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Podmokla, E., Dubiec, A., Drobniak, S. M., Sudyka, J., Krupski, A., Arct, A., . . . Cichon, M. (2017). Effect of haemosporidian infections on host survival and recapture rate in the blue tit. Journal of Avian Biology, 48(6), 796-803.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of haemosporidian infections on host survival and recapture rate in the blue tit
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2017 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 48, no 6, 796-803 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Parasites are ubiquitous in the wild and by imposing fitness costs on their hosts they constitute an important selection factor. One of the most common parasites of wild birds are Plasmodium and Haemoproteus, protozoans inhabiting the blood, which cause avian malaria and malaria-like disease, respectively. Although they are expected to cause negative effects in infected individuals, in many cases studies in natural populations failed to detect such effect. Using data from seven breeding seasons (2008-2014), we applied a multistate capture-mark-recapture approach to study the effect of infection with malaria and malaria-like parasites, individual age and sex on the probability of survival and recapture rate in a small passerine, the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus, inhabiting the island of Gotland, Sweden. We found no effect of infection on survival prospects. However, the recapture rate of infected individuals was higher than that of uninfected ones. Thus, while our data do not support the presence of infection costs in terms of host survival, it suggests that parasites from the genera Plasmodium and Haemoproteus may affect some aspects of host behaviour, which translates into biased estimation of infection frequency at the population level.

National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-329716 (URN)10.1111/jav.01108 (DOI)000403912900004 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-09-22 Created: 2017-09-22 Last updated: 2017-09-22Bibliographically approved
Arct, A., Sudyka, J., Podmoka, E., Drobniak, S. M., Gustafsson, L. & Cichon, M. (2017). Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in blue tit nestlings (Cyanistis caeruleus) under contrasting rearing conditions. Evolutionary Ecology, 31(5), 803-814.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Heterozygosity-fitness correlations in blue tit nestlings (Cyanistis caeruleus) under contrasting rearing conditions
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2017 (English)In: Evolutionary Ecology, ISSN 0269-7653, E-ISSN 1573-8477, Vol. 31, no 5, 803-814 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the relation between genetic variation and fitness remains a key question in evolutionary biology. Although heterozygosity has been reported to correlate with many fitness-related traits, the strength of the heterozygosity-fitness correlations (HFCs) is usually weak and it is still difficult to assess the generality of these associations in natural populations. It has been suggested that HFCs may become meaningful only under particular environmental conditions. Moreover, existing evidence suggests that HFCs may also differ between sexes. The aim of this study was to investigate correlations between heterozygosity in neutral markers (microsatellites) and fitness-related traits in a natural population of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus). Additionally, we tested whether sex and environmental conditions may influence the magnitude and direction of HFCs. We found a positive relationship between heterozygosity and body mass of 14 days post-hatching nestlings, but only among females. Our results suggest that the correlation between heterozygosity and nestling body mass observed among female offspring could be attributed to within-brood effects. We failed to find any evidence that environmental conditions as simulated by brood size manipulation affect HFCs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPRINGER, 2017
Keyword
HFCs, Genetic diversity, Birds, Cell-mediated immunity, Context dependence
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-335123 (URN)10.1007/s10682-017-9911-6 (DOI)000410764000014 ()
Available from: 2017-12-04 Created: 2017-12-04 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Dubiec, A., Podmokla, E. & Gustafsson, L. (2017). Intra-individual changes in haemosporidian infections over the nesting period in great tit females. Parasitology Research, 116(9), 2385-2392.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intra-individual changes in haemosporidian infections over the nesting period in great tit females
2017 (English)In: Parasitology Research, ISSN 0932-0113, E-ISSN 1432-1955, Vol. 116, no 9, 2385-2392 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Prevalence of haemosporidian parasites in bird populations varies temporally both between years and within a year. In contrast to variation at the population level, relatively little is known about variation in infection attributes at the individual level, especially in non-migratory species. We examined intra-individual changes in the presence and identity of haemosporidian parasites (genera Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) over the course of the nesting period in females of great tits (Parus major)-a species considered to be resident over much of its distribution range. Birds were sampled during two stages of the nesting period: nest building and nestling rearing. The mean time interval between sampling occasions was 43 days. Between the first and second samplings, 30.6% of females gained at least one parasite lineage and 18.5% lost the lineage. Haemoproteus gains were over three times more common than Plasmodium gains. The probability of the lineage gain decreased with the date of the first sampling, was higher in individuals in better body condition and differed between years, but was not associated with the host age. The probability of the lineage loss was not explained by any of the considered parameters except for year. These results indicate that in a large proportion of a population, infection attributes (presence/absence and/or parasite identity) may change over the nesting period and the occurrence of such changes may be associated with the individual quality. Consequently, this phenomenon should be taken into account to correctly interpret parasite-mediated effects.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2017
Keyword
Haemosporidians, Individual quality, Mixed infections, Resident host, Seasonal change
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-334031 (URN)10.1007/s00436-017-5540-9 (DOI)000407396300003 ()
Available from: 2017-11-22 Created: 2017-11-22 Last updated: 2017-11-22Bibliographically approved
Germain, M., Part, T., Gustafsson, L. & Doligez, B. (2017). Natal dispersers pay a lifetime cost to increased reproductive effort in a wild bird population. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, 284(1851), Article ID 20162445.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Natal dispersers pay a lifetime cost to increased reproductive effort in a wild bird population
2017 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 284, no 1851, 20162445Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Natal dispersal is assumed to be costly. Such costs can be difficult to detect, and fitness consequences of dispersal are therefore poorly known. Because of lower phenotypic quality and/or familiarity with the environment, natal dispersers may be less buffered against a sudden increase in reproductive effort. Consequently, reproductive costs associated with natal dispersal may mostly be detected in harsh breeding conditions. We tested this prediction by comparing lifetime reproductive success between natal dispersers and non- dispersers in a patchy population of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis) when they reared either a non- manipulated brood or an experimentally increased or decreased brood. Natal dispersers achieved lower lifetime reproductive success than non- dispersers only under more stressful breeding conditions (i. e. when brood size was experimentally increased). This was mostly due to a lower number of recruits produced in the year of the increase. Our results suggest a cost associated with natal dispersal paid immediately after an increase in reproductive effort and not subsequently compensated for through increased survival or future offspring recruitment. Natal dispersers adjusted their breeding investment when reproductive effort is as predicted but seemed unable to efficiently face a sudden increase in effort, which could affect the influence of environmental predictability on dispersal evolution.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ROYAL SOC, 2017
Keyword
reproductive success, return rate, natal dispersal, reproductive effort, dispersal cost, brood size manipulation
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-320036 (URN)10.1098/rspb.2016.2445 (DOI)000397884000009 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-04-13 Created: 2017-04-13 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Björklund, M. & Gustafsson, L. (2017). Subtle but ubiquitous selection on body size in a natural population of collared flycatchers over 33years. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 30(7), 1386-1399.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Subtle but ubiquitous selection on body size in a natural population of collared flycatchers over 33years
2017 (English)In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 30, no 7, 1386-1399 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Understanding the magnitude and long-term patterns of selection in natural populations is of importance, for example, when analysing the evolutionary impact of climate change. We estimated univariate and multivariate directional, quadratic and correlational selection on four morphological traits (adult wing, tarsus and tail length, body mass) over a time period of 33years (approximate to 19000 observations) in a nest-box breeding population of collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis). In general, selection was weak in both males and females over the years regardless of fitness measure (fledged young, recruits and survival) with only few cases with statistically significant selection. When data were analysed in a multivariate context and as time series, a number of patterns emerged; there was a consistent, but weak, selection for longer wings in both sexes, selection was stronger on females when the number of fledged young was used as a fitness measure, there were no indications of sexually antagonistic selection, and we found a negative correlation between selection on tarsus and wing length in both sexes but using different fitness measures. Uni- and multivariate selection gradients were correlated only for wing length and mass. Multivariate selection gradient vectors were longer than corresponding vector of univariate gradients and had more constrained direction. Correlational selection had little importance. Overall, the fitness surface was more or less flat with few cases of significant curvature, indicating that the adaptive peak with regard to body size in this species is broader than the phenotypic distribution, which has resulted in weak estimates of selection.

Keyword
body size, collared flycatcher, multivariate selection, reproduction, survival, time series
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-330009 (URN)10.1111/jeb.13117 (DOI)000405355100012 ()
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilSwedish Research Council Formas
Available from: 2017-10-11 Created: 2017-10-11 Last updated: 2017-10-11Bibliographically approved
Briedis, M., Hahn, S., Gustafsson, L., Henshaw, I., Traff, J., Kral, M. & Adamik, P. (2016). Breeding latitude leads to different temporal but not spatial organization of the annual cycle in a long-distance migrant. Journal of Avian Biology, 47(6), 743-748.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Breeding latitude leads to different temporal but not spatial organization of the annual cycle in a long-distance migrant
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 47, no 6, 743-748 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The temporal and spatial organization of the annual cycle according to local conditions is of crucial importance for individuals' fitness. Moreover, which sites and when particular sites are used can have profound consequences especially for migratory animals, because the two factors shape interactions within and between populations, as well as between animal and the environment. Here, we compare spatial and temporal patterns of two latitudinally separated breeding populations of a trans-Equatorial passerine migrant, the collared flycatcher Ficedula albicollis, throughout the annual cycle. We found that migration routes and non-breeding residency areas of the two populations largely overlapped. Due to climatic constraints, however, the onset of breeding in the northern population was approximately two weeks later than that of the southern population. We demonstrate that this temporal offset between the populations carries-over from breeding to the entire annual cycle. The northern population was consistently later in timing of all subsequent annual events - autumn migration, non-breeding residence period, spring migration and the following breeding. Such year-round spatiotemporal patterns suggest that annual schedules are endogenously controlled with breeding latitude as the decisive element pre-determining the timing of annual events in our study populations.

National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-313400 (URN)10.1111/jav.01002 (DOI)000390326900001 ()
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Available from: 2017-01-20 Created: 2017-01-19 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Saether, B.-E., Grotan, V., Engen, S., Coulson, T., Grant, P. R., Visser, M. E., . . . Weimerskirch, H. (2016). Demographic routes to variability and regulation in bird populations. Nature Communications, 7, Article ID 12001.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Demographic routes to variability and regulation in bird populations
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2016 (English)In: Nature Communications, ISSN 2041-1723, E-ISSN 2041-1723, Vol. 7, 12001Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is large interspecific variation in the magnitude of population fluctuations, even among closely related species. The factors generating this variation are not well understood, primarily because of the challenges of separating the relative impact of variation in population size from fluctuations in the environment. Here, we show using demographic data from 13 bird populations that magnitudes of fluctuations in population size are mainly driven by stochastic fluctuations in the environment. Regulation towards an equilibrium population size occurs through density-dependent mortality. At small population sizes, population dynamics are primarily driven by environment-driven variation in recruitment, whereas close to the carrying capacity K, variation in population growth is more strongly influenced by density-dependent mortality of both juveniles and adults. Our results provide evidence for the hypothesis proposed by Lack that population fluctuations in birds arise from temporal variation in the difference between density-independent recruitment and density-dependent mortality during the non-breeding season.

National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-300077 (URN)10.1038/ncomms12001 (DOI)000379090300001 ()
Funder
EU, European Research Council, ERC-2010-AdG 268562
Available from: 2016-08-02 Created: 2016-08-02 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Vaugoyeau, M., Adriaensen, F., Artemyev, A., Banbura, J., Barba, E., Biard, C., . . . Moller, A. P. (2016). Interspecific variation in the relationship between clutch size, laying date and intensity of urbanization in four species of hole-nesting birds. Ecology and Evolution, 6(16), 5907-5920.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Interspecific variation in the relationship between clutch size, laying date and intensity of urbanization in four species of hole-nesting birds
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2016 (English)In: Ecology and Evolution, ISSN 2045-7758, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 6, no 16, 5907-5920 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The increase in size of human populations in urban and agricultural areas has resulted in considerable habitat conversion globally. Such anthropogenic areas have specific environmental characteristics, which influence the physiology, life history, and population dynamics of plants and animals. For example, the date of bud burst is advanced in urban compared to nearby natural areas. In some birds, breeding success is determined by synchrony between timing of breeding and peak food abundance. Pertinently, caterpillars are an important food source for the nestlings of many bird species, and their abundance is influenced by environmental factors such as temperature and date of bud burst. Higher temperatures and advanced date of bud burst in urban areas could advance peak caterpillar abundance and thus affect breeding phenology of birds. In order to test whether laying date advance and clutch sizes decrease with the intensity of urbanization, we analyzed the timing of breeding and clutch size in relation to intensity of urbanization as a measure of human impact in 199 nest box plots across Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East (i.e., the Western Palearctic) for four species of hole-nesters: blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus), great tits (Parus major), collared flycatchers (Ficedula albicollis), and pied flycatchers (Ficedula hypoleuca). Meanwhile, we estimated the intensity of urbanization as the density of buildings surrounding study plots measured on orthophotographs. For the four study species, the intensity of urbanization was not correlated with laying date. Clutch size in blue and great tits does not seem affected by the intensity of urbanization, while in collared and pied flycatchers it decreased with increasing intensity of urbanization. This is the first large-scale study showing a species-specific major correlation between intensity of urbanization and the ecology of breeding. The underlying mechanisms for the relationships between life history and urbanization remain to be determined. We propose that effects of food abundance or quality, temperature, noise, pollution, or disturbance by humans may on their own or in combination affect laying date and/or clutch size.

Keyword
Breeding phenology, orthophotograph, passerine birds, population dynamics, urban heat island effect
National Category
Ecology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-305943 (URN)10.1002/ece3.2335 (DOI)000381578400028 ()27547364 (PubMedID)
Funder
EU, European Research Council
Available from: 2016-11-04 Created: 2016-10-24 Last updated: 2017-11-29Bibliographically approved
Sudyka, J., Arct, A., Drobniak, S., Gustafsson, L. & Cichoan, M. (2016). Longitudinal studies confirm faster telomere erosion in short-lived bird species. Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, 157(1), 373-375.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Longitudinal studies confirm faster telomere erosion in short-lived bird species
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Ornithology = Journal fur Ornithologie, ISSN 0021-8375, E-ISSN 1439-0361, Vol. 157, no 1, 373-375 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evidence is accumulating that telomeres become shorter with advancing age and possibly explain some of the observed variation in longevity. Cross-sectional analyses have shown that species with shorter lifespans lose more telomeric repeats with age than species with longer lifespans. Using existing data from longitudinal studies performed on several bird species, we confirmed a negative relationship between the rate of telomere shortening and maximum longevity.

Keyword
Ageing, Wild population, Blue Tit, Longevity, Lifespan
National Category
Zoology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-277802 (URN)10.1007/s10336-015-1304-4 (DOI)000368610900038 ()
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
Mills, J. A., Teplitsky, C., Arroyo, B., Charmantier, A., Becker, P. H., Birkhead, T. R., . . . Zedrosser, A. (2016). Solutions for Archiving Data in Long-Term Studies: A Reply to Whitlock et al. [Letter to the editor]. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 31(2), 85-87.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Solutions for Archiving Data in Long-Term Studies: A Reply to Whitlock et al.
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2016 (English)In: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, ISSN 0169-5347, E-ISSN 1872-8383, Vol. 31, no 2, 85-87 p.Article in journal, Letter (Refereed) Published
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:uu:diva-284652 (URN)10.1016/j.tree.2015.12.004 (DOI)000369462400004 ()26778168 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2016-04-19 Created: 2016-04-19 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6566-2863

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