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Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Bergfeldt, N., Kirdök, E., Oskolkov, N., Mirabello, C., Unneberg, P., Malmström, H., . . . Götherström, A. (2024). Identification of microbial pathogens in Neolithic Scandinavian humans. Scientific Reports, 14(1), Article ID 5630.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of microbial pathogens in Neolithic Scandinavian humans
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2024 (English)In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 14, no 1, article id 5630Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

With the Neolithic transition, human lifestyle shifted from hunting and gathering to farming. This change altered subsistence patterns, cultural expression, and population structures as shown by the archaeological/zooarchaeological record, as well as by stable isotope and ancient DNA data. Here, we used metagenomic data to analyse if the transitions also impacted the microbiome composition in 25 Mesolithic and Neolithic hunter-gatherers and 13 Neolithic farmers from several Scandinavian Stone Age cultural contexts. Salmonella enterica, a bacterium that may have been the cause of death for the infected individuals, was found in two Neolithic samples from Battle Axe culture contexts. Several species of the bacterial genus Yersinia were found in Neolithic individuals from Funnel Beaker culture contexts as well as from later Neolithic context. Transmission of e.g. Y. enterocolitica may have been facilitated by the denser populations in agricultural contexts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-526578 (URN)10.1038/s41598-024-56096-0 (DOI)001185083700029 ()38453993 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2021/5-335Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2021/6-260Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/5-100Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/6-46Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/22-507Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/23-275Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973Swedish Research Council, 2019-00849Swedish Research Council, 2017-02503Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationRiksbankens Jubileumsfond, P21-0266Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P19.0740:1
Available from: 2024-04-12 Created: 2024-04-12 Last updated: 2024-04-12Bibliographically approved
Fortes-Lima, C. A., Burgarella, C., Hammarén, R., Eriksson, A., Vicente, M., Jolly, C., . . . Schlebusch, C. (2024). The genetic legacy of the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples in Africa. Nature, 625(7995), 540-547
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genetic legacy of the expansion of Bantu-speaking peoples in Africa
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2024 (English)In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 625, no 7995, p. 540-547Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The expansion of people speaking Bantu languages is the most dramatic demographic event in Late Holocene Africa and fundamentally reshaped the linguistic, cultural and biological landscape of the continent1-7. With a comprehensive genomic dataset, including newly generated data of modern-day and ancient DNA from previously unsampled regions in Africa, we contribute insights into this expansion that started 6,000-4,000 years ago in western Africa. We genotyped 1,763 participants, including 1,526 Bantu speakers from 147 populations across 14 African countries, and generated whole-genome sequences from 12 Late Iron Age individuals8. We show that genetic diversity amongst Bantu-speaking populations declines with distance from western Africa, with current-day Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo as possible crossroads of interaction. Using spatially explicit methods9 and correlating genetic, linguistic and geographical data, we provide cross-disciplinary support for a serial-founder migration model. We further show that Bantu speakers received significant gene flow from local groups in regions they expanded into. Our genetic dataset provides an exhaustive modern-day African comparative dataset for ancient DNA studies10 and will be important to a wide range of disciplines from science and humanities, as well as to the medical sector studying human genetic variation and health in African and African-descendant populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Genetics Evolutionary Biology Medical Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-524632 (URN)10.1038/s41586-023-06770-6 (DOI)001157281900014 ()38030719 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2022-06725EU, European Research CouncilM Borgströms stiftelse för ärftlighetsforskningSven och Lilly Lawskis fond för naturvetenskaplig forskningEU, Horizon 2020, 839643Swedish Research Council, 2017-02503Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P21-0266EU, Horizon 2020, 810645Uppsala University
Available from: 2024-03-13 Created: 2024-03-13 Last updated: 2024-03-13Bibliographically approved
Mattila, T. M., Svensson, E. M., Juras, A., Günther, T., Kashuba, N., Ala-Hulkko, T., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2023). Genetic continuity, isolation, and gene flow in Stone Age Central and Eastern Europe. Communications Biology, 6(1), Article ID 793.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Genetic continuity, isolation, and gene flow in Stone Age Central and Eastern Europe
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2023 (English)In: Communications Biology, E-ISSN 2399-3642, Vol. 6, no 1, article id 793Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The genomic landscape of Stone Age Europe was shaped by multiple migratory waves and population replacements, but different regions do not all show similar patterns. To refine our understanding of the population dynamics before and after the dawn of the Neolithic, we generated and analyzed genomic sequence data from human remains of 56 individuals from the Mesolithic, Neolithic, and Eneolithic across Central and Eastern Europe. We found that Mesolithic European populations formed a geographically widespread isolation-by-distance zone ranging from Central Europe to Siberia, which was already established 10,000 years ago. We found contrasting patterns of population continuity during the Neolithic transition: people around the lower Dnipro Valley region, Ukraine, showed continuity over 4000 years, from the Mesolithic to the end of the Neolithic, in contrast to almost all other parts of Europe where population turnover drove this cultural change, including vast areas of Central Europe and around the Danube River. Genome-wide sequencing of 56 ancient hunter-gatherer and early farmer individuals from Stone Age Central and Eastern Europe reveals striking population continuity in the east in contrast to central Europe that displays extensive admixture.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-510703 (URN)10.1038/s42003-023-05131-3 (DOI)001045489100002 ()37558731 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), snic2018-8-304Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), snic2019-8-270Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), snic2020-2-10Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), snic2021-22-823Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2017-02503Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P21-0266
Available from: 2023-09-06 Created: 2023-09-06 Last updated: 2023-09-06Bibliographically approved
Blank, M., Tornberg, A., Sjögren, K.-G., Knipper, C., Frei, K. M., Malmström, H., . . . Storå, J. (2023). Interdisciplinary analyses of the remains from three gallery graves at Kinnekulle: tracing Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age societies in inland Southwestern Sweden. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 15, Article ID 94.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interdisciplinary analyses of the remains from three gallery graves at Kinnekulle: tracing Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age societies in inland Southwestern Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 15, article id 94Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we investigate the Scandinavian Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age of Kinnekulle in southwestern Sweden. The above-mentioned periods in the study area are poorly understood and the archaeological record consists of a few stray finds and a concentration of 20 gallery graves. This study focuses on three of the gallery graves where commingled skeletons from successive burials were recovered. The human remains and the artefacts from the graves were used for discussing individual life stories as well as living societies with the aim of gaining new knowledge of the last part of the Neolithic and the beginning of the Early Bronze Age in southwestern Sweden. We focused on questions concerning health and trauma, mobility and exchange networks, and diet and subsistence of the people using the graves. Chronological, bioarchaeological, and biomolecular aspects of the burials were approached through the application of archaeological and osteological studies, as well as stable isotope, strontium isotope, radiocarbon, and mtDNA analyses. The study provides evidence for high mobility and diverse diets, as well as inhumations primarily dated to the transition between the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. We suggest that the mountain plateau of Kinnekulle was mainly reserved for the dead, while the people lived in agriculture-based groups in the surrounding lower lying regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Scandinavian Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age, Gallery graves, Isotope analyses, Health, Trauma, Subsistence, Mobility
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-506984 (URN)10.1007/s12520-023-01793-6 (DOI)001002993100002 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2013-1905Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationUniversity of Gothenburg
Available from: 2023-07-03 Created: 2023-07-03 Last updated: 2024-06-10Bibliographically approved
Chylenski, M., Makarowicz, P., Juras, A., Krzewinska, M., Pospieszny, L., Ehler, E., . . . Malmström, H. (2023). Patrilocality and hunter-gatherer-related ancestry of populations in East-Central Europe during the Middle Bronze Age. Nature Communications, 14, Article ID 4395.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patrilocality and hunter-gatherer-related ancestry of populations in East-Central Europe during the Middle Bronze Age
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2023 (English)In: Nature Communications, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 14, article id 4395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The demographic history of East-Central Europe after the Neolithic period remains poorly explored, despite this region being on the confluence of various ecological zones and cultural entities. Here, the descendants of societies associated with steppe pastoralists form Early Bronze Age were followed by Middle Bronze Age populations displaying unique characteristics. Particularly, the predominance of collective burials, the scale of which, was previously seen only in the Neolithic. The extent to which this re-emergence of older traditions is a result of genetic shift or social changes in the MBA is a subject of debate. Here by analysing 91 newly generated genomes from Bronze Age individuals from present Poland and Ukraine, we discovered that Middle Bronze Age populations were formed by an additional admixture event involving a population with relatively high proportions of genetic component associated with European hunter-gatherers and that their social structure was based on, primarily patrilocal, multigenerational kin-groups. By analysing 91 Bronze Age genomes from East-Central Europe, the authors discovered that Middle Bronze Age populations were formed by an admixture event involving hunter-gatherers and that the social structure of resulting population was primarily patrilocal.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
National Category
Archaeology Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-511896 (URN)10.1038/s41467-023-40072-9 (DOI)001048667500017 ()37528090 (PubMedID)
Funder
Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, P21-0266Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2017-02503Swedish Research Council, 2018-05973Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/2-11Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022-/22-299Swedish National Infrastructure for Computing (SNIC), SNIC 2022/23-163
Available from: 2023-09-21 Created: 2023-09-21 Last updated: 2023-09-21Bibliographically approved
Coutinho, A., Malmström, H., Edlund, H., Henshilwood, C., van Niekerk, K., Lombard, M., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2021). Later Stone Age human hair from Vaalkrans Shelter, Cape Floristic Region of South Africa, reveals genetic affinity to Khoe groups. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 174(4), 701-713
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Later Stone Age human hair from Vaalkrans Shelter, Cape Floristic Region of South Africa, reveals genetic affinity to Khoe groups
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2021 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 174, no 4, p. 701-713Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Previous studies show that the indigenous people of the southern Cape of South Africa were dramatically impacted by the arrival of European colonists starting ~400 years ago and their descendants are today mixed with Europeans and Asians. To gain insight on the occupants of the Vaalkrans Shelter located at the southernmost tip of Africa, we investigated the genetic make-up of an individual who lived there about 200 years ago. We further contextualize the genetic ancestry of this individual among prehistoric and current groups. From a hair sample excavated at the shelter, which was indirectly dated to about 200 years old, we sequenced the genome (1.01 times coverage) of a Later Stone Age individual. We analyzed the Vaalkrans genome together with genetic data from 10 ancient (pre-colonial) individuals from southern Africa spanning the last 2000 years. We show that the individual from Vaalkrans was a man who traced ~80% of his ancestry to local southern San hunter–gatherers and ~20% to a mixed East African-Eurasian source. This genetic make-up is similar to modern-day Khoekhoe individuals from the Northern Cape Province (South Africa) and Namibia, but in the southern Cape, the Vaalkrans man's descendants have likely been assimilated into mixed-ancestry “Coloured” groups. The Vaalkrans man's genome reveals that Khoekhoe pastoralist groups/individuals lived in the southern Cape as late as 200 years ago, without mixing with non-African colonists or Bantu-speaking farmers. Our findings are also consistent with the model of a Holocene pastoralist migration, originating in Eastern Africa, shaping the genomic landscape of historic and current southern African populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
admixture, genomics, human history
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Research subject
Biology with Specialisation in Human Evolution and Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-397032 (URN)10.1002/ajpa.24236 (DOI)000614599500001 ()33539553 (PubMedID)
Funder
Göran Gustafsson Foundation for Research in Natural Sciences and MedicineKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationThe Research Council of Norway, 262618Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-5211Swedish Research Council, 642-2013-8019
Note

Authors in thesis list of papers: Coutinho, A., Edlund, H., Malmström, H., Henshilwood, C., van Niekerk, K., Lombard, M., Schlebusch, C. & Jakobsson, M.

Available from: 2019-11-18 Created: 2019-11-18 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Juras, A., Ehler, E., Chylenski, M., Pospieszny, L., Spinek, A. E., Malmström, H., . . . Dabert, M. (2021). Maternal genetic origin of the late and final Neolithic human populations from present-day Poland. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 176(2), 223-236
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maternal genetic origin of the late and final Neolithic human populations from present-day Poland
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2021 (English)In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, ISSN 0002-9483, E-ISSN 1096-8644, Vol. 176, no 2, p. 223-236Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: We aim to identify maternal genetic affinities between the Middle to Final Neolithic (3850-2300 BC) populations from present-day Poland and possible genetic influences from the Pontic steppe.

Materials and methods: We conducted ancient DNA studies from populations associated with Zlota, Globular Amphora, Funnel Beaker, and Corded Ware cultures (CWC). We sequenced genomic libraries on Illumina platform to generate 86 complete ancient mitochondrial genomes. Some of the samples were enriched for mitochondrial DNA using hybridization capture.

Results: The maternal genetic composition found in Zlota-associated individuals resembled that found in people associated with the Globular Amphora culture which indicates that both groups likely originated from the same maternal genetic background. Further, these two groups were closely related to the Funnel Beaker culture-associated population. None of these groups shared a close affinity to CWC-associated people. Haplogroup U4 was present only in the CWC group and absent in Zlota group, Globular Amphora, and Funnel Beaker cultures.

Discussion: The prevalence of mitochondrial haplogroups of Neolithic farmer origin identified in Early, Middle and Late Neolithic populations suggests a genetic continuity of these maternal lineages in the studied area. Although overlapping in time - and to some extent - in cultural expressions, none of the studied groups (Zlota, Globular Amphora, Funnel Beaker), shared a close genetic affinity to CWC-associated people, indicating a larger extent of cultural influence from the Pontic steppe than genetic exchange. The higher frequency of haplogroup U5b found in populations associated with Funnel Beaker, Globular Amphora, and Zlota cultures suggest a gradual maternal genetic influx from Mesolithic hunter-gatherers. Moreover, presence of haplogroup U4 in Corded Ware groups is most likely associated with the migrations from the Pontic steppe at the end of the Neolithic and supports the observed genetic distances.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & SonsWiley, 2021
Keywords
ancient DNA, Central Europe, human population, mitochondrial haplogroups, Neolithic
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-470098 (URN)10.1002/ajpa.24372 (DOI)000678718100001 ()34308549 (PubMedID)
Funder
Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationSwedish Research Council, 2017-02503
Available from: 2022-03-18 Created: 2022-03-18 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Blank, M., Sjögren, K.-G., Knipper, C., Frei, K. M., Malmström, H., Fraser, M., . . . Storå, J. (2021). Mobility patterns in inland southwestern Sweden during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age. Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 13(4), Article ID 64.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobility patterns in inland southwestern Sweden during the Neolithic and Early Bronze Age
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2021 (English)In: Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, ISSN 1866-9557, E-ISSN 1866-9565, Vol. 13, no 4, article id 64Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this paper, we investigate population dynamics in the Scandinavian Neolithic and Early Bronze Age in southwestern Sweden. Human mobility patterns in Falbygden were studied by applying strontium isotope analysis combined with archaeological and bioarchaeological data, including mtDNA and sex assessment on a large dataset encompassing 141 individuals from 21 megalithic graves. In combination with other archaeological and anthropological records, we investigated the temporal and spatial scale of individual movement, mobility patterns of specific categories of people and possible social drivers behind them. Our results of strontium and biomolecular analyses suggest that mobility increased in the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age compared to the earlier parts of the Neolithic. The data indicate individuals moving both into and away from Falbygden. Mobility patterns and contact networks also shift over time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
Keywords
Mobility, Southwestern Sweden, Megalithic graves, Strontium isotopes, Mitochondrial aDNA, Neolithic, Early Bronze Age
National Category
Archaeology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-441857 (URN)10.1007/s12520-021-01294-4 (DOI)000630357600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council, VR 2013-1905Riksbankens Jubileumsfond, M13-0904:1Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationUniversity of Gothenburg
Available from: 2021-05-12 Created: 2021-05-12 Last updated: 2024-06-10Bibliographically approved
Larena, M., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Sjödin, P., McKenna, J., Ebeo, C., Reyes, R., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2021). Multiple migrations to the Philippines during the last 50,000 years. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 118(13), Article ID e2026132118.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Multiple migrations to the Philippines during the last 50,000 years
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2021 (English)In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, ISSN 0027-8424, E-ISSN 1091-6490, Vol. 118, no 13, article id e2026132118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Island Southeast Asia has recently produced several surprises regarding human history, but the region's complex demography remains poorly understood. Here, we report similar to 2.3 million genotypes from 1,028 individuals representing 115 indigenous Philippine populations and genome-sequence data from two similar to 8,000-y-old individuals from Liangdao in the Taiwan Strait. We show that the Philippine islands were populated by at least five waves of human migration: initially by Northern and Southern Negritos (distantly related to Australian and Papuan groups), followed by Manobo, Sama, Papuan, and Cordilleran-related populations. The ancestors of Cordillerans diverged from indigenous peoples of Taiwan at least similar to 8,000 y ago, prior to the arrival of paddy field rice agriculture in the Philippines similar to 2,500 y ago, where some of their descendants remain to be the least admixed East Asian groups carrying an ancestry shared by all Austronesian-speaking populations. These observations contradict an exclusive "out-of-Taiwan" model of farming-language-people dispersal within the last four millennia for the Philippines and Island Southeast Asia. Sama-related ethnic groups of southwestern Philippines additionally experienced some minimal South Asian gene flow starting similar to 1,000 y ago. Lastly, only a few lowlanders, accounting for <1% of all individuals, presented a low level of West Eurasian admixture, indicating a limited genetic legacy of Spanish colonization in the Philippines. Altogether, our findings reveal a multilayered history of the Philippines, which served as a crucial gateway for the movement of people that ultimately changed the genetic landscape of the Asia-Pacific region.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2021
Keywords
Philippines, human population genetics, Austronesian, Negrito, ISEA
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-442884 (URN)10.1073/pnas.2026132118 (DOI)000637394200079 ()33753512 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 642-2013-8019Swedish Research Council, 2020-04789Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2021-05-21 Created: 2021-05-21 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Larena, M., McKenna, J., Sanchez-Quinto, F., Bernhardsson, C., Ebeo, C., Reyes, R., . . . Jakobsson, M. (2021). Philippine Ayta possess the highest level of Denisovan ancestry in the world. Current Biology, 31(19), 4219-4230
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Philippine Ayta possess the highest level of Denisovan ancestry in the world
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2021 (English)In: Current Biology, ISSN 0960-9822, E-ISSN 1879-0445, Vol. 31, no 19, p. 4219-4230Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multiple lines of evidence show that modern humans interbred with archaic Denisovans. Here, we report an account of shared demographic history between Australasians and Denisovans distinctively in Island Southeast Asia. Our analyses are based on-2.3 million genotypes from 118 ethnic groups of the Philippines, including 25 diverse self-identified Negrito populations, along with high-coverage genomes of Australopapuans and Ayta Magbukon Negritos. We show that Ayta Magbukon possess the highest level of Denisovan ancestry in the world--30%-40% greater than that of Australians and Papuans-consistent with an independent admixture event into Negritos from Denisovans. Together with the recently described Homo luzonensis, we suggest that there were multiple archaic species that inhabited the Philippines prior to the arrival of modern humans and that these archaic groups may have been genetically related. Altogether, our findings unveil a complex intertwined history of modern and archaic humans in the Asia-Pacific region, where distinct Islander Denisovan populations differentially admixed with incoming Australasians across multiple locations and at various points in time.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cell PressCELL PRESS, 2021
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-461850 (URN)10.1016/j.cub.2021.07.022 (DOI)000723628100003 ()34388371 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 642-2013-8019Swedish Research Council, 2020-04789Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation
Available from: 2021-12-17 Created: 2021-12-17 Last updated: 2024-01-15Bibliographically approved
Projects
Alvastra - archaeogenetics, archaeology and cultural interactions [2017-02503_VR]; Uppsala University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6456-8055

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