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Gustafsson, Lars, ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6566-2863
Alternative names
Publications (10 of 84) Show all publications
Briedis, M., Bauer, S., Adamik, P., Alves, J. A., Costa, J. S., Emmenegger, T., . . . Hahn, S. (2019). A full annual perspective on sex-biased migration timing in long-distance migratory birds. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 286(1897), Article ID 20182821.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A full annual perspective on sex-biased migration timing in long-distance migratory birds
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2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 286, no 1897, article id 20182821Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In many taxa, the most common form of sex-biased migration timing is protandry – the earlier arrival of males at breeding areas. Here we test this concept across the annual cycle of long-distance migratory birds. Using more than 350 migration tracks of small-bodied trans-Saharan migrants, we quantify differences in male and female migration schedules and test for proximate determinants of sex-specific timing. In autumn, males started migration about 2 days earlier, but this difference did not carry over to arrival at the non-breeding sites. In spring, males on average departed from the African non-breeding sites about 3 days earlier and reached breeding sites ca 4 days ahead of females. A cross-species comparison revealed large variation in the level of protandry and protogyny across the annual cycle. While we found tight links between individual timing of departure and arrival within each migration season, only for males the timing of spring migration was linked to the timing of previous autumn migration. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that protandry is not exclusively a reproductive strategy but rather occurs year-round and the two main proximate determinants for the magnitude of sex-biased arrival times in autumn and spring are sex-specific differences in departure timing and migration duration.

Keywords
annual cycle, geolocator, long-distance migrant, migration phenology, protandry, protogyny
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383886 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2018.2821 (DOI)000465432500022 ()30963841 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2019-05-29 Created: 2019-05-29 Last updated: 2019-05-29Bibliographically approved
Sudyka, J., Arct, A., Drobniak, S. M., Gustafsson, L. & Cichon, M. (2019). Birds with high lifetime reproductive success experience increased telomere loss. Biology Letters, 15(1), Article ID 20180637.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Birds with high lifetime reproductive success experience increased telomere loss
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2019 (English)In: Biology Letters, ISSN 1744-9561, E-ISSN 1744-957X, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 20180637Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Lifetime reproductive success (LRS) is what counts in terms of evolution, but investments in reproduction entail costs for an organism. The idea that telomere dynamics may be shaped in response to such costs is already established; however, we still lack information on whether this relation translates to overall fitness. Here, we quantified LRS (number of fledged young) and longitudinal telomere dynamics of small passerine birds-the blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). We found that individual telomere erosion rate was positively associated with lifetime fledgling number. Birds with more fledged young experienced increased telomere attrition. We show that telomere attrition rate, but not telomere length, is related to individual fitness and suggest that telomere dynamics may underlie reproductive costs experienced by animals as a consequence of prioritizing their lifetime fitness. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to provide evidence that more pronounced telomere erosion is associated with higher fitness gain.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC, 2019
Keywords
cost of reproduction, telomere shortening, ageing, life-history, regression to the mean
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-383035 (URN)10.1098/rsbl.2018.0637 (DOI)000465402800002 ()30958221 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-05-08 Created: 2019-05-08 Last updated: 2019-05-08Bibliographically approved
Morinay, J., Daniel, G., Gustafsson, L. & Doligez, B. (2019). No evidence for behavioural syndrome and genetic basis for three personality traits in a wild bird population. Animal Behaviour, 153, 69-82
Open this publication in new window or tab >>No evidence for behavioural syndrome and genetic basis for three personality traits in a wild bird population
2019 (English)In: Animal Behaviour, ISSN 0003-3472, E-ISSN 1095-8282, Vol. 153, p. 69-82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Personality traits and their correlations have been shown to be linked with life history strategies and fitness in various species. Among-individual correlations (i.e. behavioural syndromes) between personality traits can affect the evolutionary responses of these traits to environmental variation. Understanding the genetic and ecological determinants of personality traits and their interactions as behavioural syndromes in the wild is thus needed to shed light on the mechanisms shaping their evolution. Partitioning the observed (co)variance in these traits, however, requires large numbers of repeated behavioural measures on many individuals of known relatedness level. In the absence of such data, it is thus often assumed that phenotypic (co)variances inform about (i) underlying among-individual (co)variances (i.e. ignoring within-individual (co)variances) and (2) underlying genetic (co) variances. We tested these assumptions using three personality traits collected during 3 years on a long-term monitored breeding population of collared flycatchers, Ficedula albicollis. We partitioned the observed phenotypic (co)variance of aggressiveness, boldness and neophobia into genetic, permanent environment and parental components, and we estimated the repeatability, and heritability of these traits and their among-individual correlations. All three traits were repeatable between years (at least on the latent scale) but none were heritable. Permanent environment effects explained 15% of the phenotypic variance in aggressiveness, and parental effects explained 25% of the phenotypic variance in neophobia, in line with previous studies in wild populations. The three traits showed phenotypic correlations but no among-individual correlations and no additive genetic covariance. Thus, our results did not support the assumptions that phenotypic covariance reflects behavioural syndromes and genetic covariance. We discuss the reasons for the absence of heritability and among-individual and genetic covariance between these three personality traits in light of the possible selective pressures acting on this population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Aggressiveness, among- and within-individual correlations, boldness, collared flycatcher, Ficedula albicollis, heritability, neophobia, parental effects, quantitative genetics, repeatability
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-364210 (URN)10.1016/j.anbehav.2019.05.001 (DOI)000474355600008 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-10-24 Created: 2018-10-24 Last updated: 2019-08-22Bibliographically approved
Sudyka, J., Podmokla, E., Drobniak, S. M., Dubiec, A., Arct, A., Gustafsson, L. & Cichon, M. (2019). Sex-specific effects of parasites on telomere dynamics in a short-lived passerinethe blue tit. The Science of Nature: Naturwissenschaften, 106(1-2), Article ID 6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sex-specific effects of parasites on telomere dynamics in a short-lived passerinethe blue tit
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2019 (English)In: The Science of Nature: Naturwissenschaften, ISSN 0028-1042, E-ISSN 1432-1904, Vol. 106, no 1-2, article id 6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parasitic infections potentially drive host's life-histories since they can have detrimental effects on host's fitness. Telomere dynamics is a candidate mechanism to underlie life-history trade-offs and as such may correlate with observed fitness reduction in infected animals. We examined the relationship of chronic infection with two genera of haemosporidians causing avian malaria and malaria-like disease with host's telomere length (TL) in a longitudinal study of free-ranging blue tits. The observed overall infection prevalence was 80% and increased with age, constituting a potentially serious selective pressure in our population. We found longer telomeres in individuals infected with a parasite causing lesser blood pathologies i.e. Haemoproteus compared to Plasmodium genus, but this only held true among males. Female TL was independent of the infection type. Our results indicate that parasitic infections could bring about other types of costs to females than to males with respect to TL. Additionally, we detected linear telomere loss with age, however a random regression analysis did not confirm significant heterogeneity in TL of first breeders and telomere shortening rates in further life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER HEIDELBERG, 2019
Keywords
Avian malaria, Bird, Chronic infection, Parasitaemia, Random regression
National Category
Zoology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-377222 (URN)10.1007/s00114-019-1601-5 (DOI)000457329900001 ()30701351 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2019-02-15 Created: 2019-02-15 Last updated: 2019-02-15Bibliographically approved
Hsu, B.-Y., Doligez, B., Gustafsson, L. & Ruuskanen, S. (2019). Transient growth-enhancing effects of elevated maternal thyroid hormones at no apparent oxidative cost during early postnatal period. Journal of Avian Biology, 50(1), Article ID e01919.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Transient growth-enhancing effects of elevated maternal thyroid hormones at no apparent oxidative cost during early postnatal period
2019 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 50, no 1, article id e01919Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maternal thyroid hormones (THs) have been proven crucial for embryonic development in humans, but their influence within the natural variation on wild animals remains unknown. So far the only two studies that experimentally investigated the potential fitness consequences of maternal THs in birds found inconsistent results. More studies are thus required to assess the general effects of maternal THs and their influences on more behavioral and physiological parameters. In this study, we experimentally elevated yolk TH content in a wild migratory passerine species, the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis, to investigate the effects on hatching success, nestling growth and oxidative stress. We found that TH‐injected eggs had a higher hatching success, and the nestlings hatched from TH‐injected eggs were heavier and larger than control nestlings, but only during the early postnatal period. These differences vanished by fledging. Nestlings from TH‐injected eggs exhibited lower activity of the glutathione‐s‐transferase, a major antioxidant enzyme, than control nestlings at day 12, a few days before fledging, but they did not differ in oxidative damage and overall intracellular oxidative state. These results suggest that the early growth‐enhancing effects incurred no observable oxidative stress. We hypothesize that such a transient growth‐enhancing effect might be adaptive in advancing the development and maturation of the offspring so they are well‐prepared in time for the upcoming migration. Further studies investigating whether such advancing effects can influence long‐term fitness, will be more than valuable.

Keywords
collared flycatcher, maternal effects, maternal hormones, nestling growth, oxidative stress, thyroid hormones
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-372646 (URN)10.1111/jav.01919 (DOI)000456749100003 ()
Funder
Academy of Finland, 286278
Available from: 2019-01-08 Created: 2019-01-08 Last updated: 2019-03-05Bibliographically approved
Strand, T., Lundkvist, Å., Olsen, B. & Gustafsson, L. (2018). Breeding consequences of flavivirus infection in the collared flycatcher. BMC Evolutionary Biology, 18, Article ID 13.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breeding consequences of flavivirus infection in the collared flycatcher
2018 (English)In: BMC Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1471-2148, E-ISSN 1471-2148, Vol. 18, article id 13Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The breeding consequences of virus infections have rarely been studied in avian natural breeding populations. In this paper we investigated the links between humoral immunity following a natural flavivirus infection and reproduction in a wild bird population of collared flycatcher (Ficedula albicollis). We analyzed plasma from 744 birds for antibodies and correlated these results to a number of reproductive components.

Results: Nearly one third (27.8%) of the sampled collared flycatchers were found seropositive for flavivirus. Males had significantly more frequently flavivirus antibodies (32.3%) than females (25.1%). Seropositive females differed significantly from seronegative females in four traits: they had earlier lay date, higher body weight, higher survival rate and were older than seronegative females. The females did not differ in clutch size, number of fledged young or number of recruited young. Seropositive males had female partners with earlier lay date, i.e. the males bred earlier and they also produced more fledged young than seronegative males. In contrast, the males did not differ in clutch size, number of recruited young, male weight, age or survival. Interestingly, seropositive males had larger ornament, forehead badge size, than seronegative males.

Conclusions: Collared flycatchers with an antibody response against flavivirus were more successful than birds with no antibody response, for any of the measured life history traits. The positive link between flavivirus antibody presence and life-history trait levels suggest that it is condition dependent in the collared flycatcher.

National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
Biology with specialization in Animal Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-344684 (URN)10.1186/s12862-018-1121-5 (DOI)000424461700001 ()29402209 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research Council FormasSwedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-03-07 Created: 2018-03-07 Last updated: 2018-03-28Bibliographically approved
Moller, A. P., Balbontin, J., Dhondt, A. A., Remes, V., Adriaensen, F., Biard, C., . . . Lambrechts, M. M. (2018). Effects of interspecific coexistence on laying date and clutch size in two closely related species of hole-nesting birds. Journal of Animal Ecology, 87(6), 1738-1748
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effects of interspecific coexistence on laying date and clutch size in two closely related species of hole-nesting birds
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Animal Ecology, ISSN 0021-8790, E-ISSN 1365-2656, Vol. 87, no 6, p. 1738-1748Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Coexistence between great tits Parus major and blue tits Cyanistes caeruleus, but also other hole-nesting taxa, constitutes a classic example of species co-occurrence resulting in potential interference and exploitation competition for food and for breeding and roosting sites. However, the spatial and temporal variations in coexistence and its consequences for competition remain poorly understood. We used an extensive database on reproduction in nest boxes by great and blue tits based on 87 study plots across Europe and Northern Africa during 1957-2012 for a total of 19,075 great tit and 16,729 blue tit clutches to assess correlative evidence for a relationship between laying date and clutch size, respectively, and density consistent with effects of intraspecific and interspecific competition. In an initial set of analyses, we statistically controlled for a suite of site-specific variables. We found evidence for an effect of intraspecific competition on blue tit laying date (later laying at higher density) and clutch size (smaller clutch size at higher density), but no evidence of significant effects of intraspecific competition in great tits, nor effects of interspecific competition for either species. To further control for site-specific variation caused by a range of potentially confounding variables, we compared means and variances in laying date and clutch size of great and blue tits among three categories of difference in density between the two species. We exploited the fact that means and variances are generally positively correlated. If interspecific competition occurs, we predicted a reduction in mean and an increase in variance in clutch size in great tit and blue tit when density of heterospecifics is higher than the density of conspecifics, and for intraspecific competition, this reduction would occur when density of conspecifics is higher than the density of heterospecifics. Such comparisons of temporal patterns of means and variances revealed evidence, for both species, consistent with intraspecific competition and to a smaller extent with interspecific competition. These findings suggest that competition associated with reproductive behaviour between blue and great tits is widespread, but also varies across large spatial and temporal scales.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2018
Keywords
clutch size, density, interspecific competition, intraspecific competition, nest boxes, reaction norm, spatiotemporal variation
National Category
Ecology Zoology Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-368434 (URN)10.1111/1365-2656.12896 (DOI)000446663700020 ()30101503 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2018-12-10 Created: 2018-12-10 Last updated: 2018-12-10Bibliographically approved
Fletcher, K., Xiong, Y., Fletcher, E. & Gustafsson, L. (2018). Glucocorticoid response to both predictable and unpredictable challenges detected as corticosterone metabolites in collared flycatcher droppings. PLoS ONE, 13(12), Article ID e0209289.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Glucocorticoid response to both predictable and unpredictable challenges detected as corticosterone metabolites in collared flycatcher droppings
2018 (English)In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 12, article id e0209289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In most vertebrate animals, glucocorticoid hormones are the chief mediators of homeostasis in response to ecological conditions and as they progress through their lifecycle. In addition, glucocorticoids are a major part of the stress response and stress induced elevations of the hormone can make it difficult to assess glucocorticoid secretion in response to changes in life-stage and current environmental conditions in wild animals. Particularly when quantifying circulating levels of glucocorticoids in the blood which fluctuate rapidly in response to stress. An alternative method of quantifying glucocorticoids is as hormone metabolites in faeces or urine giving a historical sample related to the gut passage time and urinary tract that is less sensitive to stressful events which cause spikes in the circulating hormone level. Although the concentration of glucocorticoid metabolites are influenced by faecal mass thereby potentially affecting any differences in hormone metabolites detected amongst samples. In the present study, we aimed to detect changes in levels of corticosterone, the primary bird glucocorticoid, in relation to the phase of reproduction, in a breeding population of collared flycatchers by sampling corticosterone metabolites in droppings. We also tested how corticosterone metabolite concentrations were affected by ambient temperature and related to body condition in adult birds. Our results indicate that the upregulation of corticosterone between incubation and nestling feeding in female birds is crucial for successful reproduction in this species. Also, females appear to downregulate corticosterone during incubation in response to lower ambient temperature and poorer body condition. Our results did not indicate a relationship between dropping mass and corticosterone metabolite concentrations, which suggests that our findings were linked to the regulation of corticosterone in response to predictable and unpredictable challenges.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-373230 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0209289 (DOI)000453841700051 ()30571789 (PubMedID)
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2019-01-14 Created: 2019-01-14 Last updated: 2019-01-14Bibliographically approved
Morinay, J., Forsman, J. T., Kivelä, S. M., Gustafsson, L. & Doligez, B. (2018). Heterospecific nest site copying behavior in a wild bird: assessing the influence of genetics and past experience on a joint breeding phenotype. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, 5(167)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterospecific nest site copying behavior in a wild bird: assessing the influence of genetics and past experience on a joint breeding phenotype
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2018 (English)In: Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2296-701X, Vol. 5, no 167Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Breeding site selection is often a joint decision of pair members in species with biparental care and the experience of both pair members may influence the use of information for site selection. Nevertheless, quantitative genetics of joint information use for site selection remains unexplored so far. We used an experimental approach to quantify the relative importance of genetics (heritability) and past experience (age, familiarity with the environment, previous breeding success, previous information use) in heterospecific social information use for nest site selection in wild collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis). Flycatchers collect social information from resident tits for nest site selection. We created an apparent preference of tits for a novel nest site feature and recorded choices of flycatchers (copying or rejecting the tit preference). Copying behavior was stronger for naive individuals but also differed between years, which could be explained by contrasting seasonality in the demonstrator species. Past experience as reflected by age affected subsequent use of social information: pairs with a yearling male were more likely to copy the heterospecific preference than pairs with older immigrant males. There was no general pattern in successive individual choices over the years. Accordingly, individual repeatability in copying tit preference was very low. At the pair level, we estimated sex-specific direct and indirect genetic effects on the joint nest site decision and found no sex-specific heritability and no cross-sex genetic correlation. Our results confirm the importance of past experience for social information use and suggest that social information use is highly plastic and most likely not genetically inherited in collared flycatchers. Whether individuals use social information should be related to environmentally-induced changes in the quality of information and thus be context-dependent. Selection may therefore act on the ability to optimally use social information in varying environments and on the processes underlying such adjustment, such as learning, rather than the use of information itself.

National Category
Evolutionary Biology Genetics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-345984 (URN)10.3389/fevo.2017.00167 (DOI)000451611600001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

Correction in: FRONTIERS IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, Volume: 6, Article Number: UNSP 80, DOI: 10.3389/fevo.2018.00080

Available from: 2018-03-13 Created: 2018-03-13 Last updated: 2019-01-24Bibliographically approved
Janas, K., Podmokla, E., Lutyk, D., Dubiec, A., Gustafsson, L., Cichon, M. & Drobniak, S. (2018). Influence of haemosporidian infection status on structural and carotenoid-based colouration in the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus. Journal of Avian Biology, 49(10), Article ID UNSP e01840.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of haemosporidian infection status on structural and carotenoid-based colouration in the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus
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2018 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 49, no 10, article id UNSP e01840Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Hypotheses postulating parasite-mediated mate choice intrinsically assume that parasitic infections deteriorate the quality of male ornamentation. Although this assumption has often been studied in the context of carotenoid-based colouration, only few studies investigated this with reference to structural feather colouration, which in many species plays a vital role in sexual selection. Here, using a three-years dataset from a wild blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus population, we examined the relationship between the haemosporidian infection status and the structural as well as the carotenoid-based colouration of adult birds. Furthermore, we investigated potential differences in the impact on feather colouration between two examined parasite genera: Plasmodium and Haemoproteus. For analysis of the feathers spectral reflectance we used both the tristimulus model and the avian tetrahedral colour space model, incorporating visual phenotype of the blue tit. Contrary to expectations we found that infected birds showed higher brightness, in both the structural and the carotenoid-based colours. We also found no differences in the feather colouration between birds infected with Plasmodium and Haemoproteus. Observed pattern might be best explained by the parasite-mediated selection hypothesis, as only individuals of superior quality should be able to survive the acute stage of infection and therefore they could produce more elaborate ornamental colouration.

Keywords
haemosporidians, carotenoid-based colouration, structural colouration
National Category
Ecology Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-369750 (URN)10.1111/jav.01840 (DOI)000449685500006 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2018-12-18Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6566-2863

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