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Arnqvist, Göran, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3501-3376
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 108) Show all publications
Novicic, Z. K., Sayadi, A., Jelic, M. & Arnqvist, G. (2020). Negative frequency dependent selection contributes to the maintenance of a global polymorphism in mitochondrial DNA. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 20, Article ID 20.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative frequency dependent selection contributes to the maintenance of a global polymorphism in mitochondrial DNA
2020 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 20, article id 20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Understanding the forces that maintain diversity across a range of scales is at the very heart of biology. Frequency-dependent processes are generally recognized as the most central process for the maintenance of ecological diversity. The same is, however, not generally true for genetic diversity. Negative frequency dependent selection, where rare genotypes have an advantage, is often regarded as a relatively weak force in maintaining genetic variation in life history traits because recombination disassociates alleles across many genes. Yet, many regions of the genome show low rates of recombination and genetic variation in such regions (i.e., supergenes) may in theory be upheld by frequency dependent selection.

Results: We studied what is essentially a ubiquitous life history supergene (i.e., mitochondrial DNA) in the fruit fly Drosophila subobscura, showing sympatric polymorphism with two main mtDNA genotypes co-occurring in populations world-wide. Using an experimental evolution approach involving manipulations of genotype starting frequencies, we show that negative frequency dependent selection indeed acts to maintain genetic variation in this region. Moreover, the strength of selection was affected by food resource conditions.

Conclusions: Our work provides novel experimental support for the view that balancing selection through negative frequency dependency acts to maintain genetic variation in life history genes. We suggest that the emergence of negative frequency dependent selection on mtDNA is symptomatic of the fundamental link between ecological processes related to resource use and the maintenance of genetic variation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMC, 2020
Keywords
Balancing selection, Mitochondria, mtDNA, Polymorphism, Negative frequency dependent selection
National Category
Genetics Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-407284 (URN)10.1186/s12862-020-1581-2 (DOI)000513931600003 ()32019493 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, Horizon 2020, 656338
Available from: 2020-03-25 Created: 2020-03-25 Last updated: 2020-03-25Bibliographically approved
Bayram, H. L., Sayadi, A., Immonen, E. & Arnqvist, G. (2019). Identification of novel ejaculate proteins in a seed beetle and division of labour across male accessory reproductive glands. Insect biochemistry and molecular biology, 104, 50-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Identification of novel ejaculate proteins in a seed beetle and division of labour across male accessory reproductive glands
2019 (English)In: Insect biochemistry and molecular biology, ISSN 0965-1748, Vol. 104, p. 50-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The male ejaculate contains a multitude of seminal fluid proteins (SFPs), many of which are key reproductive molecules, as well as sperm. However, the identification of SFPs is notoriously difficult and a detailed understanding of this complex phenotype has only been achieved in a few model species. We employed a recently developed proteomic method involving whole-organism stable isotope labelling coupled with proteomic and transcriptomic analyses to characterize ejaculate proteins in the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus. We identified 317 proteins that were transferred to females at mating, and a great majority of these showed signals of secretion and were highly male-biased in expression in the abdomen. These male-derived proteins were enriched with proteins involved in general metabolic and catabolic processes but also with proteolytic enzymes and proteins involved in protection against oxidative stress. Thirty-seven proteins showed significant homology with SFPs previously identified in other insects. However, no less than 92 C. maculatus ejaculate proteins were entirely novel, receiving no significant blast hits and lacking homologs in extant data bases, consistent with a rapid and divergent evolution of SFPs. We used 3D micro-tomography in conjunction with proteomic methods to identify 5 distinct pairs of male accessory reproductive glands and to show that certain ejaculate proteins were only recovered in certain male glands. Finally, we provide a tentative list of 231 candidate female-derived reproductive proteins, some of which are likely important in ejaculate processing and/or sperm storage.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pergamon, 2019
Keywords
Reproductive proteins, Stable isotope labelling, Acps, Sperm competition, Seminal fluid
National Category
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373579 (URN)10.1016/j.ibmb.2018.12.002 (DOI)000458938500006 ()30529580 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523Knut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-03-11Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Thilliez, E., Arnqvist, G. & Berger, D. (2019). Sexual selection, environmental robustness and evolutionary demography of maladapted populations: a test using experimental evolution in seed beetles. Evolutionary Applications, 12(7), 1371-1384
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sexual selection, environmental robustness and evolutionary demography of maladapted populations: a test using experimental evolution in seed beetles
2019 (English)In: Evolutionary Applications, ISSN 1752-4571, E-ISSN 1752-4571, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 1371-1384Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whether sexual selection impedes or aids adaptation has become an outstanding question in times of rapid environmental change and parallels the debate about how the evolution of individual traits impacts on population dynamics. The net effect of sexual selection on population viability results from a balance between genetic benefits of “good‐genes” effects and costs of sexual conflict. Depending on how these facets of sexual selection are affected under environmental change, extinction of maladapted populations could be either avoided or accelerated. Here, we evolved seed beetles under three alternative mating regimes to disentangle the contributions of sexual selection, fecundity selection, and male–female coevolution to individual reproductive success and population fitness. We compared these contributions between the ancestral environment and two stressful environments (elevated temperature and a host plant shift). We found evidence that sexual selection on males had positive genetic effects on female fitness components across environments, supporting good‐genes sexual selection. Interestingly, however, when males evolved under sexual selection with fecundity selection removed, they became more robust to both temperature and host plant stress compared to their conspecific females and males from the other evolution regimes that applied fecundity selection. We quantified the population‐level consequences of this sex‐specific adaptation and found evidence that the cost of sociosexual interactions in terms of reduced offspring production was higher in the regime applying only sexual selection to males. Moreover, the cost tended to be more pronounced at the elevated temperature to which males from the regime were more robust compared to their conspecific females. These results illustrate the tension between individual‐level adaptation and population‐level viability in sexually reproducing species and suggest that the relative efficacies of sexual selection and fecundity selection can cause inherent sex differences in environmental robustness that may impact demography of maladapted populations.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373578 (URN)10.1111/eva.12758 (DOI)000480580300011 ()31417621 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-05233Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523EU, Horizon 2020, GENCON AdG-294333
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Rüffler, C., Arnqvist, G. & Berger, D. (2019). The efficacy of good genes sexual selection under environmental change. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 286(1896), Article ID 20182313.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The efficacy of good genes sexual selection under environmental change
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1896, article id 20182313Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sexual selection can promote adaptation if sexually selected traits are reliable indicators of genetic quality. Moreover, models of good genes sexual selection suggest that, by operating more strongly in males than in females, sexual selection may purge deleterious alleles from the population at a low demographic cost, offering an evolutionary benefit to sexually reproducing populations. Here, we investigate the effect of good genes sexual selection on adaptation following environmental change. We show that the strength of sexual selection is often weakened relative to fecundity selection, reducing the suggested benefit of sexual reproduction. This result is a consequence of incorporating a simple and general mechanistic basis for how sexual selection operates under different mating systems, rendering selection on males frequency-dependent and dynamic with respect to the degree of environmental change. Our model illustrates that incorporating the mechanism of selection is necessary to predict evolutionary outcomes and highlights the need to substantiate previous theoretical claims with further work on how sexual selection operates in changing environments.

Keywords
natural selection, sexual reproduction, adaptation, population viability, stress, frequency dependence
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383889 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2018.2313 (DOI)000465431000008 ()30963930 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-05233Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523
Note

De 2 första författarna delar förstaförfattarskapet.

Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Sayadi, A., Martínez Barrio, Á., Immonen, E., Dainat, J., Berger, D., Tellgren-Roth, C., . . . Arnqvist, G. (2019). The genomic footprint of sexual conflict. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 3(12), 1725-1730
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The genomic footprint of sexual conflict
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2019 (English)In: Nature Ecology & Evolution, E-ISSN 2397-334X, Vol. 3, no 12, p. 1725-1730Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Genes with sex-biased expression show a number of unique properties and this has been seen as evidence for conflicting selection pressures in males and females, forming a genetic 'tug-of-war' between the sexes. However, we lack studies of taxa where an understanding of conflicting phenotypic selection in the sexes has been linked with studies of genomic signatures of sexual conflict. Here, we provide such a link. We used an insect where sexual conflict is unusually well understood, the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus, to test for molecular genetic signals of sexual conflict across genes with varying degrees of sex-bias in expression. We sequenced, assembled and annotated its genome and performed population resequencing of three divergent populations. Sex-biased genes showed increased levels of genetic diversity and bore a remarkably clear footprint of relaxed purifying selection. Yet, segregating genetic variation was also affected by balancing selection in weakly female-biased genes, while male-biased genes showed signs of overall purifying selection. Female-biased genes contributed disproportionally to shared polymorphism across populations, while male-biased genes, male seminal fluid protein genes and sex-linked genes did not. Genes showing genomic signatures consistent with sexual conflict generally matched life-history phenotypes known to experience sexually antagonistic selection in this species. Our results highlight metabolic and reproductive processes, confirming the key role of general life-history traits in sexual conflict.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2019
National Category
Genetics Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-402373 (URN)10.1038/s41559-019-1041-9 (DOI)000500728800022 ()31740847 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilKnut and Alice Wallenberg FoundationEU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523Swedish Research Council Formas, 2018-00705
Available from: 2020-02-03 Created: 2020-02-03 Last updated: 2020-02-03Bibliographically approved
Grieshop, K. & Arnqvist, G. (2018). Sex-specific dominance reversal of genetic variation for fitness. PLoS biology, 16(12), Article ID e2006810.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific dominance reversal of genetic variation for fitness
2018 (English)In: PLoS biology, ISSN 1544-9173, E-ISSN 1545-7885, Vol. 16, no 12, article id e2006810Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The maintenance of genetic variance in fitness represents one of the most longstanding enigmas in evolutionary biology. Sexually antagonistic (SA) selection may contribute substantially to maintaining genetic variance in fitness by maintaining alternative alleles with opposite fitness effects in the two sexes. This is especially likely if such SA loci exhibit sex-specific dominance reversal (SSDR)-wherein the allele that benefits a given sex is also dominant in that sex-which would generate balancing selection and maintain stable SA polymorphisms for fitness. However, direct empirical tests of SSDR for fitness are currently lacking. Here, we performed a full diallel cross among isogenic strains derived from a natural population of the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus that is known to exhibit SA genetic variance in fitness. We measured sex-specific competitive lifetime reproductive success (i.e., fitness) in >500 sex-by-genotype F-1 combinations and found that segregating genetic variation in fitness exhibited pronounced contributions from dominance variance and sex-specific dominance variance. A closer inspection of the nature of dominance variance revealed that the fixed allelic variation captured within each strain tended to be dominant in one sex but recessive in the other, revealing genome-wide SSDR for SA polymorphisms underlying fitness. Our findings suggest that SA balancing selection could play an underappreciated role in maintaining fitness variance in natural populations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Public Library of Science, 2018
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373580 (URN)10.1371/journal.pbio.2006810 (DOI)000455108400013 ()30533008 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2019-02-01Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Savkovic, U., Dordevic, M., Arnqvist, G., Stojkovic, B. & Berger, D. (2018). The consequences of sexual selection in well-adapted and maladapted populations of bean beetles. Evolution, 72(3), 518-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The consequences of sexual selection in well-adapted and maladapted populations of bean beetles
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2018 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 518-530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whether sexual selection generally promotes or impedes population persistence remains an open question. Intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC) can render sexual selection in males detrimental to the population by increasing the frequency of alleles with positive effects on male reproductive success but negative effects on female fecundity. Recent modeling based on fitness landscape theory, however, indicates that the relative impact of IaSC may be reduced in maladapted populations and that sexual selection therefore might promote adaptation when it is most needed. Here, we test this prediction using bean beetles that had undergone 80 generations of experimental evolution on two alternative host plants. We isolated and assessed the effect of maladaptation on sex‐specific strengths of selection and IaSC by cross‐rearing the two experimental evolution regimes on the alternative hosts and estimating within‐population genetic (co)variance for fitness in males and females. Two key predictions were upheld: males generally experienced stronger selection compared to females and maladaptation increased selection in females. However, maladaptation consistently decreased male‐bias in the strength of selection and IaSC was not reduced in maladapted populations. These findings imply that sexual selection can be disrupted in stressful environmental conditions, thus reducing one of the potential benefits of sexual reproduction in maladapted populations.

Keywords
Adaptation, environmental change, fitness landscape, genetic variance, sexual conflict, sexual selection
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-351087 (URN)10.1111/evo.13412 (DOI)000427676800007 ()29238970 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2015-05223Swedish Research Council, 621-2014-4523EU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333
Available from: 2018-05-18 Created: 2018-05-18 Last updated: 2018-05-18Bibliographically approved
Martinossi-Allibert, I., Savković, U., \DJor\djević, M., Arnqvist, G., Stojković, B. & Berger, D. (2018). The consequences of sexual selection in well-adapted and maladapted populations of bean beetles. Evolution, 72(3), 518-530
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The consequences of sexual selection in well-adapted and maladapted populations of bean beetles
Show others...
2018 (English)In: Evolution, Vol. 72, no 3, p. 518-530Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Whether sexual selection generally promotes or impedes population persistence remains an open question. Intralocus sexual conflict (IaSC) can render sexual selection in males detrimental to the population by increasing the frequency of alleles with positive effects on male reproductive success but negative effects on female fecundity. Recent modeling based on fitness landscape theory, however, indicates that the relative impact of IaSC may be reduced in maladapted populations and that sexual selection therefore might promote adaptation when it is most needed. Here, we test this prediction using bean beetles that had undergone 80 generations of experimental evolution on two alternative host plants. We isolated and assessed the effect of maladaptation on sex-specific strengths of selection and IaSC by cross-rearing the two experimental evolution regimes on the alternative hosts and estimating within-population genetic (co)variance for fitness in males and females. Two key predictions were upheld: males generally experienced stronger selection compared to females and maladaptation increased selection in females. However, maladaptation consistently decreased male-bias in the strength of selection and IaSC was not reduced in maladapted populations. These findings imply that sexual selection can be disrupted in stressful environmental conditions, thus reducing one of the potential benefits of sexual reproduction in maladapted populations.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373576 (URN)10.1111/evo.13412 (DOI)
Available from: 2019-01-15 Created: 2019-01-15 Last updated: 2020-02-28Bibliographically approved
Stojkovic, B., Sayadi, A., Dordevic, M., Jovic, J., Savkovic, U. & Arnqvist, G. (2017). Divergent evolution of life span associated with mitochondrial DNA evolution. Evolution, 71(1), 160-166
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Divergent evolution of life span associated with mitochondrial DNA evolution
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2017 (English)In: Evolution, ISSN 0014-3820, E-ISSN 1558-5646, Vol. 71, no 1, p. 160-166Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Mitochondria play a key role in ageing. The pursuit of genes that regulate variation in life span and ageing have shown that several nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes are important. However, the role of mitochondrial encoded genes (mtDNA) is more controversial and our appreciation of the role of mtDNA for the evolution of life span is limited. We use replicated lines of seed beetles that have been artificially selected for long or short life for >190 generations, now showing dramatic phenotypic differences, to test for a possible role of mtDNA in the divergent evolution of ageing and life span. We show that these divergent selection regimes led to the evolution of significantly different mtDNA haplotype frequencies. Selection for a long life and late reproduction generated positive selection for one specific haplotype, which was fixed in most such lines. In contrast, selection for reproduction early in life led to both positive selection as well as negative frequency-dependent selection on two different haplotypes, which were both present in all such lines. Our findings suggest that the evolution of life span was in part mediated by mtDNA, providing support for the emerging general tenet that adaptive evolution of life-history syndromes may involve mtDNA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY-BLACKWELL, 2017
Keywords
Acanthoscelides obtectus, artificial selection, Bruchinae, coadaptation, mitochondria, mtDNA, negative frequency dependent selection, senescence
National Category
Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-319809 (URN)10.1111/evo.13102 (DOI)000394439600014 ()27778315 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council, GENCON AdG-294333Swedish Research Council, 621-2010-5266
Available from: 2017-04-10 Created: 2017-04-10 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Kebe, K., Alvarez, N., Tuda, M., Arnqvist, G., Fox, C. W., Sembene, M. & Espindola, A. (2017). Global phylogeography of the insect pest Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchinae) relates to the history of its main host, Vigna unguiculata. Journal of Biogeography, 44(11), 2515-2526
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Global phylogeography of the insect pest Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Bruchinae) relates to the history of its main host, Vigna unguiculata
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Biogeography, ISSN 0305-0270, E-ISSN 1365-2699, Vol. 44, no 11, p. 2515-2526Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus is an important tropical and subtropical pest of legumes distributed world-wide. Archaeological evidence suggests an African origin with later world-wide invasion facilitated by the last centuries' legume trading and exchange. To date, no studies could identify the routes or timing of dispersal of the species. Here, we investigate the global phylogeography of this pest to shed light on the main inter-continental dispersal routes that led to it becoming a cosmopolitan pest. Location: World-wide.

Methods: We sampled seed beetles over a large fraction of the species' range and sequenced one nuclear and three mitochondrial loci. Using this data, we estimated spatio-temporal phylogeographical reconstructions, and the demographic history of the species. We also used our dataset to evaluate the effect of panmixia on Bayesian demographic estimations.

Results: Callosobruchus maculatus exhibited regional and continental genetic structure, with the highest genetic diversity found in Africa. Our discrete Bayesian phylogeographical approach indicated that the species first dispersed to Asia and then colonized the pantropical belt. The three methods used for inferring the demographic history of C. maculatus indicated a recent demographic expansion in the world-wide dataset, as well as in the subset restricted to African samples. Such a signal was, however, not observed in the subset composed of Asian specimens. This demographic expansion occurred in the Holocene and is likely explained by the spread of cowpea and other host legumes across and out of Africa.

Main conclusions: The inferred dispersal routes support the idea that the evolutionary history of C. maculatus relates to the trade of its main host plant, Vigna unguiculata. Human-mediated processes appear to have shaped the global genetic structure of this pest. As a methodological implication, we demonstrate that coalescent-based demographic reconstructions can be erroneous if the dataset violates the assumption of panmixia.

Keywords
Bruchinae, Callosobruchus, demographic history, dispersal routes, human-mediated dispersal, insect pest, world-wide distribution
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-341353 (URN)10.1111/jbi.13052 (DOI)000414077300008 ()
Available from: 2018-02-12 Created: 2018-02-12 Last updated: 2018-02-12Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3501-3376

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