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Publications (10 of 30) Show all publications
Andersson, H. (2018). Att skriva uppsats i mänskliga rättigheter (andra rev. utgåvan). Uppsala: Teologiska institutionen: Uppsala University
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Att skriva uppsats i mänskliga rättigheter (andra rev. utgåvan)
2018 (Swedish)Report (Other academic)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Teologiska institutionen: Uppsala University, 2018. p. 21
National Category
Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-347424 (URN)
Available from: 2018-04-02 Created: 2018-04-02 Last updated: 2018-04-12
Andersson, H. (2018). Rätten att ha rättigheter: Arendts och Kafkas politiska tänkande. In: Mikael Stenmark m.fl. (Ed.), Filosofiska metoder i praktiken: (pp. 305-323). Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rätten att ha rättigheter: Arendts och Kafkas politiska tänkande
2018 (Swedish)In: Filosofiska metoder i praktiken / [ed] Mikael Stenmark m.fl., Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018, p. 305-323Chapter in book (Refereed)
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Uppsala: Acta Universitatis Upsaliensis, 2018
Series
Uppsala Studies in Philosophy of Religion ; 5
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Research subject
Ethics; Philosophy of Religion
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-348415 (URN)978-91-513-0364-2 (ISBN)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2018-04-12 Created: 2018-04-12 Last updated: 2018-08-05
Andersson, H. (2017). 'My little wild fever-struck brother': Human and animal subjectivity in Hélène Cixous' Algeria. International Journal of Philosophy and Theology, 78(4-5), 456-468
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'My little wild fever-struck brother': Human and animal subjectivity in Hélène Cixous' Algeria
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Philosophy and Theology, ISSN 2169-2327, E-ISSN 2169-2335, Vol. 78, no 4-5, p. 456-468Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the place of human and animal subjectivityin two autobiographically informed texts by Hélène Cixous. It takesher view on the word ‘human’ and the figure of Fips, the dog ofthe Cixous family, as a point of departure. By thinking through thisfigure, I argue, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialismand anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own responseto such kinds of political evils, arguing for human relationality andanimal corporeality. The article shows that Cixous’ meeting withFips creates a stigma that, belatedly, breaks through the barrierbetween herself and the dog; the reopening of the wound takesplace in a poetical writing that reveals an intense ‘animal humanity’formed by communal suffering, finiteness, and love. The lessonCixous learns from the memory of Fips the dog is how to become‘better human’. This becoming is also an assault on the falsehumanism of the colonial project and on racialized social exlusion.

Keywords
Human; animal subjectivity; Cixous; corporeality; stigma, political evil
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Ethics
Research subject
Philosophy of Religion; Ethics; Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308749 (URN)10.1080/21692327.2017.1364661 (DOI)000424585600012 ()
Projects
Ethics and the Politics of Writing: Membership, Testimony and Representation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-11-29 Created: 2016-11-29 Last updated: 2018-04-04Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H. (2017). Traces of a Half-Forgotten Dog: Suffering and Animal Humanity in Hélène Cixous' Algerian Scenes. Literature & Theology, 31(4), 420-431
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Traces of a Half-Forgotten Dog: Suffering and Animal Humanity in Hélène Cixous' Algerian Scenes
2017 (English)In: Literature & Theology, ISSN 0269-1205, E-ISSN 1477-4623, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 420-431Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hélène Cixous’ engagement with animals is a significant but neglected aspect of her work. In this article I trace one specific character among her animals, Fips, a dog she had when she was living in Algiers during the late 1940s. By reflecting on this figure, I outline the way the dehumanising logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism are critiqued by Cixous. I lift up her themes of relationality and corporeality as constructive for animal studies. Taking the work of Jacques Derrida as a starting point, the article shows how Cixous’ primal encounter with Fips produces a wound that, belatedly, ruptures the barriers between herself and this dog; its dehiscence reveals Fips’ ‘profound animal humanity’ generated by shared suffering, finitude, and love. The lesson Cixous learns from revivifying the memory of this dog is, I suggest, how to become more human. The ‘humanity’ of the dog is the capacity to see and indeed love outside preconceived ideas: ‘Perhaps the irony is that we are never more human than when we are dogs.’ Becoming more human is an assault on the borders of racialised exclusion and a challenge to the false humanism of the colonial project.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Glasgow: Oxford University Press, 2017
Keywords
Cixous; Derrida; Animal; Humanity; Wound; Algeria
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Ethics General Literature Studies
Research subject
Ethics; Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-308751 (URN)10.1093/litthe/frx030 (DOI)000417185100004 ()
Projects
Ethics and the Politics of Writing: Membership, Testimony and Representation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-11-29 Created: 2016-11-29 Last updated: 2018-03-06Bibliographically approved
Andersson, H. (2016). Animal and Human Subjectivity in Cixous' Algerian narratives. In: : . Paper presented at AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio, Texas, November 19-22, 2016.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Animal and Human Subjectivity in Cixous' Algerian narratives
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the place of the human and the animal in Hélène Cixous' work. It takes the figure of Fips, the dog of the Cixous family that she writes about in her autobiographical narratives, as a starting point. By thinking through this figure, I argue, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own response to it, arguing for human relationality and animal corporeality. The paper shows that Cixous’ primal encounter with Fips produces a stigma that, belatedly, ruptures the barrier between herself and this specific dog; its dehiscence reveals a profound animal humanity generated by suffering, finitude, and compassion. The lesson Cixous learns from the memory of the Dog is how to become ‘more human’. This becoming is also an assault on the false humanism of the colonial project, on the closed gates as markers of colonial dehumanization and racialized social exclusion.

National Category
Ethics Humanities
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283044 (URN)
Conference
AAR Annual Meeting San Antonio, Texas, November 19-22, 2016
Projects
Ethics and the Politics of Writing: Membership, Testimony and Representation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-04-09 Created: 2016-04-09 Last updated: 2016-12-03
Andersson, H. (2016). Assault on the Borders: Hélène Cixous on Animals and the Human. In: : . Paper presented at The 18th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Religion, Literature and Culture: 'Lines in the sand, broders, conflicts and transitions' 9th-11th September 2016, University of Glasgow.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assault on the Borders: Hélène Cixous on Animals and the Human
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Despite the continual displacement of nearly every established conception of the human, the figure of the human remains a powerful idea for political and ethical theorizing. In the era of human rights, the language of dehumanization has become a dominant frame for accounting for and criticizing a wide range of abuses and social harms. Likewise, the human has come to mark a status that promises protection from the dehumanizing effects of violence, discrimination and other modes of injustice. Cixous’ recent work on the concept have contributed to this discussion by providing an analysis of the borders between what we call human and inhuman and by pointing to the precarious conditions of hospitality towards other beings (human and nonhuman). This paper examines the place of the human and animals in Cixous’ work. It takes the figure of Fips, the dog of the Cixous family in Algiers, as a starting point. By thinking through this figure, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own response to it, arguing for human relationality and animal corporeality. The paper shows that Cixous’ relationship with Fips produces a stigma that, belatedly, disrupt the barrier between herself and this specific dog. The lesson Cixous learns from revivifying the memory of the Dog is how to become ‘more human’. This becoming is also an assault on the false humanism of the colonial project, on the closed Gates as markers of colonial dehumanization and racialized social exclusion. The lesson of hospitality Cixous learns by another primal event: the resurrection of Fips in the form of another animal – the unexpected arrival of a cat (Thea) that puts conditional hospitality into question simply by demanding (and giving) an unconditional hospitality.

National Category
Humanities Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Ethics
Research subject
Aesthetics; Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284362 (URN)
Conference
The 18th Biennial Conference of the International Society for Religion, Literature and Culture: 'Lines in the sand, broders, conflicts and transitions' 9th-11th September 2016, University of Glasgow
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-04-17 Created: 2016-04-17 Last updated: 2017-02-03
Andersson, H. (2016). On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida. In: On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida: . Paper presented at Animals, Theology and Critical Theory Symposium, 20 January 2016, University of Chester, England.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida
2016 (English)In: On the Humanity of Animals in Cixous and Derrida, 2016Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Other academic)
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Humanities Ethics
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283042 (URN)
Conference
Animals, Theology and Critical Theory Symposium, 20 January 2016, University of Chester, England
Projects
Ethics and the Politics of Writing: Membership, Testimony and Representation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-04-09 Created: 2016-04-09 Last updated: 2017-02-03
Andersson, H. (2015). Between Oblivion and Memory: The ethics of animals in Derrida and Cixous. In: : Between Oblivion and Memory. Paper presented at LITCRI '15 / IV. Literary Criticism Conference, November 12-14, 2015 in Istanbul..
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Between Oblivion and Memory: The ethics of animals in Derrida and Cixous
2015 (English)In: : Between Oblivion and Memory, 2015Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Keywords
Cixous; Memory; Oblivion; Animal; Human; Suffering; Compassion
National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion
Research subject
Ethics; Aesthetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283041 (URN)
Conference
LITCRI '15 / IV. Literary Criticism Conference, November 12-14, 2015 in Istanbul.
Projects
Ethics and the Politics of Writing: Membership, Testimony and Representation
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-04-09 Created: 2016-04-09 Last updated: 2017-02-13
Andersson, H. (2015). Franz Kafka’s and Hannah Arendt’s perceptions of membership in a human community. In: : . Paper presented at Ethics and Literature. First International Conference,Porto Portugal, 21-23 May, 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Franz Kafka’s and Hannah Arendt’s perceptions of membership in a human community
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation only (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper examines the complex, paradoxical and tortuous relationship between human, nonhuman and inhuman in the fiction of Franz Kafka and the philosophy of Hannah Arendt in connection with the issues of the ethical importance of being human and the political processes that produces the ideological concept of “the human.” Whereas Arendt, as a philosopher, is especially concerned with the legal or quasi-legal norms that should entitle every subject, even a stateless refugee, to appear as a member in a political community, Kafka, as a literary writer, analyzes the social norms of “imagination” that determine whether a human being appears to fellow human beings as a member of the human community at all.

Keywords
Kafka, Arendt, legal vacuum, rightlesnesss, injustice
National Category
Ethics Philosophy Languages and Literature
Research subject
Ethics; Aesthetics; Literature
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283043 (URN)
Conference
Ethics and Literature. First International Conference,Porto Portugal, 21-23 May, 2015
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-04-09 Created: 2016-04-09 Last updated: 2017-02-03
Andersson, H. (2015). Refugees, rights and writing: An Arendtian Perspective. In: : . Paper presented at Human Rights, Violence, and Dictatorship, Krakow, Polen 3-4th december 2015.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Refugees, rights and writing: An Arendtian Perspective
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Ours is a time of global institutional change. It would perhaps be premature to refer to this situation as a condition of statelessness, but there is a sense in which the modern state has lost its privileged position in the exercise of democratic politics. Partly through its own act of outsourcing and outlawing, partly through pressure from global actors and economic structures, it has assisted in creating a growing call of ‘precarious’ people around the world: migrants, refugees, stateless persons. The number of people without rights or work in Europe is growing. In political life, this group is the subject of increasingly hostile discourse on ‘illegal immigrants’ and ‘international terrorism’. This paper explores how a rereading of the work Hannah Arendt can contribute to the analytical and political task of giving an alternative meaning to the presence of this group in our societies. She shows us the stateless person as a victim subjected to a very specific form of domination; as an emblematic figure whose status exposes the contradiction of state-centered citizenship and the discourse of human rights; and as an important political actor whose protests can become visible sites of active citizenship.

National Category
Philosophy, Ethics and Religion Political Science
Research subject
Ethics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-283045 (URN)
Conference
Human Rights, Violence, and Dictatorship, Krakow, Polen 3-4th december 2015
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2014-968
Available from: 2016-04-09 Created: 2016-04-09 Last updated: 2018-04-12
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6768-5292

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