 80◦C, which resulted in low coulombic efficiencies duringthe first 20 cycles, most likely due to a growing SEI layer and the formation of soluble IL reduction products. X-ray photoelectronspectroscopy studies of the cycled SnO2 electrodes indicated the presence of an at least 10 nm thick solid electrolyte interphase (SEI)layer composed of inorganic components such as lithium fluoride, sulfates, and nitrides as well as organic species containing C-H,C-F and C-N bonds.

National Category
Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-316877 (URN)10.1149/2.0861704jes (DOI)000400958600021 ()
Available from: 2017-03-07 Created: 2017-03-07 Last updated: 2017-06-14Bibliographically approved
Liu, J., Ma, Y., Roberts, M., Gustafsson, T., Edström, K. & Zhu, J. (2017). Highly efficient Ru/MnO2 nano-catalysts for Li-O2 batteries: Quantitative analysis of catalytic Li2O2 decomposition by operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Journal of Power Sources, 352, 208-215.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Highly efficient Ru/MnO2 nano-catalysts for Li-O2 batteries: Quantitative analysis of catalytic Li2O2 decomposition by operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Power Sources, ISSN 0378-7753, E-ISSN 1873-2755, Vol. 352, 208-215 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In-situ or operando quantitative analysis is very important for Li-O2 batteries, in order to properly, accurately and comprehensively evaluate electrocatalysts and characterize Li-O2 electrochemistry in real-time. Synchrotron XRD can provide much higher X-ray intensity and time resolution than traditional in-house diffractometers, and therefore can contribute to quantitative analysis for Li-O2 batteries. Here, operando synchrotron XRD is further developed to quantitatively study Li-O2 batteries with nano catalysts, Ru/MnO2. The time-resolved oxygen evolution reaction (OER) kinetics for Li-O2 cells with Ru/MNT was systematically investigated using operando synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD). Li2O2 decomposition in the electrodes with Ru/MNT catalysts during galvanostatic and potentiostatic charge processes followed pseudo-zero-order kinetics and showed ideal Coulombic efficiency (close to 100%). Furthermore, it was found that the OER kinetics for a cell with 2 wt% Ru/MNT charged at a constant potential of 4.3 V was even faster than that for a cell with the same amount of pure Ru nanoparticles, which have been considered as a highly active catalyst for Li-O2 batteries. These results indicated that Ru/MNT with a special nanostructure represented a very efficient electrocatalyst for promoting the OER in Li-O2 batteries. We also demonstrate that synchrotron radiation XRD can "highlight" a way to quantitative analysis for Li-O2 batteries.

Keyword
Ru nanoparticle, MnO2 nanotube, Li-O-2 battery, Electrocatalyst, Oxygen evolution reaction, Operando synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD)
National Category
Materials Chemistry Other Chemical Engineering
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-324237 (URN)10.1016/j.jpowsour.2017.03.127 (DOI)000401206100024 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2012-4681Swedish Energy Agency, 2010-000414StandUp
Available from: 2017-06-15 Created: 2017-06-15 Last updated: 2017-12-30
Björklund, E., Brandell, D., Hahlin, M., Edström, K. & Younesi, R. (2017). How the Negative Electrode Influences Interfacial and Electrochemical Properties of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 Cathodes in Li-Ion Batteries. Journal of the Electrochemical Society, 164(13), A3054-A3059.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How the Negative Electrode Influences Interfacial and Electrochemical Properties of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 Cathodes in Li-Ion Batteries
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2017 (English)In: Journal of the Electrochemical Society, ISSN 0013-4651, E-ISSN 1945-7111, Vol. 164, no 13, A3054-A3059 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The cycle life of LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 (NMC) based cells are significantly influenced by the choice of the negative electrode. Electrochemical testing and post mortem surface analysis are here used to investigate NMC electrodes cycled vs. either Li-metal, graphite or Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as negative electrodes. While NMC-LTO and NMC-graphite cells show small capacity fading over 200 cycles, NMC-Li-metal cell suffers from rapid capacity fading accompanied with an increased voltage hysteresis despite the almost unlimited access of lithium. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) results show that no structural degradation occurs on the positive electrode even after >200 cycles, however, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) results shows that the composition of the surface layer formed on the NMC cathode in the NMC-Li-metal cell is largely different from that of the other NMC cathodes (cycled in the NMC-graphite or NMC-LTO cells). Furthermore, it is shown that the surface layer thickness on NMC increases with the number of cycles, caused by continuous electrolyte degradation products formed at the Li-metal negative electrode and then transferred to NMC positive electrode.

National Category
Chemical Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-338161 (URN)10.1149/2.0711713jes (DOI)000418409800021 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 37725-1; 40495-1StandUp
Available from: 2018-01-08 Created: 2018-01-08 Last updated: 2018-01-22Bibliographically approved
Renman, V., Valvo, M., Tai, C.-W., Zimmermann, I., Johnsson, M., Gómez, C. P. & Edström, K. (2017). Investigation of the Structural and Electrochemical Properties of Mn2Sb3O6CI upon Reaction with Li Ions. The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, 121(11), 5949-5958.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Investigation of the Structural and Electrochemical Properties of Mn2Sb3O6CI upon Reaction with Li Ions
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2017 (English)In: The Journal of Physical Chemistry C, ISSN 1932-7447, E-ISSN 1932-7455, Vol. 121, no 11, 5949-5958 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The structural and electrochemical properties of a quaternary layered compound with elemental composition Mn2Sb3O6Cl have been investigated upon reaction with lithium in Li half cells. Operando XRD was used to investigate the potential impact of this particular layered structure on the lithiation process. Although the results suggest that the material is primarily reacted through a conventional conversion mechanism, they also provide some hints that the space between the slabs may act as preferential entry points for lithium ions but not for the larger sodium ions. Cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic cycling, HRTEM, SAED, and EELS analyses were performed to unravel the details of the reaction mechanism with the lithium ions. It is found that two pairs of reactions are mainly responsible for the reversible electrochemical cycling of this compound, namely, the alloying of Li-Sb and the conversion of MnxOy to metallic Mn with concomitant formation of Li2O upon lithium uptake. A moderate cycling stability is achieved with a gravimetric capacity of 467 mAh g(-1) after 100 cycles between 0.05 and 2.2 V vs Li+/Li despite the large particle sizes of the active material and its nonoptimal inclusion into composite coatings. The electrochemical activity of the title compound was also tested in Na half cells between 0.05 and 2 V vs Ne/Na. It was found that a prolonged period of electrochemical milling is required to fully gain access to the active material, after which the cell delivers a capacity of 350 mAh CI. These factors are demonstrated to clearly limit the ultimate performances for these electrodes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
National Category
Nano Technology Materials Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320200 (URN)10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b13092 (DOI)000397546300011 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2011-6512Swedish Research Council Formas, 245-2014-668Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationStandUp
Available from: 2017-04-18 Created: 2017-04-18 Last updated: 2017-12-30
Valvo, M., Liivat, A., Eriksson, H., Tai, C.-W. & Edström, K. (2017). Iron-Based Electrodes Meet Water-Based Preparation, Fluorine-Free Electrolyte and Binder: A Chance for More Sustainable Lithium-Ion Batteries?. ChemSusChem, 10(11), 2431-2448.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Iron-Based Electrodes Meet Water-Based Preparation, Fluorine-Free Electrolyte and Binder: A Chance for More Sustainable Lithium-Ion Batteries?
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2017 (English)In: ChemSusChem, ISSN 1864-5631, E-ISSN 1864-564X, Vol. 10, no 11, 2431-2448 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmentally friendly and cost-effective Li-ion cells are fabricated with abundant, non-toxic LiFePO4 cathodes and iron oxide anodes. A water-soluble alginate binder is used to coat both electrodes to reduce the environmental footprint. The critical reactivity of LiPF6-based electrolytes toward possible traces of H2O in water-processed electrodes is overcome by using a lithium bis(oxalato) borate (LiBOB) salt. The absence of fluorine in the electrolyte and binder is a cornerstone for improved cell chemistry and results in stable battery operation. A dedicated approach to exploit conversion-type anodes more effectively is also disclosed. The issue of large voltage hysteresis upon conversion/de-conversion is circumvented by operating iron oxide in a deeply lithiated Fe/Li2O form. Li-ion cells with energy efficiencies of up to 92% are demonstrated if LiFePO4 is cycled versus such anodes prepared through a prelithiation procedure. These cells show an average energy efficiency of approximately 90.66% and a mean Coulombic efficiency of approximately 99.65% over 320 cycles at current densities of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 mAcm(-2). They retain nearly 100% of their initial discharge capacity and provide an unmatched operation potential of approximately 2.85 V for this combination of active materials. No occurrence of Li plating was detected in three-electrode cells at charging rates of approximately 5C. Excellent rate capabilities of up to approximately 30C are achieved thanks to the exploitation of size effects from the small Fe nanoparticles and their reactive boundaries.

Keyword
batteries, electrolytes, energy storage, iron oxide, pseudocapacitance
National Category
Inorganic Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-327376 (URN)10.1002/cssc.201700070 (DOI)000403005900016 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council Formas, 245-2014-668
Available from: 2017-08-10 Created: 2017-08-10 Last updated: 2017-08-10Bibliographically approved
Xu, C., Renault, S., Ebadi, M., Wang, Z., Björklund, E., Guyomard, D., . . . Gustafsson, T. (2017). LiTDI: A Highly Efficient Additive for Electrolyte Stabilization in Lithium-Ion Batteries. Chemistry of Materials, 29(5), 2254-2263.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LiTDI: A Highly Efficient Additive for Electrolyte Stabilization in Lithium-Ion Batteries
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2017 (English)In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 5, 2254-2263 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The poor stability of LiPF6-based electrolytes has always been a bottleneck for conventional lithium-ion batteries. The presence of inevitable trace amounts of moisture and the operation of batteries at elevated temperatures are particularly detrimental to electrolyte stability. Here, lithium 2trifluoromethy1-4,5-dicyanoimidazole (LiTDI) is investigated as a moisture-scavenging electrolyte additive and can sufficiently suppress the hydrolysis of LiPF6. With 2 wt % LiTDI, no LiPF6 degradation can be detected after storage for 35 days, even though the water level in the electrolyte is enriched by 2000 ppm. An improved thermal stability is also obtained by employing the LiTDI additive, and the moisture-scavenging mechanism is discussed. The beneficial effects of the LiTDI additive on battery performance are demonstrated by the enhanced capacity retention of both the LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC)/Li and NMC/graphite cells at 55 degrees C. In particular, the increase in cell voltage hysteresis is greatly hindered when LiTDI is presented in the electrolyte. Further development of the LiTDI additive may allow the improvement of elevated-temperature batteries, as well as energy savings by reducing the amount of effort necessary for dehydration of battery components.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
AMER CHEMICAL SOC, 2017
National Category
Physical Chemistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319530 (URN)10.1021/acs.chemmater.6b05247 (DOI)000396639400040 ()
Funder
Swedish Energy Agency, 34191-1 39036-1Swedish Foundation for Strategic Research Carl Tryggers foundation StandUp
Available from: 2017-04-06 Created: 2017-04-06 Last updated: 2017-12-30
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-4440-2952

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